35 Burst results for "Severe Disease"

Biden tests positive for COVID-19, returns to isolation

AP News Radio

00:41 sec | 2 weeks ago

Biden tests positive for COVID-19, returns to isolation

"President Biden again is tested positive for COVID-19 The president has returned to isolation following his positive test Saturday White House physician doctor Kevin O'Connor says in a letter that Biden has experienced no reemergence of symptoms and continues to feel quite well Biden was just cleared three days ago to exit coronavirus isolation In accordance with Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guidelines the president will reenter isolation for at least 5 days The agency says most rebound cases remain mild and that severe disease during this period has not been reported Mike Hempen Washington

President Biden Covid Biden Kevin O'connor Centers For Disease Control An White House Mike Hempen Washington
Deborah Birx: We Overplayed the COVID Vaccines

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:32 min | 2 weeks ago

Deborah Birx: We Overplayed the COVID Vaccines

"Look at Deborah birx. Look at what Deborah birx said to Neil cavuto the other day. This one blows my mind. I can not get over her admission to Neil cavuto Friday on Fox News. I knew these vaccines were not going to protect against infection. And I think we overplayed the vaccines and it made people then worry that it's not going to protect against severe disease and hospitalization. It will, but let's be very clear, 50% of the people who died from the amaron surge were older, vaccinated. So that's why I'm saying, even if you're vaccinated and boosted, if you're on vaccinated right now, the key is testing and packs love it. It's effective. It's a great antiviral. And really, that is what's going to save your lives right now if you're over 70, which if you look at the hospitalizations, hospitalizations are rising steadily with new admissions, particularly in those over 70. And so if you live in the south, I know people keep talking about the fall. I'm worried about the south. Worried about rural America and our tribal nations that just don't have access to testing in a primary physician like the president does. And I hope coming out of address these rural counties. You're worried about the south, what do you mean you worried about the, you think the south doesn't have running water? What are you talking about? And there's so much to unpack there.

Deborah Birx Neil Cavuto Fox News America
Pfizer says tweaked COVID-19 shots boost omicron protection

AP News Radio

01:01 min | Last month

Pfizer says tweaked COVID-19 shots boost omicron protection

"COVID-19 vaccine makers are tweaking their formulas and federal regulators plan to review their work this week The Food and Drug Administration is considering ordering a recipe change for both Pfizer and Moderna vaccines hoping to modify boosters might better protect against another search expected this fall in winter Current vaccines still offer strong protection against severe disease and death but those shots target the original coronavirus strain and their effectiveness dropped markedly when the super contagious omicron variant emerged Pfizer says its omicron targeted booster has shown to be effective and increased protection As does a combination shot mixing it with the original The tweak shots also produce antibodies capable of fighting a genetically distinct relatives BA four and BA 5 although those levels weren't nearly as high Moderna hopes to offer a similar combination shot and recently announced similar results the FDA's scientific advisers will debate the data on Tuesday I'm Ben Thomas

Severe Disease Pfizer Moderna The Food And Drug Administrati Ben Thomas
US making COVID antiviral drug more available at test sites

AP News Radio

00:55 sec | 2 months ago

US making COVID antiviral drug more available at test sites

"The federal government is trying to make Pfizer's COVID antiviral treatment more accessible The White House announced steps to make the antiviral treatment packs low bid more readily available across the U.S. as it projects COVID-19 infections will continue to spread over the summer travel season The nation's first federally backed test to treat site is opening today in Rhode Island providing patients with immediate access to the drug once they test positive More sites are set to open in Massachusetts Minnesota and New York City The drug which has been found to reduce severe disease among 90% of patients is now available at almost 40,000 pharmacies White House coordinator doctor Ashish jha says getting a vaccine and booster shots is still the best way to protect against the virus confirmed infections in the U.S. have quadrupled since late March to more than a 105,000 a day That's a likely undercount because so many rapid tests go unreported but deaths have declined steadily to fewer than 300 per day just as this is the first time those two metrics have not trended together I'm Jennifer King

White House Severe Disease Pfizer Federal Government Ashish Jha U.S. Rhode Island Massachusetts Minnesota New York City Jennifer King
"severe disease" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

03:10 min | 3 months ago

"severe disease" Discussed on WTOP

"Rest in 72° Bethesda 69° in woodbridge It's one 40 The CDC is urging people to mask up an areas where COVID levels are high That's about a third of the country It comes as cases continue to rise in the CDC is warning we can see an even bigger spike in the fall You see SF infectious disease expert doctor Monica Gandhi joined WTO's Demetrius sodas on Skype to talk about the latest recommendations from the CDC Cases absolutely have been rising but our deaths have continued to fall our COVID related deaths And there was an article in Bloomberg two days ago about how sometimes our hospitalizations will make our vaccines look a less effective because what's happening is we swab everyone in the hospital who comes in for COVID and often those hospitalizations are with COVID in the nose and not for COVID So really looking at severe disease now in terms of our COVID deaths we're not seeing that rise and we continue to see falls about three to 4% every 7 days So I'm still hopeful we have a lot of immunity in our population and even though we're getting a lot of mild infections I do appreciate you bringing up the fact that with the testing in some areas it looks like the vaccines are less effective I happen to see an expert on the PBS NewsHour and he said he roughly speaking now that we went from 90 some percent effectiveness with our vaccines to more like the 80s and he was really alarmed by that Why does that not alarm you in the same way The effectiveness depends on if we're thinking about a mild or a severe infection In terms of severe infections and getting hospitalized there is simply no doubt that the vaccines work extremely well And basically anyone who's over 60 should get a third dose anyone who's over 80 should get a fourth dose That's what Europe is doing right now And anyone who's immunocompromised should have gotten four shots by this time But the protection against severe disease is persistent And it actually has to do with antibodies that are B cells and T cells but just to put it very cleanly antibodies are coming down They're not working as well against Dominican Lots seeing a lot more mild infections Cases are going up But our T and B cells from the vaccines continue to work and they're holding us And that's why the severe disease and the deaths especially are going down It is a lot to cover in one minute that we have left but your best advice for masking distancing and trying to live a good life this summer This is what I would say Anyone who wants to wear a mask indoors absolutely should and where a specific kind N95 KN 95 FFP two KF 94 If you want to kind of even avoid mild infections if you're more vulnerable we're a good mask inside even though the vaccines work really well My 87 year old father who just finished with chemo I'm happy with this vaccine So but if you want to wear a mask containing a more vulnerable do it But there is also living with this virus And we can't get away from this virus It will never eradicate it So at some point we're going to have to make a decision as a country If it's like influenza which there was a paper on me through that it is at this point do we just decide that we will take the mild risk of a.

CDC Monica Gandhi Demetrius sodas severe disease woodbridge Bethesda infectious disease WTO Skype Bloomberg PBS Europe influenza
"severe disease" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

02:48 min | 3 months ago

"severe disease" Discussed on WTOP

"This is WTO P news The CDC is now urging people to mask up in areas where COVID levels are high that's considered right now about a third of the country It comes as cases continue to rise in the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is now warning that we can see an even bigger spike likely in the fall This morning UCSF infectious disease expert doctor Monica Gandhi of the latest recommendation this week from the CDC He says absolutely have been rising but our deaths have continued to fall our COVID related to us And there was an article in Bloomberg two days ago about how sometimes our hospitalizations will make our vaccines look less effective because what's happening is we swab everyone in the hospital who comes in for COVID and often those hospitalizations are with COVID in the nose and not for COVID So really looking at severe disease now in terms of our COVID deaths we're not seeing that rise and we continue to see falls about three to 4% every 7 days So I'm still hopefully we have a lot of immunity in our population and even though we're getting a lot of mild infections I do appreciate you bringing up the fact that with the testing in some areas it looks like the vaccines are less effective I happen to see an expert on the PBS NewsHour and he said he roughly speaking now that we went from 90 some percent effectiveness with our vaccines to more like the 80s and he was really alarmed by that Why does that not alarm you in the same way The effectiveness depends on if we're thinking about a mild or a severe infection In terms of severe infections and getting hospitalized there is simply no doubt that the vaccines work extremely well And basically anyone who's over 60 should get a third dose anyone who's over 80 should get a fourth dose That's what Europe is doing right now And anyone who's immunocompromised should have gotten four shots by this time But the protection against severe disease is persistent And it actually has to do with antibodies or B cells and T cells but just to put it very cleanly it kind of bodies are coming down They're not working as well against Dominican Lots seeing a lot more mild infections Cases are going up But our T and B cells from the vaccines continue to work and they're holding us And that's why the severe disease and the deaths especially are going down Your best advice for masking distancing and trying to live a good life this summer This is what I would say Anyone who wants to wear a mask indoors absolutely should and where a specific kind N95 KM 95 FFP to KF 94 If you want to kind of even avoid mild infections if you're more vulnerable we're a good mask inside even though the vaccines work really well My 87 year old father who just finished with chemo I'm happy with this vaccine So but if you want to wear a mask inside into more vulnerable do it But there is also living with this virus And we can't get away from this virus It.

CDC Monica Gandhi severe disease UCSF WTO Bloomberg PBS Europe
"severe disease" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

03:02 min | 3 months ago

"severe disease" Discussed on WTOP

"Three 33 The CDC is now urging people to mask up in areas where COVID levels are high that's considered right now about a third of the country It comes as cases continue to rise in the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is now warning that we can see an even bigger spike likely in the fall This morning UCSF infectious disease expert doctor Monica Gandhi of the latest recommendation this week from the CDC He says absolutely have been raising but our deaths have continued to fall our COVID related to us And there was an article in Bloomberg two days ago about how sometimes our hospitalizations will make our vaccines look less effective because what's happening is we swab everyone in the hospital who comes in for COVID and often those hospitalizations are with COVID in the nose and not for COVID So really looking at severe disease now in terms of our COVID deaths we're not seeing that rise and we continue to see falls three to 4% every 7 days So I'm still hopefully we have a lot of immunity in our population and even though we're getting a lot of mild infections I do appreciate you bringing up the fact that with the testing in some areas it looks like the vaccines are less effective I happen to see an expert on the PBS NewsHour and he said he roughly speaking now that we went from 90 some percent effectiveness with our vaccines to more like the 80s and he was really alarmed by that Why does that not alarm you in the same way The effectiveness depends on if we're thinking about a mild or a severe infection In terms of severe infections and getting hospitalized there is simply no doubt that the vaccines work extremely well And basically anyone who's over 60 should get us their dose anyone who's over 80 should get a fourth dose That's what Europe is doing right now And anyone is immunocompromised should have gotten four shots by this time But the protection against severe disease is persistent And it actually has to do with antibodies that are B cells and T cells but just to put it very cleanly antibodies are coming down They're not working as well against Dominican Lots seeing a lot more mild infections Cases are going up But our T and B cells from the vaccines continue to work And they're holding us And that's why the severe disease And the deaths especially are going down Your best advice for masking distancing and trying to live a good life this summer This is what I would say Anyone who wants to wear a mask indoors absolutely should and where a specific kind N95 KM 95 FFP to KF 94 If you want to even avoid mild infections if you're more vulnerable where a good mask inside even though the vaccines work really well by 87 year old father who just finished with chemo I'm happy with this vaccine So but if you want to wear a mask inside a more vulnerable do it But there is also living with this virus And we can't get away from this virus It will never eradicate it So at some point we're going to have to make a decision as a country If it's like influenza which there was a paper on meteor that it is at this point do we just decide that we will take the mild risk of a mild infection With the latest concerns over the coronavirus.

CDC Monica Gandhi severe disease UCSF Bloomberg PBS Europe influenza
Rare cases of COVID returning pose questions for Pfizer pill

AP News Radio

00:54 sec | 3 months ago

Rare cases of COVID returning pose questions for Pfizer pill

"Doctors doctors doctors doctors are are are are reporting reporting reporting reporting rare rare rare rare cases cases cases cases a a a a virus virus virus virus patients patients patients patients who who who who relapse relapse relapse relapse after after after after completing completing completing completing a a a a course course course course of of of of visors visors visors visors coded coded coded coded nineteen nineteen nineteen nineteen pill pill pill pill packs packs packs packs love love love love it it it it has has has has become become become become the the the the go go go go to to to to treatment treatment treatment treatment against against against against Kobe Kobe Kobe Kobe nineteen nineteen nineteen nineteen it's it's it's it's convenient convenient convenient convenient and and and and effective effective effective effective and and and and heading heading heading heading off off off off severe severe severe severe disease disease disease disease but but but but questions questions questions questions are are are are emerging emerging emerging emerging as as as as a a a a small small small small number number number number of of of of patients patients patients patients the the the the symptoms symptoms symptoms symptoms returned returned returned returned several several several several days days days days after after after after their their their their five five five five day day day day treatment treatment treatment treatment regimen regimen regimen regimen the the the the FDA FDA FDA FDA last last last last week week week week advised advised advised advised against against against against a a a a second second second second round round round round because because because because there there there there seems seems seems seems to to to to be be be be little little little little risk risk risk risk of of of of hospitalization hospitalization hospitalization hospitalization some some some some researchers researchers researchers researchers believe believe believe believe certain certain certain certain people people people people may may may may just just just just be be be be vulnerable vulnerable vulnerable vulnerable to to to to relapse relapse relapse relapse one one one one to to to to two two two two percent percent percent percent of of of of people people people people in in in in the the the the original original original original study study study study saw saw saw saw their their their their virus virus virus virus levels levels levels levels rebound rebound rebound rebound after after after after ten ten ten ten days days days days others others others others suggest suggest suggest suggest the the the the current current current current does does does does just just just just isn't isn't isn't isn't strong strong strong strong enough enough enough enough to to to to fully fully fully fully suppressed suppressed suppressed suppressed the the the the virus virus virus virus leading leading leading leading to to to to worries worries worries worries about about about about resistant resistant resistant resistant mutations mutations mutations mutations visor visor visor visor tested tested tested tested the the the the drug drug drug drug on on on on unvaccinated unvaccinated unvaccinated unvaccinated patients patients patients patients during during during during the the the the delta delta delta delta weight weight weight weight but but but but experts experts experts experts wonder wonder wonder wonder if if if if the the the the pillars pillars pillars pillars holding holding holding holding up up up up against against against against a a a a mutating mutating mutating mutating virus virus virus virus in in in in a a a a population population population population where where where where eighty eighty eighty eighty nine nine nine nine percent percent percent percent of of of of adults adults adults adults have have have have had had had had at at at at least least least least one one one one shot shot shot shot in in in in about about about about sixty sixty sixty sixty percent percent percent percent have have have have already already already already been been been been infected infected infected infected there's there's there's there's no no no no clear clear clear clear answer answer answer answer yet yet yet yet I'm I'm I'm I'm Jennifer Jennifer Jennifer Jennifer king king king king

Relapse Relapse Relapse Relaps FDA Kobe Kobe Kobe Kobe Severe Severe Disease Disease Symptoms Symptoms Symptoms Sym Resistant Resistant Resistant Delta Delta Delta Delta Jennifer Jennifer Jennifer Jen
"severe disease" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

02:08 min | 3 months ago

"severe disease" Discussed on WTOP

"In an infant such as seizures Doctor Danielle Dooley of children's national hospital says if your infant is not on something highly specialized don't hesitate to try the generic store brand or another brand that may be available But she recommends not using European brands from off the Internet because they are not held to the same regulatory standards for seeking WTO P news There are questions about the effectiveness of an antiviral pill that's being used to treat COVID Pax levit has been a go to option because of its convenience and its track record at heading off serious illness Doctors have also reported some patients have had symptoms return after taking it for the 5 day regimen The FDA says it recommends against a second round of treatment because there's little risk of severe disease or hospitalization among relapsed patients Both Pfizer and the FDA say this shouldn't be a shock as one to 2% in Pfizer's original study did relapse Peter king CBS News Gun violence during the early days of the pandemic put further strain on an already overwhelmed healthcare system According to data shared with CNN the Health and Human Services department says overall emergency department visits dropped by about a quarter percent but visits for a gun related injury jump 34% between March of 2020 and February of last year there were more than 62,000 firearm related instance here in the U.S. They resulted in 4400 people being killed and 10,000 more injured 7 25 money news now with Jeff claw But that lost another 654 points Monday the NASDAQ tumbled four and a quarter percent a fed survey finds inflation expectations for the next year are at 6.3% new and used vehicle loan payments are at record highs and averages $650 a month for a new vehicle at 545 for a used There's now an old bay seasoning version of goldfish crackers Earlier this year a Maryland distiller began selling an old bay flavored vodka Jeff claypool Money news brought to you by Jeff go Businesses that make energy efficiency upgrades can save an average of $3000 in utility costs each year.

Danielle Dooley Pax levit national hospital Pfizer FDA Health and Human Services depa seizures WTO Peter king CBS News Jeff claw CNN U.S. Jeff claypool Maryland
Easter Sunday marks a return to in-person worship as COVID-19 restrictions lessen

AP News Radio

00:56 sec | 4 months ago

Easter Sunday marks a return to in-person worship as COVID-19 restrictions lessen

"For for for for many many many many Christians Christians Christians Christians in in in in the the the the U. U. U. U. S. S. S. S. this this this this weekend weekend weekend weekend marks marks marks marks the the the the first first first first time time time time in in in in three three three three years years years years still still still still gather gather gather gather in in in in person person person person to to to to celebrate celebrate celebrate celebrate Easter Easter Easter Easter Sunday Sunday Sunday Sunday following following following following the the the the disruptions disruptions disruptions disruptions of of of of the the the the covert covert covert covert nineteen nineteen nineteen nineteen pandemic pandemic pandemic pandemic I'm I'm I'm I'm Ben Ben Ben Ben Thomas Thomas Thomas Thomas with with with with a a a a look look look look at at at at where where where where the the the the white white white white house house house house sees sees sees sees things things things things right right right right now now now now we we we we are are are are in in in in a a a a much much much much much much much much better better better better place place place place and and and and we we we we have have have have banned banned banned banned doctor doctor doctor doctor she she she she straw straw straw straw is is is is the the the the White White White White House House House House virus virus virus virus response response response response coordinator coordinator coordinator coordinator appearing appearing appearing appearing on on on on NBC's NBC's NBC's NBC's meet meet meet meet the the the the press press press press he he he he cautioned cautioned cautioned cautioned cases cases cases cases are are are are rising rising rising rising we we we we want want want want to to to to see see see see is is is is this this this this going going going going to to to to translate translate translate translate into into into into more more more more severe severe severe severe disease disease disease disease more more more more customizations customizations customizations customizations or or or or dats dats dats dats he he he he also also also also addressed addressed addressed addressed the the the the question question question question of of of of getting getting getting getting a a a a second second second second Brewster Brewster Brewster Brewster the the the the data data data data out out out out of of of of Israel Israel Israel Israel is is is is pretty pretty pretty pretty compelling compelling compelling compelling that that that that people people people people over over over over sixty sixty sixty sixty who who who who got got got got a a a a second second second second booster booster booster booster after after after after four four four four months months months months after after after after their their their their first first first first booster booster booster booster sought sought sought sought not not not not just just just just a a a a reduction reduction reduction reduction in in in in factions factions factions factions but but but but a a a a reduction reduction reduction reduction in in in in deaths deaths deaths deaths his his his his recommendation recommendation recommendation recommendation people people people people over over over over sixty sixty sixty sixty I I I I think think think think should should should should be be be be getting getting getting getting that that that that booster booster booster booster again again again again that that that that evidence evidence evidence evidence is is is is pretty pretty pretty pretty compelling compelling compelling compelling fifty fifty fifty fifty to to to to fifty fifty fifty fifty nine nine nine nine you're you're you're you're certainly certainly certainly certainly eligible eligible eligible eligible depends depends depends depends on on on on your your your your risk risk risk risk profile profile profile profile that's that's that's that's a a a a place place place place where where where where things things things things really really really really born born born born to to to to talk talk talk talk to to to to your your your your doctor doctor doctor doctor Ben Ben Ben Ben Thomas Thomas Thomas Thomas Washington Washington Washington Washington

NBC U. U. U. U. S. S. S. S. Ben Ben Ben Ben Thomas Thomas White White White White House Virus Response Response Respon Israel Severe Severe Disease Disease Brewster Brewster Brewster Bre Ben Ben Ben Ben Thomas Thomas Washington
What do we know about “stealth omicron" so far?

AP News Radio

00:48 sec | 4 months ago

What do we know about “stealth omicron" so far?

"Scientists scientists scientists scientists say say say say an an an an extra extra extra extra contagious contagious contagious contagious version version version version of of of of the the the the Omicron Omicron Omicron Omicron variant variant variant variant is is is is spreading spreading spreading spreading globally globally globally globally but but but but it it it it doesn't doesn't doesn't doesn't seem seem seem seem to to to to be be be be causing causing causing causing more more more more severe severe severe severe disease disease disease disease B. B. B. B. A. A. A. A. two two two two is is is is now now now now the the the the dominant dominant dominant dominant Kobe Kobe Kobe Kobe nineteen nineteen nineteen nineteen variant variant variant variant in in in in the the the the United United United United States States States States and and and and dozens dozens dozens dozens of of of of other other other other countries countries countries countries the the the the so so so so called called called called stealth stealth stealth stealth bomb bomb bomb bomb a a a a crown crown crown crown was was was was first first first first identified identified identified identified in in in in November November November November and and and and it's it's it's it's been been been been driving driving driving driving new new new new surges surges surges surges in in in in parts parts parts parts of of of of Asia Asia Asia Asia and and and and Europe Europe Europe Europe although although although although highly highly highly highly contagious contagious contagious contagious health health health health experts experts experts experts say say say say it it it it doesn't doesn't doesn't doesn't seem seem seem seem to to to to be be be be causing causing causing causing dire dire dire dire health health health health problems problems problems problems in in in in the the the the existing existing existing existing covert covert covert covert vaccines vaccines vaccines vaccines are are are are effective effective effective effective in in in in preventing preventing preventing preventing severe severe severe severe illness illness illness illness and and and and death death death death health health health health officials officials officials officials are are are are also also also also tracking tracking tracking tracking other other other other variants variants variants variants including including including including X. X. X. X. P. P. P. P. first first first first identified identified identified identified in in in in January January January January in in in in the the the the United United United United Kingdom Kingdom Kingdom Kingdom but but but but it it it it hasn't hasn't hasn't hasn't been been been been labeled labeled labeled labeled a a a a variant variant variant variant of of of of concern concern concern concern hi hi hi hi Jackie Jackie Jackie Jackie Quinn Quinn Quinn Quinn

Severe Severe Disease Disease B. B. B. A. A. A. A. Kobe Kobe Kobe Kobe United United United United St Europe Asia Asia Asia United United United United Ki Kingdom Jackie Jackie Jackie Jackie Qu
"severe disease" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

WABE 90.1 FM

01:56 min | 6 months ago

"severe disease" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

"Is quite a change isn't it What happened Well it is a big change with the CDC has done is it shifted the framework it uses for advising people when to mask Previously the CDC masking guidelines relied on case counts in cases where high pretty much everywhere in the country But a lot of people now have immunity through vaccination or prior infection so the risk of severe disease for them is lower So high case counts don't necessarily mean a lot of people are ending up in the hospital Now this new guidance still factors in case counts but it puts more emphasis on what's happening at hospitals at the local level Things like COVID admissions and hospital capacity basically it puts the focus on making sure local hospitals aren't being overwhelmed by severe cases of COVID Doctor Sharif el Mahal is a former health commissioner for New Jersey and he says from a public health perspective this new metric makes sense I do think it's the right time to focus on what we're really trying to control for which is severe disease hospitalization and death So if you are in a county where there's a lot of COVID cases that are ending up in the hospital you may still want to mask up But in another county where hospitals are just fine CDC says you can ditch the mask if you want to for now How do people know what the rich level is in their county If you go to CDC dot gov right there on the main page you'll see a banner that says find local COVID-19 guidance check your county Do that and you'll find out what the risk level is where you live Right now about 70% of the U.S. population lives in areas considered to be low or medium risk And in these places the CDC says it's okay to stop masking indoors And is that applied to schools as well Yeah before now the CDC recommended universal masking in schools Now it only advises students mask up when their community risk is high A number of public health experts have been speaking to say.

CDC severe disease Sharif el Mahal New Jersey U.S.
Sanofi, GSK to seek authorization for COVID-19 vaccine

AP News Radio

00:51 sec | 6 months ago

Sanofi, GSK to seek authorization for COVID-19 vaccine

"Two drug makers working on a new covert vaccine say they plan to ask US and European health regulators to approve their formula to fight the virus drug maker Sanofi and GlaxoSmithKline say they're seeking regulatory approval after human testing finds their vaccine offers protection against Kobe eight nineteen about fifty eight percent effective in preventing overall infection and even better seventy five percent effective in preventing moderate to severe disease after two doses the companies say the evolving epidemiology of this pandemic demonstrates the need for a variety of vaccines the United States European Union Canada and other countries have already signed agreements for millions of doses of this new Sanofi Glaxo Smith Kline vaccine hi Jackie Quinn

Sanofi Glaxosmithkline United States European Union United States Canada Smith Kline Jackie Quinn
Police filter Brussels traffic to dilute trucker protests

AP News Radio

00:49 sec | 6 months ago

Police filter Brussels traffic to dilute trucker protests

"Sweden's recommending a fourth prove it nineteen vaccine does to people over AT on those living in nursing homes or getting home care Swedish authorities say a fourth of those in this age range strengthens the protection against severe disease adding it must be administered no earlier than four months after the previous shot for most of the pandemic Sweden has stood out among European nations for its comparatively hands off response to the coronavirus it never went into lockdown all close businesses largely relying instead on individual responsibility to control infections while cope with nineteen deaths were high compared with other Nordic countries they will lower the many other places in Europe that did implement lockdowns I'm Charles de Ledesma

Sweden Europe Charles De Ledesma
"severe disease" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

02:42 min | 6 months ago

"severe disease" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"What COVID-19 has in store for the world as the virus now heads into its third year spreading across the globe Bloomberg medical science and tech reporter Michelle Cortez wrote the latest big take She joins us now for more Michelle it's good to have you with us Certainly a lot of people including policymakers as we've been seeing we're hoping that the omicron variant would be the last gasp of this pandemic It's been coming at a very interesting time when we're seeing a lot of countries start to dial back restrictions even though we've seen this dramatic surge in COVID cases Absolutely the virus is going to act away a virus does And at this point I don't think anybody who actually understands the way the science works here expects this to just basically dry up and disappear So what's going to happen is the virus will search for ways to mutate around the existing immunity that's in the population either from preexisting vaccination or natural infection The big question is going to be what is this next variant going to look like Certainly as you point out there are a lot of places that are done with wearing masks people don't want to take tests anymore before they get on an airplane You don't have to prove your vaccinated but then there are other places in the world where we're starting to see additional cases creep up debts and severe disease are a real thing in many places and we're just really not done with this virus yet even though we all want to be What do scientists think that next variant could look like There seems to be a lot of broad range as to whether it could be less infectious less severe or could go the other way Is there a consensus at this point There really just isn't a consensus at this point in the concern was that we were going to see a spin off of delta when we actually went on the con emerged and it turns out that Omnicom is a milder variant And it was actually breeding already just as we were starting to get hit with Delta So while on a crime was out there in the wild really making everyone sick and very very high numbers we could have already been developing the next variant that's going to hit And the concern is of course that it would build on Delta There is some folk wisdom that usually that viruses will become less deadly as they as they progress because obviously the virus doesn't want to kill.

Bloomberg medical science and Michelle Cortez severe disease Michelle
"severe disease" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

04:55 min | 8 months ago

"severe disease" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"I'm Michael Barr and this is Bloomberg Nathan Okay Michael thank you It's 5 19 on Wall Street live from the Bloomberg interactive broker studios This is Bloomberg daybreak I'm Nathan Hager The Alma cron variant of COVID-19 continues to spread at a breathtaking pace Global infections have topped a million for a second day and over the past week the U.S. is averaging a quarter million cases per day but hospitalization still remain relatively low Let's get more on the current state of the pandemic In a conversation with Rosanna peeling she is director of the London school of hygiene and tropical medicine She spoke yesterday with Bloomberg's Paul Sweeney and Matt Miller Let's listen to that interview now How do you think about this variant and how the response should be Well I think everybody should do everything they can to stop or slow the spread of this variant Because with the numbers that we're seeing eventually the healthcare system would be really stressed out And so we really need to think about even if possible wearing a mask distancing good cough etiquette and also hand hygiene washing your hands as much as possible If only to Swiss personal safety and also for not compromising the healthcare system So that those who need care can really get it What kind of data do we have on now doctor I mean do we know for example what percentage of omicron cases end up in the hospital Because people are dropping like flies or rather they're getting infected left and right but not really dropping like flies in my anecdotal experience Everyone seems to be getting it but nobody is going to the hospital Yes so I think that right now because many people are doing rocket testing themselves they may not necessarily report them to the authorities So our case rates are actually not as accurate as before when we had everyone going to testing centers So then in terms of the estimating percentage of those who are infected going into a hospital that estimate is not going to be as accurate But we do know that even with these amazing case rates we're not seeing the hospitals being overwhelmed the way they were at the beginning of this pandemic with quite a few people being sick and have severe disease And also I must say that for those people who are vaccinated even though they almost can't maybe not susceptible to the neutralizing antibodies that are induced by vaccines the vaccines still protect against severe disease and death And so I think that we are fortunate in that respect in many people being vaccinated or planned to be vaccinated and quite a few people are already getting boosters Do you know how many days after getting this roughly that you're still infectious that you're still liable to give it to somebody else Because we just had new CDC guidelines and they've reduced the amount of time you need to stay home if you're asymptomatic from ten days to 5 days Does that make sense Yes I think so And that's being if you're cautious in the beginning of the pandemic for the virus we said that you could be infectious and pass the infection onto others two or three days before your symptomatic and maybe you could be infectious up to 8 days afterwards But then most of the people are most infectious within three to 5 days after this concept of symptoms So I think CDC is recommending 5 days so that allow the economy to recover allow people to go back to work so it's a balance between risks and benefits And so I agree with the CDC recommendation to cut the isolation by half up to 5 days because you now averted the period when people are most infectious That was Roseanne appealing director of the London school of hygiene and tropical medicine speaking with Bloomberg's Paul Sweeney and Matt Miller You can hear their full interview online at Bloomberg dot com Tune in for more from.

Michael Barr Nathan Hager London school of hygiene and t Paul Sweeney Matt Miller Rosanna Bloomberg severe disease cough Michael U.S. CDC Roseanne
"severe disease" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

04:46 min | 8 months ago

"severe disease" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Mark President Biden and the rest of the world moves to counteract the surging oh Macron variant of COVID with the FDA announcing just a short time ago that we will be able to take an antiviral pill now from Pfizer For an analysis of what is likely to make the biggest difference in this battle against COVID we welcome doctor Asha who specializes in infectious diseases at Stanford health So welcome doctor Shaw great to have you with us Let's start with the pill because it's the most recent news This is something that I understand you take after you already have contracted COVID You need to do it fairly quickly How important could this Yeah so this is big news and this is the first time that there's actually an oral option an oral therapy for individuals that test positive for COVID The recommendation is to take it within 5 days of symptom onset And it's been shown in the clinical trials to reduce the risk of hospitalization and severe disease vitalist 90% So traditionally we've been using monoclonal antibody therapy for these types of patients which involves patients coming in for IV infusions which has its own challenges associated with it So this is the first time that it's something that patients can take at home So once again this is designed after you've contracted it The goal I guess is to avoid contracting it by being vaccinated and fully boosted Israel now has said maybe we should have a fourth shot There are authorizing a fourth shot Does that make sense in the United States at least to consider that possibility In my opinion I still feel like the push should be for getting the unvaccinated vaccinated And that's not only in the United States but that's from a global standpoint If we can push harder to get vaccines to developing countries and encourage more vaccination that will decrease the chances that more variants will form Because that's what we've seen with on the con right It was born in South Africa Where there were low vaccination rates and that will continue to happen unless we get more in the world vaccinated with their primary series Crown of course is relatively new at least our discovery of it We haven't known about it very long How much do we know about it And let me ask very specifically it seems to be incredibly contagious It's spreading in a very fast rate It's doubling at a rate of maybe even every two days At the same time is it less severe So what we know so far is that it's seemingly causing more mild disease but that's mostly an individuals that are fully vaccinated or boosted So that's a key point Individuals who are unvaccinated especially those that are a high risk for severe disease because of age or immunocompromised or comorbidities continue to be at risk for severe disease from any variant of COVID-19 And so while that's promising news of what we're learning most of that information is coming from individuals who are fully vaccinated and contracting a Macron There are also reports that The White House is at least considering shortening perhaps the isolation time once you have COVID down from the ten days at least for critical people such as healthcare workers Do you have an opinion on that Does that make sense I do think that that's a direction that we're going to need to go in Mostly because of the rapidity with which this is spreading through the community as well as through our workforce I think the healthcare workers are vital to keeping the healthcare systems running And so I do think that it's something that needs to be explored especially in those that have been boosted and may contract a con and have very minimal symptoms It would be nice to get folks back into the workplace quicker So giving us some advice generally What is the most important thing we can do right now to fight against overcrowd Should we be staying home So I think there's a fine balance We are in a very different position this holiday season than where we were the last holiday season When we were just starting to give COVID vaccines to healthcare workers and vulnerable populations at this time of the year last year Now we have the tools to fight on the we have vaccines readily available We have for either the primary series or for boosters we have testing there's lots of options for testing and while there is an extraordinary demand for testing we have many more testing options now than we did back a year ago And we also have ingrained in our kind of our systems the knowledge about the public health measures that are needed to stop the spread of COVID right So this isn't new So it's washing your hands and staying home when you're.

Mark President Biden Stanford health severe disease severe disease vitalist Asha Pfizer Shaw FDA United States Israel South Africa White House
WHO: Omicron could spread faster but it's still not certain

AP News Radio

00:54 sec | 8 months ago

WHO: Omicron could spread faster but it's still not certain

"The the World World Health Health Organization Organization says says early early evidence evidence suggests suggests the the Omicron Omicron variant variant of of the the corona corona virus virus may may be be spreading spreading faster faster than than the the delta delta variant variant but but causing causing less less severe severe disease disease I'm I'm Dan Dan Thomas Thomas with with the the latest latest the the WHO's WHO's health health emergencies emergencies chief chief Dr Dr Michael Michael Ryan Ryan says says Omicron Omicron is is efficiently efficiently transmitting transmitting probably probably more more so so than than even even the the delta delta variant variant better better face face better better adapted adapted to to exploiting exploiting the the contacts contacts and and the the connections connections between between us us however however Ryan Ryan says says that that doesn't doesn't mean mean it's it's invincible invincible on on that that topic topic the the WHO's WHO's covered covered nineteen nineteen technical technical lead lead Maria Maria van van Kirk Kirk we we certainly certainly have have information information from from South South Africa Africa that that there there many many of of the the patients patients that that are are identified identified with with makan makan have have a a more more mild mild course course of of disease disease but but she she cautions cautions that that evidence evidence is is anecdotal anecdotal and and doesn't doesn't mean mean an an Omicron Omicron infection infection won't won't prove prove deadly deadly especially especially to to vulnerable vulnerable populations populations I'm I'm Ben Ben Thomas Thomas

World World Health Health Orga Severe Severe Disease Disease Dan Dan Thomas Thomas Dr Dr Michael Michael Ryan Rya Omicron Omicron Ryan Ryan Maria Maria Van Van Kirk Kirk South South Africa Makan Makan Disease Disease Africa Ben Ben Thomas Thomas
"severe disease" Discussed on The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

01:41 min | 9 months ago

"severe disease" Discussed on The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

"Deployed now. To them announcing that we're going to triple that, more than double, we're going to get to 60 teams ready to deploy in states experienced a surge in cases over the course of the winner. I was just with the governor in Minnesota, who was raving about the positive impact that's had on his state. But there's other states the same. In the same circumstance. Additionally, we're increasing the availability of new medications recommended by real doctors, not conspiracy theorists. For example, monoclonal antibody treatments have been shown to reduce the risk of hospitalization by up to 70%. And for unvaccinated people at risk of developing severe disease. We've already distributed over 3 million courses of this treatment to save lives. And reduce the strain on hospitals. And we have promising new arrival. He rushed through this. He had to pause. Monoclonal antibodies are very important Therapeutics for people who are infected. And I don't think he's ever mentioned them before. And I'm glad that he did, even though he rushed through it. That's the part I don't like. I mean, tumbling on his words, but he had a speech impediment and we understand that. But monoclonal antibodies finally out there in the open, that's good. Here's what he had to say about what schools are going to happen when they get a positive test. Cut number three. When we get to that around at that point, vaccinating our children is also critical to keeping our schools open. But while over 99% of our schools are open now, we need to make sure that we keep that throughout the winter..

severe disease Minnesota
Britain tightens COVID rules as world on alert over omicron

AP News Radio

00:57 sec | 9 months ago

Britain tightens COVID rules as world on alert over omicron

"Covert nineteen cases from the new variant are emerging outside of southern Africa where it was first identified this very it is spreading around the world with two cases so far identified here in the U. K. British prime minister Boris Johnson announced new measures aimed at containing the spread of the Omicron variant many countries are imposing new restrictions on travel from southern Africa including the U. S. we were so slow to act on delta and the whole world it's such a high price for it Danny Altman is a professor of immunology at imperial college London let's try and be forewarned can do it properly this time so I think I could probably is warranted the good thing is that we have monitoring systems around the world to detect these variants very quickly the world health organization's Maria banker cove already scientists are sharing research with us information with us so that we can take action open questions include the effectiveness of current vaccines against Omicron and whether it causes more severe disease there's been no indication of that so far I'm Ben Thomas

K. British Prime Minister Bori Southern Africa Danny Altman U. Imperial College London Maria Banker Cove World Health Organization Ben Thomas
"severe disease" Discussed on Defocus Media

Defocus Media

03:51 min | 10 months ago

"severe disease" Discussed on Defocus Media

"You'd wanna explore. I wouldn't necessarily say so You know. I think what really this was a career opportunity that you're wanting to explore and is to be involved in not just in your clinic you need to get involved externally so a lot of different things that kind of gave me potential made me a candidate was that i was involved at the state level with different committees. I was involved in political type committee. These i also started to be kind of on that lecture circuit as well because a lot of what we do is go is a lot of different public speaking. Or we're going to be going and we're going to be speaking in educating to institutions into different physicians than so showing bat to these different biotech indifferent farm companies. Yes i've been involved. I've been connected and this isn't something where you know. The clinician got out of optometry school in stop learning. Because you don't you have to keep learning and the msl role is that is exactly what it is. It's just continuing to learn showing that you have that ability and that you have that desire is very important and then also that kind of public piece of it. That you you enjoy it. I didn't do a residency. I did i worked at the mall. Just that i had known growing up that i knew had a very very heavy disease Base of very severe disease severe coma severe diabetes and i worked for attack as tech for her before i went to school in so my out. I went to her and to send their position. That i could fill your practice where i can come to learn to treat this disease For year and then go on into in my clinic. So is i guess a su- residency in that sense but really. It was just trying to dive headfirst into understanding disease..

severe disease severe coma sev
There's Something Suspicious About Monoclonal Antibody Treatment for 'High Risk' Patients

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:54 min | 10 months ago

There's Something Suspicious About Monoclonal Antibody Treatment for 'High Risk' Patients

"I'm sixty one years old slightly a little bit overweight. I got ten or twenty more pounds. I'd like to lose. I don't know what kind of risk that am. I high risk. If i die of covert i guess i would have been a high risk. How many people have we heard didn't have any commodities and died of covert not everybody who dies with coverted has a bunch of pre existing conditions. Right listen to what this reporter jennifer that care. Tv in minneapolis. Saint paul says at the beginning of her report treatment only works if you get covert and you're also at high risk for severe disease. Now listen the treatment only works if you're at high risk that doesn't even make any sense. That's not even logical. It only works if you have and if you're at high risk really that's what it works so if you're low risk it doesn't work you see what they're doing. And i'm not a conspiracy theorist but do you see why the media is a trusted. Think about that. It only works these these antibody treatments. If you're at high risk and if you've got kelvin well guess what asari on like the guy on the titanic knocking over the ladies and little kids to get on the lifeboat. If i get cove in. I want the monoclonal antibody treatments okay. You gotta do now. Why don't i get that opportunity. Oh only if you're high risk will at work you see it only work. It won't work for sixty one year old. You know chubby white guys. It only works if you're like got emphysema and all kinds of other terrible health conditions.

Severe Disease Saint Paul Asari Minneapolis Jennifer Kelvin Emphysema
US FDA Recommends Booster Jabs for Over 65s

This Week with George Stephanopoulos

01:50 min | 11 months ago

US FDA Recommends Booster Jabs for Over 65s

"Few days before the official start of fall. What was billed as the summer of freedom has come and gone on the national mall more than six hundred thousand flags one for each life loss to covert the sea of white representing unfathomable and devastating toll. Just three months ago the. Us daily case average was nearing a record low about eleven thousand new cases. Now we're averaging about one hundred forty three thousand cases per day reporting roughly one million cases over the last week and while president biden hoped an fda advisory panel would recommend boosters for all vaccinated americans on friday. The panel voted to recommend boosters only for those sixty five and older or at high risk of severe disease. Dr anthony found. She is standing by joins us in just a moment. But we begin with the latest on that fda recommendation and what it all means for some of the most vulnerable as the school year gets underway. It was just last month at president biden. Laid out his plan for booster shots. These booster program is start here. September twentieth pending approval. Fda cdc committee outside experts that approval did not come for everyone and while the handled did not officially vote on it they do support including vulnerable populations like teachers healthcare and other frontline workers in this first round but when it comes to ending the pandemic the message remains clear to vaccinate the unvaccinated. While seventy six percent of adults have received. at least one dose the millions of unvaccinated americans are fueling hospitalizations and directly impacting. Some of the most vulnerable children

President Biden Severe Disease Dr Anthony FDA Cdc Committee United States
"severe disease" Discussed on FoundMyFitness

FoundMyFitness

03:31 min | 11 months ago

"severe disease" Discussed on FoundMyFitness

"To be some evidence of that at least that the research articles that i've read and if you look at what's happening right now with the delta variant in in israel and the united states we see a reduction in the ability of the vaccines to reduce transmission right so with the delta very instead of the ninety eighty to ninety percent that we enjoyed early on in the pandemic it's been knocked down somewhat but we really haven't seen an erosion to that extent in prevention of hospitalization and severe disease and that that has more to do with t cell responses and cytotoxic because by this point the virus is inside the body inside the cells and antibodies have very limited ability to take care of those types of situations so Do you mean system is very complex. And i think We need to sort of look back and always couple are our in-vitro hypotheses with with real world data and so far the real world data is still holding up in terms of prevention of severe disease. And i'd also like to add. There's been some sort of a A false equivalence if you will that is made in terms of what we know that overuse of antibiotics can cause bacterial resistance to those antibiotics. And there's no question about that that's a whole nother topic of discussion. The overuse of antibiotics in humans and animals especially and that gives rice with these superbugs. That emerged that are no longer susceptible to antibiotics that we have. But that's a different situation. That's where the antibiotics that are. Being used are are basically selectively killing out all of these susceptible bacteria and only leaving those that are resistant so in other words the resistant bacteria already exists. But we're knocking out. The bacteria that are susceptible and allowing the resistant forms to produce. That's very different than what we're talking about with vaccines because in the terms of vaccines viruses. The resistant viruses. Don't exist. what allows them to be created is the ability to replicate okay and that's very different with bacteria bacteria very few resistant. Bacteria are occurring. Because they're being allowed to replicate the only way that they can become resistant is if they acquire dna that gives them the called plasmids or vectors. That allow antibiotic resistance to them be incorporated in their dna. That's not the case with viruses viruses and bacteria are very different dr swell. I think the most common reason i've heard for people choosing not to get the vaccine is that they feel like the process may have been rushed that there isn't enough long-term data yet they may be willing to get the vaccine at some point but they will look at the historical timelines vaccines and realize that it takes often ten years. Maybe the average for vaccine to actually Be manufactured and go through the authorisation and approval process. So what what are your thoughts about this sentiment and Do you feel like the vaccine was rushed. You feel like we can trust the process in this case with this particular technology. That's a great question. So there's no question in my mind in anyone else's that this process was accelerated. No question about it..

severe disease israel united states
"severe disease" Discussed on FoundMyFitness

FoundMyFitness

05:37 min | 11 months ago

"severe disease" Discussed on FoundMyFitness

"Unclear and i think what is clear is that we definitely do need more data. We need more high quality data. We need more data from states that are from from countries. That don't have a really high background of parasitic diseases. Dr schwab pointed out. Very big confounding factor. But also we need to not sensationalize something and and you know speak speak about things that are not true. Like there's just no evidence that ivermectin is going to protect you from infection and from severe disease as well as a vaccine does no evidence of that and so don't make that claim you know make make the claim for what the data speaks to. There may be an effect. There may be an effect particularly in viral clearance in. So i think if people would tone it down and not make these. Grandiose claims there would be a lot more interest in in ivermectin studying ivermectin and you know the other thing to keep in mind is that there's been a lot of people that have now sought out a veterinary form. It because it is something that in addition to being used in humans for parasitic diseases and helmets and also scabies lice. And things like that. It's also used in like you know people are calling it horster warmer and which you know. It's just it's not a good idea to go and get a veterinary type of medication and try to treat yourself because there's vastly different doses involved. I mean horses are much larger than humans. And so you know. It's it's very dangerous to do something. Like that. And i think people have have sort of hard. These sensational claims started taking their their their own action. Trying to get get some form of ivermectin and really That can be quite dangerous. So i think i agree agree with dr well that we should be studying these. You know these these repurpose therapeutics and there is a. There is a potential for ivermectin. At least in my opinion at the very least it seems as though it's pretty consistently involved in speeding up the viral clearance to some degree. It's not like a huge huge effect but there isn't effect and it's consistent with with pre mytalk studies at that. I personally looked at so. I think that you know we should really go after that. And try to to see if that's if that's real and and that's that's pretty much thought excellent and speaking of those studies that you both talked about and and the these meta analyses one argument..

Dr schwab severe disease
FDA Panel Is First Key Test for Biden COVID-19 Booster Plan

NPR News Now

00:54 sec | 11 months ago

FDA Panel Is First Key Test for Biden COVID-19 Booster Plan

"The food and drug administration is meeting today to review pfizer's request for third dose of its covert nineteen vaccine. Npr's windsor johnston reports some health. Experts have questioned whether a booster shot is necessary at this point a key. Fda advisory panel convenes today to discuss. Whether there's enough proof that a booster dose of the cova vaccine developed by pfizer is safe and effective citing data from recent studies. Pfizer argues that. Yo protection against severe disease is holding strong in the united states immunity against milder infection. Wayne somewhere around six to eight months after the second dose. The pharmaceutical company also says those. Antibodies appear strong enough to protect people against the highly contagious delta variant. If the fda decides to recommend the boosters the cdc will then have to decide who should get the additional doses windsor johnston

Pfizer Windsor Johnston FDA Severe Disease NPR Wayne United States CDC
Two Top FDA Officials Resigned Over the Biden's Booster Shot Plan

Mark Levin

02:01 min | 11 months ago

Two Top FDA Officials Resigned Over the Biden's Booster Shot Plan

"Now we've been talking Are hearing talk about booster shots. Get the booster shot, get the booster shot and then suddenly, two of the most senior people at the FDA resigned. And why did they resign because they felt they were being pressured by the Biden administration. To push booster shots before they felt The data was in before the science was ready to support it. It got very minimal media attention, and it died within 24 to 36 hours. Now The Associated Press this afternoon. With this headline. FDA experts among groups opposing US booster shot plan The average person doesn't need a covid 19 booster yet an international group of scientists Including two top U. S, regulators wrote Monday in a scientific journal. The experts reviewed studies of the vaccines performance and concluded the shots are working well despite the trick, contagious Delta variant, especially against severe disease. Even in populations with fairly high vaccination rates. The unvaccinated are still the major drivers of transmission at the stage of the pandemic, they concluded. So right now they're arguing. No, You don't need boosters yet. Uh, so the federal government is saying two things at the same time. You have these FDA experts among groups opposing US booster shot plans. You have the Biden ministrations trying to push the date for booster shots up early. You have Fauci on TV, and we'll take both positions. At the same time. You now finally had people on our favorite cable network and elsewhere. Talking about? What do we mean by unvaccinated? What about natural immunity people who actually have anti bodies? Why would they be vaccinated again?

Biden Administration FDA Severe Disease The Associated Press United States Federal Government Fauci Biden
FDA Experts Among Group Opposing US Booster Shot Plan

AP News Radio

00:39 sec | 11 months ago

FDA Experts Among Group Opposing US Booster Shot Plan

"The confusion over covered nineteen booster shots continues the average person does not need a covert nineteen booster yet that's according to an international group of scientists including two top U. S. regulators the latest information appeared in an opinion piece published in the lancet the experts reviewed studies of the vaccine's performance and concluded their shots are working well despite the extra contagious delta very especially against severe disease at this stage of the pandemic they add even in populations with fairly high vaccination rates the unvaccinated are still the major drivers of transmission I actually after

Confusion
What Is a Breakthrough COVID-19 Infection?

South Florida's First News with Jimmy Cefalo

01:54 min | 1 year ago

What Is a Breakthrough COVID-19 Infection?

"Dr Deborah and Mulligan, professor at Nova Southeastern University's College of Osteopathic Medicine. She is board certified in pediatrics and emergency medicine as welcome our dear doctor. Good morning, Jimmy. Let's talk about little bit about breakthrough infections. I think I saw that about 83 85% of the people hospitalized in the state of Florida. Were not vaccinated, but there are some And that's the breakthrough infection. Right? That's what we call it. Tell us about this. Yeah, sure. So, you know, we had a really good vaccine driven strategy for the vaccinated. It was supposed to be a worry free, hot back summer of socializing and fun. That was before Delta. You know, this tough, formidable folks spoil their plans and rising covid breakthrough infections. Among fully vaccinated is a reminder that these vaccines are not a silver bullet. Nor is the mask a full proof invisibility cloak. So let's define what is the definition of vaccine breakthrough infection for our listeners. It's the detection of SARS Kobe to RNA or antigens. Collected from a person more than 14 days after they completed recommended doses of covid 19. So I have had patients who were diagnosed with Covid Illness, but they hadn't been fully vaccinated. So, for example, maybe you got the first shot. It was a week later, they hadn't got their second shot. So Jimmy, these vaccines are intended to prevent severe illness. That was the end point, and they're doing that. They were not intended to prevent spread 100%, although they were pretty marvelous until you know Delta came along. These vaccines are working as expected there, bolstering memory B cells, protective D cells and antibodies to protect us from severe disease. They're doing that.

Dr Deborah Nova Southeastern University College Of Osteopathic Medicin Mulligan Jimmy Florida Sars Severe Disease
Will Booster Shots Make a Difference?

The Secret History of the Future

02:06 min | 1 year ago

Will Booster Shots Make a Difference?

"On wednesday. The president's top covert advisors cited a few early studies to make the case for boosters from new york from nursing homes from the mayo clinic. Plus there was some data from israel. I see two things. I i see a few canaries in the coal mine. I do see that. The is Specially from based on the us data. There is a diminishing of effectiveness against mild moderate disease. Here's michelle will get. The director of the centers for disease control and prevention on wednesday talking about a mayoclinic analysis of more than eighty thousand vaccinated and unvaccinated. People like we saw in the new york. Dana vaccine effectiveness against infection declined over time. In this case from seventy six percent to forty two percents for those who receive the pfizer vaccine and from eighty six percent to seventy six percents for those who receive. The madonna vaccine are also see that things seem to be holding up against severe disease including hospitalization. More or less which seems great but seems quick which is good. The other thing i see is whenever things are that nuanced. I want to see the whole ishii be process unfold. Who needs the advisory committee on immunization practices. It's a group of fifteen outside advisers. Doctors nurses public health specialists. Who make recommendations to the cdc on vaccines on cova. Yes but on other things too and the committee has a standard deliberative process. That anyone you were me can log on and watch the encouraging thing and something that got lost in a lot of coverage was that the actual verdon of things that came out yesterday was that they are doing this for planning purposes to start with september twentieth bending authorization from fda and bending the advisory committee on immunization practices review. So i as a scientist. I had weighed for the review because things are that nuanced.

Mild Moderate Disease Centers For Disease Control An Mayo Clinic New York Michelle Israel Dana Pfizer Advisory Committee On Immuniza Ishii United States Advisory Committee On Immuniza FDA
"severe disease" Discussed on Squawk Pod

Squawk Pod

05:52 min | 1 year ago

"severe disease" Discussed on Squawk Pod

"This virus replicates that we shouldn't be able to drug the machinery that it uses to spread this three drugs in advanced development right now one's by pfizer. That's in face to face to studies another one by merck they in license it from a company called ridgeback. That's been a good drug-fighting company those are the two that have furthest along. They both looked promising in early. Stage clinical trials in pivotal trials. Right now there's a third drug by roche that's in development that's a little bit further behind. There's a possibility that we could have a drug available. This winter from one of these clinical trials. I think the clinical trials themselves are gonna be challenging to run. Because you're going to be looking to run. Trials either demonstrate that the drugs reduce the symptoms of covert or reduced progression to severe disease or they reduce the likelihood of coming coming down with covert. If you're exposed to it when you're trying to run those trials against the backdrop of a largely vaccine population to try to look at those outcomes. You need to enroll a pretty big cohort people and probably need to follow them for an extended period of time particularly. If you're looking to demonstrate the drugs reduced the progression to severe disease because the reality is only a very small percentage of people with covert progress severe disease and then scott..

merck pfizer severe disease roche scott
"severe disease" Discussed on Exchanges at Goldman Sachs

Exchanges at Goldman Sachs

02:33 min | 1 year ago

"severe disease" Discussed on Exchanges at Goldman Sachs

"Now one of the questions is maybe this has to do with the timeframe of vaccination as many people know israel was at the leading edge of the global vaccination campaign and so there could be some of waning effect of the vaccines over time. and so. that's one thing that again. The companies are studying. We're gathering more data on to fully understand that now as we shift to look at severe disease. Remember as i mentioned before this is a spectrum right so again here importantly i think the message is the vaccine. Efficacy against severe disease in hospitalization is still around ninety percent even with the delta variant and that comes from some data out of both israel and canada. So that's very encouraging and so bottom line is if you're double vaccinated have very good protection against delta especially against severe disease and hospitalization and that's obviously a big focus of the healthcare system because when we talked about these lockdowns in different measures that countries are taking it relates to really trying to preserve that healthcare system capacity. And so given the vaccine efficacy. Were seen here out of israel and canada very encouraging protection against severe disease. Let me just thought to that. Because obviously we have pfizer. We've moderna we have other vaccines around the world. Are there any very material differences between these vaccines. So i'd say bottom line it looks like the messenger. A vaccine so pfizer by on tech and madeira are somewhat better than the adenoviruses. Vaccines those from astrazeneca. Jay for symptomatic kovic nineteen so again that kinda symptomatic disease but all four these vaccines look to be very very good again. Severe disease hospitalization. So not as much of a difference there and remember that's the big focus of the healthcare system is ensuring that we're protected against severe disease and hospitalization so less differentiation among the vaccines on that front. We're hearing that the severity of illness for breakthrough infections so meaning vaccine to people getting the infections is actually lower. Is that true. What is the evidence. Say around that yet. Obviously another very important topic here in everyone's probably seen a lot of different headlines on this. So look you know. Vaccine breakthroughs are still generally rare. But unfortunately they do happen. Now the flip side of it is if you do have a breakthrough infection. The symptoms and duration of illness is likely much less severe than it would be if you aren't vaccinated and there's some data that's emerged on this front from earlier in the pandemic that suggests if you do have a breakthrough infection you still have about sixty percent..

severe disease israel pfizer symptomatic disease canada Severe disease delta astrazeneca Jay
"severe disease" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:44 min | 1 year ago

"severe disease" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Ombudsman for Bay Area long term care facilities. Unfortunately, the long term care system it's common for staff to work at multiple locations. I mean, they're caring for multiple residents that they are asymptomatic. They could take the disease to multiple buildings. And so I actually feel that staff, um confidence in the vaccine and access the vaccine for staff member. So that means publishing information in English, Spanish to college in any other language Necessary is a critical importance. Doctor, are you Seeing the importance of this communicating vaccine safety to staff and not just the residents. I completely agree that it hasn't been done very well. That we definitely needed more preparation as far as like instruction for a staff a swell about the safety off this vaccines as well. Other issue that is can happen that Expected side effect of vaccine, which is more pronounced on the second dose of vaccination, which many office staffs are worried about that, including some fever, fatigue and any other symptoms. We are assuring them and again Administration administration's off a long term facility. Also, they need to pay attention. In this case. If this happened, we first of all, we need to stagger the staff that not all the stuff at the same time they get vaccinated in case if they have one or two days off the side effect. And also make sure that we have preparation for this and help them regarding this symptoms that can happen. This new variant of the Corona virus has arrived in California. According to health experts, It's potentially more contagious, but not more deadly. How does that affect the response at nursing homes, which have already been hit so hard by the coronavirus? Correct. I mean, the nursing home overall, have played a central role in covert 19 outbreak For the last week, we saw a massive outbreak in a skilled nursing comma game in Santa Korin sama to county and many other places in California as well, even the new viruses with the new mutation. Of the vaccine can be helpful because nursing home population they are having all the chronic condition that can be extremely difficult to control with the severe disease. Windy. You expect people living in nursing homes and other long term care facilities. Will be able to physically see their loved ones again safely. Great question and the answer. It will be dead in both vaccine of Fizer and buying taken Moderna vaccine. The efficacy off the vaccine was a lower in adults 65 years older and they have other medical conditions. It means that even with vaccinating entire long term facility and his staff, not all of them will be immune against Kobe 19. It means that visitors who are not vaccinated at the same time as well. They still can carry this wireless and infect their loved one in a long term facility. We still have to wait till almost the target percentage of general population will be vaccinated. And then be observed after weeks off their vaccination. If he have less new cases less hospitalization, then we can safely open the doors off long term facilities to visitors. The state is considering anybody 75 or over to be next in line to get vaccinated. This comes as the state deals with a surge that's expected to last through January. Is the rollout of the vaccine moving fast enough to reach this point? No, unfortunately, no in other countries like the United Kingdom, they already started to vaccinating all the geriatric population. 65 years old and already And that was actually a very good decision because there are also very susceptible to get infections right now. I hope that we can accelerate the process and we're older adult people they can get vaccinated as soon as possible Doctor near Dad I A T professor of medicine at Stanford. Into medical adviser to nursing homes in the Bay Area. Thanks so much for talking to us. Thank you for having me It was my pleasure. You're listening to morning edition on KQED. More news from NPR and from KQED and Brian and just a minute. Here's Joe was some bar news. Knew Bart DeLay. This is a 20 minute delay from Millbrae to Richmond because of an equipment problem on a train the biggest traffic jam because of the crashes in Marin County, one of one south down before the Civic Center..

California KQED asymptomatic Bay Area Santa Korin United Kingdom fever Millbrae Marin County professor of medicine NPR Bart Stanford Joe Civic Center Brian Richmond
"severe disease" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

07:54 min | 1 year ago

"severe disease" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"The University of Oxford on their vaccine. Now, the race for a vaccine was part of a discussion that I moderated from our recent Bloomberg New economy form a panel that really looked at how the world can ensure that we never ever have another catastrophe like Covad 19. That panel was with Stefan Bonsall, chief executive officer at Madonna. Regina Dugan, CEO at Welcome Leap, and Dr Wu Zun Yo, chief epidemiologist at the Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention. We began by hearing from a Dernis CEO on their vaccine. We announced that The first eat everyone that is easily face pre study. Just tell your 50,000 participants should almost 95% because T. But the piece that makes me almost more excited is the fact that off 11 people with severe disease. They were all of those people were not on the vaccine. And so if you think about it, what does that mean? I mean, the once we get the final data, we should be able to see this is confident that if you get over thing we have 95% chance of, you know, this is And if you get is easy with my symptoms, you need not have cereal this season that we know that's what he'd been a big impact in come off hospitalization for patient with the worst. I seen you professionally in the world's there. It will be impractical as had, but only on human life, of course, but on mental health on the economy. We think this could be a game changer. And so what we're doing now is getting the final data all locked up. Submitting these regulatory agencies around the world. End. Hopefully I will be getting the vaccine approving the emergency use before the end of the year. We're making as much product as weak. And then we said We liked me for being a very expensive meat, and those is Ready to ship as soon as we are rigged artery for all right, So that's certainly some upbeat news doctor who I want to bring you into this conversation when you and I spoke over the weekend. I believe you were in Xinjiang or had been in Xinjiang. China has done and I think most would argue that as among The biggest the most developed country. You guys have done a good job in terms of containing the virus. But even so, there continues to be breakout. Where are we in China when it comes to cope in 19? I just come back from a singer now back to the Beijing we just controlled another outbreak in Makarska Sinjin weaker, autonomous region. Epidemic started in the letter of October and brought under control in November. In the China. I saying what we did it have very strong Got civilians and Pete control the epidemic as a war so go back to the earlier responds. Choose the initial outbreak in Wuhan. Most of the people suspected China delayed or that's not a responded very quickly. Actually, I'll give you two examples. We did a very bold position, for example. When the outbreak of fluster looks by doctors. That's a last December, 27th and the national expert arrived in the heart. They made a proposition toe close the seafood market. Is that fine? There were only 40 cases and 27 of them had exposure to honestly for the market. Metadata decision is a tough And the national expert in the local expert has a different opinion and local expert has gone against to achieve that position. Another decision. It's a shutdown will has city. The decision was made in the generating two second time will only have about 500 cases. That it is a maid had come into the skill of the over the 19 out of the whole China the Duke to do this he made, I think is the best off the philosophy. Prepare for the wash the scenario that's the arms and the principal. So we responded, choose covered 19 very quickly with quite to remove all the rise. Virus from the community to please the up that make society safe. Now China. I think the fact that zero local transmission now All right. Begin. I want you to come in on this too. What are you hearing from your network about where we are in this process and in this cycle in terms of dealing with the virus Well, I want to calibrate for a moment, because, remember the normal time to go from an outbreak to a vaccine is something like 5 to 10 years, So this achievement here is remarkable unprecedented. The team at Madonna goes from virus sequence to first dozing in humans and 63 days. And as stuff on his fund of saying That's an advance a decade in the making. In fact, I remember a decade ago when M. RNA based vaccines were first proposed. On. The critics said there was no evidence to suggest it would work on bond, Other said. There is no evidence to suggest it won't we should try, and if we are successful, it would matter. And here we are today. In fact, it matters. So I think what we're hearing now is How do we begin to work on the next piece is so how do we shorten the clinical trial? How do we begin to get manufacturing underway so that we can couple the early warning with a rapid response and there's still much more to do there. And in my view, this is the Sputnik moment of our generation, right? And in the same way that Sputnik inspired a space age, so too, might this pandemic inspire a health age? Lots to do so I want to continue this conversation cause now I want to kind of look forward a quick poll in a reminder to everybody who's watching the pole. That's out there would love to hear your response. The question we're asking. What are the lessons from Asia Successful response to Cove in 19. Some individual freedom must be sacrificed for the public. Good. That's answer a answer. Be early lockdowns reduced. Overall economic impact answers see more investment in digital health infrastructure, including contact tracing and D. Face coverings work, so having said that we'll look for those responses. So let me ask you. How do we make sure this never ever happens again? Bloomberg New Economy said. There is no greater challenge for a global leaders that figuring out how to make sure this never happens again. Stefan, can we do this? Do we now have the playbook? I think we'll be on the logs. And as Regina say, That means first. What has been this year by scientists around the world, and the collaboration we have seen is unprecedented in some of this opinion. We've learned a lot as well. And I think there's two dimensions where we should invest aggressively across the world in a public private partnership. Who me use the time to get to her back because, as we know, you know, Republican credentials are extremely in prospect. And right now wearing a mask and social distancing are critical treatment of very important people in the hospital, but to really get back to normal, we need to vaccinate people. And as we know the world is focusing on that vaccine. That was Stefan Bonsall, CEO at Madonna. Regina Dugan, chief executive officer. Welcome Leave, and Dr Wu Zun Yo, chief epidemiologist at the Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention at the recent Bloomberg New Economy Forum. Coming up the race to a vaccine made transparent, out of necessity coming up. Next we've got an entrepreneur and the CEO of up front who is looking to bring transparency to market that touches many Americans and their kids. That's coming up next on Bloomberg Business Week. This is Bloomberg. President of the Jewish Medicare annual election period. Deadline is coming soon. I'm MEREDITH Vieira.

Bloomberg Chinese Center for Disease Con China Regina Dugan Stefan Bonsall CEO Dr Wu Zun chief executive officer Madonna Epidemic University of Oxford Xinjiang Covad Dernis MEREDITH Vieira Beijing Welcome Leap Wuhan Makarska Sinjin
"severe disease" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:08 min | 1 year ago

"severe disease" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"I'm Mary Louise Kelly and I'm Audie Cornish for the third Monday in a row. We have good news about a Corona virus vaccine today. The pharmaceutical company AstraZeneca and its partner, the University of Oxford, announce that their vaccine was 70% effective in preventing cove in 19. This vaccine uses a different technology from the ones made by Visor and Madonna that have already been shown to be effective. Joining me now is NPR's science correspondent Joe Palka to talk about the news. Joe, What is this technology? How is it different? Nobody. The Fizer by on tech and modern of vaccines, or what's called M RNA vaccines. They work by injecting a tiny snippet of the genetic material the coronavirus directly into someone's body, and that material contains instructions for a protein that can prop someone's immune system. Making immune response to the Corona virus. So are you with me so far? Yes, That's guys sort of vaccine is as we know it Well, it's a little different, but this one is even different Still, because the AstraZeneca Oxford vaccine also contains genetic material from the coronavirus. But instead of injecting it directly into someone, it's carried into someone's body using what's called a viral vector. Now this has certain advantages, not least that it's cheaper and easier to make this vaccine. So in the study were hearing about today. One group of people got two doses of the vaccine, and another group got two shots also, but those injections didn't contain the experimental covert vaccine. Andrew Pollard is head of the Oxford Vaccine group. And he says the vaccine worked pretty darn well. We've got a vaccine, which is highly effective. It prevents severe disease and hospitalization on and intriguingly in the results. We do have a subgroup that you've got a half dose is the first does And then a full dose does the second days where we saw the 90% protection, he said, Intriguingly. And how does that work Right? Half a dose being better than a full dose? Yeah, the 22 full doses are the all the trial showed 70% effective. It is 90. Well, it's a bit of a puzzle, and Sara Gilbert is a professor of action ology at the University of Oxford. She developed the vaccine and she says Puzzles are fine with her. We're a group of academics. So we're delighted to have something more academic to study on this, and it could be that by giving a small amount of the vaccine start with and following up with a big amount. That's a better way of kicking the immune system into action and giving us the strongest immune response on the most effective immune response, but more work to do on that. Yeah, sounds like work to do on that. And it seems they only came up with this result by chance when researchers realized they had underestimated the potency of the first injections in one of the groups of volunteers What happens next in this process? Well, AstraZeneca says they will take this data that they've gathered these data and to the UK and European regulatory agencies and discuss getting approval for some sort of, you know, discuss with them some sort of approval provisional approval. And they'll also talk with the U. S. Food and Drug Administration to see if this data will satisfy them for a emergency use authorization, And they'll also be talking to the FDA to see if they can modify the vaccines thing that's going on in this country where they've already rolled 10,000 volunteers in order to switch it to that same regimen where you get a half dose and then a full dose. And the storage. How is it different? Well, you might remember that the Fizer vaccine used had to have ultra cold freezers, and this one does not. It doesn't even need a freezer. It can be stored safely at normal refrigerator temperatures, and that makes it easier to distribute globally, which AstraZeneca says it's committed to doing and they're also planning to keep the cost down to about $3 a dose. Make it more available in low resource countries. That's NPR's science correspondent Joe Palka. Thank you. You're welcome. For people who talk to work colleagues by zoom or use it to catch up to family and friends. It is easy to take the platform for granted. But zoom will not host just any conversation. The video streaming platform is being accused of censorship after it blacklisted a controversial speaker at a public event. MPR's Bobby Allen reports, and we should note Zoom is a financial supporter of NPR. Controversial speaker is Palestinian activist Layla Holiday Holiday is a member of the Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine. The U. S considers that a terrorist group holiday is notorious for hijacking a plane in 1969 and trying to do it again a year later. So when Rob Bob Abdulhadi invited Holland to speak, she knew it would set off a big debate. Abdu Holly, a professor at San Francisco State University, says it never happened because of zoom. The company said they were legal concerns. We might be implicated and criminal activities off material support for terrorism, and that might include a imprisonment and a fine. Abdulhadi didn't fear those consequences. She sees solid as a feminist icon who should be able to speak at a public event. Some 1500 people had planned to tune in on soon as a platform. They do not have the right to use their being a platform in order for them to veto the content of our classroom and thus actually impinge on our academic freedom. Legally Zoom can't tell Abdel Hadi what to teach. But it can kick speakers off its platform and the pro Israel Law Fair Project had been pressuring zoom to do just that. Brooke Goldstein is the project's executive director. So if your interest isn't having an academic discussion about controversial issues, go ahead. But that doesn't mean that you have the right to assist a designated terrorist group in carrying out their mission. This wasn't the first time zoom face this kind of heat. This summer Zoom shut down meetings Commemorating the Tiananmen Square massacre. At the request of the Chinese government. Social media sites like Facebook, Twitter and YouTube have been in the middle of debates over enforcing content rules for a while for zoom. It's new Welcome to the party Zoom. Daphne Keller is a former Google lawyer who is now it's Stanford Cyber Policy Center. Zoom started as a corporate video service. But now with the pandemic.

AstraZeneca NPR Joe Palka Oxford Vaccine group University of Oxford AstraZeneca Oxford professor Rob Bob Abdulhadi Mary Louise Kelly Audie Cornish Madonna Andrew Pollard RNA Sara Gilbert partner UK MPR Liberation of Palestine