35 Burst results for "Seventy Year"

Jeff Bridges says he has lymphoma, cites good prognosis

AP News Radio

00:42 sec | 1 d ago

Jeff Bridges says he has lymphoma, cites good prognosis

"The popular actor is fighting a form of cancer yeah well the data by Jeff bridges taking the same kind of attitude his character the dude in the big Lebowski he's being treated for lymphoma but says his prognosis is good the seventy year old actor says in a social media post he understands the disease a serious and express gratitude to his family friends and doctors but just as he will keep his fans posted on his recovery Regis has been nominated for seven Oscars during his career winning once for crazy heart in twenty ten Regis has deep Hollywood bloodlines he's the son of actors Lloyd and Dorothy bridges both of whom died in nineteen ninety eight I'm Oscar wells Gabriel

Jeff Bridges Lymphoma Regis Hollywood Lloyd Dorothy Oscar Wells Gabriel
Stevie Wonder leaves Motown and releases two new songs

The Breakfast Club

02:46 min | 6 d ago

Stevie Wonder leaves Motown and releases two new songs

"Stevie wonder had a new kidney. He had a kidney transplant last year. He said he feels thirty years younger after that. Any also announced that he is leaving motown. So He's been on motown forever. So that's a big deal and he put out to new songs as well. So we actually have one of those songs for you right now and this song is called can't put it in the hands of fate. It's a call to action with rhapsody, Corday CHICA and BUSTA rhymes. Don't repeat many. took notes from the Peter you Samah Vitamin. Apologize. Made debts legal. When the dog equal. A debt. Town got to find. The. Time was raised by Mother Nature in the projects in the mid war withdraws. Was Easy to spot the government. Dropped include Bob Rhapsody who there? Yes. They get busy. Telling me one did leave and motown is like telling me somebody died that I thought vindicated who the hell thought. stevie wonder was still on motown. I no clue until either. Let's hear Stevie wonder's part of the song as well. You. have to make a change. Again. Wouldn't. told. US. Can't. Okay timeless talent, timeless talents devi one absolutely. Never forget the brass club hats TV WANNA come saying happy happy birthday to Senator Hilary Clinton when she was running for president in two thousand sixteen. She didn't win. Of course I a great moment it was. Put out another sound call whereas I love song this is under his new. So what's the Fuss Music Label with republic records all the proceeds from is our love song will be donated to feeding America. You know he was on Motown for sixty years all right now oprah. Seaport seventy years old. Wow. Sixty is. To leave and kept he probably kept on signing again masturbate I. Don't know if he got on TV hope he has some I can almost guarantee stevie wonder message

Stevie Wonder Bob Rhapsody Motown Senator Hilary Clinton United States Corday Chica Peter America President Trump
Stevie Wonder releases 2 new songs after announcing that he's leaving Motown

The Breakfast Club

02:46 min | 6 d ago

Stevie Wonder releases 2 new songs after announcing that he's leaving Motown

"Stevie wonder had a new kidney. He had a kidney transplant last year. He said he feels thirty years younger after that. Any also announced that he is leaving motown. So He's been on motown forever. So that's a big deal and he put out to new songs as well. So we actually have one of those songs for you right now and this song is called can't put it in the hands of fate. It's a call to action with rhapsody, Corday CHICA and BUSTA rhymes. Don't repeat many. took notes from the Peter you Samah Vitamin. Apologize. Made debts legal. When the dog equal. A debt. Town got to find. The. Time was raised by Mother Nature in the projects in the mid war withdraws. Was Easy to spot the government. Dropped include Bob Rhapsody who there? Yes. They get busy. Telling me one did leave and motown is like telling me somebody died that I thought vindicated who the hell thought. stevie wonder was still on motown. I no clue until either. Let's hear Stevie wonder's part of the song as well. You. have to make a change. Again. Wouldn't. told. US. Can't. Okay timeless talent, timeless talents devi one absolutely. Never forget the brass club hats TV WANNA come saying happy happy birthday to Senator Hilary Clinton when she was running for president in two thousand sixteen. She didn't win. Of course I a great moment it was. Put out another sound call whereas I love song this is under his new. So what's the Fuss Music Label with republic records all the proceeds from is our love song will be donated to feeding America. You know he was on Motown for sixty years all right now oprah. Seaport seventy years old. Wow. Sixty is. To leave and kept he probably kept on signing again masturbate I. Don't know if he got on TV hope he has some I can almost guarantee stevie wonder message

Stevie Wonder Bob Rhapsody Motown Senator Hilary Clinton United States Corday Chica Peter America President Trump
The Beginning of Black History

Black History in Two Minutes

01:34 min | Last week

The Beginning of Black History

"Most of us think that the first Africans to arrive in what is now the United States, we're slaves, but it turns out that that's not true. The first African to set foot on what would become United States soil was a free black man named Juan Garrido. A conquistador, the Spanish name for a conqueror. Rita was born around fourteen eighty in west Africa. As a young man he traveled to Lisbon. Portugal then to Sa- V. Spain when he converted to the Roman Catholic. Church he took a new name Juan Garrido meaning handsome John. He winds up sailing with the Spanish is a free person as A. Door and spends three decades in service to the Spanish crown. In fifteen thirteen garrido participated in Pants Dale Fain expedition in Florida in search of the Fountain of Youth. This is the first record of a black person setting foot in what is now the United States. What does that mean? It means that there was this space people of African descent could occupy. That wasn't exclusively being a person of bondage. RETO. Settled in Mexico where he spent his final years working at a gold mining operation and while he was a freeman, he profited from local slave labor. Garrido died in fifteen fifty almost seventy years before the first enslaved Africans arrived in Jamestown?

Juan Garrido United States Lisbon Portugal Rita Mexico Sa- V. Spain A. Door Fountain Of Youth Dale Fain West Africa Jamestown Florida
Sudan floods: UN calls for urgent funding,asfood insecuritymounts

UN News

05:42 min | Last week

Sudan floods: UN calls for urgent funding,asfood insecuritymounts

"While Sudan has been hit by devastating floods the worst seen in decades impacting more than six hundred, thousand people across seventeen of the country's eighteen states with homes destroyed and farmland damage. Just ahead of the harvest season, he's been another shock amid multiple crises according to the Food and Agriculture Organization FAO urgent funding is needed to support a country already facing alarmingly high rates of hunger and food insecurity. Dominique Bergin FAO's director of emergency resilience has just returned from a mission to sedan. He told Charlotte Lomas how dire the situation really is for people there. They're just returned from Sudan couple of days ago where I wasn't a mission already to the floods which have been affecting the countries over the last couple of these floods are truly devastating down the largest thinking the country in over seventy years who have conducted happy assessments with the me of coacher and found that up to six hundred thousand households have been affected by the impact. Of the floods more than two point, two million actors have been damaged. So it's quite serious but the problem here is that this comes at the top of an already difficult situation for millions of paper as a matter of fact, before these, let's nine point six million people were already in acute food insecurity ready a very difficult situation related to a variety of of issues social economic crying he's covid crises and even know in some part of the country the issues already locust. So quite serious situation that therefore Esguerra, our full attention. You travel to two of the affected sites what were your impressions? So we went to two of the most affected states we undertook mission with government officials as a matter of. Factly culture was with us and we spend today's in blue, Nile State, and in Sennar state, and they're what we could see is the variety of the damaged. We saw the impact on commercial farmers, and with few damage, they will be very little employment opportunities for the people. So one of the things we saw. We saw. Livestock owners, Pasta list being severely affected. By doing of the floods having lost for some of them up to seventy five percent of their livestock, which in turn is a problem for them because this is their main source of livelihood we saw that forty two percent of those affected by by the floods are women and it all sorts. So we went to the field we we spend time with them, and what we saw is that I mean situation is very, very severe. This time of the year they should have sorghum that is one meter and a half I ready to our best. Instead, we could see field full of. wheats with sorghum and that will not be honest. So in talking to these women, we understand they're already struggling. They're adopting what we call negative coping strategies, which means that they are cutting the number of the means to quantity of them is and what we found is that at this point of the ready, they're only having one meal per day and very basic meal. So very T- tuition and therefore these people need our assistance. How will this floods affect food security across the country? The food security situation prior to the floods was already severe nine point six, million people in acute insecurity. Two point two million people in emergency face. When we visited the blue states, what was clear is that we were in a state where twenty seven percent of the population prior to the plots was already in acute with with insecurity. So it is clear that with the impact of the ways, the fact that people not be able to harvest with the fact that they have been losing animals with the fact that prices are extremely volatile and ever tendency to increase significantly. The estimate is that the food security situation will further. And therefore, we need to be ready to provide at scale. Livelihood Saving Assistance. In collaboration, of course, we other agencies what is doing to assist Sadan since the beginning of the year I feel despite the covid situation has been able to provide assistance who about nine, hundred, twenty, thousand people, which is quite significant in this context. Now, what we are doing is that we are appealing for additional resources innovation essentially to the floods, but the flood. Being one more driver of accurate with insecurity. So, what we are doing is essentially appealing for seventy million dollars additional. To basically cover the needs of the people for the coming season in terms of cash assistance for people to meet the most immediate needs press agricultural inputs for the coming season so that immediately they can go back to their productivity. Always bearing in nine FAO wide providing humanitarian livelihood saving activities is very keen to build the zillions of populations which as we know are essential when people face regular shocks.

Livelihood Saving Assistance Dominique Bergin Fao FAO Sudan Food And Agriculture Organizat Sennar Director Charlotte Lomas Sadan
The Reasons Behind Our Faulty Dietary Guidelines

20 Minute Fitness

05:27 min | 2 weeks ago

The Reasons Behind Our Faulty Dietary Guidelines

"Hi, Brian, how's it going good Dylan Grades Swell. Thank you so much for making it onto our show. Absolutely exciting. So can you just tell our listeners late more about your background? Yeah. Well, actually lives nutrition twenty-five day for three years. I've been making a film I'm just all in I just read studies I watched lectures I go to conferences. My whole world is around finding out about health and I'm making film called food lies, which is all about that. It's trying to demystify nutrition nutrition super complicated right everyone has their own idea diet everyone someone who went vegan in loss late and someone did. The. They went carnivore they lost weight and they feel great houses even possible. So my big overarching goal is trying to get the average person to understand nutrition and eating and how to be health. Yeah. So I've been a reading about the documentary lies that you're working on and I think site were saying that you know the documentaries reading intended to cover the history of dietary. Guidelines the epidemic of chronic disease and obesity that followed from that on the new signs actually telling US humans what we should be eating and how to eat that food sustainable. Let let's unpack that actually one by one because I'm curious about what you mean actually when you talk about the history of dietary guidelines. Yeah. Well, there there's a long history there and actually I should say. I've been doing this longer than three years. I just spent three years full-time actually actually have background mechanical engineering and tech, but also had my own sort of health during my family I lost both my parents at eight thirty, thirty one to these chronic diseases from people eating the wrong diet, and this leads into dietary guidelines because we follow the dietary guidelines, our whole life they ate. The Food Pyramid we ate the low fat foods cooked food ourselves. We weren't going out to McDonald's we weren't. You know doing anything crazy. We were we were just making our own food and falling the guidelines and they slowly got just sicker as they aged and we kind of except that, right it's people like Oh. Yeah. It's like the dad body you know yeah, you're supposed to. Get a dad bought as you grow up, wait a second. That's that's not right. Actually you know and look myself in my twenties. I was getting that dad bod I didn't I have great health I was getting sick every once in a while I had just pudgy and now I'm ten years older thirty seven now and I'm in way better health than I was when I was twenty seven and it's because I went away from the dietary guidelines on way from the Food Pyramid and you know as the cliche goes you do the opposite and just to be clear like when when when you say food pyramid, that's something that was introduced by the Food and Drug Administration like what's sixty sixty seventy years ago? Yeah. Whilst Nineteen, seventy, seven, there was the original deter nineteen eighty. I. Think was a even more recent. Yeah. It started. Okay. So I will go into that. The actually history of it started around nineteen, fifty five with President Eisenhower had heart attack right? So this is the time when a lot of people smoking and a lot of these all these new vegetable oils are coming through diet like, Fried, foods and people are moving away from the national foods. You know they cook for themselves. So there's a lot going on in this time and yet he was like, Hey, what's going on why do I have heart disease and he had more heart attacks basic put together. The McGovern. Committee. Also in the in the nineteen sixties and seventies is one is all taking place and there was a guy named Ansel keys that was kind of tasked with figuring out what how does heart disease developed right and he looked any thought it was saturated fat and cholesterol is it that was his hypothesis and he did the famous seven countries study and there's a lot to that story. Some people turn a million times something have never heard of it but he basically looked at all these different countries in he cherry picked seven out of twenty two and showed this correlation where the. More, saturated fat cholesterol, the country eight, the more heart attacks died from and you know it, it's actually wasn't done well it it's correlation science not causation on he also cherry picked it and we look at all the countries he skips there was no direct correlation was all over the place and there was another guy named John Yetkin who had a competing theory that it was the sugar and the refined flour that was causing the problem and he was over in England and looking at all these different societies that just recently changed their diet than started adding a lot more. Sugar and flour and stuff like that, and they were getting sick. So that was his idea but he's won out eventually we came to these dietary guidelines like I said in seventy seven and nineteen eighty was food pyramid. Now it's called my plate, but it's all about the same and is kind of the same around the world and those guidelines to told us to what like eat more grains and less meat dairy or what was it exactly the Food Pyramid people don't even remember the food. The whole base of the Food Pyramid is starches and grains. You know it's like e. Eight to eleven, servings of starches and grains, rice, and Pasta and bread, and all this stuff, and then it was fruits and vegetables in the next level and it was like whatever five to six servings of each and then we finally got to the the highly bioavailable nutrient animal foods up up near the top and in the very top were you know backed sugar and oil I guess we're the very top. So yeah, this is what they put out to the world. They basically put the world's on an experiment unproven low fat diet and they actually said, what's the worst that could happen? The world on the low fat diet and you know how can be bad fat Scott would be bad for you even though we've been eating fat for all of human history

Food And Drug Administration Brian President Eisenhower Dylan United States Mcdonald Ansel Keys Cherry Mcgovern Scott John Yetkin England
Airbus' Ambitious Hydrogen Plans

Aviation Week's Check 6 Podcast

07:18 min | 3 weeks ago

Airbus' Ambitious Hydrogen Plans

"I'm happy to welcome with me on the program senior editor, Guy Norris and tier to our France Bureau chief who as you surely know if you read ideation? Gregory is an expert in aerospace technology subjects to. This week, we are going to talk about three aircraft concepts that Abbas presented for the first time. They are very different from each other in many ways, but they do have one thing in common they are supposed to be powered by hydrogen. And Abbas Vision in the transformation of aviation into a greener more sustainable, future exciting ideas but lots of questions too. So let's take a step back I wonder if I can ask you to just walk us through the plans that Abbas. Presented this week. Sure So basically, there are three concept plaints. At the center of the city they called him supplies because none of them will actually be built but three directions that are going to be studied in depth. One of them is looks like turboprop aircraft to wing configuration. I think the maximum. Capacity would be around one hundred passengers. The other one. Sorry. The first one, I mentioned a because it would burn hydrogen in relatively conventional outside rented conventional. Engine turbines. The second concept plane is also conventional Tuban Wing country duration from be powered by two defense number props to defense money hydrogen. Again, capacity is between one, hundred, twenty, two, hundred passengers, and just like the first concept plane the shooting hydrogen attack is located at the rear of the fuselage and the third concept is definitely the most spectacular. It's a blended wing but. Again powered by defense. So often concepts contemplates both hundred ten. Engines but the big difference, the May feature of the sudden is the blend buddy consideration, which means you can much more optimize hide myrow dynamics, and you can also dispute passengers and fuel tanks. I, know much more efficient way in the in. So. Roughly speaking this, all three concepts that are is. Speaking about so we're we're kind of fifteen years right I mean they're talking about enter enter into service in twenty thirty five but already, they're making some very important technology choices you mentioned liquid hydrogen for instance can just walk Ciragan. You know what are the steps that are coming up in between now and twenty, thirty five so between now one, twenty, thirty, five, the and again, twenty thirty five is the plant date for entry to service our first main Maislin if she wishes twenty twenty-five by then they expect to have majored some technology bricks as they. Call them to choose from and they would launch a program in twenty, twenty, seven or twenty, twenty eight. So that would be a food program for the Industrial Program between or twenty degrees and would would be very, very informative for us to follow is the next five years they plan to do several demonstrations. So they will demonstrate that technology bricks such as hydrogen storage, for example, and one of the most demonstration projects is about hydrogen storage and distribution they were stopped on the ground, but they also plan some instructional on the sorry in the era in. which could be quite a spectacular and they plan quite. Surprised by this, they plan to start with gaseous hydrogen storage demonstration before moving to liquid, and as they seem to have made a choice ready for liquid hydrogen meet surprised by the fact, they are going to also test guess. So Guy. Abbas. Seems to be really enthusiastic about this and it's kind of came out of nowhere but it came a bit of as a surprise to me. That's enthusiasm isn't really shared by everyone in an industry particularly in the engine industry they're still seem to be quite some serious reservations about this. So can you tell us what what what you're hearing? Yeah Hi there. It's basically a very is a very interesting time because, of course, the engine manufacturers like the fray manufactures they're all facing this kind of cliff of how do we meet the sustainability targets in really thirty years seems like a long time but but in the aerospace business, it's really not They've got. So they've they've been approaching this idea of whether to adopt the new transformational approach. Mostly based on alternative fuels, which would be dropping into the existing kind of infrastructure, the existing propulsion designs and the existing tube and wing configurations that the framers of loved and developed and perfected for the past fifty years all nor so you can imagine that there is a bit of a shock going on here to how do we suddenly move all of that towards a hydrogen based ecosystem. Of course, the other thing is that they've saying, well, you know we have been that before we've studied this, we started in the nineteen fifties, for example, more based for military type applications again, in the seventy s during the fuel crisis when they the first global fuel crisis and again in the nineties when there was the first glimmers of the emerging environmental issues this time of course, it's different as you both said, you know the there is a driving force has never been there before, and of course, the the French government tying the. Incentive. Package really to sustainability is the big decision making sort of driver on this. So you know the fact that. There's much more urgent need now is is changing the game, but doesn't change the fact that there is seventy years of history of safety and certification and development behind a no operational cycle around kerosene people know how to handle it. They know how to certify it, and this is a whole new ballgame. So why would you know bus get buy in from the other industry participants if that wasn't possible for one reason or another over the past? Several decades well I mean one of the thunder, the reasons that time does move on and technology has improved. They're all ways of coping now as a couple of ways to look at it. One is from a big picture perspective. The big challenge that a lot of them see both in and out of aerospace is the fact that they feed stalking. The actual production of hydrogen has to be done in a sustainable way to make this entire equation balance

Abbas Tuban Wing Senior Editor Guy Norris France Bureau Gregory Ciragan Stalking
Senator Chris Murphy On The Violence Inside Us

Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

04:25 min | Last month

Senator Chris Murphy On The Violence Inside Us

"Thank you so much for joining us. You start out your book by talking about a fistfight that you got into in first grade and I think one of the most striking things you write about that you felt like you were just hardwired to fight. Can you tell me and my listeners that story and what you meant by that? You know this is the introduction by the way. Let's the thanks for having me on. Again this is a topic that both you and I are obviously deeply committed to in this book is really about my study of the issue gun over the last seventy. Years Changed in twenty twelve of the shooting in Connecticut and I think what I wanted to communicate at the beginning of this book is a recognition that there is violence that sits inside all of us that as a species, we are hardwired for violence and well, ninety nine point, nine percent of Americans had never taken a life very few of us have never had a moment in which we didn't at least contemplate putting our hands on someone else. That's because our species is actually more violent, much more violent historically then almost any other and so it's important for us to recognize that so. That we can make changes in the way that we associate with ourselves, the rules that govern us to try to tamp down that instinct, and that's what this book is really about it's about the long human has Rian violence and how we've been pretty effective in controlling it but then America's unique history of violence and how we've been very ineffective in this country at controlling it. It's interesting because you say that we're hardwired for violence and it makes me think of fight flight or freeze, which is our natural response to any kind of danger that response to sits at the bottom of our. Brain stem, which is like the most primitive part of our entire body. It has not evolved at all, and so that is there for survival mechanisms. Right is there for survival mechanisms, but our body has actually sent a message that it doesn't like to use that mechanism. So this stories in the book as well when you experience that fight or flight moment, right when you're presented with such a danger that you either run or you fight back, your body releases a hormone cortisol, and at the moment that hormone is really helpful because it helps you make quick decisions and it gives you a little. Bit more courage and strength. But in the long run cortisol breaks your brain, it breaks your brain and so if you have these fighter flight moments every day or every week, then you literally can't learn you can't relate to other human beings and so why we call the epidemic of violence in this nation of public health epidemic is because kids who live in violent neighborhoods fear for their life every time they walk to the Corner Bodega or their school in the morning, their brains are broken by this hormone that gets released over and over and over again, and so it's no coincidence that. The underperforming schools are all in the highly neighborhoods, kids whether their shot at or not. They simply are different or bodies respond differently because of this constant exposure trauma, and then you add just food vulnerability and how hard it is to find fresh produce and all of those things that helped to restore the brain, restore the body, and then it becomes a whole other issue nourishment makes it very difficult for a child to learn and for a brain to grow. I. Want to ask you how do you think violence in America is different than violence in the rest of the world the first part Of this book is really a story of the trajectory of American violence and what's interesting is that America is actually not a wildly violent place until about the middle of the eighteen hundreds and three things happen there that separate us from the rest of the world and we never returned back to Earth we became a more violent nation and we still are more validation and quickly the three things are in their interesting I. It's the expansion of the slave population in the south. After the invention of the cotton gin more slaves means more violence in the country kind of becomes anesthetize to violence. Numb to it because it's what is necessary in order to just keep our economy together second, you've got all these waves of immigrants coming to the United States in what history tells us is that the more groups in one space at one time the more risk there is for conflicts and violence but then lastly, it's the invention of handgun and the decision of the United States to not regulate that weapon it gets sold in every corner of the United States and all of a sudden common arguments on the street become deadly because you've got this little weapon that you can hide in your pocket.

America Cortisol United States Rian Connecticut Corner Bodega
Carnivore Diet Myths Debunked

Ben Greenfield Fitness

07:17 min | 2 months ago

Carnivore Diet Myths Debunked

"Is up guys welcome to this solo cast episode think you'd have been Greenfield for the questions which I will be answering in Solo casts episode. As many of you may know I've written the book, the Cardboard Code Rushing the video. You can see there behind me, this podcast will be released the first week of August twenty twenty one the second edition of my book is now live. So if you enjoy information check out the book dot, Carnivore Code Dot Com if you guys are new to this you. Haven't heard me talk to Ben. About the Carnivore Diet to previous podcasts on the Carnivore Diet you may WanNa check out in addition to this. So I was on Ben's podcast in March of Twenty nineteen and then last year or earlier this year when the first edition of the came out, I did the first solo cast on Ben's episode on Ben's show in which I answered some reader questions, not the Carnivore Code and after Ben read the book, He me a list of questions that he had about. The were code and that is what I will be diving into more specifically today on this solo casts episode. As many of you know Ben is a student of this stuff about chemistry. So some of these questions are pretty detailed try and break them down as clearly as I can. There's a lot of good nuance here that I think bring guys a lot of value. If you are more interested in ain't virata your Ordina, I'll give you three minutes summary Now for dive into some of these finer points the. Carnivore Diet is is an idea of an animal based I in contradistinction to plant based sides of today, the feces that I advance in my book the Carnivore Code are twofold in broad terms. The first is the animal foods specifically red meat and ruminant animals have been incorrectly vilified the last seventy years mostly at the by the result or as a result of incorrectly done science based on observational epidemiology. We have answer keys to thank for that. In many ways I've done a great podcast on my show with Natasha. Wrote Big Fat surprise in which we breakdown many of the myths surrounding saturated fat. So I probably will not get into saturated fat in this episode today. But if you want to know why we have such a bad misunderstanding, saturated fat listened to that episode on my podcast, we go into the details of saturated fat why it's actually very healthy for humans approach to get into it a little bit. Today with steering acid later but that is a big big misconception. There are many other misconceptions regarding read me that will cause cancer that will cause heart disease that it was shorten your life. Some of those will address today they are all addressed in my book, but they are all false none of them are supported by real interventional science actual experiments. They are false claims made based on observation deeming allergy. That has been widely misinterpreted and is inherently flawed Ben and I have talked about this in the past on previous shows. So referred of those. So the first of the book, a Carnivore Co is that Red Meat Animal Foods knows detail organ meets, which I want to talk about a lot today are critically important in the human diet. The part of every humans diet if we wish to be healthy and optimal and they should not be shunned based on incorrect science embrace the red meat especially. And know that you need those meeting Oregon's in order to thrive Ben I know is becoming more and more a fan of organ meats. He many nose to tail meals in the past together with the great. Great. Enjoyment in there are many amazing stories of that and let him tell you at some point in the future. The second thesis of the book is the plant foods exist on a toxin spectrum plants are rooted in the ground. They have no defenses other than the toxins they have evolved. This is not really conjecture botanical science. In the Condor Code I discussed multiple studies showing there are thousands and thousands of plant toxins that are present in plants and these can be harming. It's my golden writing. This book is not commit everyone to stop eating all plants. It's to empower you to realize to fold as saying here now that red meat and animal foods are the most nutritious foods on the planet that I mean containing the most bioavailable sources of all the nutrients humans need to thrive and number two that if you're not kicking as much fun as you want, you may be you may be well served by considering the plan foods you're eating on A. Spectrum which also outlined in the book and eliminating the plants that are most toxic that may be harming you in a variety of ways plans make defense chemicals. This is undeniable and again again all out in the book, it's a very comprehensive book over six hundred fifty references, and that is a broad strokes outlook on the way that I think humans really should be eating the first part. Of the book is about evolution we talk about the human brain is talking about the human brain in book at that point, and I talk about how it's gotten very big very quickly over the last two, million years primarily as a result of humans eating meat hunting I'm going to answer some questions been had in regard to this that in this podcast in secondarily I, talk about the fact. that. When we began agriculture are health when south very quickly and there's very good evidence that this is the really the massive change in the nutritional density of our foods accompanied that as we were hunting less and I will talk about that specifically in this podcast because Ben asked a question about that second part of the book is mostly about plant toxins I breakdown individual types of land toxins. I about polyphenyls why I think we've got this all wrong Benon I may respectfully disagree here but I I do make out what I believe is a very strong case for the book and I would love more discussion with this in the future I talk about oxalate electons solicits and I talk about all kinds of things like that. That are harming US isothiocyanates, which I will talk about today. which are things like fourteen in goal trian. and. How these plant compounds can affect for Mona balance that can affect nutrient absorption. They can affect our gut and really wreak havoc in lot of us if we are not aware of how present in our diet they are, how we might detoxify them in house. Some of US might be more specifically sensitive to them than and they can be causing us great harm and suffering the third part of the book is about to bunking. MITTS in the book. I. Talk About. I. Bunk. With me at that assurance, your life that causes cancer that causes heart disease and that you need fiber to poops all that is in the book I won't get into all of that today I could never do that would be a six hour podcast restaurants in there and in the fourth and final part of the book I outline very clear perspective very clear a model for how to eat a diet outlined five tiers. Of the Carnivore Diet, which gives the reader a sense of how to do this that works best for you and they some of them include plants a tier one for Diet includes plants I call it carnivore ish, but it gives you a toxicology spectrum and the foods that I believe are least toxic are included. They are able to be included on a carnivore ish type diet. Ben Himself has often said that he's eating carnivores. Words in his mouth I think that he would agree with this that he's thinking about making the majority of his Diet Animal Foods and organ meats, and then eating the foods, the plant foods that agree with him the most and thinking about the toxicity spectrum of those plants.

Ben Himself Red Meat Animal Foods United States Cancer Heart Disease Greenfield Oregon A. Spectrum Natasha
And They Will Inherit It

Latino USA

03:31 min | 2 months ago

And They Will Inherit It

"The film, salt of the Earth was made only a year or so after the strike and released in one, thousand, nine, hundred, eighty, four, it tells the story of our group of Mexican American miners to Ghana. Powerful mining company to demand their rights their fifteen month long strike includes some unexpected heroes and we'll explain that soon. But I you need to understand how radical the film was for the Nineteen Fifties. Politicians at the time were determined to root out secret communists from Hollywood. There were even public interrogation of filmmakers. Are you now have you ever been a member of the? Communist Party, this is audio of the interrogation of filmmaker Herbert Bieber Bearman in front of the House UNAMERICAN activities committee. To use this to. The motion, picture industry and. The Right? Not only be be Berman ended up serving time in prison and was blacklisted in Hollywood because of his suspected communist sympathies, and then he made salt of the Earth along with two other men who also been blacklisted. It seems pretty clear that salt of the Earth was an act of defiance. The government had sanctioned the filmmakers for his sympathies. So they made a movie that was unapologetically leftist. In one thousand, nine, hundred, fifty, four, the film was so controversial, only a few theaters across the US would show it. Salt of the Earth was essentially buried from public sight for decades. But in one thousand, nine, hundred seventies, she gano and feminist movements embraced the Phil. They saw it as an example of what social justice movements could actually look like. In two, thousand, eighteen producer. Traveled to Grant County New Mexico to uncover the story of what would come to be called the Empire Zinc strike. He wanted to find out how is sleepy mining town erupted into protest, and if almost seventy years later, anyone still remembers Sayer give them is going to take it from here. Before I tell you about what things are like in county. Now, I'm GonNa, tell you the story about how things were and we're going to start with our to Florida's. He was an important figure in the empire's ING strikes. Please come in. Thank you. My Dad Arthur. Florida's one hundred years old. One of the first. President Sir Locally. Local. Late Ninety is the name of the miners union in Grant County. By the way, we're going to hear about it a lot and our to Florida's was a union leader there in the nineteen fifties. Here, it's OK. Okay. I ever I have no problem with talking. Hundred. Be. Dumb. You're doing just fine. Sits in a wheelchair. His thin silver hair is neatly combed. His son. Larry leaves out a set of old photographs on the table. Here's head. Here's some of the actors from the movie, Clint Man Walking Out of the Union Hall Women Flannels and big brimmed hats smiling triumphantly at the camera. There's two is a full head of thick black hair. The photo is labeled local eight, Ninety Activists Nineteen fifty-three.

Florida Hollywood Sayer Ghana Communist Party Herbert Bieber Bearman Grant County New Mexico Miners Union Berman Grant County Union Hall Women Flannels United States Gano Clint Man Larry Producer Arthur President Trump
Science News Briefs from Around the Planet

60-Second Science

02:02 min | 3 months ago

Science News Briefs from Around the Planet

"Hi. I'm scientific. American Assistant News. Editor Sarah Lou in Frazier and here's a short piece from July twenty twenty issue of the magazine in the section called advances dispatches from the frontiers of science, technology and medicine. The article is titled Quick Hits In it's a rundown of some non corona virus stories from around the globe. From, Turks and Caicos Islands analysis of Ano- lizards collected before and after hurricanes, Irma and Maria in twenty seventeen and eighteen months later revealed that the surviving lizards and their descendants had larger and therefore grippier Topaz. The team examined Lizard photographs from natural history collections and seventy years of hurricane data to confirm the trend. From Italy sediment samples drawn from the tree and see revealed hotspots with up to one point nine million micro plastic particles per square meter, the highest concentration ever recorded on the sea floor. Most of pollution comes from wastewater and sewage systems. Researchers say. From Antarctica, paleontologists found a fossilized forty million year old frog on Seymour. Near the tip of the peninsula, The FROG is related to modern ones living in temperate humid conditions in the Chilean Andes. From Iraq researchers probing the Turkish State Archives found the earliest known record of a meteorite causing a death. The object struck a hilltop in neighboring Iraq in eighteen, eighty, eight, killing one man and paralyzing another. From Japan results gathered from the KAMIOKA. Observatory which includes an underground detector tank filled with fifty five thousand tons of water, suggested intriguing discrepancy in how neutrinos, an anti neutrinos oscillate potentially violating symmetry between matter and antimatter. From Kenya scientists identified a malaria blocking microbe in mosquitoes on the shores of Lake Victoria. Every mosquito catalog with this apparently benign fungus was free of the disease, carrying parasite and experiments showed the fungus prevented its transmission. That was quick hits. I'm Sarah Lou Frazier.

Sarah Lou Frazier Iraq Sarah Lou Chilean Andes Caicos Islands Editor Antarctica Turkish State Archives Kamioka Malaria Kenya Japan Turks Italy Lake Victoria Irma Maria
Amtraks Sale on Sleeper Cars: COVID-19 Travel Solution?

Business Wars Daily

03:07 min | 3 months ago

Amtraks Sale on Sleeper Cars: COVID-19 Travel Solution?

"I love traveling by train. The sounds the scenery long distance train travel is almost undeniably romantic and yet. I almost always opt for airplanes in normal times. Train travel is just too time consuming for me and most average travelers, but of course we're not in normal times, and that's giving Amtrak and advantage over plane travel that it hasn't had in more than seventy years so rights Robert Clara and editor at Ad Week Clara unearthed a seventy four year old report produced by the Association of American railroads in a desperate bid to compete with convenience of flying. The report touted the solitude and comfort of the sleeping car over time of course that promotion failed. Until perhaps now once again in a new century for a new reason, Amtrak is making that same argument last week Amtrak, a two for one promotion, for its Roumat's tiny private compartments whose seats convert to upper and lower sleeping berths at night. Buy One ticket for a trip down the east coast or from Chicago to Los. Angeles and your companion can share your cozy for by seven foot space for free. Not Surprisingly Amtrak is promoting the affordable room at a great solution to cabin fever by staying isolated in your tiny train compartment. You can see the country without being pressed up against the flying masses. The ticket price includes linens, towels and meals which you can eat in the dining car. For! True social distancing have them delivered to your room at ticket. Holders can venture out into a big window observation lounge lounges at train stations, but must wear masks, and naturally Amtrak has stepped up its sanitizing procedures to tickets are available on many different lines like the California Zephyr which travels from the West Coast through the rocky mountains on its way to Chicago or take a different route out of Chicago, and travelled through Memphis on the way to the big easy on the city of New Orleans line. Comes no surprise that airlines are suffering because of covid nineteen with most people staying home, so to is Amtrak. The organization received a Billion Dollars of federal cares act funding to keep employees on the payroll through the end of September according to USA Today but on July Sixth Amtrak reduced the frequency of many lines and last month it warned employees of more doom and. And Gloom in October, it plans to cut service even more and Shrink the workforce by twenty percent. The company says it will cut staff through voluntary buyouts, early retirements and layoffs, if necessary. According to USA Today more than thirty, two million passengers climbed aboard an Amtrak Train and twenty nineteen, the paper reported, but Amtrak predicts it'll have half that ridership in twenty twenty one. Trying to boost sales, Amtrak is also cut many other ticket prices to the bone including tickets for the a Selah, it's fastest train on the ACELA. It'll cost you only sixty to seventy bucks to speed from Boston to new. York to Washington DC less than half the usual prize that deals good through the middle of September, according to ask traveler.

Amtrak Chicago Usa Today Robert Clara Boston New Orleans Angeles Editor West Coast Association Of American Memphis Washington York California LOS
GANs Can Be Interpretable

Data Skeptic

06:17 min | 3 months ago

GANs Can Be Interpretable

"My name is Eric Cadigan a master student at Visual Computing Group in Aalto University in Finland, and I recently did an internship with adobe research, and this papers also in collaboration with them very neat wire to begin with. Tell me a little bit about your graduate studies. What types of problems are you interested in rats I've been involved in computer. Graphics Allot so physically. Physically based rendering recently during my internship I also started working with generative model so I'm still a masterson finishing up my studies so i. don't have a vast experience in the field, but I'm getting started on this really interesting problem so eager to work on this in the future, one of the drawbacks to this being an audio podcast is that people can't enjoy. Enjoy some of the amazing visual aspects of your work. I will be sure to include a link to to the youtube videos in the show notes for this, but for those you, maybe the the visually impaired. Can you give us a quick description of what are some of the in my own opinion, rather stunning effects, you can produce with the research you've been doing. Doing right so generative adversarial network organs in general, they've really skyrocketed in image quality, so we can generate human faces are other photos of landscapes are objects that can look almost photo realistic. It might be hard to realize that they're actually generated by a computer, but it's hard to control. These models with our method were really giving the controls to the user to. To like change the identity of the post and the expression of human face, or the apparent gender or the hairstyle, or maybe move around car, rotate a car in a C- In our move a dog around make it bigger smaller change background on the clouds in the sky, and so on one of the first exposures I had to. These ideas was when Google released. Released deep dream which I. Guess is sort of primitive here. It's some of the earliest work that lead in directions like this, even though I'm not sure if they use Ganz or not, that was not gambling. Their results were always kind of trippy like maybe they'd be good for a music video or something seems like the results were seeing now the state of Of the art are much more photo realistic. Are you aware our car companies using some of these technologies or anything like that that you've heard of or do you think we're not close enough for that? Maybe I think for car commercials specifically. We're not quite yet there. Because the image quality expected in a commercially super super high, but I think for some of these. These more creative fields, where for example, if you're designing clothes or shoes or artwork digital artwork, it might make sense to kind of prototype and look at new possible products are paintings or stuff like that image quality is really improving steadily steel so one day I can see against being used in stock, photography and stuff like that, and maybe even in commercials i. I know you've looked at a lot of these. You've produce them, so maybe we can assume your eye is better trained than the public. Do you think you have a talent for spotting gins or spotting the output of I guess? I should say there's a few giveaways usually. If you're looking at for example face, the background is often not quite consistent or realistic might. Might be too simple or there might be patterns that Don look quite right and I think in general practitioners in the field know how to spot some of these typical features or artifacts, but I really think a few years down the line. It's not gonna be possible anymore, so most of my experience playing around with these myself somewhat limited certainly compared to your. Your experience, but it's that the again I might want use I've trained it up or I've acquired it from somewhere. Maybe extended it and I want to transform images. It's kind of a throw of the dice for me. You know I can tweak some things randomly, just kind of guessing and flipping weights here and there and I'll get some interesting results, but I feel. Feel like I'm the dark and I'm blind. Just reaching around has that historically been what style transfer and techniques that have been like before? Some of the research you've been involved in was getting, too. I would say hey. There's been a few different approaches to controlling generative adversarial networks, so one approach might be just label a bunch of your training data that you. You feed to the model during the trading face. You're looking at training data, and you're finding some attributes that you consider to be important, and then you label your date until the model. Hey, police, learn these things because this is what I consider to be important, and recently some research has shown that even just labeling one percent of your trading day might be enough. Enough to get a muddle where you can change some aspect in a meaningful way, but you still have to retrain your model, which is a very custody thing to do, and also just it's very time consuming manual label the data also, you're kind of limited by what you expect. Your data said to contain if you have some abstract data set where you're not. Not Quite sure what the important directions of change our it might be hard to label, and then the second approach would be detained pre-trade generator, and then just hope that he tasks learned something interesting, and then you have a hypothesis that maybe has learned about the post of the head or something like that, and then you can verify this by generating a bunch of. Of Images and then labeling them and try to identify a direction in the input space that this effect, but again you're kind of limited by your own imagination on what you can come up with, and you could even use an existing attribute detector that knows how to identify the gender expression face, but you're relying on something that someone has made before you so. Really just is more exploratory and we ask the model to show us what he has learnt. So we the other way around instead of verifying policies, we add the model to show us. The largest are the most important directions of change, and then from these we can extract controls, so that's really the difference, or we're not looking for anything in particular we're. We're just asking the model to show us what there is, and it turns out that there's lots of interesting sliders to find in this space. Yeah, it's break into those sliders. A little bits I before reading. The paper didn't necessarily have a bias either way. It could have been in my mind that the ways in which the model learn things were exotic. I've done some principal components analysis in my past and similar to like burt vectors or any other embedding. They're just numbers that happened to work really well. I can't explain why it's thirty seven minus seventy year. Whatever these numbers are so I wasn't sure what again was gonNA. Give us in that way. What did you guys find? Are they're kind of human interpreted parameters in there? Yes, so in general PCA, orders the components at fines orders them by the various that they explain so if there's some aspect, the various a lot in the generated images that's going to be explained by the first few principal components, and in general, we find interesting behavior where the principal. Principal components have a style content separation in data sets. Where if we have a data set to where there's a lot of geometric change that change is going to be captured by the first few components, and then the components after that because they're orthogonal, they're going to contain that information, and then instead they're gonNA explain some other variants, so the first few components are really quite geometrics. Head might be rotating. The dog might be moving left to right or up and down or zooming. Then the later components might explain more style properties of the image, so you might get different color, slight morphing of the geometry, but nothing major us in the first few components.

Principal Youtube Aalto University Finland Masterson Eric Cadigan Adobe Google Visual Computing Group Ganz DON
Andr Leon Talley on 'The Chiffon Trenches'

The Book Review

03:20 min | 4 months ago

Andr Leon Talley on 'The Chiffon Trenches'

"When I wrote this I my first book was basically a Beautiful Ahmad to those two ladies, and then I, did cover some of the things about upgrade my background, but I do not go into the depths of what I have gone into this you find trenches initial find trenches in his epistle of love to the important narrative of my life getting. Under upbringing North Carolina all the way to twenty twenty. I go to the decades of when I was at the top of my career vote. In sitting in the front row in. Daily experiencing racism, sexism ageism, all of that and I decided to I had to be very very raw, an honest within a degree, and I told the truth about many things that I never spoken before one being my sexual abuse in childhood. Then I told things that had never been told before about how I experienced racism in the world of fashion. As the there are two different books. occas of sort of a a jewel of book and I'm very proud that I is well because. Of How these two women shaped my life, and became very important factors in my life how they overlaps, it's women, one of African American domestic made for fifty years of her life at Duke University, the other woman a mentor. Editor. Chief evoke in the sixties, and then she went onto the museum. The Metropolitan. When she created the modern fashion exhibit is thanks to her that people now have major fashion exhibits in museums globally. There's not one that has not been influenced by the work of the. So, is there a point in that seventeen year interim between these two books where you thought to yourself, you know I've left something out, or I need to go back and tell a fuller story now. That was never a point like I always just say I had an uncle, said just keep getting up everyday. Just keep getting so I never thought about it in seventy years. I've gotTA write my second memoir. My Document Jerry came out in twenty eighteen the Gospel according to Andrei benefits by the second memoir, because the response of people the outpouring of love. From that documentary was so beautiful. The response I got from People Street. Some people would see the film in the audiences. Remarkable so wonderful, and he gave me the confidence to write the Second Watch. The second while was born from the document. Jerry and I saw the duck return. I loved it by the way I loved what Kate Novak did what we did as collaborators, and then I decided well I. Think I. should not my memoir a second I only. But it never headed for seventeen years I left out. I never thought that I was GONNA. Write another one. My agent David Vigilante took me around, and it'd be had meetings with different companies, different companies, and we got to Pat Buchanan at Random House, and that was one on Friday and Saturday what he called me and he said. Random House is ready to preempt all offers an idea and said well I'm GonNa do it I did it and I have never looked back

David Vigilante Jerry Random House North Carolina Duke University Kate Novak Editor
Houston - Harris County Sheriff's Office deputy dies from COVID-19

Coast to Coast AM with George Noory

00:37 sec | 4 months ago

Houston - Harris County Sheriff's Office deputy dies from COVID-19

"Harris County sheriff's department says they have lost another deputy to corona virus seventy year old deputy Juan Menchaca died this weekend after contracting the virus several weeks ago to lose another one of our brothers is just heartbreaking for our whole family every day our folks are showing up for work knowing that they're doing so in the midst of a pandemic and and the they're putting themselves in jeopardy there's got a share of department spokesman Jason Spencer says been Chagas the second deputy to die from corona virus deputy I'm in shock leaves behind a wife and seven

Juan Menchaca Jason Spencer Harris County
NASCAR allows limited audience for first time since coronavirus, Confederate flag ban

World News Tonight with David Muir

02:36 min | 4 months ago

NASCAR allows limited audience for first time since coronavirus, Confederate flag ban

"A historic milestone for sports in America Nascar drivers on the track today, a small number of fans back in the stands for the first time since the corona virus outbreak, and now the band confederate flag not allowed anywhere in sight. ABC's Victor Oquendo is in Florida. Green. Card going full throttle. Spree quality, welcoming back a select group of fans, but not the confederate flag that company has done more in one week for racial equality than it had done in the past seventy years. Pass cars overcome covid. Nineteen fans are back at the track for the first time today. And battling social and racial injustice with a car, bearing the black lives matter Hashtag Bubba Wallace the circuits, only fulltime black driver, leading the charge for change. This is about our brothers, and our sisters that are that are are suffering through a lot and. You look at. The confederate flag and and how yes may mean heritage to most but to a group that is in a lot of pain right now. The community is in a lot of pain. That's a symbol of hate. It's an a veteran in attendance welcoming the new era. I'm happy that. THAT NASCAR has finally realized that there are so many other people that probably Wanna come to track, but they didn't feel comfortable, and hopefully now they will talk to your drivers like Jimmy, Johnson and Kyle Busch, taking their own action, cutting ties with the helmet designer over tweets about the confederate flag, but not all drivers are united one threatening to quit after the flag band, one thousand members of the military invited to the Dixie vodka four hundred everyone's screen before entry masks were required. Fans spread out NFL pro bowl running back. Alvin Kamara there to going to homes in Miami speedway. FIRST NASCAR race rooting for bubble wallace tonight, president trump saying he won't be watching football if players Neil during the anthem responding to a tweet about the US national soccer team, not being required to stand for the anthem. Saying looks like the NFL is heading in that direction also, but not with me watching. Okay victory. Kendall joins us now from home, said in Miami Dade County at the speedway there and Victor I wanna go back to NASCAR. What will car do with fans trying to defy the confederate flag ban? Tom Nascar is finalising protocol to enforce this new policy, but the bottom line is the confederate flag is banned from all races. It's banned from all events the next race next week at Talladega where up to five thousand five fans are expected,

Nascar NFL Tom Nascar Bubba Wallace Victor Oquendo Miami Dade County ABC America Alvin Kamara Talladega Donald Trump Florida Kendall Kyle Busch Miami United States Soccer President Trump
Houston - Second Harris County deputy dies from COVID-19

Coast to Coast AM with George Noory

00:35 sec | 4 months ago

Houston - Second Harris County deputy dies from COVID-19

"Seventy year old Harris County deputy one admin Chaka had been hospitalized for several weeks after contracting covert nineteen he's finally passed away from the disease when talk was a fourteen year veteran of the Harris County sheriff's office and was most recently assigned to the court's division sports division he began his law enforcement career with with the the Nacogdoches Nacogdoches police police department department and and did did serve serve eighteen eighteen years years as as a a parole parole officer officer deputy deputy even even Chaka Chaka and and his his wife wife had had seven seven children children he's he's the the second second sheriff's sheriff's office office employee employee to to die die after after contracting contracting the the corona corona virus virus funeral funeral arrangements arrangements for for deputy deputy man man chalk chalk are are pending pending

Chaka Chaka Harris County Nacogdoches Nacogdoches Officer
Queen Elizabeth's birthday marked with smaller ceremony

AP News Radio

00:48 sec | 4 months ago

Queen Elizabeth's birthday marked with smaller ceremony

"Queen Elizabeth the second's birthday has been marked with a smaller ceremony than usual as the annual trooping the colour parade was canceled amid the corona virus pandemic the ex dividend display of pomp and pageantry a highlight of the royal calendar that typically attracts thousands of tourists to line the streets of central London has only been counseled once before June almost seventy years of the queen's reign that was in nineteen fifty five during a national rail strike this year a small number of soldiers and military musicians paid tribute to the monarch at Vincent costume the queen received awards which was followed by military drills soldiers marching across the grounds in accordance with social distancing rules very

Queen Elizabeth London Vincent
"seventy year" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

Newsradio 700 WLW

01:39 min | 1 year ago

"seventy year" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

"A seventy seventy year old woman is dead after being hit by a car in SIMS township the incident took place around eight AM on Tuesday on Humphry road. When Mary Lodhi was crossing the street in a crosswalk and was hit by a car. Police at the driver of the car failed to see her and hit her. She was taken to UC medical center where she was pronounced dead. The driver was not injured in the crash alcohol drugs and speed were not a factor in the crash to more people have been arrested after a mob like fight involving more than one hundred teenagers broke out Saturday night at a melt healthy strip mall, the massive brawl escalated, Saturday night at hilltop plaza shopping center on Hamilton avenue. According to the incident report, hundreds of people mostly juvenile's were involved in a massive altercation. Police may two additional arrest Tuesday night in charge them with operating teen. Club without a license radio. Seven hundred wwl dummy. Sports in college basketball, news UCLA officially introducing Mick Cronin. As the Bruins new head basketball coach today in Los Angeles. I can't wait to meet gentlemen, like Jamaal Wilkes cream of Jabbar alone. There's too many people to name what opportunity for me to get the no these people convey, my message to them ways. They could help reds update game. Two of the Marlins read series tonight at great American ballpark. Trevor Richards will go up against Tyler Molly seven hundred wwl obvious. Coverage begins at five forty with a salvage store. USA inside pitch. Kelsey Chevrolet extra show after the game. Bill Denison, seven WW sports. Our next update is at five thirty. I'm India Jones, NewsRadio seven hundred wwl w seventy.

Jabbar Mary Lodhi Jamaal Wilkes cream hilltop plaza Kelsey Chevrolet UC medical center Bill Denison Mick Cronin Trevor Richards basketball UCLA Los Angeles India Jones Tyler Molly Bruins USA seventy seventy year
"seventy year" Discussed on Rich Dad Radio Show

Rich Dad Radio Show

01:40 min | 1 year ago

"seventy year" Discussed on Rich Dad Radio Show

"That is the worst financial advice possible. Yet ninety six percent of the people believe that that information. This is a seventy year secular bull market that might be coming to an end, and how long will the secular bear market last? We don't know. But for those that are prepared for it is going to be the best time to ever had to get rich as like WalMart selling cucumbers for. Ten cents a pound or steak for ten one dollar a pound. It's going to be the best time. But if you're an edit and went to school in believing saving money, you could be in the big, mama trouble. So anyway, final words Kim. I just want to thank our guest, Michael Pinto. We're going to have him back because he did make my head spin. And he left me with a lot of questions, and I'm going to start. There's things I want to start really paying attention to that. I wasn't paying attention to before. And I think that's one of the beauties of having guests like Michael on because he gets me thinking, and then it's time for me to get to work and figure out what the heck he just said. Well, the last thing is that you know, you can go to a coin dealer right now you can buy a dime that used to cost me ten cents back in nineteen sixty four today that ten cent dime caused me two dollars. So that should tell us all your savers out there getting screwed. So somebody tells you save money and invest long-term of the stock market that could be the worst possible financial advice possible yet if you don't know any better, it might be the best thing you can do. So that once again, thank you for listening to a rich, dad radio. Once again, you can submit your questions so ask Robert at rich, dad radio dot com, and I think Michael Pinto president founder of pencil portfolio, strat strategies. Thank you. Listen to the program.

Michael Pinto WalMart Kim Robert president founder ninety six percent ten one dollar seventy year two dollars
"seventy year" Discussed on 10 10 WINS

10 10 WINS

01:37 min | 2 years ago

"seventy year" Discussed on 10 10 WINS

"Driver was a seventy year old woman who lost control. She was trying to make a left hand turn onto seventy Seventy-nine a dangerous place. According to this guy. This is the third accident. I know of very short period of time is a dangerous intersection. They've got to do something about it. The driver got out of her SUV and stayed on the scene. Police have not filed any charges as they continue. The investigation wins. News time eleven thirty one from the ramtruck traffic center theories Brian Britain, John Lewis over to Staten Island and got a really rough ride on the westbound expressway. Here looks like Highland boulevard straight out to four forty. You are loaded up. And then folks realizing the bay bridge is closed. That's why it is a very busy ride on his closed all weekend reopen tomorrow Sunday at about three in the afternoon. The gospels the bridge there. Okay. Wants to get there. It is. Here's what you need to know about the bridges and tunnels, and that sort of the theme bridges themselves tunnels themselves. They look, okay. You just gotta get there. Looking at the Lincoln tunnel right now. Route three loads up back through Seacaucus getting out of four hundred five through the construction zone. Same Beal back onto the turnpike eastern spur, you creep and crawl Holland tunnel. You're fine into the tunnel itself. Coming off the turnpike one and nine about a fifteen minute delay. And then there is the GW bridge bridge that is a mess on the upper level. We have a crash taking up the center lane onto the apartments. You've got at least a forty forty five minute upper level delay thirty on the lower deck outbound. There's nothing really going on. But you're hammered westbound cross Bronx back to the Bruckner the Degan loads up one big long line of cars from the get this RFK triborough bridge all the way up to the cross Bronx one fifty s loaded on the east side of town as well. And then while we're staying in the Bronx. Let's go to the Bronx to Westchester the Bruckner north from essentially interchange to.

Bronx Holland tunnel GW bridge bridge bay bridge RFK triborough bridge Lincoln tunnel John Lewis Bruckner Staten Island ramtruck Seacaucus Brian Britain Westchester forty forty five minute fifteen minute seventy year
"seventy year" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

KLBJ 590AM

01:55 min | 2 years ago

"seventy year" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

"And thirty three percent for each of the following two years is a healthy seventy year old the salesman recommended that i ended what is your opinion of long term care policies that's a really important question interest meant a lot of talk in the financial press a lot of companies that got into the long term care policy business discovered that they made a mistake that they underpriced the cost of the claims because they didn't know how many people were going to use it they didn't know how long they were going to use it and they didn't know what the inflationary costs were going to be and some pretty big insurance companies had completely gotten out of the business and i noticed recently mass mutual said we'll stay with seventy seven policy owner seventy seven thousand policy owners we have we're not gonna take anymore and prices are going to go up i would tell you that i'm very skeptical that even after the two years given what i've read that they can stick with that because they're not in business to lose money and the cost of long term there's going up because of the demographics of the country more and more people getting older and older and putting more demands on the system if you are healthy and you have what you believe to be adequate savings along with social security pension or whatever i'm probably with the salesman who recommended that you end it frankly impressed with salesman because she or he would probably get some additional economic benefit by you staying in it and they're recommending you ended so without knowing a lot more about your situation in my opinion i tend to agree with the salesman i'd be inclined to stop doing it it's about time for us to take a break we're coming up on the last quarter hour together so if you've been thinking of calling that would be a terrific.

salesman two years thirty three percent seventy year
"seventy year" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

03:56 min | 2 years ago

"seventy year" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"Up and knowing that ultimately the more he can tag anais in creating disruption that ultimately people will come around and come back to the table because there's money on the table and try to work out some deal the problem i see is that he creates this chaos which by the way i mean tactically i understand that chaos can be helpful but what concerns me is strategic chaos where there is no strategy as to where it's going so you get rid of t t p but where's the strategy to deal with that you get rid of nafta but where's the strategy to repair that you create a trade war increased tariffs but where is that taking us you move away from climate change but where's the strategy to deal with that you get rid of the iran agreement but where is the strategy to deal with that and i have a sense that he's applying that same kind of approach when it comes to nato which is to create a lot of disruption to kind of challenge these countries to and look i i do believe that these countries obviously have have to meet their responsibility to nato i think he actually deserves some credit for getting some of these countries to come forward and begin to respond with their two percent requirement but what he's missing is that you know this isn't just a country club where people have to pay their dues this is an alliance of allies that has a seventy year history that is critical to the security not only of the united states but the security of europe in the world and he's got to keep coming back to that fundamental point he's not doing that he's basically criticizing he's pushing him he's making the kind of statements that he made this morning and what concerns me as i said is where the hell are we going with this what is the long term strategy is trying to undermine nato is he trying to weaken nato or you know deep down is he trying to use this as a tactic to hopefully strengthen nato for the few so secretary let me ask you the question i was puzzling over this morning i've traveled a nato summits with you in the past if memory serves and i wondered this morning whether we were getting near the tipping point where at some point people say know he's been banging on us now for a year and a half i'm beginning to believe it i believe that he doesn't really believe in nato and so at that moment if you're a european you say we need to think about other ways to guarantee our security the american commitment to defend us with nuclear weapons if necessary is no longer how close are we to that tipping point where people say we gotta make other plans i think one thing that could very well happen in these next few days is that it may very well defined trump foreign policy for the duration of his term as president and it can go one or two ways if he takes advantage of the fact that european countries are coming forward tries to take steps to strengthen the nato alliance to provide the kind of military assistance and deployments that are important to keeping that alliance strong he could use that as a strong point in going to the summit with putin i think it could strengthen his hand in dealing with putin and then ask obviously deal with putin on some of the critical issues that we confront with russia that that is something we should hope for as the path that he will take on the other hand it could be a disaster and he could very well wind up in nato continuing his criticism demanding that if they don't pay that the united states will somehow withdraw in terms of the numbers of military personnel and equipment that we provide to nato so he could really send a torpedo into the strength of nato weaken data and then go trotting off to to russia and have a great reality tv meeting with with putin similar to what happened with the g seven and then going to.

seventy year two percent
"seventy year" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

03:28 min | 2 years ago

"seventy year" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"Middle east we dermer have neighbors who would be democratic because democracies ten non democratic states tend to fight others external enemies in order to justify their internal repression but when it comes to israel's democracy i think it is a tremendous model for the world because democracies are tested under crisis that's actually when accounts not when you're at peace and israel's the most beleaguer democracy on earth we've never known a day of full peace fortunately we have peace with our addiction and jordanian neighbors now but in our seventy year history we've had to deal with security threats faced by no other democracy and yet we've maintained our democratic institutions and democratic values and i i was born and raised in this country so is is a former american i'm marvel that israel was able to do it because i remember the situation in this country and people will remember this on september twelfth two thousand and one and the fear that there was maybe there would be another imminent attack and how at that point people were willing to trade certain civil liberties for their security and then over time is the danger receives you of course cherish those civil liberties so the pendulum swings back but israel has been in september twelfth for seventy years and i because we don't know there could always be another attack and the fact that we've been able to keep our democratic institutions strong and vibrant and all our branches of government strong and vibrant and to maintain free press to maintain so you don't see it changing anytime soon no i don't see changing but i think other countries are dealing with these security challenges can look to israel as a model and i agree with the embassador to what he said i think a lot of this is the effects of globalization changes in the workforce and different movements come about but it's important also to not say the sky's falling when it comes to democracies and he just because you say instead of the sky is falling what's happening with micro say i just think it's a natural course that democracies are always fights between branches of government monto skew pointed that out a long time ago they're always fights between brain is it raining guys and you can have for instance in israel we have an issue of sort of the supreme court in the role of the supreme court should plan our society and sometimes that is cast is democracy in israel is falling because i totally disagree you had a battle in your country about the role the supreme court the person who fought that battle was actually thomas jefferson case two hundred years ago and said hey the supreme court in the united states should not have the power to to actually knock out a legislation and congress and this was the person who came up with the bill of rights because we only have a few minutes left and i want to go to of course seconds okay i think it's important not to cry wolf on there's the natural process and the give and take within democracies and say well this is a sign of fascism is this is sign of totalitarian totalitarianism because when you do then have a real threat to democracy people won't be able to see so europe hungary brexit lot of worry about immigration now all eyes on about the alliance with nato can how do you see the world order we started talking about this changing world order how are things changing i think i i think it's the first time my life where political life in europe and political life in america so comparable we are facing basically the.

Middle east two hundred years seventy years seventy year
"seventy year" Discussed on The Eddie Trunk Podcast

The Eddie Trunk Podcast

03:43 min | 2 years ago

"seventy year" Discussed on The Eddie Trunk Podcast

"And it's like the bandidos no we have to be paid you cannot do that anyway i'm all good and and this is going to be that's the gift to those people that can't get lottery tickets come on down you know what i'm saying and then you can go straight to kabul from there too i mean that's the whole idea is like if you're coming from you know texas you can stop and lax jump in a car forty minutes to to huntington beach back to airport boomed you're in combat the next thing i'll meet you there you know it's amazing man seventy first you're going to be seventy one god bless you better and sing better than almost anybody else out there i gotta tell you this the other day just a couple of days ago i went to see steven tyler steven tyler is seventy year seventy i you tyler and mick jagger are the three nobody can touch of the seventy club nobody can touch any of you you and i'm not just saying this i'm saying now i don't know mick but i know you and i know stephen and eight is it's remarkable it's inspirational to see people at your age still be so frigging good at what they do steven tyler went out there and owned it and moved and sang everything spot perfect i don't know you guys made a deal with the devil i don't know how you did it because there's a lot of guys in their sixties there too down they can't touch what they once did they're running tracks doing this you guys come out and it's still is great as it ever was i don't know how you do it i don't know tyler jagger ever get together and talk but it's crazy man i got three i mean two reasons one of them you either you stay in shape like i was trying to get to before when you went to you're not trying to i got it said you gotta keep your voice in shape once you get out of shape at seventy it's tough to get it back but if your legs are shot you know if you're you get big and fat man you can't all the sudden go on a diet and say i'm gonna go back out and be a rockstar again it's hard you gotta stay in shape or the guys that have worked too hard and went and did three hundred shows a year for ten twenty years in a row that are burnt out that's the only thing i can say it's one of the other because i know stephen stays in shape he tours enough to keep his voice going to keep his body shape mic we certainly know he doesn't same thing with the stones and it's what i do i play enough shows to say shape and keep my enthusiasm about all good making a new record i think it's going to be called hey hey and and with the circle and we're done i'm just gonna mix and hopefully have it out by first of the year by the end of this year i don't know i got so many things on my plate but i'm having a good time man on the verge of seventy one you working harder than ever and we're going to get a circle album of original material this is on a concept record call hey hey y'all really it's a yep yeah i'm sorry lyrically it holds up it holds up i'll talk to you about this one when it's closer hate to waste any time on it because i wanted to be closer to becoming out i don't wanna try to hide people on it yet because it ain't coming out yet but listen it's the best record i made in my life man i'm so it's like if i say i'm never make a record again as long as i live i made this record and that's how i feel about and i've took my whole time i've been working on a four year and i mean working hard on it and jason the tell you it's killing men it's it's it's from montrose led zeppelin van halen sammy chicken foot it's all of it is on this record everything i've ever been a part of we we just honed it down and gave gave you little taste of all of it it's really really great yeah i'm excited ready to talk about that and that's closer to coming out of course we'll do something on that and the last thing you.

kabul ten twenty years forty minutes seventy year four year
"seventy year" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

BizTalk Radio

01:44 min | 2 years ago

"seventy year" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

"Right so if you're a seventy year old seventy and a half year old and you're married to a twenty two year old hey you're required minimum distribution we would be quite a bit less if you're married to somebody who's you know sixty five or whatever interest seventy so yes that is an important thing to know however you still have a required minimum distribution do you do still have a required minimum distribution and the first required minimum distribution is the only one that you have leeway a little bit of a time lag on it so let's say that i'm turning seventy and a half this year and i have a required minimum distribution remember that's the twenty eighteen required minimum distribution i calculate it i know what it is it's based on the end of last year's balanced and the age their reach this year take the balanced divided by the age that's my required minimum distribution but i don't want to take the required minimum distribution this year or i forgot i have this and this one only my first one of my first one only could be postponed until the first quarter of next year now what i'm i'm taking it out next year i'm still taking my twenty eighteen required minimum distribution even though i'm taking it in february of two thousand nine january february march of two thousand nineteen it's still the twenty eighteen required minimum distribution but now i'm seventy one seventy two i have a required minimum distribution for twenty nineteen as well and i have to take that one during the calendar year you've got to you got to take that year so where i've seen the postponement makes sense is one you forgot and you caught it in the first month of the year so you end up taking it out in time the other is maybe i'm still working at.

twenty two year seventy year
"seventy year" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

BizTalk Radio

01:45 min | 2 years ago

"seventy year" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

"Right so if you're a seventy year old seventy and a half year old and you're married to a twenty two year old hey good you're required minimum distribution be would be quite a bit less if you're married to somebody who is sixty five or whatever interests seventy so yes that is an important thing to know however you still have a required minimum distribution do you do still have a required minimum distribution and the first required minimum distribution is the only one that you have leeway a little bit of a time lag on it so let's say that i'm turning seventy and a half this year and i have a required minimum distribution remember that's the twenty eighteen required minimum distribution i calculate it i know what it is it's based on the end of last year's balanced and the age their reach this year take the balanced divided by the age that's my required minimum distribution but i don't want to take the required minimum distribution this year or i forgot i have this and this one only my first one of my first one only can be postponed until the first quarter of next year now when i'm i'm taking it out next year i'm still taking my twenty eighteen required minimum distribution even though i'm taking it in february of two thousand nineteen january february march of two thousand nineteen it's still the twenty eighteen required minimum distribution but now i'm seventy one seventy two i have a required minimum distribution for twenty nine nineteen nine as well and i have to take that one during the calendar year you've got to you got to take that year so where i've seen the postponement makes sense is one you forgot you caught it in the first month of the year so you ended up taking it out in time the other is maybe i'm still working at this point.

twenty two year seventy year
"seventy year" Discussed on WGIR-AM

WGIR-AM

02:21 min | 2 years ago

"seventy year" Discussed on WGIR-AM

"So big question chuck is we talked about facebook getting into the dating business yesterday is it only going to be old people that are on that dating site i don't think so no you think young people will migrate over there like if you had if you guys aren't single anymore so you don't have to worry about it i think there's this misconception that it's only seventy year olds using facebook it's not a lot of my friends still do on a regular oh okay yeah it's it's not that no one us i mean get two billion active users now there aren't that many old people i wonder what facebook because we still don't know what they're going to charge or if they're even going to charge right for because they don't charge us regular face if they're smart they won't charge thing then they just kill don't they kill everybody if that if that happens like like why would you pay fifty bucks a month to with what's the one e harmony in theory those communities do preselect for people who are looking for the same thing that you are so makes a lot of the process easier on facebook if they say look it's going to be free and anyone can use it yeah you don't necessarily know what you're going to get whereas if you're on harmony you know that someone said okay this is the platform that i want to be on yeah that's why you have all these niche sites that have actually popped up is because it does a lot of the preselection work for you well we'll only time will tell i just think that they have access to so much information like most people have been i'm trying to think when i joined facebook it's not very big they ever make a lot of hockey players when you think about parking.

chuck facebook hockey seventy year
"seventy year" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

02:36 min | 2 years ago

"seventy year" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"Isn't it in the seventy year history of the nation of israel the formal nation of israel who unleashed the iranian islam on nazi regime in tehran and as i've said you many many times even worse than naval neville chamberlain and appeaser he can't accuse neville chamberlain of actually funding the third reich kenya now but you can't accused barack obama of actually funding the a slam on nazi regime in tehran no question about funding it what will the world say one hundred years from now take my word for it he won't get this lavish flemish slobbering praising press that he gets today from our pretoria guard me then i look at these two men trump a netanyahu and the same leftists we've always objected to them the same leftists who oppose their elections try to destroy them take something that's so minor and try and turn it into something so major power by any means destruction by every route so they unleashed police investigations of netanyahu suggest as a unleashed a special council on trump and when these socalled investigators have a myopic mission you know that it's not like in the case of muller he's the us attorney in manhattan covering that entire now he's effectively the us attorney for donald trump just like these socalled police investigators in israel our investigators for beating at ya and his family and his wife who's also trashed see liberals are liberals they know no boundaries less nisar leftist whether than the united states or whether they're in israel or whether they're in europe same mentality the progressives and we're we're progressivism comes from wasn't born in the united states certainly wasn't born in israel it's been imported into both countries.

israel tehran neville chamberlain kenya barack obama netanyahu manhattan us attorney donald trump united states pretoria europe one hundred years seventy year
"seventy year" Discussed on Pardon My Take

Pardon My Take

01:31 min | 2 years ago

"seventy year" Discussed on Pardon My Take

"Digital unlike febrary seventy year as their meagre about the groundhugging no these guys that got to get the workshop got a whole list art my cool thrown i got to first one is oh actually know this is one of my another hotseat i have two out seats one cool truck mother hotseat is scott boris so scott porous the number one mlb agent he has had a tough offseason he promised a lot of money to a lot of people and he hasn't really can't come through so jd martinez when the offseason started he said there was going to get seven years two hundred and ten million dollars he ended up getting five years one hundred ten million dollars has more signed for eight years and he last year was talking about how hawsers beside for ten and jake arrieta still not signed so basically the entire collusion against scott boris has worked and he's especially on hotseat too because he's trying to convince everyone how he's doing well and in the house moore press conference for the padres he said the padres or is a hot volcano of talent lava so he's kind of losing his mind their wait is that a good thing are bad it's i know what an awesome i think it is good but it's also like it's a it's the quote of a crazy man we can't touch him the padres are hot lava yeah if i remember my tang las garrelts i can't take him out yet true of their hot love really good so our hotseat that's the six tool yeah if it in a six to a player yudhijit each r g j martinez sning yeah i don't really know much about him except it's too good sun yeah.

scott boris jd martinez padres jake arrieta moore press one hundred ten million dollar ten million dollars seventy year eight years seven years five years
"seventy year" Discussed on WINT 1330 AM

WINT 1330 AM

01:46 min | 3 years ago

"seventy year" Discussed on WINT 1330 AM

"A a friend of mine who is a um a seventy year old woman who recently got a seasonally had our calcium scores taken and they were out three thirty one and uh rhetorical last was about to sixty five and she has been taking statins but she's been getting like a terrible muscle pains from it shows and wanted to take the injuries he what she should take okay that's a great question so let's look at the situation we got uh on the basis of the cholesterol we wouldn't know if this person who is seventy female has plaque many women who have high cholesterol it turns out they don't have any black but she did do the ebt heart scan which is uh a calcium scoring that i recommend very highly that helps people discern whether the risk factors that they seem to have whether they add up to the deposition of calcium within their arteries and the three three one score suggests that she may be on her way to heart problems so she would be a candidate ordinarily for stands on ninety unalterably opposed to statins i think you know that's one of the ways that we can reduce risk and maybe that was worth of try in her case but unfortunately she's reacting really badly to the statin so what's the point you know being miserable for twenty years on the offchance uh that uh the remaining years of her life it'll protect her from cardiovascular disease that's not a solution so let's look at some potential alternatives uh for some patients to intolerant to statins red yeast rice can lower cholesterol it's it is a natural staten in fact but it's much milder and some people tolerate that much better edge recently saw a patient who had put on red yeast rice because she didn't tolerate statins and the cholesterol is dramatically lowered with red yeast rice the other thing that i'm really.

staten seventy year twenty years
"seventy year" Discussed on KKAT

KKAT

02:17 min | 3 years ago

"seventy year" Discussed on KKAT

"But then we went nominated the bunch half halfwits in various states yeah because they spouted the party line and they listen we have some witless smart seventy year old women listening and i'll explain why i say that but a lot of them were just kind of the appeal did daughterinlaw old ladies type candidates that just said the right things and and we're could mold timea but they were just completely ineffective and what is it about you know if you're going to really energize conservatives you end up nominating a roy more when there are plenty of really smart aggressive kidd explaining why it's a good idea small government types out there but they lose an and the kinda more corn pony biblethumping roy more types get over or sharron angle in nevada which will taught me till my grave nobody could have lost to harry go round nobody and she did president drug defending his decision this morning to initially back senator luther strange against roy moore's saying in a predawn tweet that quote the reason i originally endorsed luther strange and his numbers went up mightily is that i said roy more will not be able to win the general election i was right roy work hard but the deck was stacked against he actually didn't work hard i heard one republican commentator say it seemed like a very lazy campaign the reason being his handlers decided the less he spoke the better and so he did not work towns he did not work the city's he made a few rally appearances that sort of thing but we'll that was probably a good idea though right yeah yeah but the idea that roy work hard compared to what how did they not get an energized right in campaign going quick after the washington post came forward story say decision of here's here's our guy get behind him right of men he would award i think you may well have yeah yeah boiler too much division the steve bannon wing rights swayed donald trump the get behind more so the decision was made not to go in that direction that bit him if anybody can offer a counterargument.

kidd nevada senator luther roy moore president washington steve bannon donald trump seventy year
"seventy year" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

02:18 min | 3 years ago

"seventy year" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"On the hammer nigel show man we like to have a good time you like to have fun we take our fund look at the headlines but it's all bad news every bit of it as bad news when you're talking about what's going on down in texas for the first time in the history of the city of houston a pair of seventy year old reservoir dams that of protected basically all of downtown houston from flooding have started the breach an overflow this is the worst possible scenario of anything going on in houston they've opened up brand new emergency shelters on the west side of the city a control meteorologist floodcontrol meteorologist in houston says that the reservoirs will eventually flow into downtown houston this is a mess and if you look at the way the city of houston a set up these reservoirs the big interstate ten is right there on the side so they're going to go over the interstates they're going to flow into downtown houston earlier today a woman was rescued from the rushing water near one of these dams that have breached and a cnn reporter kind of stuck there microphone into this woman's face she had her children with her pick a listen to this you can hear the pain he you can hear the suffering from this woman's voice and this kind of gives you a feel of what's really going on and houston huge just arrived now you're with your children we've heard stories of mothers trying to save their children from the rushing waters can you tell us how that wasn't report feet of water to go get them food on the first day yeah yeah that delighted see i didn't hear your thoughts on the interview people that are no whiteside like that's not the slightest thing to do like equal not really breaking down a yeltsin here with cameras and microphones what the is wrong with some say you are these are not a fan of what the microphone then they might fade when these set by the way i use their putnam like this i am up sources floor as it sounds like you've got a very upset family there were to take a break from that and we'll get back to you later on i'm sure i'd be the same exact away no doubt on my mind i think what people haven't heard a.

texas houston yeltsin cnn reporter whiteside seventy year
"seventy year" Discussed on WJR 760

WJR 760

02:35 min | 3 years ago

"seventy year" Discussed on WJR 760

"Have for many years when you think of your grandfather and uh you taking over the the family businesses president what are what are some of the thought to have when you think about him oh that's a great question well i wish that i would have the opportunity to tell him that i work here that our family work here on what the business of doing that were celebrating seventy year on i think about him very very often i wish he would hear q 'invita um inform on uh we are right now in practice and honored soviet anniversary where working on a compiling the history of the company and i've been thinking about him very often that within reflecting on early days and how we heard it in business and time it's pretty amazing all that happened in the court the seventy years and i'm excited to see you know where the future leader lilley it does this make you the first woman president in the seventy years of vesco oils history yeah i am the first president i'm the four at theme family member to hold the role i with my lead my grandfather eugene and then my late uncle richard than my father dina dina now i'm before a theme to hold this condition that first female sell are you are you planning on doing anything in your role and women in business and trying to expand um mm awareness for women who want to be in leadership well we're really proud to have uh w b e n fee certification majority womenowned business that if it's something that we've had for years now with on my mom marjorie winkelmann acting as our chairman of the board so we've been majority women owned and women liat for several years now and were definitely huge you know proponent the porkers of all people and business women included um but cafe hope to have an opportunity in my new condition to how the port other women in intercompany an outsider companies who want to pursue leadership or all lilley house your father handling this transition my dad has been incredibly gracia and incredibly generous and allowing the fabric unity he um he never wind had anything other than how proud is and how the poor have you of.

soviet anniversary lilley president eugene richard dina dina marjorie winkelmann chairman seventy years seventy year
"seventy year" Discussed on KOIL

KOIL

02:17 min | 3 years ago

"seventy year" Discussed on KOIL

"Aw here's latest from abc news i'm mark remillard abc news learning tonight at white house senior adviser jared kushner has agreed to appear before the senate intelligence committee as part of its investigation into russian meddling abc's mary ellis park says more on the closeddoor meeting scheduled for this coming monday at present soninlaw has kept a low profile since joining the administration his appearance on capitol hill will mark a new phase for this white house these congressional investigations into russia's interference in the election and he will be one of the most highprofile subjects interviewed and undoubtedly the closest confidants and the president the senate intelligence committee has said since march that kushner with one of many in the trump white house it planned to question and kushner has maintained he is willing to cooperate with investigators even after that meeting last summer with a russian lawyer that he attended the congressional budget office out with analysis of the new republican effort to simply repeal obamacare and replace it later the cbo estimates a repeal would cut the deficit by four hundred seventy three billion dollars but it also says it would mean thirty two million more uninsured americans by 20 26 we find out tomorrow whether oj simpson will spend more time behind bars or if he'll be released as a seventy year old exfootball player has a parole hearing in nevada abc's met guzman is in nevada with a preview in that hearing room along with simpson will be his attorney his mr his daughter arnelle and the victim in that crime bruce fro among now he was held the gun point he accused simpson of essentially kidnapping him at holding him hostage but now he says that simpson has served enough time in prison and should be granted parole the partner of minneapolis police officer who shot and killed announced raelian woman says he was startled by allowed sound near their squad car seconds before the shooting occurred just damon was shot by officer mohammad nurun saturday while he was seated in the passenger seat of his patrol car u s stocks climbing today led by gains in technology and health care this is abc news pressures for base buildings will include windows who works works excessive economic recovery we've all been waiting for is finally here stocks are soaring hen construction spending across america has been on the rise if you've been waiting to build the time is now whether you want to.

partner abc patrol car squad car minneapolis kidnapping jared kushner white house america windows officer mohammad nurun damon officer senior adviser attorney nevada guzman abc oj simpson cbo president russia capitol hill mary ellis park senate intelligence committee four hundred seventy three bil seventy year