35 Burst results for "Seventy Five Years"

Here are the winners of the 2020 Ig Nobel Prizes to make you laugh, then think

Kottke Ride Home

04:45 min | Last week

Here are the winners of the 2020 Ig Nobel Prizes to make you laugh, then think

"The Twenty Twenty Ige Nobel Prize winners were announced last night the ignoble prizes to achievements that. First make people laugh. Then make them think the prizes are intended to celebrate the unusual honor the imaginative and spur people's interest in science medicine and technology and quote. A. Common Misconception about the ignoble prizes is that they're like the razzies you know making fun of things for being bad. But as they say on their website quote, we're honoring achievements that make people laugh and then think good achievements can also be odd funny and even absurd. So combat achievements a lot of good science gets attacked because of its absurdity and a lot of bad science gets revered despite its absurdity and quote. This year, the award ceremony was held only online but fun fact for you the ceremony while always in person prior to this year has also been streamed online every single year since nineteen, ninety, five making it. One of the very first events to be streamed live online. Improbable research who runs the prize thinks that it may have been the first ever event streamed live online was. Not a music concert, which is pretty cool and now without further ADO, here's a rundown of the twenty twenty winners, the Acoustics. Prize. went to a multinational team that basically had an alligator inhale a bunch of helium with the high pitched effect you'd anticipate so that they could study how alligators communicate the psychology prize went to a North American, team who came up with a method to. Identify, narcissists based on their eyebrow movements. The Peace Prize actually went to the governments, of India and Pakistan. For quote, having their diplomats surreptitiously ring each other's doorbells in the middle of the night and then run away before anyone had a chance to answer the door and quotes and next up the physics prize went to a team who wanted to see what happens to an earthworm. When you vibrate at high frequencies, some of these I think make a lot more sense view actually dive into the paper ignoble does a really good job of describing them in the weirdest most intriguing ways possible. The Economics Prize was awarded to the team who tried to quote quantify the relationship between different countries, national income inequality, and the average amount of mouth to mouth kissing and quote. The management. Prize went to a team of professional Chinese hitmen who conducted a hit by having. So many of them pay the other one to do it with less and less money each time that eventually no one was murdered. The. Prize was awarded to Richard vetter for collecting evidence that Entomologists Aka people who study insects or indeed scared of spiders. Are Not Insects. Now, the medicine prize went to a Dutch and Belgian team for diagnosing missile phony A-. And this is one I remember seen in the headlines about when the research was published because I super identify with it missile phony is Stress at hearing other people make chewing sounds end quotes. The materials science prize sounds completely bazaar and pointless until you understand that this British and American team are archaeologists who were trying to prove something about an artifact that had been found. They won the prize for quote showing that knives manufactured from frozen human feces do not work well and quotes. And finally the Second Prize winner of the year to be more ripped from the headlines than based on academic papers. The Medical Education Prize was awarded to Jay Your Bolsonaro of Brazil. Boris. Johnson of the United Kingdom. Never Injure mody of India Andrea Manual Lopez Obrador of Mexico. Alexander Lukashenko of Belarus, Donald Trump of the USA or John of Turkey Vladimir Putin of Russia and govern Guli Berdymukhamedov of Turkmenistan. For quote using the covid nineteen viral pandemic to teach the world that politicians can have a more immediate effect on life and death. Then scientists and doctors can end quote. Wow. Yeah I mean scientists are pretty fed up. You might have seen that scientific American actually endorsed a candidate for president for the very first time in their one hundred and seventy five year history because among other points. Trump's rejection of evidence in public health measures have been catastrophic in the US and quotes

Prize Nobel Prize Medical Education Prize Twenty Twenty Ige India Donald Trump Belarus USA President Trump Vladimir Putin Alexander Lukashenko Andrea Manual Lopez Obrador Jay Your Bolsonaro Pakistan Turkmenistan Mexico Guli Berdymukhamedov Johnson
India records world's highest increase in new COVID-19 cases

Marketplace Morning Report with David Brancaccio

02:08 min | Last week

India records world's highest increase in new COVID-19 cases

"Now, where another record rise in daily Corona virus infections has brought the country's total case count to above five million it's adding more new cases a day than any other country in the world fueling concerns about how the economy will continue to cope with the pandemic official forecasts predict a ten percent contraction this year the government has allocated tens of billions of dollars to help battle the economic crisis but there's some head-scratching today over a new multi million dollar contract that's been awarded to Indian conglomerate Totta the BBC's around Mukherjee. What we're looking at is one hundred, seventeen million dollars to refurbish the existing parliament complex. But this is part of a larger two point seven billion dollar government project to give a face lift and modernized old colonial era government buildings in the heart of Delhi even when this plan was initially announced, which was in October last year many questioned the need to spend so much at a time when India is just coming out of its lockdown batting, a rising number of one thousand cases growing at an alarming rate, the economy has contracted by the worst in decades. Where does the government going to get this money from as you say why? Hasn't the government put this plan on ice of the government says that look this parliament complex dates way back to the nineteen twenties now since then various parliament constituencies have increased and therefore so have the number of parliamentarians and the staff there simple argument is this complex isn't big enough. The also interestingly want to build despite twenty, twenty two so that it can coincide with India celebrating seventy five years of its independence, and where's the government GonNa get the money to fund this project that is million dollar question in the same week on Monday. The government asked for parliamentary approval of to infuse nearly two point seven, two, billion dollars to. Help the ailing banking sector here in India deal with the prospects of bad loans which are likely to rise. So the message that the government has given is that we are cash strapped, but the question is, where are you going to get this money from for this kind of luxurious project at a time when India is battling a national crisis, more questions than answers then the BBC's democracy in new. Delhi. Thank you. Thank you.

India Parliament Delhi BBC Official
Thanks to the Pandemic, Apple’s Big Event Was Just … an Event

WSJ Tech News Briefing

04:39 min | 2 weeks ago

Thanks to the Pandemic, Apple’s Big Event Was Just … an Event

"Been covering these sorts of apple events in product reveals for a while now yes. Seventy five years. Have the one compare it was definitely very different though in June we had apples developer's conference and it was pretty similar to that. So in the sense of we're getting used to this, but it's definitely different than me flying out to Cupertino waiting in line to get into a big amphitheater in a room packed full of. Apple Employees, other press, and hearing a lot of excitement about new products. And on the products, let's start with that side of things. What are your biggest takeaways from what was announced and what star listeners be thinking about when they go to buy their next of ice I think the biggest thing I want everyone to remember when they go to buy an apple device is that getting the most expensive apple device doesn't necessarily anymore mean it's the best one to get. Now sure there are going to be features that they're going to have in these higher end products like we saw yesterday with the Apple Watch series six announcement. That is a three, hundred, ninety, nine dollars watch. But we also got an Apple Watch se that starts at two hundred, seventy nine dollars and has a lot of the features you would probably want seeing that also on the IPAD so you can get a three hundred twenty, nine dollar really good ipad. You get an IPAD air new IPAD air that's five, hundred, ninety, nine dollars or you can go up to the eight hundred dollar ipad pro but that IPAD air is actually a really good value and has a lot of the same things as that pro. and. We also heard a lot about services. Apple has really been leaning into this part of its business lately. Did we get any news there? We heard a lot about services yesterday and I think it was really interesting how apple threaded that throughout the hardware announcements specifically fitness plus announcement, and this was an announcement of a new on demand video workout service think about your Peleton's about your other sort of video workout videos but this comes. With an Apple Watch or you have to pay extra ten dollars a month to get this with your Apple Watch and this really sort of emphasizes if you've got this wash if you've got this hardware, then you can also get the service and for apple that means you're going to have recurring revenue. You're going to have this customer who didn't only pay for the hardware, but is now gonNA pay a monthly service fee for this new service. So some changes there another big change normally a new iphone would be the headliner of this event that's been pushed because of coronavirus related supply chain issues. But given everything we saw yesterday do you have any predictions about what new features we might see when that eventually is announced? There is no mention of the iphone which. Actually shocking to me I figured Oh they're going to at least tease it. This is the September event. They're going to remind people. We know we usually gather for the IPHONE but coming soon. But there was none of that. I would say the biggest hint we got about what's coming with the IPHONE is that the Apple Watch will no longer ship in its box a USB adapter the one that you plug into the wall that no longer is GonNa be shipped. In. The box and apple says, that's for environmental reasons that we all have these already why do we need more of these ending up in the landfill? I think apple will do the same exact thing with the iphone coming next month will hold you to that taking a step back here. You know this event is typically meant to really hype up the products that apple announces with no iphone and you mentioned sort of a less flashy event than we're used to. Are we expecting to see an impact on apple's bottom line I would say this is one of the most boring apple events in recent history that said I actually think it could end up being one of the most successful in terms of products announced you had the lower end ipad refresh the three, hundred, twenty, nine dollars Ipad, which we know as a top seller for apple, and now you also have these new apple watches that are. Not as expensive as the usual three, ninety, nine version but one that's more affordable has a lot of health features and you have also this this backdrop of the pandemic and people wanting to spend less and focus on health and I think that the Apple Watch I it's it's been sort of less of a niche product, but it's not spread over to everyone and I. Think this year we're going to see it really broaden its horizons. And here with the announcement of not only the different pricing tiers and having three different models out. But also the family sharing this is a feature they announced where you can actually give the watch to your kid even if they don't have an iphone and you can then set it up and control it and you can also use it to track your kid if they're at school, I think that is really showing how big of A. Market Apple thinks the watch can get into. So they've had things like fall detection for people who are older. They now have this feature for those who are younger. So I really think this is the beginning of seeing the the watch a lot bigger than we had thought

Apple A. Market Apple Cupertino Developer Peleton
UN chief names COVID, a ceasefire, and climate as UN75 priorities

UN News

10:57 min | 2 weeks ago

UN chief names COVID, a ceasefire, and climate as UN75 priorities

"Let's make sure. That we have a global ceasefire, let's make sure that you'll have a vaccine and let's make sure that when we rebuild our economies through so. Fifteen. This. Is Colin from U. N.. News. September marks the most high profile period in the calendar the opening of the new General Assembly. session. This year is a special, the organization as it reaches its seventy fifth year. But preparations of overshadowed by the global. covid nineteen pandemic which has led to practically all of the events surrounding the general debates of the General Assembly being moved online. Ahead of the opening, you news may Yakub sense down an appropriate distance with the UN Secretary General Antonio Guitarist in this special that his own podcast find out what he wants to get out of the event and what can be salvaged from a year ridden with multiple crises. May began the interview on the subject that can't be ignored covid nineteen and Austin UN chief to assess global progress so far I'm very worried. I mean the pandemic Sean, the enormous fragility of the world's the not only ration- tool. The coffee that I mean, we have friend Julia. Climate Change to the lawlessness in cyberspace even to the risks of nuclear proliferation to the impacts of inequality. In the cohesion of societies but the the vitals that is a microscopic vitals has put us on our knees, and unfortunately, these should lead to a lot of humility in world leaders and to unity and solidarity fighting the coverage. Now that as we know unit, each country has adopted some strategy and we see the result, the vitals as progress to hear, and at the same time, there is not enough solidarity in relation to the developing countries and we see all in the. People are suffering so much and to a certain extent disease negative for everybody because. If we are not able to address properly the COVID also in developing countries. The vitals goes back and forth and. We will pay a heavy price even in the richest countries in the world. What would you hope government and community to do to overcome and emerge stronger? We need everybody to work together in cooperation, and now we have a good test and the test is the treatment and the vaccine. It is absolutely essential that the vaccine be considered a global public good people's vaccine and that we want have a competition of countries trying to get as many vaccines as possible for themselves. Forgetting about those that have less resources, we need a vaccine for everybody everywhere in affordable. The conditions because we will only be safe everybody's safe to think that we can preserve the rich people and let the people suffer. It's a it's a stupid mistake because there is no way. Everybody will not pay heavy price if not everybody is properly. Supported by the vaccination. On Climate Change Covid nineteen may have diverted attention and resources away from the urgent need for climate action and you have said categorically, people have to raise their voices. Business has to their site. Major emitters need to do more to save our planet. You'd recently said call is going up in smoke. What are three key things that must be done immediately for the Paris accord to work and the word to shift skier so we What is our objective? The objective has been defined by the scientific community. We absolutely must limit the growth in temperature to one point, five degrees namely at the end of the century for that, we need to have coronal throw in twenty fifty, and for that, we need to have a reduction of about forty five percents of emissions in the next. So the objectives clear. How can we reach them? We need a total commitment special if the big images to all the transformation elections, inanity, negative culture, you need history in transportation in all his whole life. We need transformational actions that make it possible to reach those objectives and it's very simple. We should stop spending money taxpayers, money and subsidies for fossil fuels. We should massively invest in renewable energy because it's cheaper, it's most profitable. It's it's not only the right thing to do is the best economic sink to do We need to stop the construction of coal plants we need to invest. In. New Forms of mobility namely through electric cars we've invested in either login that is the will of the future. And at the same time, we need to conduct the. Protection of Biodiversity Protection of forests transformation. In formations in our agriculture In, all these aspects we need to work together with a common strategy and with the clear objective, we need to be carbon neutral in twenty fifty. The twenty thirty deadline set for the achievement of these seventeen sustainable goals is really not too far away. How should world leaders refocused efforts? To achieve a disease after all, it's our blueprint. For a more sustainable and equitable planet, we'll because of the covid nineteen in the needles to recover economists, we are spending trillions of dollars at the present moment. So if you are spending billions of dollars, let's do it in line with the sustainable development goals that's fluid in line with agenda twenty thirty. Let's rebuilt. Is Better. With more equity fighting inequality, more sustainability, fighting climate change and all the other aspects of relevant in this Central Government Wolves beat the delegation of poverty be to the protection of the oceans beat. Seems ready to education to health to governance. So the the cover these threats is a problem, but it is also an opportunity because as to change. We can change in the right direction as we are mobilizing massive resources to rebuild. We can rebuilt in the right direction and our blueprint must be the agenda twenty thirty and disassembly Robbins schools. The UN has been around for seventy five years and you've called on everyone to participate actively in the UN seventy-five conversations. especially, those not often heard including youth you have spoke to you. But. Also, you were often in listening mode. What encouraged you from those conversation with us A very strong commitment of us to International Corporation The Yankees much more cosmopolitan than my generation. They feel universalist approach to problems. They understand that we need to be together and so the stand that we need a stronger multi-lateralism but the multi-lateralism that is also multilateralists in which they can participate a decision making. And these very strong commitment of the young people to ideas like universal coverage to ideas like the climate action to ideas like more justice inequality in our societies gender equality. Fight Against Racism all these aspects show a very. Young people. That is the biggest hope I ever to our. Common. Future. Some twenty-five years ago the Beijing Declaration was a historic turning point for advancing the rights of women. But Millennia of Patriarchy have resulted in a male dominated world. What would you like to see men do to ensure we have gender policy party and equality men must understand that it is these are. Not only of women to have gender equality agenda parody because the world will be better. It is relieving a male dominated world with a male dominated culture. That is why it is so important Indian which parity and we have done it at top level, but we need to do it everywhere. There is essentially a question of power. And we need to have I. don't like to use empowering women. It looks like we're giving bullet women. Power novel is not given it's taken, but we need to have women moving in order to assert their role in society, and we need men understanding that that is a positive thing for them. Mr. You've spoken passionately about inequalities and justice. The. Cause of many unfortunately problems in the war today. What are some of the most damaging example of these and how can multilaterism be the answer for all humankind to benefit it's very shocking from the point of view of wealth and income to see percents of humankind having more resources than off of the world's population. But I would say the most shocking aspects of inequality are not necessarily linked to money. It's equality linked to discriminations in relation to gender inflation to. Racist. Innovation to religion insulation to. People with this with ability in addition to the LGBTQ community. I mean we need to have a society in which cohesion is all objectives which we need to invest in the collision to make every community indigenous communities. Minorities in societies, every community to feel that their identities respected but they also they are part of the society as a whole. Mr Finally the ward the last word is for you. This is a virtual general assembly. Devoid from the usual trump far. But full of urgency and Gravitas and hope. What would you want? Would leaders and the public to take away from this UN Jason Of course many things, but if I would have to choose. Priorities I would say, let's make sure. That we have a global ceasefire. Let's make sure that you'll have a vaccine that is a global public good at People's vaccine, and let's make sure that when we rebuild our economies new to each governor. That was UN Secretary General Antonio guitarfish speaking to you a news current unit chief May Yaacob for the special three. UN. General Assembly addition of our flagship podcast the zone. I'm Connor Lennon thanks for

UN General Assembly Austin Un Secretary General Antonio Guit Colin Secretary General Antonio Guit Julia Beijing Connor Lennon Paris Yankees International Corporation Mr. You
2 depressions in Atlantic to become tropical storms Monday

AP News Radio

00:38 sec | 3 weeks ago

2 depressions in Atlantic to become tropical storms Monday

"Lawyers hi Mike Rossi for the few you're weeks reporting founder to depressions Julian assigns in the Atlantic and are the expected U. S. government to become tropical also squaring storms off today in a London forecasters court are keeping a high their eyes stakes on two extradition tropical depressions case in the the Atlantic lady by the Ocean corona on virus this Labor pandemic Day both are expected Songz to become who spent tropical almost storms a year today and a half a tropical in a British storm prison warning has been sat issued in for the the COBOL dock Verde of the Old islands Bailey with criminal tropical cooled depression and formally eighteen refused moving in the last American reported extradition two hundred fifty request miles east several southeast dozen of the supporters island had the system gathered outside is forecast the to courthouse bring two to five before inches the hearing of rain to the islands American through prosecutors Tuesday have and indicted tropical the depression Australian seventeen on eighteen formed late espionage Sunday forecasters and computer say it misuse was centered charges thirteen hundred over eighty wikileaks miles east publication of the north Leeward of secret Islands early US this morning military documents hi Mike Rossio a decade ago with a maximum sentence of one hundred seventy five years in prison a song she's lawyers say the prosecution is a politically motivated abuse of power that will stifle press freedom the put journalists around the world at risk Charles Taylor that's not London

Mike Rossi Founder Atlantic Songz North Leeward Secret Islands Mike Rossio Charles Taylor London Julian
WikiLeaks' Assange to fight US extradition bid in UK court

AP News Radio

00:52 sec | 3 weeks ago

WikiLeaks' Assange to fight US extradition bid in UK court

"Lawyers for the few weeks founder Julian assigns and the U. S. government also squaring off in a London court a high stakes extradition case the lady by the corona virus pandemic Songz who spent almost a year and a half in a British prison sat in the dock of the Old Bailey criminal cooled and formally refused the American extradition request several dozen supporters had gathered outside the courthouse before the hearing American prosecutors have indicted the Australian on eighteen espionage and computer misuse charges over wikileaks publication of secret US military documents a decade ago with a maximum sentence of one hundred seventy five years in prison a song she's lawyers say the prosecution is a politically motivated abuse of power that will stifle press freedom the put journalists around the world at risk Charles Taylor that's not London

United States Charles Taylor London Founder Julian Songz
WikiLeaks' Assange to fight US extradition bid in UK court

AP News Radio

00:52 sec | 3 weeks ago

WikiLeaks' Assange to fight US extradition bid in UK court

"Lawyers for the few weeks founder Julian assigns and the U. S. government also squaring off in a London court a high stakes extradition case the lady by the corona virus pandemic Songz who spent almost a year and a half in a British prison sat in the dock of the Old Bailey criminal cooled and formally refused the American extradition request several dozen supporters had gathered outside the courthouse before the hearing American prosecutors have indicted the Australian on eighteen espionage and computer misuse charges over wikileaks publication of secret US military documents a decade ago with a maximum sentence of one hundred seventy five years in prison a song she's lawyers say the prosecution is a politically motivated abuse of power that will stifle press freedom the put journalists around the world at risk Charles Taylor that's not London

United States Charles Taylor London Founder Julian Songz
WikiLeaks' Assange to fight US extradition bid in UK court

AP News Radio

00:51 sec | 3 weeks ago

WikiLeaks' Assange to fight US extradition bid in UK court

"With the leaks found that Judy the signage is set to fight for his freedom in a British court after a decade of legal drama as he challenges American authorities attempts to extradite him on charges connected to secret military documents lawyers for a song and the US government a scheduled to face off in London on Monday at an extradition hearing that was delayed by the crowd of ours pandemic American prosecutors indicted the Australian on eighteen espionage and computer misuse charges adding up to a maximum sentence of one hundred seventy five years his lawyers argue the prosecution is a politically motivated abuse of power attorney Jennifer Robinson saying the case is fundamentally about basic human rights and freedom of speech American prosecutors say the song just a criminal not a free speech hero chancellor this month London

United States London Jennifer Robinson Judy Attorney Chancellor
Interview With Danny Cannon On Gotham

Sci-Fi Talk

04:45 min | Last month

Interview With Danny Cannon On Gotham

"Cave. Bite has one of the show runners of Gaza. Danny can. Talk to me at the beginning of season one. What was the visual sensibility in aesthetic that you are trying to get across in Gotham as opposed to the other Batman related projects or you just trying to make this totally different? Well, no, no no. Completely different because you know I wanted to fit into into this great cannon, the work that's been gone for seventy five years. but at the same time might make it contemporary. And at the same time, it's twenty years from from Batman basically. So. We talked about a few things myself in the rights and when we first met and it seemed like everything we had in that first meeting as played out which is. New York in the seventies was was a a brilliant dangerous time like light seventies. Not just because of all the graffiti on trains and the rundown and Harlem, and all these dangerous places that you could go to his fooling down places but culturally, it was really good music films. It was a hip hop star. Know. New Wave. Everything. Would it culturally it was really great. We talked about that law but the talks about the Kennedy in. London. And and the have and the have nots and that industrial revolution age and. That something I wanted to bring into the fact that city that hasn't been gentrified yet is still locked in the past and probably falling down a little bit. So all the sets of design slightly askew with like slightly going down you know like the whole thing is crumbling been held up with good and things like that, and then the last thing we spoke about was rim fairy tales and and the fact that as adult fairy tale element to. To honor the comic book idea of it. And so those three elements thrown together. And then must is to keep your feet on the ground. So it's it feels really reliable. It seems like it also has a color, its own color Palette jet texture that we haven't really seen in other comic book adaptations to now I mean that was just because with all of those influences coming in there are certain gels you caught through. There was a contemporary look we didn't do. We could do a test now bicycler whereas like is this often cars that cars this governed governor it's the same thing as colors and. Trying to get the crews taste and and and the performance tastes into that same thing. It's it's good and it was easier than we thought. You know it's it's quite. Nobody knows what period is if feels comfortable because it feels very familiar. That yet, but nothing sticking out you to to portray that. Theatrical reality that was one of the series executive producers and Danny Cannon, whose asked if Gotham itself as a character in this without doubt. Yeah. Without doubt that's why the show that was very much. Bruno's intentions had to be a character and all the designing I did was was was on that. Was myself in the production. drew for a long time just to get I found myself. It wasn't just drawing the new buildings that wanted to insert into New York will take away the glass buildings out of New York. Older Dickensian style attended the century English buildings It it I I. Drew Skies, and that was I don't know where that came from US listened to music and I'd start during stormy skies everywhere and I was like. That's it that stat stats when I got it was when I I put stormy sky on everything. Now, Gotham is a huge hit on twitter. How do feel about beating every other show on twitter are really Fila get on twitter? Obviously doesn't need me. Yeah right yeah. I think that's wonderful I. You know to be talked about Israeli sometimes even better than watched I think it would be I. I. It's Great. As long as I can promise those nice people that allowed that to happen that the show gets better and better, and there's plenty to talk about are there any character storylines you would like to bring in that you haven't brought in already? We have a great relationship with DC and we sit down with them constantly and Ask about origins of various characters and. It's amazing. How many don't have Origins. Many characters just turned up his bad guys you know in the and so. It's really. We feel on to be able to go back in this. Great. Legacy and and and UH. site. Okay. So how did they turn up like that? How did they have? So. Yeah. Now we're having a lot of fun.

Danny Cannon Gotham Twitter New York Gaza United States Harlem New Wave Kennedy London Bruno Executive
That history should not repeat: Hiroshimas storytellers

The Economist: The Intelligence

08:16 min | Last month

That history should not repeat: Hiroshimas storytellers

"Seventy, five years ago, this week, the B twenty, nine, bomber, Nola gay dropped little boy, the world's first use of an atomic weapon. At Eight fifteen in the morning of August six Japanese time. The first atomic thumb has done enemy talk. It detonated over. Hiroshima immediately killing around one hundred and forty. Thousand People I'm was aimed to explode about zero point. In the city at the junction of. Untold River. Three days later, another stroke sake. As Japan marks the anniversary, it hopes to keep the wartime memories alive using the stories of people who survived the attacks. On all. Holland. But the average age of survivors is now over eighty three. But those. This'll be the last chance to hear from those witnesses during a major anniversary. August sixth nineteen forty five was supposed to be a day off for seventeen year old. Takeo to Toco. No Snyder is the economists Tokyo Bureau chief. She had made plans to meet two girlfriends at eight fifteen owning at a train station on the west side of Shema. She was running late, and then she stepped outside, she saw flash and heard a bang. Which you regained consciousness, she found herself lying thirty meters away a mushroom cloud rising over the city. People with charts skin peeling from their arms rushing over a nearby hillside. Mr K. Ohka left's to look for her mother. and. Found rivers filled with bodies took her six days to locate her mom who is still miraculously alive. Mom lived for another twenty two years. We stuck ohka became a prominent voice amongst the hypocrisy shower, atomic bomb survivors, atomic sufferers. Telling Her story abroad many times in hopes of preventing atomic bombs from ever being used again. I heard this tale from her daughter. He got no. Mario. Who's part of a fascinating unique project underway in both your Sima Nagasaki to help preserve the stories, of Hypoxia, for generations to come to, how does this project work? So there are still some hundred and thirty thousand living. inbox. Amiss. Gone. But their average age is now over eighty three and the number who can tell their stories publicly is declining drastically. Just. You got the fact that could have done this. So the city government's in both fishermen sake have been recruiting scores of volunteers like music Otieno to become what they call dense Shosha or legacies successors. These are essentially memory keepers, people who learned the stories of the hypoxia down to the most gruesome details in order to be able to retell them with power and veracity for years into the future do. So the volunteers in, Hiroshima, have to go through a rather rigorous course, three years of study training discussion with hypoxia before they're allowed to retell the stories in public. Ms Higashi, no is somewhat unusual in that. She inherited own story, most of the Dan Shosha, take on a stranger's burden. And it simply because that's that generation of of survivors passing that the these city governments have started this program. Yeah, it is. It's really reflective of the anxiety that many people in here, C.`mon, Nagasaki and throughout Japan feel about fading wartime memories I'm what will happen. Once this generation firsthand witnesses passes away the city governments and the peace museums. Atomic bomb museums in both cities have been collecting and recording testimony for many years. But this then social program is away, they hope to preserve these memories in living form to retain the emotional impact. The comes from searing these stories from another human being. and. So where does this fit in with the the wider of up the bombing of of the war in Japan? For Japan, the Hiroshima Experience became central to wartime memory and park has some scholars have argued because it allows victim narrative to dominate shifting the focus away from the atrocities Japanese soldiers committed abroad in Asia and the Pacific certainly oaks in China and Korea have bristled at the lack of context that some of the retailing's of the aroma and Nagasaki experiences or trey. and. If you look at Japan today, it's of course, wrestling a new with the legacy of the Second World War and its aftermath in particular the constitution that America imposed on Japan after the war, which renounces war bars Japan from maintaining armed forces. In practice, Japan does maintain a powerful military which it calls the Self Defense Forces and its Prime Minister Obey Shinzo years has hoped to change the constitution to revise the constitution in order to make explicit that Japan's military is constitutional and and perhaps to expand the limits of what they're allowed to do. Curiously, the public still supports maintaining the postwar constitution. So in short pacifism is still deep seated in today's Japan. and. What about the the the effort of auction others to to learn the lessons of the second. World War d? How does nuclear non-proliferation look at this stage from where you are. Well. This is another source for concern. Of course, non-proliferation efforts in recent years have been faltering just this January. The Bulletin of Atomic Scientists. It's doomsday clock. It's subjective measure of our proximity to self-annihilation closer to midnight than anytime since its establishment in one, thousand, nine, hundred, eighty, seven, the hawks are are pleased and take solace in the signing of the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons in two, thousand, seventeen, it invokes there unacceptable suffering in its preamble and a nod to how the memory of interesting Nagasaki continues to shape non-proliferation efforts globally yet at the same time, no country with nuclear weapons has signed up to that treaty neither has Japan in fact, which shelters under America's nuclear umbrella. And, and how does that sit with Hypoxia at this stage at this anniversary being marked. I spoke with US Akihiko the governor of the prefecture, and he expressed the view that I heard from many others both your seem sake, which was a wish that Japan would use its moral authority as the only victim of atomic weapons to push harder for their abolition. The hypocrisy. Have Long gramps and spoken about abolishing the bomb before the last houses away. Just to make the do. You call. You can. That's unlikely. But the hypocrisy hope that their stories at the very least. Deter the world from ever using his weapons again. Thank you very much for your time. Thank you very much for having me.

Japan Hypoxia Hiroshima Nagasaki Bulletin Of Atomic Scientists Sima Nagasaki Untold River Mr K. Ohka Dan Shosha Toco America Takeo Holland Ms Higashi Snyder Tokyo Bureau Chief Mario United States
75 years after Hiroshima, they're still feeling its impact.

Between The Lines

09:42 min | Last month

75 years after Hiroshima, they're still feeling its impact.

"This bomb has this frank for twenty thousand tons of TNT. Harnessing, the basic power of the universe. What I fifteen I am on August six, nine, hundred, forty, five, the US Air Force dropped the little boy uranium fission bomb on central hero. Shema. Making it the first city ever to be destroyed by a nuclear bomb. On August nine Nagy became the second when the bomb exploded around thirty percent of Hiroshima's population that were killed instantly many more died in the months and years to come. Now, the bombs brought to an end to world war two but the wool was horrified at the human cost. Russia has since become a byword for nuclear holocaust forever linked to the words never again. Now, this week marks the seventy fifth anniversary of the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki joining me to reflect on the legacy of those events. Tashi. Tauch. She is assistant professor at Georgetown University's School of Foreign Service and the author of political fallout, nuclear weapons testing, and the making of Global Environmental Crosses. Welcome. Tasha. Thanks for having me and Michael Gordon Professor of history at Princeton University and Co. it is a of a new book called the age of Russia. Welcome. Welcome. It's very good to be here. Now, Michael the fear of the nuclear age is the period after World War Two when the US dropped the bomb. The fee was that the nuclear weapons would become a common part of conventional warfare but in the seventy five years since he Russia and Nagasaki, there's not been a single bomb dropped in a conflict. Question is this because deterrence works or have we just been lucky I would say we've mostly been lucky It's quite rare that there are conflicts between nuclear-armed nations. The major example is the nineteen sixty, nine border conflict between the People's Republic of China and the Soviet Union. So there haven't been many occasions for things to escalate, and there's a strong incentive in those cases to de-escalate. There have however been very close near accidents whether missile just that needing on its own or people launching almost launching in fear of an attack and there. Have Been Plenty of conventional wars that could have escalated that way. So by and large, we've been lucky but we've been abetted by the fact that there has been an ambient taboo that has grown over the years against nuclear first use although that is rarely the policy of any nuclear power. Okay. Now from an Australian perspective, Tic- Japan was seen as an aggressor in the war, the war crimes but also as a victim because of the destruction wrought by the nuclear bombs have is the wool remit in Japan now aggressor and victim. Tarshi. Many pass through consider themselves as victims thinking that Japanese were misled by the government inter- Disastrous Wall Conquest. In this view here stands at the as the ultimate symbol of Japanese victim. But today is victim narrative faces two competing accounts. One is to recognize Japan's acts of wartime aggression, including tweeting massacres, forced labor, and sexual violence. If we see hero Shimmer from this perspective, it takes on a whole different meaning not. Not as a national tragedy, but rather as international event. killed not only the Japanese residents but also many colonial subjects and allied. POW's who are present in the city at the time of the Tom Bombing. The other interpretation that has also gained for Japan is to see the wartime conduct Japan as an act of self defense. This This lesion is narrative recaps here. As the ultimate proof of Western aggression. So fitting the predation of Japan's Joel Roles as. Aggressor and victim during the war will gain the upper hand in the future will depend on how sweet society around the world comes together and develops a shared understanding of the complex legacies or Corna reason on the war in the Asia Pacific region and back to the United States markle. There's a popular conception that Washington had to drop the bomb that it was the only way. To win the war, of course, the war in Europe come to an end in May of forty five. This is early August two, forty five is that true I mean what? What President Truman's options? So. This is a great question and it's one with a lot of confusion around it. Functionally. The only way the only government that had any power to end the war was the Japanese government which was in a position to surrender and the question was when would that happen would have happened later or earlier by summer nineteen, forty, five, it was already clear that the war was militarily lost. President Truman and the US government in general had basically fixed options of what they could do to try and encourage the Japanese government to take that move. There's only two that people usually talk about dropping the atomic bomb or invading the home islands of Japan. Both of those were on the table also having the Soviet Union inducing them to enter the wars of belligerent which happened on August eighth increasing the intensity of firebombing tightening the blockade of foodstuffs into the home islands. and modifying the terms of unconditional surrender to allow Japan to keep the emperor. The interesting thing is all six of those happen Truman pursued all sex and the war ended. It's unclear which ones were determinative. But the point is there wasn't like we had one option or nothing else. The US had plenty of options and exercised actually all of them. On the one level target for the bombs was obviously Japan on another level. Real target was the Soviet Union. How did the Kremlin of you? He Russia Mirror Negga? Second Markle. So. Really, the question here is a small set of people within the Kremlin stolen and his closest advisers and you that there was an atomic bomb project going on in the United States for years they've found that out from spies from Britain from spies in the United States, and they had their own uranium enrichment and bomb development program that was going on at I would say a medium scale What happens after the destruction of Hiroshima is I in absented himself for a few days he went into a depression and didn't. React to any of his advisors and then immediately massively escalated the Soviet development of their own atomic bomb. So they were both caught by surprise and not caught by surprise. It's true that the Americans didn't always think about the Soviet Union as a factor in any decision related to how the war was going to end but they also very strongly, we understood that the key issue was trying to get this the Japanese government to surrender faster because the faster they surrendered the less impact. The Soviet entry in the war would have to how the end game would play out in Asia, my guest, Michael Gordon, and Tashi Hitachi, and we're reflecting on the seventy fifth anniversary of Hiroshima. Tashi. One, hundred fifty thousand atomic bomb survivors still living in Japan. In fact, as a guest of Japan's Ministry of Foreign. Affairs this would have been in September twenty, sixteen I met one of one of the survivors now they're all in education and public law has plied an important part in shaping Japan's post-war Pacifism. Now, as generation dies out, is the role of pessimism in Japanese politics is that diminishing especially in the face of Rausing China Toshi? I don't think the passing of the atomic bomb survivors will diminish the strengths of pacifism in any short-term. The correctly memory of human magazine Japan has been fairly robust and the taken deep roots in popular culture. I can think of a good example that is Japanese animated wartime drama film released just four years ago in two thousand, sixteen cold in this corner of the world. This picture accounts of the wartime life in here she was a smash hit in the box office. Be, atomic bomb survivors will also active in passing down lessons from the world's first nuclear war to the next generation. The city's over here streaming nagy training. Many Japanese Ron Tears as storytellers who share the testimonies are waging victims and a second generation survivors are spearheading efforts for peace unjustice. Well, that brings me to today and really in the last that he is the end of the call was thirty years ago the US. And the Soviets on Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty non stop this was President Bush senior and Gorbachev in Russia in the inside at Union. Then just as it was collapsing now, both agree to significantly reduce their nuclear stockpiles and of course, the updated treaty between Moscow and Washington that expose I. Think it's February Knicks Jeez. So that's just a few days after the next president is warning Michael Do you think it will be resigned. I think that's entirely dependent on the results of the election. Joe. Biden has indicated that he would refine the treaty The trump administration has had many opportunities to re-sign the treaty, but they have not taken advantage of those opportunities yet. Russia's indicated that they're very interested in extending

Japan United States Soviet Union Hiroshima Michael Gordon Russia Japanese Government President Truman Nagasaki Us Air Force Tic- Japan Washington Nagy President Bush
Judge sentences ex-MSU coach to jail in Nassar-related case

AP News Radio

00:52 sec | 2 months ago

Judge sentences ex-MSU coach to jail in Nassar-related case

"The former head gymnastics coach at Michigan State University has been sentenced to jail for lying to police about what she do about abuse by university Dr Larry Nassar Cathy Clegg is said at trial that she did not remember being told about abuse by former Olympic and Michigan State University doctor Larry Nassar she was found guilty by a jury in February of lying to police and today she's been sentenced to ninety days in jail and eighteen months of probation Nassar was sentenced in twenty eighteen to forty two hundred and seventy five years in prison for decades of serial abuse to hundreds of athletes several of Nassar's victims testified the greatest knew about the abuse two of them spoke ahead of the sentencing Larissa Boyce sekaligus held up a piece of paper in front of her when she was sixteen and older if she filed a report there could be serious consequences for her voice that she was representing her sixteen year old self was silenced and humiliated and all of the hundreds of girls that were abused after her I'm Jennifer king

Michigan State University Dr Larry Nassar Cathy Clegg Larry Nassar Jennifer King Larissa Boyce
Judge sentences ex-MSU coach to jail in Nassar-related case

AP News Radio

00:52 sec | 2 months ago

Judge sentences ex-MSU coach to jail in Nassar-related case

"The former head gymnastics coach at Michigan State University has been sentenced to jail for lying to police about what she do about abuse by university Dr Larry Nassar Cathy Clegg is said at trial that she did not remember being told about abuse by former Olympic and Michigan State University doctor Larry Nassar she was found guilty by a jury in February of lying to police and today she's been sentenced to ninety days in jail and eighteen months of probation Nassar was sentenced in twenty eighteen to forty two hundred and seventy five years in prison for decades of serial abuse to hundreds of athletes several of Nassar's victims testified the greatest knew about the abuse two of them spoke ahead of the sentencing Larissa Boyce sekaligus held up a piece of paper in front of her when she was sixteen and older if she filed a report there could be serious consequences for her voice that she was representing her sixteen year old self was silenced and humiliated and all of the hundreds of girls that were abused after her I'm Jennifer king

Michigan State University Dr Larry Nassar Cathy Clegg Larry Nassar Jennifer King Larissa Boyce
Charlie Kirk: Coronavirus stimulus

The Charlie Kirk Show

28:10 min | 2 months ago

Charlie Kirk: Coronavirus stimulus

"And you have Schumer Pelosi. In Biden one hundred twenty five years, Charlie Kirk of failure, unmitigated failure, swap failure and I. Think of my kids. You met my son. He's twenty one years old. My daughter's eighteen and I would think about your America their America and when I say you know, live free or die, American, the world on the brink I'm not joking. And very specifically will be probably the biggest choice election by far in my lifetime, and maybe since eighteen sixty, and there's a lot at stake We can go through the issues if you want, but it's. It's there's there's not one issue we agree on that. I can think of for the most part yet, and you wrote this, and it just really sent chills down my spine. You wrote this book to sound an alarm as a warning. Warning to my fellow patriots about the left's undying commitment turn America into a land, our parents, founders and framers wouldn't recognize it. It's perfectly put, and that's the direction that they're headed on page twenty seven. You have a great part about how Ben Franklin says we ever republic. If you can keep it, can you talk more about how this truly is? A referendum election in some sense and the left is trying to do to our country. Well the the story about Franklin's interesting, because it's, it's the constitutional convention and somebody says he comes out one days, says, is it a monarchy republic republic? If you can keep it Reagan, I quote him off. When I give speeches, said Freedom Charlie and you know this is but one generation away from extinction. And you know when if you want understand if socialism is adopted if their stated goal is adopted America as we know, it then becomes unrecognizable look, I can understand psychologically. There's a component of maybe people that that have been indoctrinated in schools, and you're great at this because you're going in to hostile environments every day, and you're saying you know what there's another way of thinking here, so maybe the idea that people think Charlie that some things are oh, everything's going to be free and they're gonNA forgive my loans at I'll have a guaranteed government job guaranteed government food. How did obamacare workout now? We're GONNA have Medicare for all or or double down on the stupidity of Obamacare and guaranteed retirement. Guaranteed vacation sounds great. But simple math shows you that you'll never get there. And that's why in the Fourth Chapter of the book did this whole history of socialism which is a history of failure? The point is look at the issues. If if we're talking about law and order. They've cited in Portland in Seattle and new. York and Chicago with the radicals. Joe Biden his yet that I know of said one good thing about the ninety nine percent of cops protect and serve and put their lives on the line for us every day. You're right. Okay, so law and order taxes. He's pledging to raise your taxes through the roof. That will destroy the economy Then they're gonNA just add all the bureaucracy. The Donald Trump spent almost four years. Eliminating that'll be gone. That means nobody's GONNA WANNA DO Business. That's why the Biden Obama economy was so bad. Then you look at where now energy independent for the first time in seventy five years with a number, one producer of energy in the world will lose that for sure We'll shut down coal fracking. Oil Gas exploration production those tens of millions of jobs high paying jobs career jobs for people. Then it's about amnesty. Or the United Sanctuary states of America versus Border Security and law and order of never mind foreign policy. We haven't even touched that part yet, so. There's a lot at stake. If those plans stated plans are implemented. America will go down the past you know. The Trash bin of history as Reagan, said Freedom One generation away from extinction we will. It I shudder to think what will happen the three you and your children by kids, and and maybe one day grandkids. ARE READY FOR THAT And I love the framing, because as the founder said either we're GonNa live free and defendant right now, or we're gonNA. Have a country that you know. We don't WanNa live it, and that's really the framing. That is so important right now, and you talk about and I'm really pleased about this. Shawn because I think we have forgotten about the Russia hoax too quickly in. In the conservative movement, you have been the leader on this every night. You were covering it. You didn't let us forget you help. Muller Accountable, you had investigative journalism and it just seemed that an Oxana names, but other conservatives just kind of drifted away from like Oh. That's what happened happened. You have two chapters on this in the book. Can you talk about that? Yeah I mean I call it Charlie, the the biggest corruption abuse of power scandal in history and the Ukraine was oh. Okay, we failed with Muller after three years. We won't. We won't even bother with a special prosecutor not to I'm going backwards here but to get to Ukraine. You? Know they're talking about quid pro quos, but you have to ignore their presidential candidate on video saying you're not getting a billion US tax payer dollars unless you're fire. That prosecutor is named Shokhin. WHO's investigating my son Hunter who went on a and said? Do you have any experience in oil? No Gas, no energy, nope, any experience in Ukraine. Nope, why are you being paid millions? No, because you dad, so there was a quid pro quo and millions of dollars for the Biden I call crime family. That's exactly right, so. Listen and China's even worse. You get to this whole thing what we now know and I believe what's coming. It's like, and this is where the media's corrupt because. They're just the propaganda wing of all things democratic. Socialist. We now know and have all the evidence that we'd ever need is that they protected their favorite candidate. Hillary Clinton. For things you and I and everybody you know that follows you and you have a massive audience would. Literally never get away with. If you had subpoenaed emails Charlie Kirk and you decided to delete them, and you decided to acid. Wash your hard drive with something. I had never heard about bleeped bleach bit and bust up your devices with hammers. You'd go to jail. If you violated the espionage act, you'd go to jail. They protected her. Then the narrative began we now know began in August. We know crossfire hurricane representatives actually went to brief. President Trump General Flynn. Flynn on national security, but they were there to try and get information on trump and Russia, the most amazing part of this, because the Democrats and the media live for all these years is that they knew and they said and they wrote, and they even testified. There was never any evidence, but there was a dirty Russian dossier. And now we know even the New York Times acknowledged full full of Russian disinformation and that was used. And they were warned not to use it, but high ranking people abusing their power, wanting to take out candidate, trump, transition, team, trump, and then deep into the Presidency Donald Trump. They use the dirty Russian misinformation dossier to ruin Carter pages life and roomed his civil liberties and constitutional rights, but more importantly to spy on candidate trump, and then they had their insurance policy. The fact that the mob in the media ignores it is beyond comprehension. I have so I have two chapters. One is on the Russia hoax, and the other is on this whole impeachment witch hunt. And I want everybody in your audience to understand one thing here if I can get one point across. Yeah, they hate Donald Trump, but they hate us more. They think we are as Peter. Struck, said the smell by the way I probably shop at Walmart say money. Why not you have a woman I love Walmart I love COSCO's. I Love I love it all. And I've shopped there my whole life I mean people always stopped me when I'm in a grocery? So, what are you doing here? Shopping? Wa I like to eat a cracks me up. So but think about that. smelly Walmart Shoppers while irredeemable deplorables, wow! Bitter Americans as Obama said that WANNA cling to their God. I'm guilty their Second Amendment Rights Guilty Bibles and religion I'm guilty of that, too. But. It's contempt for your audience. It's contemporary my audience. It's because they knew better. And they will ling. This was an attempted coup. Now do I think there's going to be arrests and prosecutions I? Do spend much slower than any of us would have liked, but the evidence is overwhelming. It's incontrovertible sad actually that this could happen. That was going to be my follow up. Question Sean because when I travel and we get thousands of e mails a on this topic. When are people going to go to jail? And can you give me insight on this? Can you give us any clues any crumbs that we're starting to see from Durham? It's I call them. It's funny. You say crumbs because call them the the Attorney General Bar breadcrumbs. It's like Hansel and Gretel. Remember. We're we're trying to follow and see the trail exactly yeah. He did say that the president was spied on. It did happen illegally. The. Think about this. If you go before Judge Judy I wouldn't WANNA lot because Judge Judy I. I've met her once she'll eviscerate. You I watched her show. You. Don't go before a court. The information that you have not verified. It actually said at the top of a FISO Warren Charlie. It says verified. Okay. We now know the dossier was unverifiable. The sub source we now know, said this this bar talk. We were making this up. This was never meant for anything and again Hillary paid for it funneled money separate issue. And so, what is going to happen I don't have a crystal ball but I. do know all of the facts that are in the public. Are Enough to indict many of the names that your audience is most familiar with. I would argue. Komi McCabe struck page. I'd like to know a clapper. Brennan's role in all of this ends up being and and others. The more fascinating deep question is. Will they get to that January fifth twenty seventeen meeting inside the Oval Office? This is when member Biden said George Stephanopoulos Oh I. Don't know. Anything about this, you know this whole impeachment Russia thing. He was the one same. Bring up the Logan Act fifteen days later Susan Rice in that meeting did the Cya memo the day that Donald Trump was inaugurated. Obama in that meeting shot Sally Age by saying a He. He knew everything about the Kislyak Michael Flynn call. If we look. To sum it up. I think we're GONNA get there because the evidence. Is that overwhelming? If we don't. I fear for the country? Because of you. GonNa Raid Manafort's home predawn raid and you're going to raid Roger Stone's home. For lying to Congress by the all many of the names I mentioned were referred for the same crime and you're gonNA. Pull it twenty nine guys in tactical gear, frogmen and tip off CNN cameras and. Have a biased jury for person. We won't have equal justice and equal application of our laws, and worse than that Charlie is. We lose our constitution. Yes, all our laws are are predicated on next great document and some `perfect, but it creates the path to perfection at a more perfect union so. Long answers. I'M GONNA talk. Show I love it. No, this is what our audience needs to hear, and and thank you for that and look I I completely agree because if we do not have people and I, say this as carefully as I can in handcuffs for what they did Donald Trump then I I will lose faith in the American justice system I. Don't want that and I don't want revenge I don't retribution I want people to be held accountable and I would want the same if someone did this to Barack Obama because it should never happen to a leader ever. Yes. and. They've gone after every single trump friend confidant, and yet if you oppose Donald Trump you get different treatment, talk a lot about the constitution in your book and the founding of our country, Sean going to be honest, I've been very let down by some of these supreme. Court decisions lately Can you comment on that and the importance to get more people like Kavanagh? Who's actually ruled brilliantly? Unlike John Roberts. I! I'm a little. I don't know what's happening. Roberts I have my theory I guess I have my sources people that. have their own ideas based on some knowledge? For whatever reason and I think this goes back to the obamacare decision. He has allowed. How the court appears to influence his decision making. I also sense with no evidence whatsoever. You're not a big fan of president trump, but that should not come into his thinking. Now. If getting rid of bureaucracy and lowering taxes and energy, independence, and securing our borders, and law and order are all part of this election. Let me tell you another big part of it. And it's you know we're taping this ninety. Whatever days away from the Election Day, I what about and we got asked. What about the Supreme Court? Yes, I go through a whole list I. Forget what paid maybe sixty seven I forget. A. In the book. Of. All the things Democrats would do if they're getting power one, is they? WanNa, stack the courts. Get rid of the Electoral College. And I. What, they're saying they. WanNa do is scary. They used to hide it Charlie. When I every single Liberal Democrat running for office, they would run to the left in the primary. They race back to the center, but you knew they wanted the left. There now openly embracing the most radical elements in the country and you know. Unfortunately we're watching it all. Play out nightly on TV and and that sad what I see happening when I think we have to remind a trump supporters that these are not trump appointed justices, a gorsuch I think ruled incorrectly on one ruling. That's it besides that gorsuch and cavenaugh have been tremendous and terrific verses Roberts. I just think we have to give the audience a sense. Sense of continued conviction that the trump appointed justices will continue to rule correctly and Clarence. Thomas and you know the the Thomas Family. They get no credit at all. I mean what he has done. And can you comment on that? 'cause I, E, you've actually been you open my eyes to that like eight years ago and I never learned about Clarence Thomas as a high schooler until you I mentioned it just as a quick aside on his incredible career. I like to do on TV and antidote on radio, too. Sometimes I call it the Hannity history, lesson 'cause I lived through all of this. I know this is going to see. You're not even thirty three, but my radio journey started in nineteen eighty-seven crazy right. Now on my twenty fifth year of Fox, I didn't think I last two. So I feel very blessed. As a side note if you haven't read my grandfather's son. Which is about Clarence Thomas is life. It's amazing. But. You know it's interesting because him and Scalia. To my opinion, my to most favorite justices in my lifetime. Scalia this incredible wit and genius and understanding and. They got a little acerbic side to when when he was questioning Clarence Thomas always set by quietly. What they called a high tech lynching at the time, the more modern. Let it. You gotTA. Remember Yeah. And you know. It was then Senator Ted Kennedy you know Robert Bork's America the borking of America. That was Clarence Thomas. Now we see it more recently cavenaugh. It exposes. The, who is Joe Biden? Who is his team? Because Clarence Thomas and Justice Scalia or the people we need on that court. We call them constitutionalists or originalists, the original intent, not people that would sight foreign law as liberal justices have done or not people that feel that they can rule by judicial Fiat and dictate or legislate from the bench. Democrats always wanted the court to do that which they could never. Do legislatively or win at the ballot box and that's why they want. We call them. Activists Justices Clarence Thomas. has shown a fidelity to the Constitution at the Antony Scalia. That is beyond enviable And the differences styles always interesting, too because Justice Thomas will always be quiet. That's very few questions. Anthony Scalia was in there in a wrestling with people. I don't know about John Roberts. I can't get into it, but I do believe the next president United States is a very good chance. You have a lot of older justices may want to retire. And I think that the next this election in just three short months. That's on the ballot and that's that's generational now. And Sean I think we have to pressure the Biden campaign to do what trump did and release a list of justices I mean president trump was so transparent and Joe Biden hasn't done it yet. Intentionally, of course, because he'll probably put repeated to lieber something on the United States Supreme Court I mean as horrifying as that might be so in two two quick closing question Sean and thank you for being so generous with your time anchorage, everyone you know. Know go by live, free or die. the first is this. Can you just talk about? We are heading into the election. A lot of trump supporters. They're failed. They're falling victim. They suppression pulse I wish that wasn't the case, but it seems like the memory of two thousand sixteen as faded where people forget. We were down by double digits. Can you just give a little vote of confidence to some of our listeners out there? That think we're just losing. I WANNA. Give the vote of confidence, but I want people to feel this way. I want people to think I'll use a football analogy that our mutual friend Linda that you know. Who's your biggest fan? My radio producer? He's amazing. Amazing, but she doesn't even know how many points you get a touchdown, so I'm giving these football analogies. I, want this election. I want people to feel the way I feel which is. We're on our own twenty. Two minutes to go. We have no time outs We're down by six. We got a cross. The plane marched down the field, cross the plane and hit the extra point to win. So if people feel a sense of genuine urgency and worry and concern, I'm cool with that because fear often as a great motivator, not irrational field fear, but if people do not vote, you will get the government that they're telling you. They're going to give you believe. That that is their agenda. To be a Republican and win. You GotTa always use this analogy got to run the table I gotTA. Get Florida Georgia North Carolina can't win without Ohio. No Republican's ever become president without it right? You got hold Iowa then you got pick off Pennsylvania Wisconsin hopefully Michigan maybe MINNEA- Minnesota will be play. Maybe the city of Arizona will be in play. By Joe Biden reference for those of you. That didn't get. We got a hold Arizona Gopher Nevada New Mexico. New Hampshire and Maine's second congressional district. If every single mom, this is a battle cry. You started out this interview with this. I wrote this book not because I like writing books. My last book I donated every Penny I made to charity I don't care. It's not that. This is a tipping point. Charlie this is I, don't. See if these policies are implemented how America recovers. Irreparable harm the to the rule of law to our courts to our economy, they want to wipe out the lifeblood of of the world's economy. This this promise of socialism and I go into such detail about how it's always failed. Here's a quick socialism of example. Member obamacare. Keep your doctor keep your plan. Save on average twenty five hundred dollars a year per family right? Okay. Millions lost their doctors. Millions lost their plans. We're all paying about two hundred percent more and add to that. Forty percent of Americans almost forty percent have only one obamacare Biden Carriage James Choice now. How did they do with that promise? Medicare is going broke. How did they do it? That promised social security. Charlie hate the break this here. He paying into it. You probably won't get it I. Barely Skate through, and they might give me ten cents until they means tested and then take it back, How does it? How did Liberal government work in New York City with all the anarchy cutting a billion dollars, so please? How's IT WORKING IN CHICAGO? All. These liberal cities have where the violence we've been talking about takes place. They all have one thing in common. They've been run by Liberal Democrats for decades right. Most of these states have been run into the ground by Liberal Democrats for decades. If you WANNA know what America will look like if Biden Bolshevik Bernie. Pelosi Schumer and Bozo. That team gets place look at new. York state and city look at Chicago the City Illinois. The State Look at California. Look at Oregon. Look at Portland, the city. Look at Seattle. Look at the state of Washington. Yes. And I. Love this country too much. You know it's an all hands on deck moment and Every everyone of you've got this connection with younger people in this country. You have this incredible. A credible platform you built, and it's become powerful and meaningful and transformative to the country, and you're going out there, and you're fighting on these college campuses and you. You know it's not easy to be in the middle of a I call it a shift. Show all the time, but let's well put, but you do it. And it's freedom works. Every time you give up freedom for security, you lose your freedom because the security that they're offering. These promises that can never ever be fulfilled. In America. The land. I'll close with this unless you want to go further I can keep going the. Barry Farber who was a mentor of mine. Just recently passed away like ninety ninety one. And he always said there's never been a country in the history of mankind that has accumulated more power and abused at less than the United States well I add. A country in the history of mankind that has accumulated more power abused at less, but used it to advanced human condition. The reason America is great and exceptional. If I can say that today, it's not perfect, but it's great. An exceptional is because of its people, and because of the fundamentals of liberty and freedom. So that? Natural rights versus government or rights, natural rights come from God doubt by our Creator. Life Liberty pursuit of happiness while you can't pursue happiness these days in Chicago New York Moreland Seattle. So there's a lot on the line. I love your audience. I'm so thankful for all you're doing, and you've got a great team that you building review and you're out there fighting the fight and I just urge you guys. Just fight like your country depends on it. Because America's, we know it. It's all hanging in the balance. Yet was Sean. You've been so generous the last quick thing I defend the president all the time personally as a person. Can you comment on that because I've had the opportunity to meet him? not as much as you obviously and get to know him, but a lot of people here misrepresentations in lies about who he is as a human being. Let's close on this note. Can you just mention one or two things that that people can take away from that? You know first of all. It's interesting. Nobody seems to understand Donald trump yet. They don't want to understand. I mean Donald Trump. The Dog Bites the beasts, things you feeling sad or get cancer. You Complain Trump. I mean that's how saying the leftist. But here's a guy that is so unique he this guy is like a soon nami force of energy like I've never met my life. The most distinct and unique quality he's had is as president. You mentioned the Supreme Court. He put those people that he said he put. He cut the bureaucracy as he said he'd caught, and he cut the taxes as he said he'd cut. He did the North Dakota. A keystone pipelines Anwar Likey said he would. He's building the wall or almost four hundred miles. A wall by the by election will be over four hundred miles. He found a way it was. It was an uphill climb He said he wanted to pull us out of foreign conflicts, but not back away from evil defeated. The Caliphate took out. Baghdadi and Associates took out Sola Mani took out the Al. Qaeda leader in Yemen. So? What makes him special and unique in terms of presidency is that he is who you see is who you get. The guy that's fights on twitter is the guy that's fighting for a better trade. Deal the guy that fights. Against Liberal Democrats and the media mob is the same guy is fighting to keep his promises that to me makes him the most unique transformative political figure in our lifetime. And Right now. The. We tip the scales. You have a choice. It's never been a bigger choice. He will keep his promises. Coronas been a little bit of a curve ball to the world, but even that ten days after the first case, the only guy that I know of thought about a travel ban will be donald trump. They were teaching at the time and Joe Binder Biden was call them Sinophobic, so he's a man of his word. He's a man that will fight to his last dying breath for this country and the promises he made, and that makes them in my view very transformative. Men will. The book is live for Your Die God bless you, Sean, thank you for that. You do and we really appreciate. It helps you soon. Thanks bye. What a great conversation that was! Please email me or questions freedom. Charlie Kirk Dot Com freedom at Charlie. KIRK DOT COM please type in trolley. Kirk, show your podcast provider. Hit subscribe, give us a five star reviews screen shot at an email us. If you want to win a signed copy of the Maga- doctrine, please get involved with turning-point USA at Teepee USA dot com that is Teepee USA DOT com. Check out divest you. Dot Com if you want to divest some of. Of your dollars from the sinister backwards malevolent higher education cartel check out our professor watchlist, professor watchlist, dot org professor, watchlist dot Org. We have some incredible new additions that you do not want to miss of radicals that are teaching your children right now to hate. America is professor watchlist dot org email me directly freedom at Charlie Kirk Dot Com your ideas and questions. You want me to ask our guests here on the Charlie Kirk show. Thank you guys so much for listening. So next time God bless.

Donald Trump America Joe Binder Biden President Trump Charlie Kirk Sean United States Warren Charlie Barack Obama Russia Chicago Liberal Democrats Seattle Clarence Thomas John Roberts Reagan Biden Obama Trump General Flynn Hillary Clinton York
How Hiroshima survivors helped form radiation safety rules

Science Magazine Podcast

06:53 min | 2 months ago

How Hiroshima survivors helped form radiation safety rules

"Now, we have contributing correspondent Dennis normal. He wrote this week on how seventy five years later. The survivors of the atomic bombs dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki have transformed understanding of the effects of radiation exposure on health. Hi, Dennis Arthur we're talking about study. Now. Run by Ari are asked, which is the Radiation Effects Research Foundation this is a very long-term study as I mentioned almost seventy five years. Years and included many many survivors over one hundred thousand. How exactly did this study get started all those years ago? Virginia's Harry Truman authorized launch of the study was in nineteen, forty, seven. They were pretty much should have a full team on the ground in Yoshii Nagasaki. By nineteen, forty, nine, thousand, nine, hundred fifty. The US Navy realized that there would be a bathroom studying the acute impact and. And the long term impact of what happens to humans when they are subjected to the detonation of Tom These survivors involvement in such a long-term study has yielded an amazing array of results, important results for health for anyone who's exposed to radiation and work or an accident. What are some of the key findings from this work us? Not just one study. They actually have a collection of different studies. Studies, they have carried out the most notable one. Is this enormous life span study where they have as you mentioned one hundred twenty thousand people who were enrolled at the outset? If you put together the combination of number of participants and the length of the study, there's probably nothing else like the RRF in his predecessor ABC city simply gathered data on how radiation has long term effects on health. Health of those who were exposed to radiation the Rif previously ABC gathered that data mix epidemiological connections between the amount of radiation. Someone gets and their risk of developing cancer later in life, other or decisions take that data and data from other studies as well, and they turn those into recommendations for the amount of exposure that people should be allowed to get if they are patient for medical imaging. Imaging, or if they are, the technicians were if their nuclear pact workers this gives away how old I am, but I went to the dentist pornography child. You sit in the dental chair and the dentist would real office machine thick x rays of your teeth, and those were go bouncing all over the room these days for dental x Ray. They put you in a special room which shielded technician. Technician is wearing a badge to track how much radiation he or she is exposed to. You're also wearing that vest to protect your organs from straight X rays all those recommendations shielding around the x ray rooms, dosimetry badges with technicians, where and the vest the patients where they all grew out of basic data that was produced by the long term studies by RRF INC with the survivors we talked. Talked about how this research got started very soon after the bombings, US government, Edna Japanese, government, and boasted research with survivors, but with different purposes. How are they different? Hauer their intentions with the studies different. The ABC was very much an American stony when the ABC's got started was so under America's occupation, and the Japanese scientists had difficulty publishing their observations amount of information that was released Japanese. was very much controlled by the occupation of Nargis, so there were real restrictions on what the Japanese scientists could do, but that initial collection of data by the US groups was over within a few months later there was a decision to set up a long-term study of the effects of radiation and at that point yet. Of the Japanese scientists in the American scientists were pretty much aligned. You mentioned in the story that the survivors weren't treated by the US scientist when they were involved in the study. Initially, that's right. Basically for political reasons, the decision was made that the ABC said he would not offer any treatment to the people who were being examined by the ABC physicians. They concern was that if the ABC city which at that time was very much? American funded American. If. They offered treatment. It might be taken as an admission of culpability in their condition, because misunderstandings and friction between the survivors, many of whom believe that they would get some help for doing with their illnesses with their injuries. Yeah, why would a survivor become involved in the study? If they weren't going to get treatment, even decades later if that was the history of the study. Initially. There was a hope that they would get some sort of medical benefit from participating in the study, the didn't get zero. In particular children that were born to survivors got medical checkups that there would not have received not been part of the study later as one of the survivors told me he has continued to cooperate with the study because he hopes that it will help the world recognize how devastating, the effects are of attack using atomic weapons, and so that is what motivates him to continue to cooperate. It's not clear whether there are. Are Health Effects for the offspring of survivors, but this survivors children are obviously concerned about their health. Can you talk about about this tension with the scientists say is that their studies so far have not identified any affects the question is. Are there no effects or are statistical data simply not detailed enough to spot affects the friction arises. Is that some of the children of the survivors? But we've that they are facing health issues that are not faced by big response were not subjected to the. It's on bond radiation, so the children what? As survivors as second-generation survivors, and they now have to court actions going forward, try to force the the government to recognize that the children of survivors should be recognized, says survivors as well, and that should also be entitled to medical support it just as their parents are

ABC Radiation Effects Research Fou Technician United States Abc City Us Navy Yoshii Nagasaki Dennis Normal Dennis Arthur Hiroshima Nagasaki ARI Virginia Harry Truman Tom These Edna Japanese Rrf Inc Hauer Nargis
Simone Biles Makes 'Vogue' Cover Debut

Ringer Dish

04:41 min | 2 months ago

Simone Biles Makes 'Vogue' Cover Debut

"Move on. Let's talk next. About Simone biles on the cover of Vogue. this is the August issue I believe crowd, yes, correct, and it was timed up for the Olympics which did not happen as you probably are not going to happen as you're likely aware. Yes, I wanted to talk to you about this just for a couple reasons. I was like pretty moved by the story and I just WanNa say so that their profile was written by Abby Aguirre. Who I believe is the same writer who the world, and also we gave a bit of a hard time to you. Because Riana surprised her with her interview a few months back, and we weren't super prepared for. She wasn't super prepared for it, and there was a little pushback there I she was prepared for this and I. This is A. I found like a moving piece. And some of it is the timing there. The reporting begins in March, and it is before lockdown has started for covid nineteen, and before the Olympics have been canceled, and so she's watching Simone biles. Who is the greatest gymnast of all time like? Asked process the this like major personal setback that Olympics what she's been training for. You know Simone biles twenty three years old, and which is on the older side for gymnasts, which is mad Jim. That brass unforgiving. An unforgiving sport in a lot of ways and so having the Olympics post be postponed a year. In addition to you know the training schedule because it her level. There's a level of optimization that we can't even begin to understand but. That has serious consequences for her and her ability to compete, so she's wrestling with all of that. And on top of that if I If you've been following gymnastics at all, then you are aware of just the absolutely horrific crimes committed by Larry Nassar, the former USA gymnastics doctor, who is now serving up to one hundred seventy five years for the sexual abuse, gymnasts and Simone. BYLES has spoken out about being survivor of his abuse and continues to be just a incredibly outspoken. Advocate she isn't an advocate, but she is really trying to hold USA gymnastics accountable, because it is obviously like a much larger problem in organization, and she is doing that while at the same time trying to be the world's top gymnasts. Yeah, it's like so unfair that she has to hold them accountable while also being the best like, can't she just be the best i? It's like it's like yeah, and there is and the. The piece does a great job of putting about all in context, but there is one line which is Simone. Biles is explaining her reaction to the postponement of the Olympics, and she talks about it for all of the athletic and physical and reasons that I just described, but she also goes another year of dealing with USA gymnastics I don't know if I can do it, and because of everything that she's been through and I. was really moved by that and by the whole story, and I mean she's obviously just inspirational and tremendous success. So I. Recommend reading it I think it is exciting that she is on the cover of vogue, because vogue as we know has historically I'm not been representative especially of. A black people and it's pages, and certainly behind the pages as well and so it's great to see on the cover. There has been kind of a side conversation about the photographs. Were taken by any bits and quite frankly are just not great. They are not the standard that they should be for someone on the cover of Ogan ally. The problem is because it does not appear that they are. Let for a black woman they. Don't have the technology and this is a continuing. This has been a long problem in TV and movies, which is just that? Many of the photographers and camera, people and lighting technicians just have not learned how to light for people of Color. And? It's a long term problem, but I think. You know if you're gonNA put smiles on. The cover faded out. Learn like earn it doesn't it doesn't matter just learn how to do figure something out and. You know there's there's another question of. Should any of yeah as I say like? The photographer look I understand she's famous, and like maybe in some ways that gives the story some attention that maybe it wouldn't get but like how about putting some literally putting Simone biles in the best possible. Yes, exactly exactly and if you're going to have an elite, do it then. Make sure. She learned how to do it.

Simone Biles Olympics Abby Aguirre Riana USA Larry Nassar Writer Representative JIM
Thousands gather for Russia's Victory Day parade as Covid-19 cases pass 600k

BBC Newshour

00:34 sec | 3 months ago

Thousands gather for Russia's Victory Day parade as Covid-19 cases pass 600k

"Straight away today in Russia where its victory day marking the Soviet defeat of **** Germany seventy five years ago rather it was victory day more than six weeks ago but the corona virus outbreak meant that it was only today that the government could stage the traditional military parades Russians have nearly six hundred thousand cases of cave in nineteen so far what I'm most scared thousands of servicemen and an array of military hardware move through red square I'm was sent watched over by president Putin who declared glory to the heroes of the Russian

Russia Germany President Putin
Buffalo, New York Mayor Speaks Out About 75-Year-Old Protester Shoved By Police

Rob Pratte

00:59 min | 3 months ago

Buffalo, New York Mayor Speaks Out About 75-Year-Old Protester Shoved By Police

"The mayor of buffalo New York put in place new policies for his city's police department after two officers were allegedly caught on camera shoving the seventy five year old protester Martin get genie hit his head on the ground and started bleeding CBS's Jeff Glor spoke with mayor Byron brown about trying to bridge the gap between law enforcement and the community when my family and I first watch that together there were tears in my house I almost feel it now just thinking about it is this a process that takes a lot longer than most people think but it's a process that has to be approached with a listening ear with an open heart and with great urgency the mayor says he has attempted to see Martin Gugino who is still recovering at a facility now but because of covert nineteen he says he's not been able to visit him in person at a hospital or another location

CBS Jeff Glor Martin Gugino Buffalo New York Byron Brown
"seventy five years" Discussed on Fun with Bells - bell and handbell ringing interviews

Fun with Bells - bell and handbell ringing interviews

13:44 min | 5 months ago

"seventy five years" Discussed on Fun with Bells - bell and handbell ringing interviews

"Bells on the Wednesday before. Yeah I I write about on the way. Oh that was my girlfriend a couple of days later. All the we had always. I won't for much about a wave pool. We right wonder we right in France. Logical wonderful various. Oh the bells this stuff back. That's absolutely wonderful. And I think we should remind listeners. On your one hundred thirsty you also rang. Grant triples some very cool. It appeals that dentists wrong have been reported in the ringing world as such ringing is appeals and quarter peals run to celebrate the victory with published in the ringing worldwide on the eighteenth of twenty fifth of May nineteen forty five. It is interesting that in the days before the Internet. It peels appeared in print within ten days. Who although the postal service was different than many of the peels were simpler methods? Such as playboy major with occasional more complex peels the only twelve bell. Peal was less to cathedral conducted by Harold J pool. This quarter I as his wife who Ryan alongside him was listed as Mris H J pool. The vast majority of ringers in the other appeals. Were also male another sign of those different times. The footnotes will short. So it's difficult to know more about the story behind many of the peels. Today we all used to seeing knows explaining the reasons for ringing such as birthday or wedging aniversary celebration postal milestones at ringing career or to mark special occasion in church life. Footnotes in the victory peels would deliberately restricted to simply recording. Those who wrangler I PEEL? The editor of the ringing world commented there could be no doubt that for the people of England the sound of bells except when it is to call people to prayer can mean one thing and one thing only everything else. Mus give place to that. The editor was any prepared to make an exception for muffled peals in memory of the deceased nevertheless it is to interesting to see that three people rang their first peel at call phone in Yorkshire at Priddle Well said in Essex and had wool in Dorset. Four people rang their first peel at rock board. Cheney near Swindon in Wiltshire on at Harefield in Gloucestershire even more extraordinary is that five people wrangler I did in Somerset at berries an Edmonds Cathedral and at Bray in Berkshire. No doubt is five people ringing their first deal together quite an achievement on hardly ever achieve nowadays but the ten bells at. Bray and buries an edmonds are around one and a half tons which is heavy well over. Three Hours. Ringing would have been thirsty. Work in May the editorial on the eighteenth of May also commented that since the break of war the attitude of people towards bells has been different to what it had been for many years before and encountered ringers to retain that respect and support by remembering. The Bell should be rung so that they give pleasure to those who hear them outside. And now. We're going to listen to Allen. Talk to Eric Hitchens. Who was one of those who rang their first peel on the day? Eric I understand that you learned to ring before the end of global two. Could you explain to listeners? How that about way you were more happened. Perhaps told you then who else who's involved. Okay it really evolves around. The situation you shouldn't have been ringing was been possibly becoming available again. Follow the gets you personally harder. And it was a up to north proctor in Wiltshire English. It's the powers in which we live because family. He had the foresight to things that it ordered. Got The bills moving again more. And there's going to be needed chose to look at the choir how it's being PAU source and indeed. Saudi hop and he invited us to come up to the tower must have been quite persuade too because all of us decided that that's what we do and so does for started and of course at this time the ban was still for on and get there for the whole issue with us being taught to handle those silent and regrets. Gusta quarterly a way and subsequent when the ban was lifted. It'll run bringing was allowed again. We were helplessly to tight part. I was on the eleventh time. I was the youngest of three. All this to ninety twenty two. I guess so I stood up with the bully Inter night brother nothing so we've progressed and ultimately by this time no doubt talk to Jay Day or eighty days such as I was coming to light and therefore we were but the drunks and by the telling the The day take place. We'd all capable rigorous now eric. I understand the day was actually a very special day in your personal ring journey. Can you tell us about the day you in the bound? North badly achieved so won't be achieve eight. We met all because of this morning service or not. I rang for the service. Or a service dictation really and offer the service came in lunchtime and then we tend to be right. It's talking the Austin. I was reading my I peel. I stood in the tower. I think going to Earth Inc aside the two others Madan actual first times as well so we were quite happy to go ahead and was myself my brother going harding. Who is a previous making stop? Who was that you were there myself. Personally harding who called the pill say on harboring so three new ones and it's Pretty Oakland the does it thrill stood day. Hungry grants dot rules and all. You'RE GONNA travel so was I on so that was it so weaver. Them effectively is pence companies. Two Thousand Fifteen minutes unsure. How on earth like stealing one place all outside. But it cost eventually and therefore we came to be the brexit books. That's that he's fantastic. Eric so a notice I because that was on the day. Can you tell us? What else rain on the individ- and things happened off to you on new day. It'd be chugging mentioned. That was nuts it Sunday for this and so on the green it was actually a two day holiday or to the great and of course the school children were. They like to out. Because I didn't go to school but needless to say the local people in the village is decorated hall made arrangements since the meal and celebrations of all sorts of. That's right yeah. She celebrated as Children's Day and call now from what side. Tedesco color her. She lives a to index storage organized. The Party and the progressive whole pull was decorated and featured which provided by the north? Talking Book there must have been a hundred fifty children We had a wonderful eastern great things on the case Eric. The food was reasonably difficult to come by other too. I says all these ingenious ladies and cooks and people time to find the necessary so that that stand tastic. Thank you Eric for sharing your story with us. That's wonderful it's closer going back. All the rate running the pill not an another run rejoined this Two words unfortunately though. They've all cost by delay. So I'm the last one note in the fine absolutely an older you now are actually ninety in November two. Well fantastic younger all the others. I lost my brother Lawrence who is in the last year so Hanging on you know very good hit. You'll still going strong eric. And thank you for this. It's delightful memories and so to sum up in World War Two. The Bells were initially assigned. What might have sounded like an important role in the defense of the country but was in effect a ban on ringing. It took over two years but this ban was lifted by an order at the highest level in the land and before the end of the war having initially supported the government the world afterwards called it little more than rather stupid bureaucratic interference. After the plan we can see with the benefit hindsight that ring did recover and with renewed confidence and the affection of the British people are bells was fully revealed. Bell ringers rang in force on vide. So that many people in remember the ban and the bells ringing again on that day leading historians too often get this story wrong. We can learn many lessons from what the Bell Rings did when confronted with the ban in World War. Two their inventiveness and the optimism and their determination to practice their ringing throughout and what. Today's ban bell ringers are increasingly using technology to sustain their absorbing fascination with the art more of that in a later episode of Fun with Bells. Now we should follow the advice. Stay home protect the NHS and save lives but look forward as ringing forebears did to the day when bell ringing resumes and the sound of bells will once more be apart of the soundscape. The readers in this episode were in order of appearance. Steve Johnson of Samaria Bow London Simon Davis of Kensington. Jill Belcher of L. Shilton Bob Christopher of Maids Morton Graham nab of Kinison Nick Brett of rugby filled tremendous column Major nattily Brett of rugby Jenny Lawrence of Mavin. Simon Limpet of Saint Martin's Birmingham President of the Central Council of Church Bell ringers. Andrew will be of Tyler and the Taylor's Bell Foundry Stephen Hall of fame. Chris Right of killed Wick. Andrew Johnson of Twyford Judith. Fry of Dunblane Simon head of warden on the Green Chris bullied of potential Stewart Newton of sedans on the see Alison Davis of whipsnade and Mars with Richard Booth of Mars worth all of a bouquet of Wolverhampton Matthew Turner of Rumney Cardiff Helen. Mcgregor of any in the Channel Islands Jonathan Stewart of politicial Andrew Booth of new offered unless Boyce of Tiverton. We also heard the voices of Allen Reagan Steward of the roles of owner who curated the articles from the ringing world and interviewees. Dennis Brooke and Eric Hitchens. The recruited bells greats. Mary's Cambridge were run by the Society of Cameras. Youths are thanks. Also go too leslie. Belcher chair of the Association of Ringing Teachers who support this podcast series. Sue whole for the PODCAST and translate Thomas. He wrote the show nate's rose nightingale who coordinated the readers and their contributions Beth Johnson and David Smith for the article in the Ring World Vickie Chapman of the Central Council of Church Bell ringers Roger Booth for script assistance and editorial consultant John. Gwynn technical support was provided by Steve Johnson phone with bells is devised produced and presented by Kathy booth..

Bells Eric Hitchens Association of Ringing Teacher Allen Reagan Steward France Jenny Lawrence Jay Day editor Bell Rings Andrew Johnson Richard Booth Ryan Roger Booth Peal Wiltshire English Chris Right Channel Islands harding
"seventy five years" Discussed on Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

04:25 min | 11 months ago

"seventy five years" Discussed on Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

"Mom is seventy five years old age she lives down there Brando which by wild way every Saturday Randall shar my mom was sitting in her recliner cool but I'd like Branagh I'm in Georgia I might be at a bar I might be at home I might be out of date what all of my group no better something big happens my mom is going to call me all three and even a bad place you ask me what the hell is the coach thank you we lost Alabama really my mom six three that she was going to call the president of the university of Georgia they get all of her tuition money but I think my mom would thank you ever for five year olds my mom did not say she will let me know our brands like what is tomorrow well it's way more fun when your family members are riding are dying with the team to you or it gets in your case it might even be the opposite team well that's a fun story when thank you so much for sharing with that with us and please tell your mama that we said hello she can call up and she can't because but you can call up and talk football anytime with us all right thanks I know a lot of you have stories of older family member seventy five is not old but older family members maybe you do have some elderly parents or grandparents who are big into their sports as well and maybe that's why you are into a particular team why you ride or die Nick is feeling the same thing rather die team for sure is Georgia football John said the Miami Dolphins from the eighties Dan Marino baby Clayton in Sacramento my ride or die team is the Sacramento Kings I'm nineteen I've seen almost every game across those nineteen years me and my dad have a bond that could never be replaced because of this team does it matter win or lose Clayton I love that tweet thank you so much for sending it to us and thank you for listening Kyle says if I only had five years to watch one team it would definitely be the Seahawks just because the Russell Wilson but I give it all up for one year the mariners no you can't pick what you have to ride or die and if you go with the Seahawks and the mariners make the playoffs will then you're just going to miss it that's the whole point Gary the first one to give us a soccer team he says the New England revolution let's see ten a month I've been a falcon fan since the first Superbowl I've gone through the post Vick era two thousand ten thirteen three Green Bay comes down here it's banks us the two thousand twelve even San Fran comes and went to the last minute no call for Roddy and of course the infamous twenty eight three broke my pinky after that I'm not gonna ask how he says I still ride or die against him I love it and then Mike I'm a ride or die Dallas Cowboys fan since the Tony doors that indeed any white days you guys are blowing up our social media this is so much fun of you tell me the story that part is cool too I love with story about his mom that's fantastic Curtis says my ride or die team is the Charlotte Hornets what anybody else says the Charlotte Hornets because I've been with them since nineteen eighty eight all right good stuff and we now people on the phones you want to weigh in as well so the hypothetical I know it's not fair but you know life is not fair if you could only watch follow at Dodge root for one team for the next five years who would it be hashtag ride or die baby or hurt in the case of our Browns fan on Facebook ride or die LOL I hate LOL it's one of my pet peeves the fact I even shared it is that you know just because of catching and clever thanks so much for tuning in eight five five two one two four two two seven and after hours with Amy Lawrence on CBS sports radio.

five years seventy five years nineteen years five year one year
"seventy five years" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

02:08 min | 1 year ago

"seventy five years" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"For seventy five years you might be Smokey bear only you can prevent wildfires that's why I'm filling in for Smokey to switch things up because there's a lot more to say and I should know because my grandfather was a fire fight and one of the things he taught me is that the people that love the outdoors the most are often the ones accidentally starting wildfires which means always B. Y. O. B. no bring your own bucket to the campfire. and be extra careful with things like burning yard trimmings don't just walk away our chances are you might be starting a wildfire so for the love of the outdoors go to Smokey bear dot com to learn more about wildfire prevention brought to you by the US Forest Service your state forester and the ad council this is your Bloomberg realistic report I'm Denise Pellegrini so much as are apparently doing way better than others when it comes to the housing market you know I'm finding that most of the center of the country is actually doing quite well as a Texas I calibers located swing through the well you know parts of Idaho Colorado doing extremely well the coastal cities on doing that about in terms of affordability Sanjiv does is chief executive officer at caliber home loans I don't think you're on the California for example eleven zero four ability really find favor by says on the other hand some local economies and their housing markets are really thriving especially places like Dallas lots of land and a lot of affordable housing is being made is really what's what's causing growth in the cities plus a lot of technology and technology backup operations are being set up in the city's dot says even so consumers are still worried about the impact of the trade war and volatility in financial markets and the two Bloomberg realistic part I'm to these publicly. advisory firms rely on BNY Mellon Pershing to meet the needs of their most complex clients Karen Novak chief operating officer Pershing adviser solutions explains half at the NY melons Pershing we bring customized.

Pershing NY Karen Novak Dallas Idaho Bloomberg chief operating officer BNY Mellon Pershing B. Y. O. B. California chief executive officer Sanjiv Colorado Texas Denise Pellegrini US Forest Service seventy five years
"seventy five years" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

02:02 min | 1 year ago

"seventy five years" Discussed on 710 WOR

"First time in seventy five years we are energy independence the first time in seventy five years by the way if you are voting in Israel and I know we have a lot of friends in Israel the listeners program yeah I got a vote Likud is we can't go through another Netanyahu victory in any camp former government because the system is so screwy over there and you know you then got a form a coalition government and then one guy decides now I'm gonna hold all the cards they prevent any progress in terms of Israel being able to move forward with the new government that was rightly elected. but I would take this here this is odd I honestly believe this is what the Saudi your of this is what the Wall Street journal says right this is the attack this is the big one. and it's gonna rock the energy market in the world in the short term the long term implications are very very clear we better not go down this rabbit hole of a a green new deal that was costs is ninety four trillion dollars and eliminate all gas and oil production and the combustion engine and eventually cal's an airplane so we can give everybody everything for free which is never going to happen or having Alexandria Castiel Cortez wanna paid for by we'll just we'll just print more money okay that's not gonna work or camallo Harris same type of insanity although print more money I will get to more on this we do have we have the GM strike going on we have the trump economic bowl we have six hundred fifty thousand kids out of poverty yeah that didn't happen under Biden Obama we got twenty twenty informational gonna hit today at the New York times scandal next well the latest scandal next. the voice of New York. seven ten W. O..

Israel Likud Wall Street journal Biden Obama New York. Netanyahu cal Alexandria camallo Harris GM New York times seventy five years ninety four trillion dollars seven ten W
"seventy five years" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

01:51 min | 1 year ago

"seventy five years" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"First time in seventy five years we are energy independent the first time in seventy five years by the way if you are voting in Israel and I know we have a lot of friends in Israel the listeners program you got a vote Likud is we can't go through another Netanyahu victory that he can't former government because the system is so screwy over there and you know you then got a form a coalition government and and one guy decides now I'm gonna hold all the cards they prevent any progress in terms of Israel being able to move forward with the new government that was rightly elected. but I would take this hearing this is odd I honestly believe this is what the Saudi or of this is what the Wall Street journal says right this is the attack this is the big one. and it's going to rock the energy market in the world in the short term the long term implications are very very clear we better not go down this rabbit hole of a a green new deal that was cost is ninety four trillion dollars and eliminate all gas and oil production and the combustion engine and eventually cal's an airplane so we can give everybody everything for free which is never going to happen or having Alexandria Castiel Cortez wanna paid for by we'll just we'll just print more money okay that's not gonna work for camallo Harris same type of insanity. our money I will get to more on this we do have we have the GM strike going on we have the trump economic boom we have six hundred fifty thousand kids out of poverty yeah that didn't happen under Biden Obama we got twenty twenty informational gonna hit today and the New York times scandal next well the latest scandal next. is the V. CBM traffic.

Israel Likud Wall Street journal Biden Obama Netanyahu cal Alexandria camallo Harris GM New York times seventy five years ninety four trillion dollars
"seventy five years" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:39 min | 1 year ago

"seventy five years" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Over for seventy five years you might be Smokey bear only you can prevent wildfires that's why I'm filling in for smoking to switch things up because there's a lot more to say and I should know because my grandfather was a fire fight and one of the things he taught me is that the people that love the outdoors the most are often the ones accidentally starting wildfires which means always B. Y. O. B. no bring your own bucket to the campfire twenty five percent tariff on American cars the reserve vice chairman Richard Florida says that he was too busy at the central bankers conference in Wyoming to read.

B. Y. O. B. vice chairman Richard Florida Wyoming twenty five percent seventy five years
"seventy five years" Discussed on Grumpy Old Geeks

Grumpy Old Geeks

01:39 min | 1 year ago

"seventy five years" Discussed on Grumpy Old Geeks

"They can store your photo for seventy five years, which brings up a number of privacy and data issues about who has permission. Any the asset seems a little crazy now apparently at the moment, you can still opt out, but you have to know that you can opt out and they don't necessarily do a good job of telling people that shocking. So yeah, I not seen this yet personally. But it's not surprising. It's coming. No. And I suppose for we know for international flights. If you have a passport you're in that database for facial recognition as your passport photo gets put in there. And that part we know about so is this was this person taking a domestic flight. Well, she said international international JetBlue flight. Okay. Okay. But I guess the weird thing is not handing over border passer passport. Because at that stage, you Decem. Yeah. I don't know. It's it's just kind of there, and they didn't really tell us. Are they relying on their under being a lack of pushback or are? We is this one of those things death by thousand cuts a rotation where we just get used to it. And next thing. You know, it's everywhere. I know what you mean. Yeah. Exactly. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah hustle. There's that. Just look for the smoke detectors next time. You're LAX. Yeah. There's that. So LAX how do we feel about this? Well, let me roll into the next story until you how I think most people feel about this because you and I and Jason probably feel a little differently about this than most people..

JetBlue Jason Decem seventy five years
"seventy five years" Discussed on The Ross Bolen Podcast

The Ross Bolen Podcast

04:01 min | 1 year ago

"seventy five years" Discussed on The Ross Bolen Podcast

"The seventy five year old woman sort of came into the business because she was she wasn't married or day. She was like she wasn't married or dating the guy the president of the company, but she was like the only employee and just sort of it just became her business. And then she writes, always forget the word. I'm seventy five I wanna call them hippies. But it's not hippies. What do you call them? And the guy goes hipsters. Yeah. Yeah. The hipsters so recently within the last five years the sales of this have quadrupled because hipsters have found this. And are you have to it says to understand Lord, you have to I understand the man responsible for keeping going? It was something of a joke to him. I love this. This is great guy. The guy who who started. Anyway, it's the autumn it tale of selling out. And for the record selling out has his negative connotation to like a negative like what is the stigma tied to it? It shouldn't. That's that's just the circle of life, dude. If this seventy five years old you got me goin' tastes like ask. And then you see the opportunity to blow it up you go for it, baby. That's the way it is. What's great is Moore is the Swedish word for wood for wormwood which. Is used in Digestif out of a belief of the herbs settles stomach. Nobody can prove that. But so that's like the main ingredient here. So that's why they are calling it Moore. It's not like a real kind of alcohol. That's just this one guy Carl Jeppesen who was a Swedish immigrant start selling something. And it's this may actually helped him skirt prohibition. This is my favorite part of the whole story legend holds that. This guy Carl Carl Jeppesen he he was fond of offering suspicious bootlegger hunting feds, a taste of his wares. After which they could only conclude that no one would dare drink it recreationally and just leave. The exact details are murky, but sometimes in the mid thirties after prohibition ended he sold his recipe off. So basically like it tastes so shitty. That when cops would be like are you selling alcohol? He's no this is medicine and constantly like no one positive drink this motor oil. So it tells the whole story of this. And then it kind of talks about the future of muerte, currently the recipes like big secret too. Yeah. Yeah. They won't. Apparently there have been people trying to knock this off. Yeah. And the guy who tried to knock it off, and they're not allowed to call it Milord anymore because they proved it due to trademarking, but he just said that it was just he just took a bunch of ever clear and dumped this woodworm stuff into it and a bunch of grapefruit peel, and they just let it so. And that's like as close as they can get this says, there's some interpretation in the recipe from Lord. So there's a lot. There's a lot to read here, and it talks about the future of this. And it's all really good. I would really encourage you to read this entire thing. The the end of the story is always great because basically this woman this stuff's are taken off like a decade ago, maybe around Chicago and more nationally like in the last three or four years. And so she recently sold she seventy two or seventy five or whatever it is. And so now she can retire. And she said, you know, if God forbid she had to go to a nursing home. She'd have the funds to do that said I never thought I would before. It sounds crazy. But you know, who knows I never know. Should never married never had kids. Moore was a job. Yes. An awful stressful one, but it brought her so much joy. She went to the Dennis few few days before we met. She was at the front desk rounding up deposit and the young woman behind the counter esker what she did for work. And she said, oh, I'm retired. And she said, well, what did you do? And she has do you know, what melas and to which the woman said. Luma lord. Ooh. And then the old lady says I missed that. That's the part. I like talking about it. That's the part. It's shared experience of disgusting..

Carl Carl Jeppesen Moore president Digestif Chicago Dennis seventy five years seventy five year five years four years
"seventy five years" Discussed on New Jersey 101.5

New Jersey 101.5

01:47 min | 1 year ago

"seventy five years" Discussed on New Jersey 101.5

"For over seventy five years. She thinks it's obvious. You should switch because. Yes. Switching to gyco is a no brainer pity the innermost nesting doll and her lot in life. W Trenton w k x w HD. From New Jersey's most listened to station New Jersey one at one point five news starts now. I'm jen. Russillo. Topping our report this hour. Congressional Democrats say they'll head to the White House at the plan to reopen. The government the same one they've been presenting. There are asking President Trump to accept a bipartisan Bill to fund border security without the wall. Democrats have called the wall ineffective and immoral. I north jersey man claimed police were out to kill him. And he later ended up dead. It's a bizarre story that has taken some time to sort out Jimmy Lowry called nine one one twice early on Saturday high on ecstasy the last time just before going into Patterson police headquarters where he got on Facebook live. Somebody's trying to kill me. Prosecutors now say cops use force to restrain Lowery before putting him back into an ambulance. And it was more than twelve minutes later that he showed up at the hospital. Unresponsive the hospital says there was no acute trauma. The Lowery's brother claims is Izhak socket and cheekbone fracture about thirty patients had to be evacuated from notion county rehab facility yesterday after high levels of carbon monoxide were detected by alarm the patients from the mannequin nursing and rehab facility were taken to Southern Ocean medical center or the shore meadow facility in Tom's river. Nobody was injured. Meningitis B is not included in the list of required vaccinate jersey college students, but Dr Richard Bezos, oh with care station medical group in Linden says students should look to get protected against this potentially fatal disease. Anyway. The people most.

Lowery New Jersey Dr Richard Bezos Jimmy Lowry Facebook Patterson White House President Trump Linden Southern Ocean medical center Tom seventy five years twelve minutes
"seventy five years" Discussed on 600 WREC

600 WREC

02:54 min | 1 year ago

"seventy five years" Discussed on 600 WREC

"Of energy seventy five years that happened under him look Americans know the fixtures in that's why Donald Trump's approval rating stands today is about forty eight percent the same as Barack Obama's was at the same time in his term. So Americans understand I'm worried about Trump himself. I'm worried about the human being I mean, how much can you take? 'cause you know the toll. It's taking on you. I know the toll it's taken on me to be hated and attacked every single day. Maybe maybe I've got a missing switch Bill, but I don't give a flying rip about these people. I know. Oh, stop times. You're sitting there going what the hell am I doing this for throat? Well, you know, I train them may five days a week. So, you know, it's part of my nature. You know, I will say this that I spend time this week of Alania. And look I would be dishonest. If I say at times, it doesn't drag on you a little look, I'm a Christian. I try not to do that. I don't want to build my life around hatred. But I feel sorry for Donald Trump the man, okay. Because I know that he's a proud man that he'd like to be treated fairly as every human being in this country would and that he used just beaten to a pulp, but let me say this every day, and it's just disgusting. I've never met and interviewed Milania and I've interviewed the president. And I've known the president like you've had over two decades. And I will tell you that he has an ability to absorb all of this and not let it get to him. The media may claim they're getting him. Not from what I have seen. Not because I'm sure it does some days and he gets mad. Some days humid stays no guy frustrated that the things that he does. Well, and I do believe you'll make a deal with China and Europe that will help us us, meaning the the entire states. But it's no word. Stay right there. Bill O'Reilly with us. Boeing a great Christmas gift. I read a cover to cover. I couldn't put it down. It's called killing the s s his killing series. By the way is the best selling if I'm not wrong Bill series ever in history. And the latest book I learned a lot about and I talk a lot about evil and how it's hard for good people to recognize evil exists, but the search for some of these war criminals post World War Two, you're gonna learn a lot. It's it's based on history. And a lot of research that I had not known about before it's called killing the SS will Lincoln to Hannity dot com. Amazon dot com. Quick break right back more with Bill O'Reilly on the other side..

Donald Trump Bill O'Reilly Milania Barack Obama president Amazon Alania China Europe Lincoln Boeing forty eight percent seventy five years two decades five days
"seventy five years" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

03:59 min | 2 years ago

"seventy five years" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Seventy five years and counting. No, that's not my age. Although I do wish I were that young. But it is a very important anivers- anniversary that we celebrated this week in Kansas City. This year is the seventy fifth anniversary of the national association of farm broadcasting. I have been a member for sixty one of those seventy five years working with some very talented men and women who had contributed a great deal, the your knowledge and understanding of what is happening in the world of agriculture, not only in this country, but in countries around the globe. Now for those of you who like me are a bit more mature, let me mentioned some names that have really been influential in. Providing farmers and ranchers with information can't mention them all because there are a lot of them that I've worked with over the years, but I would bet that some of the names you hear will jog your memory as listeners it's been by pleasure and versatile honored to work with these outstanding broadcasters and friends, but here are just a few. That I have worked with over the years. And I know many of you will remember her plan Beck and Keats Kirkpatrick had WHO Des Moines. John McDonald that W S M in Nashville, Maynard's fees, and Jim hill. WCC? Oh in Minneapolis, Linda there at KSL in Salt Lake City. Bob Miller, wwl w in Cincinnati. Art, secrecy w JBC in Bloomington. Illinois, Wally Erickson at af are read Fresno Ray Wilkinson at W R A L TV Raleigh Colleen Callahan. The w m b d Peoria, and of course, by colleague for four decades WGN Chicago max Armstrong, who by the way last year served as president of N A F B, and these are just a few of a foreign broadcasters that I could've named over the years. I've worked with them. And we've all served you with information to hopefully, make your operation a little smarter and a little easier and the night of honors program. Thursday night in Kansas City to the farm broadcasters were inducted into the farm broadcaster hall of fame dumb wake who works in North Dakota and that area and then Mike Adams who works in the mid west area. Springfield taylorville where they got started. Did he was also honored with the induction into the national farm radio hall of fame? Now, of course, this wouldn't have lasted seventy five years, if it wasn't for our advertisers who use our media to sell their products and technology to you the producers, and then really none of this would have lasted three quarters of a century with all of you who are in our audience every day listening in your dairy barn, your tractor or combine gab your pickup or your kitchen, and we sincerely thank you for that seventy five years and county. My thoughts on Samuelson says a presentation of Tribune radio networks,.

Kansas City national association of farm Salt Lake City Bob Miller Colleen Callahan Des Moines Springfield WGN Ray Wilkinson WCC Samuelson max Armstrong Beck Jim hill Minneapolis Wally Erickson Mike Adams Cincinnati John McDonald Keats Kirkpatrick
"seventy five years" Discussed on The Keto Answers Podcast

The Keto Answers Podcast

04:24 min | 2 years ago

"seventy five years" Discussed on The Keto Answers Podcast

"It's not seventy five years of corn. I can imagine eating to Okada's three of condos, no problem. It's still kind of points to though six tablespoons of oil doesn't contain a ton of nutrition that might be on the upper limit of how much we'd want to include in one meal. If not one day's worth of worth of food, and we can talk more about how to get healthier fats and all that. And I know you've put a lot of great content out there, and I know you also don't advocate drenching all of your meals with oil because of its lack of nutrition or better ways to make food delicious while adding fat think that the just add that in infinite amounts foods because people are on a diet and not limiting fat consumption. I think that that's kind of a full look at things that you need to fat for your completed conversation. So not only does it just. Hake a ridiculous amount of food that point. But how are we taking corn and soy in concede and rice brand and whatever the hell canola is. To create this amount of oil? Yeah, this one of those things where it's not always great to find out because makes you cringe a little bit sort of like learning more about factory farm animals, but to get to get the oil out of something like corn you need to. You need to. You need to use extremely high heat. So this is why you very rarely see cold pressed corn, oil or cold, press soybean, oil. You see that all the time for all of us because it's very easy. You just physically press it and oil comes out that doesn't work. So out with something like corn, we're an entire ear of corn contains just over a gram of fat. So you need to submit it to extremely high heat. You need to add harsh chemicals, like, heck, sane that still linger in the food in the oil when you're eating it and. And this kinda ties back to more more of the things we can talk about. But outside of just how you manufacture it there so much that goes into the process of actually getting that corn the I put first place through through mono-crop through the destruction too. Rainforest to what the impact on climate change. There's all these upstream downstream effects by having so much of our food revolve around corn and soy. So we take it. We chemicals, we had super high heat, like what people realize breakdown on KOMO oil upset about this. But the amount of steps that are required to take plant to an oil with the boy l- is just insane. Like the amount of chemicals stabilizes and everything like that versus just taking a press and pressing with all of or like you guys did at the farm last week, didn't you take coconuts and basically make cooking oil? We did. So just to use that same example of six tablespoons of oil that required only about a half coca, I can eat a half half coconuts delicious. I'm still kinda hungry after vest. And so, yeah, we scraped coconut. We squeezed out all the cream in a bowl of water, and then we let that cream separate and we scooped out the oil and it was very easy. It required my hands and bowl of water didn't require. Extremely high heat and require harsh chemicals, complex manufacturing, really weird chemicals right in a massive amounts of the actual thing like these are just things that humans should not that we have access to, but our. Skull me allows us to be able to manufacture these wild extremes to get things that we call food like this is not food if you need to take that much of seventy years of corn to make one purry and subject to like fifty different steps that require massive amounts of manufacturing that yes is up and downstream effects to this, but that's just a normal thing. Yeah, totally. And. It makes so much sense sense to you into me, and I hope we're helping to get the message across that this is not something you should be putting your body vegetables..

Okada Hake KOMO l six tablespoons seventy five years seventy years one day
"seventy five years" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

01:35 min | 2 years ago

"seventy five years" Discussed on KOMO

"Vehicles for over seventy five years it makes it up for more competition and make you know that you're looking at something that's a little bit different in the marketplace in something we're very proud of now there's a there's a fully clover on the side of the vehicle and it has quite a a i guess heartbreaking story attached to it explain the story around the fully clever what does it mean and why it's still on the cost so back when we were founded in nineteen ten started racing a year later and part of our racing heritage is a story where it goes to vote she was a racecar driver on behalf of outgrow male and he was had fell on hard times winning races so he painted a poorly clover within a square on the side of his race car to get him good luck and immediately after that you found you started winning races on tragically you was he died and perished in the crash on a vehicle by the way on which he did not have the quadruple lito painted and so for that in to commemorate him we took one of the corners off of that where it made it the triangle with the poorly over the uc today don't want that aside our vehicle so if i have a fully clover on my alpha may i'm protected i wouldn't say you're protected you were definitely writing something that packs a lot more horsepower than the comp petitions unique safety feature day it's a it's probably a heavenly safety feature the district a little bit numbers out of the juliet so if you have the top of the line what are we talking about performance numbers of of the vehicle of.

juliet seventy five years
"seventy five years" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

01:36 min | 2 years ago

"seventy five years" Discussed on KOMO

"Vehicles for over seventy five years it makes it stand up from a competition and they you know that you're looking at an opera nail something that's a little bit different in the marketplace and something we're very proud of now there's a there's a fully clova on the side of the vehicle has quite a a i guess heartbreaking story attached to explain the story around the fully clever what does it mean and why it's still on the cost so back when we were founded in nineteen kennedy started racing a year later and part of our racing heritage is a story where who goes to vote gee what a race car driver on behalf of alpha male and he was had fell on hard times winning races so he painted a poorly clover within a square on the side of his race car to get him good luck and immediately after that you found it you started winning races on tragically you was he died and perished in a crash on a vehicle by the way on which he did not have the quadruple legal painted and so for that in to commemorate him we took one of the corners off of that where and made it the triangle with the poorly that you say today our vehicle so if i have a fully clover on my alpha may i'm protected i wouldn't say you're protected you were definitely writing something that packs a lot more horsepower than the competition a unique safety feature it's probably a heavenly safety feature the this took a little bit at numbers out of the julia so if you have the top of the line what are we talking about performance numbers of of the vehicle of course with our five.

kennedy julia seventy five years
"seventy five years" Discussed on SuperTalk WTN 99.7

SuperTalk WTN 99.7

01:46 min | 2 years ago

"seventy five years" Discussed on SuperTalk WTN 99.7

"Seventy five years for sexual abuse and child pornography a hundred is seventy five years for sexual abuse in child pornography in fact he had over one hundred phnom star in fact he had thirty seven thousand graphic videos images of child porn thirty seven thousand of them you know it's just it this sad i mean and now we have a male survivor that gives coming out and saying he was also abused by the doctor into this male wants other people to come out and tell their stories of their removal abused by him in his in his quote was i hope he rots in how i'll be right so now um so you know in in in through all this trump signed a bill to protect amer traffice from sexual assault in a well that's great i appreciate that but the guy had thirty seven thousand pictures of child pornography is in there any kind of bill or anything you want to talk about or have congress in those guys at lease start having the conversation must protect those thirty seven thousand kids to i mean what that's the problem is we see the root but we don't want to go to it and talk about it at a big issue with that and that's what we need to start talking about that's why people are coming together that's why we defined what pornography was that's why i've been telling all these stories that's why we have this show that's why we have this ministry you know here's the gray way let's just outlaw the stuff you want to protect the kids you got to get out of the hands of adults i want you to listen to this clip here only listen to this guy talk about this is a nineteen eighty nine with this main man made this statement but listen to some key things this guy says about what pornography did he had a good upbringing he was you know the all american kid but listen how dark these secrets are listen to what it did to him i grew up in a wonderful with two dedicated loving parents.

assault Seventy five years seventy five years
"seventy five years" Discussed on KARN 102.9

KARN 102.9

01:36 min | 2 years ago

"seventy five years" Discussed on KARN 102.9

"Loss news traffic and weather station news radio one or two point nine karn fm sheridan little rock a cumulus station centuries in prison infrastructure talks i'm richard johnson making sure he never sees the outside of a prison ever again eight hundred seventy five years which is twenty one hundred miles judge rose marie akwa lena in lansing michigan said it's her privilege to sentenced dr larry nassar to those one hundred seventy five years on top of the sixty he's already received for decades of abusing girls and young women most of them athletes at michigan state university or aspiring gymnasts from all over the us before the sentencing nasser briefly spoke about how hearing nearly two weeks of vic victim's testimony hurt him you're worse this past several days worth there were have had a significant emotional effect on myself finished shaking me to my core judge aqua liener said there must be a massive investigation about why there were so many years of silence before nasser was found out before he heads to switzerland and the world economic forum president trump is meeting with about one hundred mayors from around the nation the mayor's led by new york's bill de blasio we'll talk with president trump about his plans for investing in infrastructure across the us here in new york and new jersey leaders wanna see continuation of the federal agreement to fund the gateway tunnel project a new set of rail tunnels beneath the hudson river there needed because the centuryold tunnels that are there now are in need of critical repairs and have been the cause of major disruptions for hundreds.

richard johnson michigan dr larry nassar michigan state university us aqua liener nasser new york hudson river vic switzerland president eight hundred seventy five yea one hundred seventy five years two weeks
"seventy five years" Discussed on WCHS

WCHS

02:11 min | 3 years ago

"seventy five years" Discussed on WCHS

"Five thirty three with the latest on the west virginia university mountaineers football season is going to be here before you know it first game against virginia taxable will see what kevin's got off worse this afternoon at five thirty three now here's today's metronews hotline question of the day what treasure did you receive a rich received what treasure did you retrieve from someone's trash or to dumpster the ashes because i was talking about this earlier lady in japan seventy five years old dumpster diving found one hundred and eighty grand in cash in a suitcase somebody had thrown it away turned it over to police police are now looking for the owner of the money but that'd be another question would you give it back would you turn it over if you founded in a dumpster you'll know you want to thank you would but they have become attempting wouldn't be germain you 580 grand and a dumpster in a suitcase yeah that's a conundrum right there anyway so do you ever do you ever go uh looking in people's trash her drive by someone's garbage and say hey i like the uh whatever and then go back and get it anyway lehman are younger at pick her no not not now on bamut i picked up at like that at becoming earth visible otherwise i'm not thinking through unfair yeah i'm i'm with you on that i don't even know that i stop and pick up anything i don't even do yard sales i'm just not that interested in i mean i've had a yard say all were i've i've had multiple people participate but i i don't ever uneven walk around see what people have usually 'cause i don't i don't care because i'm not going to buy it and take it home because i started having the yard sale 'cause i had junk i wanted to get rid of and i don't want to add zunika's i got enough already you know but it's and personally i yeah it was a night that we could yep part if we i took up a the parker and i could put it out through it out over it very devout getting rid of it not good enough anymore let me to get rid of of a germain you know somebody would probably pick that up if you put it out like that probably it could also be littering up the right data with that.

virginia kevin lehman zunika west virginia university mount japan germain seventy five years