35 Burst results for "Seventies Eighties"

Afghan Refugees Headed to 46 States

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

02:04 min | Last week

Afghan Refugees Headed to 46 States

"People who've served afghanistan but none of them from your perspective Axios reports thirty-seven thousand. Afghan refugees are coming in your state of florida. You'll get a thousand mississippi. Getting ten north dakota getting forty-nine ohio's getting fifty five i put it out in. America has between three hundred four hundred thousand churches. We can absorb thirty-seven thousand. Afghans and people. Ask me well. What are they like. I actually don't know so. I thought i'd ask you. What do you think we'll find among our new americans. Well let me start by saying in my beloved state of florida. I'd be happy to get five thousand and these are hard working people and let me tell you something hugh we know in florida about people who flee persecution they were called cubans. They came here and built an extraordinary community in south florida. The community that cuban-americans help build this state in the sixty seventies eighties today or a vibrant part of it. I expect nothing less from the afghans. And let me tell you. It's not just what are afghans light. It's what are these afghan. Like in. So there i would say to you. Hey how much. Courage in true grit and determination. Does it take to put your two year old on your back. Grab your four year olds. Hand picture yourself in this situation. Fight your way through those crowds. Get through that airport and get a ride out and finally make it here. I want that person on my team and like the hunger games so they are in my long association with afghans. Warm charming friendly funny hard working is going to be nothing. But a plus up for this nation of immigrants. I would say let's take all the afghans we can get and i'll close hugh you and i are both young enough to remember the arrival of vietnamese american community. Hello california do you think that's been a plus up for the golden state i do.

Florida North Dakota Afghanistan Mississippi Hugh Ohio South Florida America California
Is the COVID Vaccine Helping or Hurting the Virus?

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:48 min | Last week

Is the COVID Vaccine Helping or Hurting the Virus?

"Why should we agree to a vaccine mandate at all. Well we shouldn't. And i mean we need to have a real conversation of whether or not vaccine is actually contributing to the spread of the virus and just look at the data the more vaccinated. We become more all of a sudden people. Become infected is the vaccine slowing the spread or is it earning the spread. That's a legitimate question. Let's stop it because people are gonna go crazy. Media matters pay attention little. What's his name boo typing. If you talk to real virologists not politicians tell you. Every virus has a life cycle. It's like a bell curve and they need to burn out and what your saying could in fact be the scenario that these experimental vaccines are delaying the viruses capacity to burn out in the population. That's what you're talking about correct. That's right yeah. Just as a objective analysis which country is doing better sweden or israel which one has embarked on a mass inoculation strategy. Israel did as much of vaccines and in seventy eighty percent of the population. They did a booster shots. They did lockdowns mass. Everything and their case per population is much higher than that of sweden. Back open for business. That's right yeah. And of course had the most mature response to the virus back in last year. They did a little bit of lockdowns last summer and a little bit last winter. I wish they wouldn't have lockdown off idea and they actually don't help at all epidemiologically but way way more mature response than israel. Much more prudent and so. Yeah that's the real question is are the vaccine helping or hurting. No one wants to say no one wants to talk about it. And the cdc has now changed. The definition of what a vaccine is no longer says that it will inoculate you against the potential transmission of you getting a virus. It will help you fight the virus. That's called the treatment

Sweden Israel CDC
Is Global Warming a Hoax?

Dennis Prager Podcasts

01:42 min | Last month

Is Global Warming a Hoax?

"We're are talking with steven hayward about the just released. Un ipcc report on the imminent demise of the earth due to global warming. and steve. Before the break you were just starting to explain that this entire global warming hysteria is based on model projections but the scientists scientific portion of the ipc report is starting to acknowledge that there are simply serious problems with those models. So let's pick it up there. Yeah this is the hardest playing in simple terms you know. There's a famous quote from late. James q wilson one of the most prominent conservative political scientists to the last generation anyone's said the social scientists quick trying to predict the future. You can't even predict the past and that turns out to be exactly true. Climate modeling scientific community that works on this recently tried to back to some of their models to data we've generated from thousands thousands of years ago and found that the model generated temperature predictions that way off from what the temperature records were able to figure out actually work so come to the current Reports and you know the problem computer miles of the old garbage in garbage out. What do you put in the front end Well you have to put in an admissions projection. How much greenhouse gas emissions admit from fossil fuels over the next seventy eighty years and the last few reports from pcc. The last one being in two thousand fourteen had these very high projections of what they thought we were gonna do. Over the next century the world about growth and so forth well As time has gone on people look at those projections. say those are totally unrealistic

Steven Hayward James Q Wilson Ipcc IPC UN Steve PCC
James Clear on the Imortance of Building Good Habits

You Need a Budget

02:19 min | 2 months ago

James Clear on the Imortance of Building Good Habits

"What attracted you to the idea of habits. Why did it resonate with your audience. Well they're probably multiple reasons. I mean one thing is you're building habits whether you're thinking about them or not. Garrett body is doing brain is doing all the time to get through life and pattern matching into just live more efficiently depending on which study you look at somewhere between forty to fifty percent of. Your behaviors are automatic and habitual. But that's usually referencing just stuff that like you think about like Brushing her teeth. You're tying your shoes or pulling your phone out of your pocket to check it. And i think the true influence your assets even greater than that you know who knows what the number is. seventy eighty. Ninety percent of your behaviors are either habitual or influenced strongly by your habits. So take for example. Checking your phone. I mean you could be standing in line at the grocery store. Just you know waiting for something of an extra peanut three minutes and you just kind of out of habit. Pull your phone out. Will you may think carefully about responding to that. Email that you're reading or you know a whatever you're reading on social media or playing video game but that menu of options the behavior that you're following was all shaped by the habitable your phone out so the our habits have a very strong influence on our lives and they. They're very wide reaching their impact and in a sense. You know what many of us most of us want is some form of results in life and almost all of your results are downstream from your habits. So you know pretty much. Every outcome you have is a lagging measure of the habits that preceded so your weight's lag measure of your nutrition habits. Your bank account is a lagging measure of your financial habits. Your knowledge is lagging measure of your reading and learning habits. Even little stuff like the clutter on your desk or you know in your living room is a lagging measure cleaning habits so given that were building habits already. And they're going to be part of your life whether you think about them and given that the results that we all say we care so badly about s- Are strongly influenced by your habits. Adding it makes sense to dive into the more deeply and understand how they work so that you can be the architect of your abbots not the victim of

Garrett
Social Isolation Is a Solvable Problem for People With Disabilities

Solvable

02:06 min | 4 months ago

Social Isolation Is a Solvable Problem for People With Disabilities

"My mom found an atari really really poor My mom money. She had bought me a used. Atari hurry from one of those used electronic stores and we ended up playing like burger master. Something you like. Put a burger together. When you're talking about burger type. I remember it now but it was. It wasn't adorable piece of machinery at the time. Nintendo was already out. We couldn't afford one of those She was just really thrilled. That i was able to operate the controller at all the earliest. When i played with super mario one and duck of course and then i had super mario three. But i never got super mario to. It's always bothered me. I played all of those although we have to touch on the fact that we shot ducks snowing. Dog often up in the middle your screen. And he's like my dad. We get angry. It'd be like why is that talk like right next to the tv. Tried to shoot the so to be clear. No dogs were harmed in the making of duck video game. not that i know of a outlet. You were diagnosed with spinal muscular atrophy. Can you tell me a little bit about how it impacted you in gaming so spinal. Muscular atrophy is a sister disease to a less. So if you saw stephen hawkins' have you know anybody who is afflicted with a less than you kind of have an idea what i'm going through in my life. So essentially my muscles are getting weaker and weaker as time goes on where ellis is much quicker in its development. Sf can last for your entire lifetime. So you could live an entire seventy eighty ninety years And it might never take your life or you might only live for a couple of months past when i was born. I wasn't able to crawl like a child is supposed to x. amount of milestones. My mom's thirty noticing that was using my arms to pull myself around. My lower legs weren't pushing. They should've been

Mario Atari Stephen Hawkins Nintendo Spinal Muscular Atrophy Ellis
150 Deals at Age 22 by Putting Relationships Over Profit with Cole Ruud-Johnson

BiggerPockets Real Estate Podcast

04:42 min | 7 months ago

150 Deals at Age 22 by Putting Relationships Over Profit with Cole Ruud-Johnson

"Goal. Welcome to the bigger pockets. Podcast man good to have you in the shed. Thanks for having me on. Manus good to be in person how to marry. Yeah so tell us a little bit about how you got into the wide world of investing. Actually before you do that. how old are you. i'm two and three quarters coming. Twenty-three in okay. So that's that's a very young age and and give us a quick before you got how how you got into real estate. Give us a quick look under standing. What do you do. what's your thing. I like sesame. I want to set the table comparable to know like like what you have right now. Can what your business looks like. And then we'll go into how you got into that. So how in depth. You'll get your just give us a broad overview of your current business so broad overview right now we have an off market direct sell the company and renton washington's way of an office two thousand square feet tales managers guys a whole team and right. Now we're doing ninety percent wholesale so to sell on those deals other investors in ten percent flips. We have three flipped going on right now bound so transitioning into that slowly but still primarily also okay and then tell approximately like much volume in a year. Do you do like the last year. Like what have you. What have you done like what kind of like red zone in the past year We do about six to eight transactions a month in the seattle area so before that we were in four different states that number was higher but right now back down six to eight and just comfy and of the three main counties around seattle so whatever that comes out to seventy eighty deals year. Wow okay. that's crazy. I did like i think three wholesales once in a in a five year period and that was i was impressed with myself. I'm still. let's go into how you got started. How'd you get in your young guy with that. Most people be jealous. Jealous of unwind. Yes oh growing up Grew up in real estate family. So my my great grandma started a brokerage called rude realty which one of the first broken all the seattle are. You d you d okay. Sounds yeah okay. are you d. that was abroad. No i've been practicing your name wrong. The rude we've hung out a number of times we've poker together. Yeah exactly and i called you root rud time just let it slide. Tell people the next time it's back to rhodes. He pronounces a lot of words wrong. But don't feel bad rough instead a roof magazine and stop produce anything on accident so she was kind of the she much my whole family in real estate so then my grandparents they did a lot of commercial stuff in seattle. They own a bunch of buildings. She was an agent and then my mom got in the business. She became an agent In my brother followed her growing up Anytime i wanted to make money or be involved at all. I was you know going with her to open houses but he signs out for the open houses and i was a staging she got a staging company on the side. So i was moving furniture around so it's always around the business in some way so transitioning to when i actually wanted to make make money nationally going real estate license at eighteen nineteen left school after semester and i absolutely hated hated hated or being a residential real estate and switch brokerages three times. Of course it was the brokers those a problem of course. I showed up to every sales meeting that with everyone else. That was not my fault shift. Have you still. I sat on facebook a couple of hours a day. Scrolled through few post. How they cold called my sphere which eighteen or nineteen. Yeah they tell you to cocoa your spirits. You're graduating high school soon. How's that how's that looking. You wanna buy a house yeah so it was brutal It was a was making like a couple hundred bucks a month. Just doing like showings rather agents. And then the third brokerage. I moved to was an off market company where they were doing every tuesday night. They'd bring a bunch of investors and and they they would show them what was going to be coming to auction that week and they'd pretty much done go to auction That's what they're running their company so i learned stats out of the business and how they are creating their own inventory at unlike. That seems like something. I can get behind because people don't care what my ages then eighteen nineteen twenty rather than seattle. Sono miller house. Yeah someone's going on here. Sorry and then couple nights later. Like i've learned about wholesaling. Buddy ra- applebee's semi origin story appetizers. We shared how good there's wings it was until i survived college. Right there and We're on instagram. And this desire to young guys in the area had posted this forty thousand dollar check on her instagram. And so i was like. What are these guys doing of they can do. We can do it kind of thing to the next day. He came to my My parents house is living our parents at the time and Up and they're pretty much. Attic started cold calling end for the next three months before we got a deal. We're just sitting up in that room cocoa every single day.

Seattle Rude Realty Manus Washington Sono Miller Buddy Ra Facebook Applebee
AI and the Evolution and Automation of Live Chat - with LivePerson CEO Robert LoCascio

Artificial Intelligence in Industry

06:59 min | 8 months ago

AI and the Evolution and Automation of Live Chat - with LivePerson CEO Robert LoCascio

"So rob. I want to dive in to the future of a and chat in the enterprise and the little bit of your journey there. But before i even do even ryan this company for quite some time when you guys started online chat in the ninety s companies public firm for twenty years. Here when you look to your business something. Like i don't know how many seventy or eighty million conversations you're handling in any given month when you look down at your business tried to find where. Ai could layer value for your clients. How did you think through that process. Because it seems like that's almost an endless There's almost an endless number of answers. They're basically looking at the data center. We do about seventy eighty million conversation month. I kinda you know that data we could take and look at how are use cases around banking and telco and and and retail and healthcare. These are big customer bases. Come from these verticals. How can we automate those conversations and so we basically just dove into the data we aggregated. The data looked at across customer. And we could see that there were patterns that made really good conversations. So that drove is to say okay. Let's build a host of tools and a new platform called conversational cloud in which we could enable large enterprises market customers to scale their conversation. Automate them and with the onset of covid the there was a massive massive impact contact centers the contact center agents help and nope he was there. They couldn't take calls so so they went home now. They're taking calls there and so there's been a massive drive to automation now because having someone work at home and answer calls just not the way to go. How do you automate that through a digital experience. That's really what's happened and obviously with the onset of covid firms like yourself or now in this position to potentially catch the opportunity to major way when you look at serve. What's potentially automated man even there so much to get into. I mean there's for each individual business that you work with you know maybe a work in with a one. Eight hundred flowers may be. You're working with us. The citibank guys work with some of the biggest companies in america here. The use cases are relatively bespoke And i know you. You worked on building a tool. That's at least understandable for nontechnical people. We definitely need subject matter. Experts to layer context and to structure or flow flows for these conversational systems. But you determine what the bounding box would be because even that feels feels endless and you need to kind of focus in somewhere yes we. We're all this under the header of commerce. And i fundamentally believe that conversation. Commerce is going to be the next leg of digital so we had ecommerce and now we're shifting see commerce and e commerce is is a very interesting thing when you think about like show up at a website and basically every website looks the same right. I mean top nab. Yeah data and google set those rules instead of you don't do that. We won't index you and that's why everything looks the same so what you're seeing is digital each brand doesn't have its own personality now with conversational commerce. You develop your own personality and you develop your own way to engage your consumers too like chapultepec. We had obviously during covid. What happened was people didn't want to go in and get a burrito and make They don't want to sit there for five minutes. Make freedom so chapultepec turn to us said we want to build an automation that somebody could come into their mobile device to any messenger front facebook. I message app and we want to configure a burrito and or whatever they want and they built. We built this Automation called pepper. It's called pepper and you can communicate with pepper. And then you show up at the door and the handed to you. And so that's the poultry. One we've got David's bridal which also people didn't want to come and people get married but do you want to go and sit in the store and try and addressing the one of the largest bridal companies in the world. We automated looking at different things for your body type for your style making an appointment. So you're the only one that's in that store. Don't have a crowd in the store. We built all that. This is just examples during kovin but every one of our customers get the ability to create a conversational experience. That's unique to them. And that's what makes commerce Yeah i i could certainly see the argument that linear text back and forth actually has potentially less less opportunity for really robust customization than you know. Really fancy dancy website. But but i get where you're where you're coming from. I think that there is like a. There's a certain flavor of the brand that you get from talking that maybe you wouldn't get from from a website and obviously what you're saying is that we can tailor that of course with a website. There's a lot we can do with color and features and video and whatever but certainly there's personalization on the conversation side. I could kind of see arguments on both sides there with respect to working with these big brands again. You're you're dropping some pretty pretty big names here. Names of almost everybody listening in has heard of what does it look like to set up these unique systems for them because obviously chipotle's use case which by the way feels very accessible. The number of burritos you can build is not unlimited right as opposed you guys work with delta airlines. The number of things i can complain about to my airline is. There's probably two dozen. You could tackle off the cuff. But but there's gotta be another four hundred that are just we're handing this to a human being but cipolla feels. Wow that feels like almost like dominoes. Chat bot was pretty popular. Winning hundred flowers was doing some stuff. Because there's only so many purchase options but when you go into different clients you got big airlines. You got these restaurant chains. What's that process of really working with them. Because there's got to be a bespoke build out part. You got your core platform you guys are able to use. You have a tremendous amount of data and a lot of staff obviously which it looked like to hop into these big brands and build out. Something that really drives value for our platform conversational cloud. We really broken into three areas in and around the three areas of need when you're looking at scale automation. One is the intent. We called intent manager in its technology that ingests all the conversations and then organizes the intense. So we talk about intense anti-business. What is it consumers. They haven't intention to do something with you. They want to buy something. They wanna customer care question answered and that's an intention and we call that technology intent so we organized the intense and it turns out as we all know. We all asking and attentively. So i may ask a bill differently than you do. But the technologists differences aggregate them. And then what you get to see a list of all the intense in your business. And what are the contents and where the mid level. I'm usually what we say. Let's go solve the top intense bam one and is thirty percent of all the voice calls. You're having

ROB Citibank Ryan Cipolla America Google Facebook Delta Airlines Chipotle David
"seventies eighties" Discussed on 850 WFTL

850 WFTL

06:34 min | 9 months ago

"seventies eighties" Discussed on 850 WFTL

"The seventies eighties and nineties. It's sunny when I was 79 and online. It's sunny when I was 79 dot com. Just let you walk away. Just let you leave without a trace when I stand here, taking every breath With You're the only one who really knew me along. You just walk away from me. When all I know is that you live around shit. She's young. Winning me any less just Mantis lays. Not just the way our babies would take me. Just not to space. Did you coming back to me? That's why I go. God just made you turn around so much I need to say to you Yeah, no one really knew me. So space there's nothing left just Make way for you is all I do. That's why I got a baby Daddy. Hmm. Taken Sonny. What was that? Tonight? The greatest hits of the seventies eighties and nineties songs you grew up with, like this one. Lie, Mr Di me my stuff, please. Yes. Oh, good. So was held together. Okay, Dad up. How do you buy? But to me open Where Love. House, so Oh, Team, too. The lads, will you come back? You that way. What's still open on.

What if you were hunted by the Japanese Mafia?

This is Actually Happening

04:53 min | 9 months ago

What if you were hunted by the Japanese Mafia?

"By most profound theory lights was that i would lead and uninteresting life and i was forever in envy that other people would read an interesting life and i wouldn't. I came from kind of a prototypical new york city to kid. Jewish family father was a stockbroker and my father became time to perfect barometer of the stock market so he would come home in the evenings and his behavior was completely function of how the stock market had done that evening. My mother by contrast was a much more complex individual who had been a market researcher at the beginning of her career and felt that no amount. The questions she asked of her children would ever be enough growing up. Under my mother's careful observation was extremely close to the experience of being cross examined by a brilliant attorney so speaking through my teenage years. She was a person to be diligent. We avoided this wonderful figure in my youth and my teenage years. And i've actually my college years. My mom's first cousin who was art buchwald art buchwald by first cousin was america's preeminent political satirist in the sixties seventies eighties He tried to hide as much as possible that he was highly aligned with the democratic party. But he in fact actually was at became the godfather of bobby. Kennedy's kids as ethel chose him To help advise her and support her. After bobby. kennedy's assassination and sixty eight. He wrote a series of. I think about thirty five books that made the new york times bestseller list was syndicated in seven hundred papers and he was an incredible force of personality. Everything about art was kind of exuberant consciously or unconsciously As i went through college. And i spent a little bit of time in dc where though i did live in his house i tried to live as much as possible on his dime soaking up as many free lunches either in his office or what may some blank where. He held court several times a week. in his company just because he was so funny and so connected in washington society the closer my commencement from university came the greater. Manning's -iety grew that. I needed to come up with something interesting to do. My experience upon graduating from university was a lot like the film. The graduate i moved back into my parents house and settled into. What i think is for a lot of people the most profound depression that the ever have to return to their parents home and to be faced with the prospect of organizing the rest of their lives. I moved back in and tried to come up with an interesting concept and The only thing interesting. I could think to do it seemed lucrative and it seems. My skill set were Jobs on wall street and since my father had spent thirty five years on wall street and was a good guy. I received an offer to go to work for bear stearns and the idea of accepting that offer filled me with horror so one night upon accepting that offer. My mother and father took after dinner. My mother in attempting to make levity of suggested that she would buy me a picture book of the world and this idea stopped me dead in my tracks me sitting in a cubicle up two. Am in an investment bank office and taking the book out for my desk and looking at pictures of japan. I decided that japan was paris. Paris was where buchwald had begun his career. So this moment hit me like a brick. And i. I never showed up. I never accepted the job or went to work. Through a series of connections. I found out there was position open to become a newspaper reporter in tokyo naturally. Went to see my uncle about it. He said you've got to go. This is your moment. There's a travel agency on the first floor. Get up off your seat. I'm going downstairs to buy the ticket for you.

Buchwald Art Buchwald Bobby New York City Ethel Democratic Party Kennedy New York Times America Manning DC Washington Bear Stearns Depression Japan Buchwald Paris Tokyo
Hacker Folklore

Advent of Computing

06:15 min | 9 months ago

Hacker Folklore

"When it comes to computers the actual hardware and software only account for part of the full story. Now don't get me wrong here. Hardware is a really interesting and important. Part of what i cover. The same thing goes for software. As i always say harbor is actually pretty useless without some kind of code to run on it. But you can't fully explain the history of computing with just blinking lights and stacks of code. That would turn to a pretty dry story pretty quickly. You need to also look the messy part. That's the human element and for me. This is problems usually crop up. You see there's a certain kind of person that's drawn to computers enthusiasts programmers engineers and researchers all seem to have at least somewhat similar motivations. Why do they work with computers. Well computers are just neat by us. Solve problems is fun and finding inventive solutions is rewarding in itself. And how this kind of drive is really great for the discipline at large. It can also make researching the development of technologies. A little bit annoying. Why did can thomas. And dennis ritchie developed a unix. Why did text based adventure game start to show up all over the place sure. They're really good technical reasons but partly it was just for the fun of the project. Once mass produced computers introduced more people into the fold these kinds of traits and motivations they kind of become omnipresent at least to appoint those working on large shared mainframes quickly turned from teams of researchers into groups of friends and once networking starts to link of computers. These groups of friends form into a larger community. So we start to see a large group of people with shared ideals practices beliefs and a common cause at their core. Now that sounds an awful lot like a culture. This is usually called hacker culture and like any other culture. It has its own folklore. Welcome back to advocate of computing. I'm your host sean. Hannity and this is episode forty-six hacker folklore now. This is a project that i've actually had in the works for a while. So i'm especially excited to get to share it with you. All today's episode is going to be a little bit different from my normal fair. I'm not going to be talking a specific computer technology or even really a series of events. Instead we're taking a detour through some fun. And i think pretty funny territory. We're going to be looking at a section of the jargon file in the print edition. It's appendix a hacker folklore. Hopefully you'll excuse me but you're in for a bit of a long preamble here. I put together a mini episode on the jargon file way back in the archive mainly talking about the files origins and its history in short. It's a dictionary of terms used by the more computer savvy folk. The file began in one thousand. Nine hundred seventy s at mit artificial intelligence lab and it spread pretty quickly from their versions moved from coast to coast over the arpanet and nine hundred eighty three. The first print edition was published as the hacker's dictionary. This isn't really a dry treaties. On terms and technical language jar file is a lot closer to really humor. The files mixture of some pretty low brow jokes jabs at corporate employees and actually useful definitions for its creators. The jargon file was fun pastime with an actual purpose it captures a slightly filtered view of the culture around computers in the seventies eighties and the latest version. V four point four point seven up on cat be dot. Org was last updated in two thousand and three. Well it makes the jargon file so important is that it preserves something normally hard to come by. There's been endless. Amounts of ink spilled over big events in the history of computing figures. Like bill gates. Steve jobs have multiple biographies covering their life. Stories to that all the actual hardware and software lying around and it's actually somewhat easy to chronicle all the big events all these things are essentially preserved. So you don't really have to go hunting for that. One scrap of a note. The bill gates wrote in the mid eighties. Instead you can just go grab both the focuses on microsoft in that era when we get below that high level of visibility. We can run into some serious issues sourcing. Computer science as a field wasn't developed by a handful of people it took masses but those masses aren't usually chronicled in the same way as high profile figures. Most researchers donate their notebooks to university. Archives user group minutes were usually just thrown in the recycling bin and online forums and messages. Don't really start being relevant until much more recently. This means that trying to put together less well known stories can get kind of difficult and a lotta. The culture around these stories is either lost or really really difficult to find information on. That's where the jargon file sweeps into saved the day well at least somewhat. It gives a picture of the hacker subculture during a pretty wide span of time. I guess this may be a good time to actually address the terminology here. Hacker didn't originally mean some malicious actor that broke into computers although breaking and entering was sometimes part of it. The jar file has a few different definitions for the term. I think the most relevant here is quote a person who enjoys exploring the details of programmable systems and how to stretch their capabilities as opposed to most users who prefer to learn only the minimum necessary r f c one three nine to the internet users. Glossary usefully amplifies this as a person who delights in having an intimate understanding of the internal workings of a system

Dennis Ritchie Mit Artificial Intelligence La Hannity Bill Gates Thomas Sean Steve Jobs Microsoft Hacker
Cant Deport a Movement

In The Thick

05:03 min | 9 months ago

Cant Deport a Movement

"What's up. Welcome to the podcast about politics. Race and culture from a poc perspective money. Sam and i'm lorella joining us as a special guest. All the way from brooklyn is a daas. She's an immigrant rights lawyer professor at new york university school of law and co director of the. Oh so important. Nyu immigrant rights clinic alina. Welcome to in the thick. Thank you so much for having me. You are the author of the recent book. No justice in the shadows. Which is what we've been saying. You know people in the shadows is not a good thing for democracy and your book you write that. Roughly three hundred thousand people are formerly deported from the us every year with a million more turn back. Just you know. Within the border area you talk about how the immigration criminalization and deportation systems are intertwined desire to maintain the racial status quo in other words the white supremacy and white majority of this country. You talk about how the use of the terms like criminal alien one of our favorites. Yeah falsely separates immigrant communities into categories of good versus bad right. And we've also had this presidential election where one candidate didn't denounce white supremacists and in this mist of a nationwide protest for black lives and a pandemic that has disproportionately affected black and communities following the election right. it was declared that joe biden had one right. Donald trump who previously had said. He wouldn't commit to a peaceful. Transfer refuse to concede and his allies started referring to vote as what a surprise quote legal or illegal and they especially tried to discredit the vote counting in cities with large black populations detroit philadelphia atlanta. This idea of like even votes now becoming good and bad legal and illegal criminal or non-criminal. It just permeates throughout our entire electoral politics so alina. Can you talk about how the immigration system has been set up to protect a particular type of immigrant absolutely and this is one of the things i focus on in. The book is really a historical perspective. Because we're told that our country is a welcoming country in that people who face deportation must be facing this. Because they've broken the law. They violated the laws where the laws are actually written and the foundation of the laws are designed to treat immigrants a- suspects to exclude them and to exploit them and we know this from the very origins of this country right there first naturalisation law that congress row because the constitution required them to come up with a universal naturalization law was limited to free white persons that's the foundation of our rules about membership in belonging and we police migration in this country initially focused on black people an indigenous people right so for the first century when voluntary immigration was mostly why congress was focused on fugitive slave laws that allowed black people to be removed from free state's to slaveholding states and the indian removal act that allowed indigenous people to be removed from their ancestral lands to make room for property white man and those are the tools that congress picked up on when it decided to focus on immigrants because they had chinese immigrants arriving in large numbers but eventually that led to the national origins quotas where we explicitly used racism to decide who could get a visa a spot in this country and mexicans in particular were actually exempted in order for southern businesses to use them for cheap labor so instead of excluding them that's why in the nineteen twenties southern segregation has proposed criminalizing unlawful border crossings. So that when people's labor was no longer needed they could be easily police imprison than deported. And that's the legacy of our immigration laws and while we may have gotten rid of the national origins quotas in nineteen sixty five. We replaced it with a system that essentially perhaps immigration including mexican immigration for the first time to twenty thousand nieces when hundreds of thousands of people have been going back and forth and the laws created this kind of undocumented population at created this false sense of illegality and as a backlash to legal immigration suddenly coming from asia africa. The caribbean you saw this rise of law and order policies nineteen seventies eighties war on crime. The war on drugs suddenly treating immigrants as criminals. And that's really what's laid the foundations for the modern immigration system today where police have been taken over as essentially immigration agents to create a pipeline for deportation and that replicates all of the racism that we see in policing generally and combined so that immigrant communities kind of double ranked in their communities.

Lorella New York University School Of Alina NYU Congress Brooklyn Joe Biden Donald Trump SAM Detroit Philadelphia Atlanta United States Caribbean Asia Africa
Using Big Data to Solve Economic and Social Problems

Sway

09:06 min | 11 months ago

Using Big Data to Solve Economic and Social Problems

"Fake data tends to get a bad rap and it often deserves it from facebook's tools being used to abuse privacy to amazon knowing everything you buy two apps tracking all of your movements kids data minefield for consumers these days but in the hands of the right person big data can actually be a force for good or at least one hopes a force for good policy and raj. Chetty is trying to do just that. He's ahead of harvard based opportunity insights research institute. That's working solve america's inequality problem one data set at a time chetty has been tracking millions of people doesn't of years and tens of thousands of american neighborhoods in the process. He's learned that the country could be losing out on millions of inventors and that a move of just two miles might alter the trajectory of a third grader. But jetties research isn't just sitting in long excel. She's on dusty shells. It's helping drive. Bill gates spends his billions of dollars of philanthropy or how president elect joe biden crafts his pandemic economic recovery plant. But one thing he does best was all his piles of facts and figures is to make it easy for even the nandi to rock and there's an explosive term for that you do. Things apparently called chetty bombs. I'm not sure you love that name do like that. you mind. i guess. I guess they're unique insights where you can visually see something to do. Visualization of. What's happening. And i think some of the ones that i thought were much more effective was around covid. Which is where spending is happening or not happening so talk a little bit about what you're doing around cove it so in kobe. We're using data from a bunch of different private companies to track. What's happening to various key outcomes spending employment levels business activity and so forth in in a nutshell. What we basically find happened in the past six months is that high income folks started to spend a lot less like thirty percent less billions of dollars less per day primarily because of health concerns so lots of folks have the capacity to work remotely to self isolate and as a result they started to basically go outside their houses less and spent much less in person services. Local restaurants shops and so forth. Those businesses particularly small businesses then lost an enormous amount of revenue and in particular business located in affluent areas to think about for example the upper east side of manhattan or the highest income places in san francisco. They lost something like seventy or eighty percent of their revenues so just a massive impact in contrast in some of the less affluent places. Like if you think about the bronx or parts of queens you see more like twenty or thirty percent declines in revenue so much less than what you're seeing and appetizers and so then you got all these businesses that have lost a ton of money so what you can do with these data has asked. Okay how do they balance their books. Like what are you gonna do when you have much less money. Well naturally you see these businesses start to lay off lots of their workers and in particular. They lay off their low wage workers. If you look at some of these crops you can see very clearly this pattern where for low income workers people making less than say twenty or thirty thousand dollars a year. Somebody who works in a sandwich shop in downtown area of san francisco for example exactly seventy eighty percent of those workers have lost their jobs whereas that same worker if they weren't even at the same chain so you're working at a report layers something like that and you happen to be working at a branch that was in a less affluent area. You were much less likely to lose your job. Just because spending happened to fall less in those areas perhaps because essential workers are still out in about behalf to be outside their house because of the nature of their jobs were as time can folks can typically self isolate and so what's ended up happening is basically because of this production spending by the rich. It's lower income people who born the incidence of chuck and losing their jobs and finding now is we've had essentially a v shaped recovery for high income. Folks were their employment levels are back to where they were pre covid where it's lower income folks. You're still twenty percent below six million jobs below where you were where they've gone the brunt of the economic distress which i think anecdotally people get which is interesting one of the things that someone was talking about the statistics around the trump voters that wealthier people did vote for trump and mike while they're doing okay more than you think and their income is the same so they're not upset about this issue particularly jibe. That's right karen. I think what's more though as you can see. It's not trust lower income folks in general but in very particular areas right so in the past in previous recessions but you tend to see is that it's lower income folks in less affluent cities who took the hardest head turns out in this recession. It's actually flipped so silicon valley. For example has some of the highest rates for low income. People serfs there exactly because it's the opposite of what you might have thought because of the mechanism you just talked about. So this is one example of i think what you can see in these data but importantly as you touched upon you can basically have folksy this for themselves by just plotting the data in a very simple. I'm just finishing on covid with the cares act. Does the stimulus. Bill have an impact. Then you have this data now that you're showing this. They still haven't passed one. Maybe that's a good thing because they didn't get to see this data yet and they were just sort of shooting in the dark. Essentially isn't going to be a wakeup call or are they going to change their behaviors of where the money is going to be seeing the stated. How does that translate. Well i mean. That's the aspiration so what we're hoping going forward and i've been talking with a bunch of folks and the president elect and folks the biden team. I think there's a lot of interest both among those folks and on the other side of the isles who have been speaking with in trying to understand how we can do better invite of having these sorts of data. Because you know of course. They're always political debates about what we should focus on. But i don't think anyone is in favor of just spending lots of money and ineffective ways so talk a little bit about that concept of understanding effect understanding results in action take in the context of the current crisis the important paycheck protection program about five hundred billion dollars of loans to small businesses to try to keep people on zero again in the context of kobe to try to keep the economy going to stop businesses from laying people off so the way that program was designed. Lots of businesses were eligible in particular businesses with fewer than five hundred employees. And as you said you know there was kind of a hope that maybe giving these firms this money is going to keep lots of workers on the payroll and will make the recession. Not as bad. So what we did is using data from payroll companies which are cutting paychecks for millions of workers. We basically compare trends and employment for firms that had fewer than five hundred employees and hence were eligible for the paycheck protection program versus firms. That more than five hundred employees and ends were not eligible. So you can make an analogy there to sort of a science experiment. You've got a treatment group. The firms that have fewer than five hundred employees that got this extra assistance and the ones that up more than five hundred employees service kind of a control group. They tell you what would have happened if you didn't get this ski enough and so what you end up. Seeing the data is you can follow employment levels week by week and you can see very precisely that after april third that when when this program went into effect employment did start to go up a little bit at the smaller firms relative to the larger firms by about two percentage points. But the problem is it's only a two percentage point impact of fortune for every cost five hundred billion dollars so it it cost about three hundred thousand dollars per job that we saved as a result. Some of these are low wage. Jobs jobs that are paying about forty thousand dollars a year typically. So you know. You're spending an enormous amount of money to save these jobs now. I think people started to figure out over time that lots of firms might be taking up this program who weren't gonna lay off any workers anyway and as a result it wasn't super cost effective but we figured that out only several months afterward and so the kind of vision. We add some of this big data. Work that we're doing. And this is why i think it can be a moral force for social good as in agean. You could see as you're gonna steering the economy to three weeks later while this is kind of working but maybe we need to target it at firms that lost a lot of revenue or redesign it a bit so that it's more effective or in specific geographies like this area doesn't need any money. This area does exactly what specific sectors right. there are certain sectors particularly hard. You can take a really data driven approach and in private companies. This would be second nature right. I try to sell this product. I figure out within a couple of months people are clicking on this. They're not buying us. I'm going to then tweak it. In some way and i think we could do that from a social perspective for for policy with in my view much larger stakes.

Chetty Kobe San Francisco Joe Biden Bill Gates Harvard Amazon Bronx Queens Facebook Manhattan America
Space has a trash problem -- and its getting worse

The 3:59

05:03 min | 11 months ago

Space has a trash problem -- and its getting worse

"With me. Is johnson skillings. One of our copy cheese and the of our latest package on satellites titled signals from earth. Welcome john hey roger so we sometimes take for granted. Space has well allow space. But there's actually a huge amount of trash orbiting earth and that's the subject of the first story in a series way exactly is floating up there a lot and stuff. I mean we think about space is being infinite and it is but then there's our neighborhood right around earth And there are several layers orbit and everything not everything from the beginning the space age but a lot of stuff from the sixties and seventies eighties is still up there and we're talking about rockets satellites and big things like the international space station and then little tiny pieces that have broken off from all those things and so how big of a problem is this. The the sheer amount of stuff. That's up there. Yeah it's it's really big because it's all just spinning around eight skates controlled release trapped by different space agencies by not we do dubai right now and things are going to bump into each other and that could be bad yet. Tell me a little bit about that. Why why is it bad thing as it. Just the potential damage. I mean how big of a problem is it for these existing satellites. Give me a sense of actually. How many lives are up there right now. Year right now. There are a roughly twenty eight hundred live satellites and perhaps three times that many defunct satellites still floating around and not a lot of human traffic there right now going in and out of the space station and for the people for too long there might be some space tourists going out there. So you know. There are people who get into trouble but also a lot of machinery and they're more more salads coming up all the time if there's a sense of how may more we expect. 'cause feels like we're say launching new satellites will explore on your services running off these satellites. What what exactly is sort of the the expected volume of satellites over the coming years. It's a lot. It's hard to put a number to it. You have more and more countries all the time starting own space agencies or saying rockets up then you have commercial space traffic which is not done by the likes of nasa the european space agency. You have private. Companies like yuan musk's space x Jeff bezos and amazon. And all his money going into Rocket projects on its own in space x in particular. They have a new system called starling which is going to provide broadband service to the earth. Eighteen beta right. Now there are about six hundred or so satellites And they're going to be a lot more i mean. Musk has filed paperwork to send up as many as forty thousand of these Satellites are not not be car sized space station size but you know a chunk of metal floating around of their forty thousand is eight a huge number no matter how big or little that satellite is reading this piece and this is by jackson ryan one of our colleagues out of australia. Who is fantastic. These worth reading if the another chance. He talked to nasa researcher. At least cited a nasa researcher who fled the doomsday scenario. Tell me about that right. The researcher is donald kessler in the work. He did start in the late seventies. It's called kessler syndrome named after him in the basic idea. Is that the more satellites or anything else who have floating around in space. The greater the chance of a collision more collisions. You have you're going to get debris more debris brief floating around the maurice floating around and we're chance collisions and you get into this cycle of more and more trash spinning around and just really out of control. So what's being done about this problem. A lot of worrying a lot of thinking about how to handle it but there aren't really a lot a good solution to right now. So some satellites and rockets sly back in earth's orbit they burn up and you know some that can be directed on purpose. Some satellite skid spun into a higher higher orbits andrew out of the way By the are no good systems for dragging satellites space. Picking can't send trash trucks since tweet street. Sweepers around growling. They've been some experiments With things like Basically a big fishing net to grab satellites And even space harpoon to grab him but again you have to be careful because you don't want to fragment you one nice big clean satellite and make it into a bunch of little tiny satellite pieces. That just adds to the problem.

Johnson Skillings John Hey Roger Nasa Jackson Ryan Dubai Jeff Bezos European Space Agency Donald Kessler Musk Amazon Kessler Australia Andrew
How Olympic Gymnast Laurie Hernandez Regained Her Strength After Emotional Abuse

Latina to Latina

04:53 min | 11 months ago

How Olympic Gymnast Laurie Hernandez Regained Her Strength After Emotional Abuse

"Lori. Take me back to the moment where you fell in love with gymnastics iranian before he started. I was at home and originally did ballet. When i was three. But i think if you can't tell really a kid who can like sit still really so three to do something as serious as ballet was a little tough but they told me that they would give me sugar cookies. If i paid attention so i stayed for two more years and then when i was five i was kinda coming home from practice or rehearsal and i saw two gymnasts on the tv. I thought they looked so cool. I didn't know what they were doing was possible. And i kinda just looked at. My mom knows i want to be just like them. Mom was like okay and she put me in. And i just i loved doing it. I didn't know what i was doing. But i loved doing it and there was a lot of energy that was happening and it was a good place to put it. We all watched you and cheered for you and we see the triumph and the glory. What is it. we don't see you see a of things 'cause Interesting to me is al people. Most people know me from the olympics but in being sixteen in doing that kind of five to six week event. I had so many years of doing other things. Most of those things was training but that was such a short time period a huge peak in my career in my life but it was such a short time here. It's sometimes i kinda forget that. That's like the main part of my life really but the behind the scenes of that. I'd say there were a lot of times. I wanted to quit. Which is very common in any sport just tired and at the time. I wasn't really sharing. What was happening in practice. I'm sure a lot of people have seen like the instagram posts. A lot. that's been happening in gymnastics community within the last couple of months. But they didn't know they just saw this little kid who had really high dreams and they wanted to make sure that i didn't give up too soon because it was hard and they were pushing kind of realize okay. This actually makes sense. I see why they're doing this. So there are a lot of those moments a lot of different moments. Also i think in my particular situation trying to gauge. What do i need to make. Sure i get there like even just mental is. How do i look at this because physically. I think i can do it. But up here is the real challenge. Your brain is the part but you know if you're you could be one hundred percent physically for all your routines and whatnot. But if your brain's not bear then it's not gonna work whereas let's say physically you're at seventy eighty percent but if your brain is strong enough it's gonna pull through and you can really get it done. That's not the old but so the mental really matters. And i think a lot of that was kind of a battle of. I'm not sure how to look at the next couple of years to make sure i can hang in there and be okay. I do want to ask you about what you did to get your head right mostly because i want to learn it and process it and then do it myself but you brought this up so i want to talk about it. Which is there's a reckoning. Going on in gymnastics and a lot of the emphasis and attention has been put on the way. That gymnasts were physically violated in some cases sexually violated pushed. Really hard the abuse you suffered was different though. It was emotional abuse. What did it look like for you even just bringing it up to someone was terrifying because a lot of especially now. Gen z is kind of looked at as snowflakes. They're not tough like they need to build thicker skin. These kids are just so sensitive. And i'm like oh man. Maybe i just am really sensitive and if you ever meet my parents. They are literally the sweetest human beings possible. So maybe i'm just a really sensitive kid. Maybe this just stinks a little more. Maybe it's me who needs to toughen up. I was very wrong. that wasn't the case at all. The hardest part. I think was knowing that that culture is so common in gymnastics that even i couldn't really identify as wrong until after the fact that adults were brought into because i was still minor and my mom can kinda overheard a phone call of me my friend talking and we had brought up situation that for us. We laughed about but for my mom was a huge red flag that she didn't know about

Bruce Springsteen has a Billboard first with new album Letter to You

First Morning News

00:30 sec | 11 months ago

Bruce Springsteen has a Billboard first with new album Letter to You

"A new chart record for Bruce Springsteen. A lot of people listen to Bruce Springsteen's letter to you. Latest studio album Letter to You Debuts at Number two on the Billboard 200 album chart, giving the boss the distinction of being the only artist have a top five album in each of the last six decades. The seventies eighties nineties to thousands, tens and now twenties butter to you is Springsteen's 21st Top five album,

Bruce Springsteen Springsteen
"seventies eighties" Discussed on 850 WFTL

850 WFTL

19:31 min | 11 months ago

"seventies eighties" Discussed on 850 WFTL

"The seventies eighties What is that? A nine Okay? No. Oh, Maker. There's a place called that way you go. Take that monster. Friends along South Florida's home for the greatest hits of the seventies. Eighties and nineties. Sonny 1079 stay back. Now turn a bag said I don't believe you know, you gotta make me change my mind. I know that you didn't You know that call two minutes. Again. Call me baby again. Call me in time to call. I don't know. You got a thing matching No Teo away my life. No one No one squeeze, man. Then Teo doesn't want some wonder home man. Blue, hot love You give you the news. Give you what you Teo. You understand, don't you? Just come in visa. Just when season just Camilla Visa and Change. So things No. Playing throwback songs before throwbacks Fora Thing is bringing back such great memories. Greatest hits of the seventies eighties and nineties on Sonny, one of 79. Greatest hits of the seventies eighties. Nineties on Sonny 1079 continues Next. Duncan is here to keep you running with a much needed.

Your Next Flying Adventure in Hawaii with Fly Maui

Stuck Mic AvCast – An Aviation Podcast About Learning to Fly, Living to Fly, & Loving to Fly

02:46 min | 1 year ago

Your Next Flying Adventure in Hawaii with Fly Maui

"Love Looking things out the window, the airplane like everybody. Else. I, Love Lighthouses in Wales and I think that the Hawaiian especially Maui it'd be a perfect spot for that. But in your words I mean, why do people WANNA go fly in Maui? All Karl is now there's a lot of different reasons you know first of all people love to come to Hawaii to Maui specifically is just like. some people do it as an aviation? Adventure and it just makes it really fine. So they'll you know vacation they'll have some downtime, the beach they'll do some more interesting like hiding, and of course, incorporate flying in and organised talk about the opportunities as a pilot. You can visit your specifically in a few minutes but you know Hawaiian was it is paradise the the climate is amazing. The beaches are uncrowded. It's low key laid back in the. General aviation ramp it's everybody's friendly. A the spirit Aloha is all around just like in a lot of are other general aviation airports but the weather's awesome. I would say we are fueled actually went far couple of days ago, and you can probably count on one hand the number times in a year that we actually go I-. Afar into says you just amazing flying missions we have here. It's great for applied school. Our students hardly ever have a down day because the weather and Maui is pretty unique just because of the topography here where it's located. Just on our little island eleven of the fourteen worlds climate zones are found here so You're on the beach and lay layout or over in Fong Holly and get too hot and sweaty from being outside and being in the sand than you can always go up to your. The summit of Holly, Autho? which is a dormant shield volcano. It's over ten thousand feet at the summit and usually stays around fifty degrees during the daytime up there. So you can go up there and full off just so much to see endure, and of course, from the air getting to see all that is so unique. Really a diverse environment also the fact that you can go and cool off so much make you bet there's probably somewhere in Hawaii I'm not sure that you can go skiing I would think I know service Maui. Yeah it does happen just. Seems like once a year last February we we had six eight inches at the summit and on the Big Island, which is about seventy eighty miles from here. The three summits, their twelve, thirteen, thousand they actually do have people that because they'll have moral snowcap or longer to town. So they'll actually go have some guys get out snowboards.

Maui Fong Holly Big Island Wales Hawaii Afar Karl Skiing Autho
Your Next Flying Adventure in Hawaii with Fly Maui

Stuck Mic AvCast – An Aviation Podcast About Learning to Fly, Living to Fly, & Loving to Fly

02:46 min | 1 year ago

Your Next Flying Adventure in Hawaii with Fly Maui

"Love Looking things out the window, the airplane like everybody. Else. I, Love Lighthouses in Wales and I think that the Hawaiian especially Maui it'd be a perfect spot for that. But in your words I mean, why do people WANNA go fly in Maui? All Karl is now there's a lot of different reasons you know first of all people love to come to Hawaii to Maui specifically is just like. some people do it as an aviation? Adventure and it just makes it really fine. So they'll you know vacation they'll have some downtime, the beach they'll do some more interesting like hiding, and of course, incorporate flying in and organised talk about the opportunities as a pilot. You can visit your specifically in a few minutes but you know Hawaiian was it is paradise the the climate is amazing. The beaches are uncrowded. It's low key laid back in the. General aviation ramp it's everybody's friendly. A the spirit Aloha is all around just like in a lot of are other general aviation airports but the weather's awesome. I would say we are fueled actually went far couple of days ago, and you can probably count on one hand the number times in a year that we actually go I-. Afar into says you just amazing flying missions we have here. It's great for applied school. Our students hardly ever have a down day because the weather and Maui is pretty unique just because of the topography here where it's located. Just on our little island eleven of the fourteen worlds climate zones are found here so You're on the beach and lay layout or over in Fong Holly and get too hot and sweaty from being outside and being in the sand than you can always go up to your. The summit of Holly, Autho? which is a dormant shield volcano. It's over ten thousand feet at the summit and usually stays around fifty degrees during the daytime up there. So you can go up there and full off just so much to see endure, and of course, from the air getting to see all that is so unique. Really a diverse environment also the fact that you can go and cool off so much make you bet there's probably somewhere in Hawaii I'm not sure that you can go skiing I would think I know service Maui. Yeah it does happen just. Seems like once a year last February we we had six eight inches at the summit and on the Big Island, which is about seventy eighty miles from here. The three summits, their twelve, thirteen, thousand they actually do have people that because they'll have moral snowcap or longer to town. So they'll actually go have some guys get out snowboards.

Maui Fong Holly Big Island Wales Hawaii Afar Karl Skiing Autho
How to Run Effective In-Person and Online Workshops with Dr. Isabeau Iqbal

GradBlogger

06:47 min | 1 year ago

How to Run Effective In-Person and Online Workshops with Dr. Isabeau Iqbal

"Welcome to episode number eighty of the ground blogger podcast. This is the podcast for helping them exchanged the world through online business helping you by giving you the tools and tips strategies. You need to build an online business around your research experience and your background around the change. You want to make in the world. I'm your host doctor Crisco. It is episode. We're doing interview on how to run an effective in person and online Workshop to do that. We have back on the podcast. Dr. Iqbal from he's the boat, and we're really excited get around the podcast. Dr. Iqbal. Thank you for coming back on. Thanks Chris for having me back and really happy to be able to have this conversation with you today suppose you have been listening to the last couple of weeks and months. We had a table on an episode 74 the podcast talking about starting a coaching business as an academic her background their her story about how she started her her business where she coaches ambitious perfectionist dead. And around the higher education space talk about her journey things like how she finds clients and just overall some ideas around how to build up a business as a coach some really important takeaways there were around focus on doing just that make sure you get the skills actually be able to build a business what you're doing. It's not just coaching people you have to do but you have to actually sell services and build up an infrastructure there as well with certification a lot of other important topics as well. I want to get Isabelle back on for a couple of reasons to talk about this process of online workshops. So reason number one is that Workshop facilitation. I'm not exactly sure why but maybe she can can point out but seems to be a place where a lot of academics start there entrepreneurship journey. I think they probably have some skill sets in this already and they start doing and finding a good at it and they kind of built this up as a home service offering it they can do at other universities. The second kind of reason is if you're doing one-on-one coaching like, you know all the coaches who had on the podcast for it started with then moving dead. More towards as many to one model moving more towards workshops where you can teach and coach and help multiple people at once seems to be a place that that coaches and academic coaches in particular seem to gravitate towards as well. So in this episode over and talk about why should you consider adding workshops to your business model and talk about what are some of the common key components around planning and effective workshop and delivering an effective Workshop or how how to keep paging aged and maybe even more importantly if you want to keep the business running keep an organized there's happy and what this does look like as we transition in the space over in today to online more online learning more online workshops more online events. So as always, you know, the transcripts of this podcast episode at gravatar.com. Eighty. That's 801 probably pull out a cheat sheet with tips on running and planning effective Workshop from this intervention download at that link as well. So Isabelle we covered your kind of story your backstory while you got in the business how you build your business over the last number of years and episode 74 taking this one will probably just jump right into why wage In your business. Do you include workshops as part of your your business model? Sure. Yeah. It's pretty much what you were saying just a few moments ago. So initially it was really because off I have experience and comfort and designing and facilitating workshops from my career as an educational developer at a university teaching Learning Center. And I really enjoy Sylhet ating. So it seemed like a natural place to a natural thing to to include also as I talked about in that previous conversation that we had. I was initially trained through a tool called the Clifton strengths assessment and that approach is really focused. Well, not only on individual strengths but also team's strengths and team collaboration. So it did seem also like a really good fit with with that approach and then of course in terms of Revenue wage So what you were saying just a few minutes ago again was around. I do the one on one coaching and then to have an offer where I could also offer request with groups. It helps me in terms of having more reach and more impact in in that way to that makes a lot of sense and I have seen this come up with folks are inside the self tanner Community people they worked with and coaching where you if you're doing one-on-one services and it doesn't have to be coaching. It could be website design. It could be any sort of service of that your your business office told there's a there's inherent maximum roof. You can only you know work so many hours in a week. Hopefully, it's less than than fifty sixty seventy. Eighty. If you're if you're doing things, you know the wage like to see and maybe less than forty or Thirty if you're really dialed-in and sure you can charge more but charging more is also a tough one cuz it's not, you know charging 30% more is pretty hard to do age. Turning sixty percent more is even harder to but the end of the day, how do you charge you know, ten times or a hundred times more it's hard to do on 121. You can really move into these other models. We can serve more people at one time exactly wage. Yeah, so someone's just getting started and they're thinking well, I I do have some skills and workshops. Like you said, I understand some of the tools and I'm interested expanding into this. I think we zoom out to sort of rain this, from what are the key components around planning and effective Workshop where the pieces that we we should dive into in the rest of this conversation. Yeah, because the planning is so crucial to say you are running effective workshops. So I have eight suggestions around planning effective workshops. And the first is to to learn more about your clients need so often I'll get a phone call or an email and it'll be a really vague requests. We'd like a workshop around strengths and that dog Tell me a lot. So one of the very first things I do is request a phone meeting where I can find a little bit more about what the client is is 1:15, and that is so so helpful find things about you know, who the participants are going to be their age their backgrounds their education, whether they know each other down there strangers. So those bits will really help with the with the planning and then another part around client needs is how do they want to work together? So some people want to be more involved and others don't and I think that it's really important to to know that up front because it will help ensure their satisfaction with with the process. So that's that's one piece and I'm not sure if I should pause if you have follow-up questions or questions continued.

Isabelle Dr. Iqbal Doctor Crisco Sylhet Ating Self Tanner Community Chris Developer
"seventies eighties" Discussed on 850 WFTL

850 WFTL

05:00 min | 1 year ago

"seventies eighties" Discussed on 850 WFTL

"Of the seventies, eighties and nineties from the Ana Jar and the bean accident. Attorney studios. Have you been injured in an accident? Call the law offices of Anna Jahn Levine 1 807 473. That's 1 807 473733. You're listening to W West Palm Beach, South Florida's sunny one of 79. You're given everything that I was working. It's Sonny 1079 Jennifer built with you on this Tuesday, I had to think about that. Okay? It's National Eminem Day. Really? Yeah, This's a thing. This is ab. Sure, I'm sure Eminem's made it up. But which do you prefer peanut or plain? It's a It's a big question for us today to solve this dilemma Plane now not this so much better, and the argument started filling up on Facebook. It's gonna win..

Anna Jahn Levine Ana Jar Eminem W West Palm Beach Facebook Attorney South Florida
Interview with David Kim

Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

05:54 min | 1 year ago

Interview with David Kim

"It is One of my great pleasure is to bring on an API who is running for political office and David. Kim is I believe for district thirty four, which is encompassing. So many of the Asian American enclave here in Los Angeles I want to welcome you to the podcast David. Yes. Thank you so much for having me patent. Excited to be on your podcasts. Yes. So you actually have prevailed the through the primaries and you're you're now running head to head with is it the incumbent correct? Yes. We won second place out of five candidates in the march primary. In California. We have a jungle primary. So the top two ended its regardless of Party advanced. To the November third general election and so we're running up against the. So I gotta ask You David What what is going through your mind to actually throw your hat in the ring to go from just local involvement and representation and being an attorney and trying to get to Washington DC and and the House of Representatives the that's a great question. Or the past decade I've worked as an attorney helping people from all different walks of life. Those that are. Those that are struggling those that have the two three jobs daily grinded hustle whether they be somebody that was a labor employment whether they be client that's working creative or whether the. Client, and so Michael Career has been drawn towards helping those those that are under representatives seek justice, seek relief, exit, they need and so that's something that I've done on an individual level always fighting for the voiceless in the under representative, but there's only so much that I can do bandwidth wise because working with people individually and so for me, it means the plant where I just thought. You know what? Like the past ten years? It's made me realize this one. Thing that life isn't supposed to be this frequent tough for anybody that no person should ever have work three jobs and still try to make ends meet. So for me this this where I was already helping people individually this desperation urgency expanded where you know what now it's time to help people on a macro scale and one of the ways to do that is to run for office because once you're elected, you get to be the one that's co-governing with people that's pushing for certain legislation. and. That's change changing and clearly what's Erin right now is that our government and elected officials aren't super the change that. So that's why I decided. And in scanning through your your biography. David, this is very personal for you. You've lived through all of these challenges yourself is. Can you talk about that? Yeah for sure. Can I graduated in a loss once thousand ten at a time where the legal market was really bad. We had the biggest law firms closing down and he's odds. Were the worst scarcity and I remember. Even in my Willia- twenty interviews, and then they said it'd be zero and so. From the start we graduated from law school with mounds of debt and honor own spending ourselves, and so I, started working at the DA's office in the public revisit as as far served by clerk and with the supposed to turn inside, you a permanent higher but the county went on a hiring freeze and so that began my whole journey of the two three of and Hustle. Where I would be working seventy eighty hours a week as labor and Employment Attorney. But you paid two thousand dollars a month on its ninety nine from my boss is my boss also trying to save money honors but then I still need resin. I. Still Need Experience on my look legal resum once you have a whole on there then and you're not marketable they think that there's something wrong with you that there's a you're applying. For your next job, and so I had to work release jobs, full-time attorney jobs, and then drive lifted regret night. Then be an extra said then tutor on the side or or served during different seasons of my life and so or although I was although I was doing the best I could helping other people with their legal needs I. Myself was also trying to convince the and so armee the struggle became all too real I mean. Ordinarily, and me being myself one of the very few fortunate and made me think only crap like if I'm one is supposed to be one of the few that are fortunate and I have over two hundred thousand dollars, law school loans, Helen. The world's are other people doing right now, and so if you look at the people in our district and we have per capita income's people where it's the per capita income are less than the average rent were one apartment and you wonder how in the world people live this way and they live that way because two families live in one bedroom apartments. Yeah this is this is all pre cove in nineteen. And this is all pre covid nineteen. Now, we have already plus more million people without jobs without healthcare and so for me just although I was able to successfully kind of fine my footing I established the Hollywood Lord Dot Com. And then later sold that before during another stint in the movie ends immigration. But me it's just a matter of like now I've come to the point where I really just a off my law school loans for the next several years just all it even and you might art and that's it but. That's life is about and his life is about helping each other connecting with each other doing things together

David Attorney KIM Los Angeles California House Of Representatives Employment Attorney Erin Michael Career Washington Representative Helen
"seventies eighties" Discussed on 850 WFTL

850 WFTL

03:35 min | 1 year ago

"seventies eighties" Discussed on 850 WFTL

"Greatest hits of the seventies eighties and nineties. Sunny window 79. I want you to want me. More. Tract.

"seventies eighties" Discussed on 850 WFTL

850 WFTL

03:03 min | 1 year ago

"seventies eighties" Discussed on 850 WFTL

"Raiders of the seventies eighties and nineties that ninety one oh seven nine sees.

Raiders
"seventies eighties" Discussed on 850 WFTL

850 WFTL

04:19 min | 1 year ago

"seventies eighties" Discussed on 850 WFTL

"Hits of the seventies eighties and nineties and just like sweat pants and leggings and comfort food the songs just make you feel better thanks for continuing to isolate with us it's sunny but it's seven nine you're just a few minutes away from more of the greatest hits of the seventies eighties and nineties.

"seventies eighties" Discussed on 850 WFTL

850 WFTL

07:48 min | 1 year ago

"seventies eighties" Discussed on 850 WFTL

"Of the seventies eighties and nineties right this is this is my this my gosh leak take a chill pill it is this all eighties weekend on sunny one oh seven nine with we thirty eight special hold on loosely on a we love.

"seventies eighties" Discussed on 850 WFTL

850 WFTL

08:07 min | 1 year ago

"seventies eighties" Discussed on 850 WFTL

"Seventies eighties and nineties feel good on sunny one of seven nine the Sunday anyone in seven nine a we love the eighties weekend with Eric Carmen twenty one oh seven nine finding answers in the music we got in wonder if you're dreaming the size elation as you wondering if you're a little crazy you're happy to help flatten the curve you're going a little more restless you're going to be obsessed by playing the greatest hits of the seventies eighties and nineties we're sunny one of.

"seventies eighties" Discussed on 850 WFTL

850 WFTL

04:13 min | 1 year ago

"seventies eighties" Discussed on 850 WFTL

"Of the seventies eighties and nineties and there are so many ways for you to listen to Sonny from home three months it's funny when I was seven nine dot com download our app in your app store just search sunny when I was seven nine and of course you can always listen on your trusty home radio all the greatest hits of the seventies eighties and nineties will never be canceled radio is always on and we are here for you it's funny when I was seven nine on the windows seven on finding answers in the music we know you're going to be fun take care of one another and of course keep the faith I thank god I have where every South Florida played the greatest hits of the seventies eighties and nineties on any windows seven nine ninety one oh seven nine traffic.

"seventies eighties" Discussed on 850 WFTL

850 WFTL

20:59 min | 1 year ago

"seventies eighties" Discussed on 850 WFTL

"Seventies eighties this is sunny windows seven nine but you can go to the sun fell to him Kickin it just thank with your life these are the greatest ninety twenty one oh seven nine if anyone knows of a nine the greatest hits of the seventies eighties and nineties it's all about the music this the what it's the greatest hits of the seventies eighties and nineties twenty one oh seven nine all your favorite songs from Billy Joel hello clean and more all in one place the greatest hits of the seventies eighties and nineties feel good play on sunny.

"seventies eighties" Discussed on 850 WFTL

850 WFTL

04:22 min | 1 year ago

"seventies eighties" Discussed on 850 WFTL

"The seventies eighties and nineties poison on sunny one oh seven nine so you could be watching that will lend up as he walks over that volcano he's doing it live on Wednesday on ABC he's walked over Times Square is walked over the Grand Canyon is walked over what is he going to stop tell you what he would be a one do the all your favorite songs from Elton John and more all in one place the greatest hits of the seventies eighties and nineties feel good play on sunny windows seven hi I'm Jay Farner CEO of quicken loans America's largest mortgage lender let's talk credit card debt for a minute if you feel you're carrying too much of it you're not alone the average.

ABC Times Square Grand Canyon Elton John CEO America Jay Farner quicken
"seventies eighties" Discussed on 850 WFTL

850 WFTL

02:26 min | 1 year ago

"seventies eighties" Discussed on 850 WFTL

"The seventies eighties and nineties the day after Christmas on Sony one of seven nine sunny one oh seven nine traffic this board is brought to you by off lease only dot com shop thousands of pre owned cars trucks SUVs and vans all priced below retail now at off lease only dot com call five six one two two two cars off lease only dot com thanks to Chile to bundle up as you get out of the house and had to work in school this morning no major accidents in your way but things will start heating up literally on the roadways major delays on ninety five turnpike for forty one for federal highway so enjoy the traffic reporters brought to buy Lynne's from air conditioning and plumbing I'm Karen Curtis for sunny one oh seven nine dealing with battery problems America's number one battery destination is here to help and also look at the free services to help you start even stronger in those colder temperatures but free battery testing and battery charging you for having starting troubles come and auto so we'll test in charge your battery for free so you can drive with peace of mind in the winter time getting the job done just got easier visit your nearest AutoZone today to learn more based on data from the NPD group of corporate Carter truck four months in the summer of two thousand eighteen Hey this is Jay Farner CEO of quicken loans quicken loans is celebrating our best quarter ever and now we're celebrating some of the lowest refinancing rates ever rates have dropped so much that many Americans can reduce their rate you may be able to save money on your monthly mortgage payment right now the rate today in our thirty year fixed rate mortgage is three point nine nine percent APR four point one eight percent call us at eight hundred quicken or go to rocket mortgage dot com to learn more rates subject to change a one point three seven five percent fee to receive the discount rate offer cost information conditions equal housing lender lessons in all fifty states and MLS number thirty thirty the holidays are truly a magical I know I turned my iPhone six S. into this iPhone alive it's true right now when you trade in an iPhone six S. or newer in any condition seriously any condition look at the powerful new iPhone eleven for zero dollars a month on sprint quickly so this way the ticket to eleven local sprint store sprint dot com Holly hunter's creek one I can look at six forty five zero let me get to really make they should be restricted by and is now a page from the diary of flow do you diary there's something about protecting people's homes to progressive that inspires me because I just had an idea for a book well it was originally an idea for a movie based on a play inspired by a podcast but.

three seven five percent nine nine percent one eight percent zero dollars four months thirty year
"seventies eighties" Discussed on 850 WFTL

850 WFTL

06:58 min | 2 years ago

"seventies eighties" Discussed on 850 WFTL

"Hits of the seventies eighties and nineties feel good on sunny one oh seven nine you the Sony loyal listener network here's your chance to win a family for back if you get to aquatica in Orlando.

"seventies eighties" Discussed on 850 WFTL

850 WFTL

04:17 min | 2 years ago

"seventies eighties" Discussed on 850 WFTL

"Of the seventies eighties and nineties on sunny one oh seven nine so.

"seventies eighties" Discussed on 850 WFTL

850 WFTL

03:40 min | 2 years ago

"seventies eighties" Discussed on 850 WFTL

"The seventies eighties and nineties it's Tracy Saint George and speaking of dying and already passed windy Houston she got a hologram she's hitting the road next year for it to. kicks off in Mexico that have your up hopefully cross your fingers come last. we need. she's a hologram. it will be free. what we look at air. so I think the ticket should also be. a hologram price would be nothing. they. when..

Tracy Saint George Houston Mexico
"seventies eighties" Discussed on 850 WFTL

850 WFTL

02:05 min | 2 years ago

"seventies eighties" Discussed on 850 WFTL

"Of the seventies eighties and nineties it's bad that I know you could use an extra five hundred Bucks and we've got the easiest way for you to win it just download the all these anyone is seven nine mobile apps become a registered user and you're automatically entered to win five hundred dollars cash find out more it's funny when a seven nine dot com..

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"seventies eighties" Discussed on 850 WFTL

850 WFTL

08:20 min | 2 years ago

"seventies eighties" Discussed on 850 WFTL

"Of the seventies eighties and nineties well the good news is Friday junior already because what we call Thursdays around here thank. ever get the house back to normal life high pressure clean the patio last night because you know all the furniture still in the garage I get to. the. all of this. so. the. B.. the greatest hits of the seventies eighties and nineties. Sonny windows seven nine. doing this on a windows seven nine Taxila especially was delivered right to your phone when text club only contact the more to join simply tax money to five point eight seven nine if you're in it's that easy. sunny one oh seven nine traffic.