35 Burst results for "Seventh Grade"

Wacha, Story provide spark in new home, Sox beat Twins 8-1

AP News Radio

00:42 sec | Last month

Wacha, Story provide spark in new home, Sox beat Twins 8-1

"The the the the Boston Boston Boston Boston Red Red Red Red Sox Sox Sox Sox started started started started the the the the scoring scoring scoring scoring in in in in the the the the sixth sixth sixth sixth then then then then added added added added six six six six runs runs runs runs in in in in the the the the eighth eighth eighth eighth inning inning inning inning eight eight eight eight one one one one victory victory victory victory over over over over the the the the Minnesota Minnesota Minnesota Minnesota Twins Twins Twins Twins at at at at Fenway Fenway Fenway Fenway Park Park Park Park the the the the scoring scoring scoring scoring started started started started with with with with two two two two back back back back to to to to back back back back sacrifice sacrifice sacrifice sacrifice flies flies flies flies to to to to center center center center by by by by Alex Alex Alex Alex Verdugo Verdugo Verdugo Verdugo NGD NGD NGD NGD Martinez Martinez Martinez Martinez the the the the Sox Sox Sox Sox batted batted batted batted around around around around in in in in the the the the bottom bottom bottom bottom of of of of the the the the eighth eighth eighth eighth and and and and added added added added six six six six runs runs runs runs on on on on seven seven seven seven hits hits hits hits Michael Michael Michael Michael Walker Walker Walker Walker started started started started for for for for Boston Boston Boston Boston and and and and pitched pitched pitched pitched five five five five shutout shutout shutout shutout innings innings innings innings gave gave gave gave up up up up one one one one hit hit hit hit and and and and struck struck struck struck out out out out five five five five that that that that we we we we collect collect collect collect the the the the nice nice nice nice little little little little room room room room there there there there were were were were weird weird weird weird mix mix mix mix them them them them up up up up you you you you know know know know kind kind kind kind of of of of keep keep keep keep them them them them off off off off balance balance balance balance working working working working both both both both sides sides sides sides of of of of the the the the plate plate plate plate up up up up down down down down Trevor Trevor Trevor Trevor Larnach Larnach Larnach Larnach drove drove drove drove in in in in the the the the only only only only run run run run for for for for the the the the twins twins twins twins with with with with a a a a sacrifice sacrifice sacrifice sacrifice fly fly fly fly in in in in the the the the seventh seventh seventh seventh grade grade grade grade Cadette Cadette Cadette Cadette ski ski ski ski Boston Boston Boston Boston

SOX Boston Boston Boston Boston Re Minnesota Minnesota Minnesota Fenway Fenway Fenway Fenway Pa Center Center Center Center Alex Alex Alex Alex Verdugo Ve Boston Martinez Martinez Martinez Mar Sox Sox Sox Michael Michael Michael Michae Trevor Trevor Trevor Trevor La Cadette Cadette Cadette Cadett Ski Ski Ski
Liberian teen becomes hero for finding and returning $50,000

AP News Radio

00:57 sec | 7 months ago

Liberian teen becomes hero for finding and returning $50,000

"A teenager in Liberia who found fifty thousand dollars and returned it to its rightful owner is getting praise invitations and threats Emmanuel too low says he was riding his motorcycle taxi on a highway when he spotted a bunch of money wrapped in a plastic bag then the business woman who'd lost the money went on the radio crying he said so he founder and return the money she gave him fifteen hundred dollars in cash and materials Liberia's president invited him for a chat many are praising his honesty but some including some friends say returning the money was dumb but he'll be poor for his whole life and he says he's been threatened I need to protect myself he says too low had to quit school in the seventh grade to run a taxi service with his motorcycle to make money to help his family and he strongly defends his honesty advising others to return anything they may find I'm Rita fall lay

Liberia Emmanuel Rita
My Son and I Are Failing Math

Netflix is A Daily Joke

01:56 min | 9 months ago

My Son and I Are Failing Math

"Thirteen and it just keeps getting harder and harder so hard. My son is in seventh grade. I want all you new parents to know this right now when you were in the seventh grade and you weren't smart you're definitely not going to be smart when your kid gets to the grain. Is harder my son. And i are failing math now gonna see minus that see in in private school. That's not good. That's failing so. Of course she brings me in for a parent teacher meeting five at school. That's what they do. These sits you down because they're concerned. Mr cooley mister. Clean pleads down on i don't want to nip this in the bud to twenty. You know mr coy that your son has this theme arniston math. I'll that's not good. What are we gonna do is solve that mr koi. Will you need to help me help him. I can do whatever. I can over here at school. But when he gets home you need to crack. Open that book and start working on the question. Bring that great back couplets to the team. That's two quite. And i was like you know. I'm a comedian and i hired you to teach my son. Oh

Mr Cooley Mr Coy
A highlight from Episode 25 Top Three Sibling Songs

Planet LP

01:49 min | 10 months ago

A highlight from Episode 25 Top Three Sibling Songs

"With sisters. My sister laura loves disco. She was that was her jam. Funk soul disco earth wind and fire is probably the one record or the one group that really reminds me of her. I mean she's into the teenyboppers stuff to andy gabe and the osbournes and stuff like that. But when earth wind and fire were super-popular in the disco era chewed often come home from school work and she'd put on some earth wind fire songs and just dance just dance. It was like a stress reliever for her. But stephen i would just kind of sit there and watch her dancing. She seemed so happy to be lost in this music. And when i started seventh grade we had school dances as you know. You probably had them to john and it didn't know how to dance very well so she showed me how to do. Some basic moves with like earth wind and fire songs and then progressive other moves. That were little. More advanced beginner disco. But it worked and i never had problems asking girls to dance. Because i wasn't embarrassed by my lack of rhythm on the dance floor. I wish older sister damn should've gotten the begged her for it. Man i needed so much help in that period of my life. The record that i really love by the band is their nineteen seventy seven album all in all and like many earth wind and fire records. It has this egyptian theme. It's almost sifi which i love. I love sci-fi stuff but it has solid and varied songs from start to finish. Of course there are some huge hits on this record. Serpentine fire and fantasy and jupiter was at the top of the charts. Peaked out at number three on the billboard. Hot one hundred triple platinum so telling folks to listen to nine hundred seventy seven earth when fire all in all. It's not much of a risk. You're not risking much. Listen to this record. So all in all from earth wind and fire from nine hundred seventy seven. That's my that's my sibling. pick thanks to laura. Thank you laura. What a great choice and a

Andy Gabe Laura Stephen John
The Freeway Phantom Murders: Who Killed These Little Girls?

Reverie True Crime

02:38 min | 10 months ago

The Freeway Phantom Murders: Who Killed These Little Girls?

"Carol denise spinks was only thirteen years old. she was really shy. She was in seventh grade and was an identical twin. She loved jumping double dutch row. Playing jacks with her siblings and she was an extremely talented little. Hula hooper on april. Twenty fifth nineteen seventy-one. Her mom allen teen was heading out to go visit her aunt and brentwood maryland. She told the children they could not leave the house. The kids knew if they did. They get what i know this to be as an ass weapon either by hand a switch from a tree or a belt maybe even extension cord. She was a single mother doing the best she possibly could. Parents often mimic what their parents did to them. I'm not here to judge anyone's parenting talking about those kind of spankings definitely gave me flashbacks. Though so allenton was gone and their older sister. Valerie who was twenty four asked carol to go to the seven eleven to pick up a few groceries that evening. Some tv dinners. Bread and soda pops. Carol new if her mom found out that she'd be in big trouble but she decided to go for it. It was only a half a mile away. this seven eleven was right as you entered into maryland. Well her mom ended up seeing her and she said you better go straight home after. Go into the seven eleven. And you're going to get a woman when i get back into town. Carol made it to the seven eleven and she was venturing back home with groceries when she was said kidnapped after. Not making it back home. Her mother was on edge upset and bowed a missing person report that night after they had scoured the neighborhood for carol almost a week later her body was discovered on may first by some kids playing in a grassy location right behind saint elizabeth's hospital. Someone had dumped carol's body on a grassy embankment by the northbound lanes of odd to ninety five.

Carol Denise Spinks Hula Hooper Allenton Maryland Brentwood Allen Carol Valerie Saint Elizabeth's Hospital
Behind the Development of the Sternberg Triarchic Abilities Test

The Psychology Podcast

02:30 min | 10 months ago

Behind the Development of the Sternberg Triarchic Abilities Test

"Great to have robert sternberg on the podcast sturm. Rick is a psychology professor at cornell university among his major contributions to psychology are the arctic theory of intelligence and several influential theories relating to creativity thinking styles love and hate a review of general psychology survey ranked sternberg as the sixtieth most cited psychologist of the twentieth century. And he's authored a co-authored over fifteen hundred publications including articles book chapters and books. And even that bios a huge understatement of all eve accomplished. Hey bob so great to have you in the podcast today. Thanks reeling having me. Thanks for inspiring me to go into the field. So i i is. It seems fair seems fair. No that will thank you. Thank you so much that means a lot to me You know in starting this conversation today. We could obviously talk about the research stuff. But i wanted to start more at your own childhood because i think it's i get a real kick out of every time i read that you created intelligence test when you were in. Maybe even elementary school. Can you kind of tell me about that story. Sure when i was in elementary school i didn't created i did poorly on. Iq tests is a young kid. In the late fifties early sixties. They used to give iq tests every year to group iq tests. And i did very poorly on them and you might ask how i know since they didn't give us the scores. But when you get the test and you only finish one or two problems and everyone else's turn the page. It doesn't take a high. You realize that you bombed so when i was in sixth grade i was sent back to a fifth grade classroom to take an easier tests that they thought would be more suitable to my ability level and because it was a fifth grade classroom my was less afraid and i think i did better i in seventh grade. I decided try to figure out why did so much trouble when he just said. I did a project on development of the mental tests and i devised my own. I teach us the very famous thoroughbred test of mental gallotti's stone. Which i'm sure you've heard of in. It's so widely used still haven't gone along with everything else from winners

Robert Sternberg Sternberg Cornell University Arctic Rick BOB Gallotti
Kelsey Grammer: You Were Born With One Set of Fingerprints

Just Getting Started with Rich Eisen

01:51 min | 1 year ago

Kelsey Grammer: You Were Born With One Set of Fingerprints

"Thrilled to have right here on my latest episode of just getting started gentleman who i've been a big fan of and i haven't spoken to in a few years when he appeared kind enough on my daily rich eisen show his new film or it's films space in between which had some theatrical run back in april is in a video on demand near you on june fifteenth and the god committee is coming to theaters on july. The second just one of the many projects in the world of calcutta here. I'm just getting started. Hawaii kelsey in our. I am better for chat with you. It is great to see you this pod. I started just a few months ago. When we were really thick in the throes of covid nineteen and thick in the throes of one. We might just get back to reality in helping people maybe get started with their lives their careers their stories because everybody has an origin story. And i'm curious about yours how you just got started kelsey grammar. All i was a grandson. God was kind of an oil executive who raised me. My my dad khan disappeared. Pretty early on i. Through my childhood. I was kind of a navy man of end in military. I am. I gonna academy goal annapolis stuff and gordon. He died when i was twelve. And that kind of just short circuited the whole plan. That i said they ended up of really ball in literature shakespeare. Some of the great novels end. I started thinking well most of a military i am the else. Somewhere around seventh grade A new guy came to school to teach was acquired director. These said you come into my office tomorrow. Audition

Hawaii Kelsey Eisen Kelsey Grammar Calcutta Khan Navy Gordon
Interview With Ayesha Curry, Cookbook Author, Entrepreneur

Skimm'd from The Couch

01:55 min | 1 year ago

Interview With Ayesha Curry, Cookbook Author, Entrepreneur

"I should thank you for joining us. Welcome to skim from the couch. They hit for having me. I'm in a chair today. But that's okay. This is a very nice chair. You look very comfortable for those of you. Can't see her. she's an a very nice chair so you are a pretty public person. A lot of your life is documented. And i wanna start with. What is something we cannot go about you. What's a fun fact about you. Oh goodness a fun fact about me. Maybe you can google this. Maybe you can't i play. I can play the electric bass. Wow i started in the seventh grade. And i was in a jazzman for a little while. It's so funny. My side of the family is more on the creative arts side. like beater. drama. Move the whole thing. So i'm kind of well-versed in that side of life. So let's start there. Tell us about how you grew up. What was your childhood like. Yes so. I grew up in markham ontario canada and very proud of it. I love the fact that. I'm like one of those rare dual citizens that gets to be both canadian and american. And we're proudly. But i grew up in markham in a big jamaican family and markham itself is like this giant cultural melting pots islands always very well versed in involved. In many different cultures side. Grew up like jamaican food having weekend parties with my big family like all i know but then on the flip side of things with like watch bollywood with my friends. Bollywood movies in my friends and like learn. Bollywood dances and so i just grew up learning and knowing many different things which i think plays into the way that i cook a lot as well. I lived in canada until i was fourteen thirteen fourteen and then moved to north carolina to start high

Markham Google Ontario Canada Bollywood North Carolina
Navalny "A Horrible Skeleton" in Court Appearance After Hunger Strike

Here and Now

00:48 sec | 1 year ago

Navalny "A Horrible Skeleton" in Court Appearance After Hunger Strike

"Last week. Here's NPR's Lucienne Kim Alexei Navalny looked gaunt as he appeared on a video monitor with a short head toe appeal. A court ordered fine. According to court reporters, Navalny briefly addressed his wife, Yuliya in the courtroom and joked that he now weighs as much as he did in seventh grade. Vanni ended his hunger strike last week, saying he was getting some of the medical attention. He demanded that he was listening to his doctors who warned his life was in danger. With Navalny locked away. Authorities have targeted his political organization as an extremist group. Bonnie's allies are now disbanding his nationwide network of regional offices to protect activists from prosecution. Lucian Kim. NPR NEWS Moscow This is NPR news lie from news 88 7 in Houston. I

Navalny Lucienne Kim Alexei Navalny Yuliya Gaunt NPR Vanni Bonnie Lucian Kim Moscow Houston
How Chris Wilson Went From Life In Prison To A Life Of Meaning And Purpose

The Unmistakable Creative Podcast

05:21 min | 1 year ago

How Chris Wilson Went From Life In Prison To A Life Of Meaning And Purpose

"Chris. Welcome to the unmistakable. Creative thanks so much for taking the time to join us. Thanks for having me. It is my pleasure to have you here. So i actually came across your story up because of an article that you wrote on medium about the books that change your life in prison and i remember reading through that and my first reaction was jesus this guy Learn to speak multiple languages. Read all these books for hey. I went to berkeley. And i didn't do anywhere near that in four years of college So we'll get into that. But i think i want to start with what i think is a fitting question that i tend to ask a lot of people and that is what did your parents do for work. And how did that end up. Impacting the choices that you ended up making throughout your life in your so gr growing up. My mom started her career as a nurse. How after she graduated from college and then she went back to school and she got a couple of certifications became a paramedic and pretty much work in the medical field. Emergency response feel for For like the rest for life and so. My dad was Electrician so he worked for electric company. So that's what they did. What what impacted they end up having you in terms of the direction you end up going well. My mom Had raised me by ourselves because my dad and my mom got divorced when i was eight months. No my father wasn't really a part of my life growing up but the impact of my mom had me is like my mom because she was a paramedic. She worked twelve hour shifts. So i was still with my grandmother Monday through finding a civil my mom on the weekends and so i would. Just kind of like a hybrid. So my grandmother's neighborhood was like a really tough neighborhood. washington dc. This was late eighties early nineties and my mom lived outside of dc maryland. And a pretty like you know. Middle class neighborhood was nice. It was mixed white people black people in everything was like really cool around a but My mom when i had time to spend. What does she instilled in me. A good work ethic entrepreneurship in and being nice and respectful. Mom for the most part at least initially when i was younger mike. Thanks changes certain point. So i wonder what that point changes because i remember you. There's something that you said in the book. And this is one of those things like i. I look at basically took everything that a highlight and underline and put it into a document. But you said you know when you start from a place like division avenue. Life's fragile you don't get to make mistakes because you don't have a safety net but and you know when i when i read that and i was going through the book I remember going to school an probably. What was the worst neighborhood in a place called bryant texas and it was in seventh grade and it was by far the most dangerous area of town and i used to have to stay there late at night because i worked at the university. So it'd be terrified as this seventh grader after basketball practice but i also think that to some degree probably i have certain biases about that neighborhood. Ob just baked into how. I was raised by And so i wonder what about what about those kind of environments. Do you think that we have misperceptions about from you. Know media like my immediate thought was. Oh this is probably just like boys in the hood rob so like how accurate is stuff like that. Well i would look at it differently right a little bit. I would say. I mean you're right in the sense that folks have their biases about Neighborhoods like that. But i think what people don't think about is what would have conditions in policies that will put in place to make these neighborhoods. The waiting. Were you know so like police Name was policed in. You know people just being harassed by the police. That's what happened with. Like when i was growing up. Only come through his jump out. Pakistan folks didn't own a home folks Couldn't get jobs so there was a lot of stuff but these were like based off for policies put in place that kinda like creed atmosphere what he's neighborhoods dangerous so always important for people to remember that So that's something that you know. I don't think people think about no well. I mean you. And i were talking about this before we hit record here I remember dave chapelle talking about you know with your an african american men. Your relationship to law enforcement is fundamentally different than that of other people like you actually have a relationship of fear of the very people who are basically put in society to protect you absolutely absolutely Better than us especially at my neighborhood on weight it was just all black people and so only interaction while white people were police and when they would it would pat down. It wasn't like nice. It wasn't like it would ask. Holiday was so we grew up this way and then when stuck what happened in our neighborhood. I'd say shoot something like that and like folks like neighbors or call the police. It'd take a mike thirty five minutes. Get it twenty. Minutes or maybe. Sometimes they didn't even show up so this was a relationship with them growing up in. So is this like naturally like and then we see people on. Tv shot by police like all the time. So it's something like it's a survival mechanism to just be you know worried police.

DC Berkeley Chris Maryland Washington Dave Chapelle Mike Basketball Texas Pakistan
Episode 130: The Doctors are Insane! - burst 11

The Swearwolves

01:57 min | 1 year ago

Episode 130: The Doctors are Insane! - burst 11

"I used to love whatever it was like an elementary school. Or junior high. When you'd get the textbooks and somebody. Joe dixon like different people from nine hundred seventy but there is one. I think it was when i was in seventh grade and we had marked the book also like when we had to go like pick up a book. Everyone wanted that book because dick's everywhere and like little bubbles come out of their mouths and one of my favorite cowboy hat. His legs like straddling sitting on a wooden fence. Jane nick in there's little bubble giving them as well and it said drones. i use them. Only i just. I just remember seeing them. And i'm like who would imagine like because the textbooks that we use listen. I grew up in wisconsin in like a small community. Our textbooks or from like the seventies. So there's this older man now at this point what i what. I'm reading this text book. This older man. Who's like you know what i did but i was all over with that. Captured is brilliant. Loved it i. I use them craze. Good i used to love just getting to and the and the cartoon. Dick's are the worst dr because it looks just like a like. What's the in music like the trouble. Cliff club with a line for the head line for the whole bagley with with the worst. Pubic hair. Little mushroom tippy like this little. Yes sprinkled guys are so fucking weird. We're so fucking numbers giggling about it day. We're forty or forty two dixie. Funny they are the love him. I love dick.

Farrell Nicholas Forty Thirty Five Years Thirty Five Years Ago Seven-Year-Old Seventies Forty Two Karen Couple Drake Joe Dixon Jane Nick Dick Cliff Club Wisconsin Bagley
Dick Drawings

The Swearwolves

01:56 min | 1 year ago

Dick Drawings

"I used to love whatever it was like an elementary school. Or junior high. When you'd get the textbooks and somebody. Joe dixon like different people from nine hundred seventy but there is one. I think it was when i was in seventh grade and we had marked the book also like when we had to go like pick up a book. Everyone wanted that book because dick's everywhere and like little bubbles come out of their mouths and one of my favorite cowboy hat. His legs like straddling sitting on a wooden fence. Jane nick in there's little bubble giving them as well and it said drones. i use them. Only i just. I just remember seeing them. And i'm like who would imagine like because the textbooks that we use listen. I grew up in wisconsin in like a small community. Our textbooks or from like the seventies. So there's this older man now at this point what i what. I'm reading this text book. This older man. Who's like you know what i did but i was all over with that. Captured is brilliant. Loved it i. I use them craze. Good i used to love just getting to and the and the cartoon. Dick's are the worst dr because it looks just like a like. What's the in music like the trouble. Cliff club with a line for the head line for the whole bagley with with the worst. Pubic hair. Little mushroom tippy like this little. Yes sprinkled guys are so fucking weird. We're so fucking numbers giggling about it day. We're forty or forty two dixie. Funny they are the love him. I love

Dick Drawing Joe Dixon Jane Nick Dick Cliff Club Wisconsin Bagley
How Writer Lesl Honor Knows Poetry Changes Lives

Latina to Latina

04:26 min | 1 year ago

How Writer Lesl Honor Knows Poetry Changes Lives

"I think you for doing this. Thank you for having me. It's just such an honor to be asked and awful. What is the first poem you ever think. The first time. I was something in first grade and i think it was about a bird and my dad helped me practices into it for talent. Show or my very catholics old There was always a good talent shone catholic schools. And was there. Anyone who said who. This girl hasn't my seventh grade teacher was like you're really good writer and i was like that's nice and my mom and dad told me i have to be an attorney or doctor and then high school. I had some really great teachers who were like. This is what you should do. This is really really good. I thought about it from they're like well. Maybe it's something. nba can do this. I could be a writer writers. I love Invented just kind of unfolded. When i got to college And there were so many people that were so supportive of my writing and poetry and just teaching me how to be in that space En- just happened to what i wanted to say authentically in kind of tune out. What a lot of the other influences are other writers. I think growing up in the nineties. I wanted to talk about identity a lot. I mean it wasn't until the late nineties until we even had something in the census that allowed you to be biracial. So i would always get the questions what are you. What are you You know just very rude. Comments often feeling not enough of one of the other affiliate black enough not mexican enough. So i wrote about my identity and how i felt. Your dad is black. His new orleans. Your mom born in mexico immigrated here when she was fifteen had it those cultures. How were they playing out at home. It's lovely. I love my kids. Identify appalachian in that that even have that term to identify with my oldest daughter who is brown and we talk about how we are mirror images of each other's experience where i fought a lot to inform people of my identity as a black woman. She does the opposite to inform people of dot and so we talk about that a lot and she really pushes me to see how the world sees me had well. She's her an how they see her as black. I and how they typically see as the enough i in. What does that mean about how we move in spaces. It's a salvatori household. I think i get that. From both of my cultures. We do often that for the announcement. Those in then we have gumbo. For new year's we are very lucky to be able to tap into so many different parts of us. How would didn't play. Though when you were growing up oh my pearson talk about race. It was not a forward conversation properly until the rodney king riots. Now sophomore in high school and my father at the time was working for the lapd and so we. We did not have a conversation. The way i have with my kids about race ethnicity identity how the world sees you ought to be prepared for and then maybe around my sophomore year in high school right before the rise of doing a lot of reading and read the biography malcolm x. I say that radicalized much split on my activism button that has never been turned off since then it's pretty much in succession than the riots happened. An stuff was bubbling in. La before ride became there was a lot of tension between black and korean communities in los angeles and stuff. It wasn't something that happened out of nowhere. It it definitely was arise that shifted allots. That shifted a conversation. I never knew. My dad was locked in his apartment during the watts riots. We had never had that conversation before.

NBA New Orleans Mexico Rodney King Pearson Malcolm LA Los Angeles
Damon Johnson misses live concerts

Pantheon

07:43 min | 1 year ago

Damon Johnson misses live concerts

"Nothing better to do during a pandemic than listened to some new tunes. Some stuff you've been wanting to listen to and haven't had the chance to. I know things are starting opened up across the country but it's nevertheless music can always be escape. It can always be a form of healing and rock and roll is always there for you. It's it's loyalty you so please be loyal to rock and roll like to welcome in our next guest. Some really excited about this. I've had the pleasure of seen him live over the last few years with his old band. Black star riders and also solo. I had a pleasure of seeing him up for the winery dogs here in saint charles just outside of chicago couple years ago. Like to welcome in mr damon johnson. What's going on man. How are you good buddy. Thank you for having me on Sure i miss getting to play live shows at all but i definitely miss coming to the greater chicago. Area man there some of the best rock and roll fans in the country right there. Yeah it's always a great seen a great show whenever whenever. There's a live concert here in chicago whether it's a small club theater or arena it it just has an atmosphere that is like no other. It's really cool. I agree man I've been coming to chicago since the early days of brother cane We could have first. Album outweigh back in ninety three and straightaway man chicago and northern illinois radio in general. They really embrace this. And i feel like it's a relationship that i've been really fortunate to have for gosh man crazy number thirty years ago long time and you have some connection here too in chicago. I know steph from f three design. I think he does your local man. Stephon stephan does everything. He's yeah steffen. I think the first thing he did for me was help me. Get my website design in early two thousands and then Bizmart work for me. On my i guess my second solo album which was in a stick record and then when he has started warns. The arm in You know i've been a proud supporter of their clothing company and i love awareness stuff and they're just they're to of my favorite people on the planet. They're like family to us. Yeah i've known stephan for gosh. It's gotta be two decades three decades almost and i used to live with this rock band in chicago and he used to do. They're designed to as well in all their kind of marketing in and You know other kind kinda website and designing stuff. And i've known him so i run into him at shows like him and i always like bump into each other like. Hey man what's going on so it's always good to see him. That's amazing you've known him longer than i have. So that's That's really cool. And i'm i'm so proud of the growth. They've had their company and They're both incredibly talented. And it's inspiring you know for them to start their own kind of mom and pop business as they as they have and they grown it to the level that they have. I'm really proud to be a part of their circle. Well we got lots to get into but we always begin the episode. Every time we have a first time guest the same way and that's the essence of the show. The the question. We always ask just like every rock song has a hook. That sucks you in rock fan has a moment whether it's a band performance a song or album that hook them on rock and roll. What was it for you. Wow that's a big question The thing that hooked me on rock and roll was. I saw kiss on the midnight special on my television. When i was in the seventh grade and i it was the equivalent. I'm sure jay of our older friends. When they saw the beatles on ed sullivan that was the equivalent of that moment for me. No one's ever asked me that question to tell you the truth You know. I grew up my my folks to this day man. Both my parents love music and so it was a very musical household. The radio was always playing in. Dad would buy vinyl records of perjury artists pop artists and but yeah that was when i felt like it was something that was specifically mind. You know my parents not care for kids. They played black diamond complete with this. You know the rising drum riser in the pyro and everything manages your that. Messed me up preordained. I think it put me on the path for sure. Your kiss was an inspiration for a lot of musicians. And i think it was just the the imagery you know the the faces and the explosions and all the stuff. That kind of just pulled you in you know. The music was great too. But it just had like this power over young kids. I mean i got exposed to kiss back in like the early eighties. And i always remember knowing of them in knowing what they look like before i heard their music and then i heard their music and then i was just hooked. Yeah you know. I you know. I'm i'm probably a little older than you. So you know that midnight. Special show man that would have been nineteen seventy seven grow. This was this was early. This was. I believe this was between kiss alive. One destroyer and You know it was cool. Because i had a group of friends at school that you know we were all kind of discovering rock and roll at the same time and i remember that year in school that no kid and leonard skinner. I'm from the south. And so you know sweet home. Alabama was already the national anthem for us. And so you know the musicality of a ban like skinner We love led zeppelin and You know not long after that. We really got into bands like rush pink. Floyd bad company was big call. Rogers greatest singer of all time. You know things like that. So that set the table for me. I guess jay and then the two big bands not long after that you know when i finally started going to concerts where we saw thin lizzy. Ironically i saw them in seventy nine and that was a game changer for me and The the next summer. I saw van halen for the first time and i was cooked like that's it. I'm i gonna play guitar. You know. I have friends who go to college and get a degree and and and pursued that actually and it wasn't until i had already graduated junior college that i really ever thought of even considering it to be possible to play music as living especially for women coming from such rural backgrounds. There was nobody from where i came from. That was a professional musician. You know so. It just didn't seem possible.

Chicago Mr Damon Johnson Stephon Stephan Saint Charles Northern Illinois Steffen Steph Stephan Ed Sullivan JAY Beatles Leonard Skinner Skinner Alabama Floyd Rogers Van Halen
Dr. Jennifer Aaker and Naomi Bagdonas: "Humor creates a window into authenticity and trust."

Skimm'd from The Couch

06:26 min | 1 year ago

Dr. Jennifer Aaker and Naomi Bagdonas: "Humor creates a window into authenticity and trust."

"Cheddar. I'm really curious. Because one of the first example he said was she was kind of living this double life she was. You know this serious business professional by day and had this you know literally humorous lifestyle by night and weekends at. I'm curious gentlemen like in your studies. How common is that not necessarily common that people have you know a improv career on the side. But how common is it that people turn off some of their personality within the workplace. Such a good question you know with our students in even executives that we teach we find it know it to be incredibly common. In fact i would say that. Youtube seem to be exceptions to the rule. I think the only story is not only communist. I think there's a lot of reasons for that. We often believe that certain characteristics about ourselves like our sense of humor having some levity or even smiling or being a human have no place in the workforce because if we take our work seriously we should take ourselves seriously in a book. We dive into these four deadly myths associated with you mark and if you put the word deadly in front of it makes it sound more cornets. That's just a little scientific for you guys but the first one is you know the serious business daily math. That here's somebody has no place in the in the workforce or any place that takes yourself seriously but research shows that even just laughing has unparalleled effects on our chemistry and our behavior so it literally when you laugh together. It changes the chemistry of your rain to make you more prime connection more creative and more resourceful and more resilient stress very cafe at i in. It's really important to me to be around people that i can laugh with and i know you talk about it. Believe it's four different types of humor that that you sort of. Can you tell us what the four r. I wanted to gauge where we fit. Carl wants to know how funny she is. Yes of because. I have no problem saying i'm funny okay. The only described humor types. And then i'll take a whakatane now and carly all right. So we've got four humor styles the standup the magnet the sniper and the sweetheart so standups natural entertainers outgoing not afraid to ruffle feathers to get a laugh. Like to roast like to tease big personalities next is the magnet similarly outgoing but magnets tend to keep things positive warm uplifting. They avoid controversial. Humor the radiate charisma. They're the ones buying around of drinks at the bar while laughing next. We have these sniper so snipers are a little bit more introverted. And their style. Tends to be edgy sarcastic nuanced. so it's sort of they say they have an acquired taste and they're not afraid to cross a line in pursuit of laugh so really good at zerorez and with deadpan delivery. And then lastly we have sweetheart so again. A little bit understated in their delivery earnest and honest they again tend to use humor. That's more uplifting that brings people together. They would never make someone else the target of their job if they thought it might hurt feelings but they're not the ones that want the limelight and they're going to be on stage so those are four. Okay so this is. This is a best gas carly in the back of your mind. You should be thinking what you jan. Y'all as you should be thinking. What partly thing i got it. Okay all right so this is our best. Guess jandiyal you are likely a sweetheart and carly is part madinat and parts neighbor. Okay and when i say we i mean alex. Alex told assist so out on our team. Yeah alex get off camera. You need to be put on the spot now. Alex's terrified now yeah. I think that what's interesting about. This is my humor in the workplace is very different than my humor. I said i. I was gonna say that my humor style. Four the podcast or in the office is probably more sweetheart. But i think in in reality. It's definitely more sniper. Yes that is true. She's like midwest work muir bjork and carly. I don't know what this falls into but like any like seventh grade boy. Category link found. You guy humor okay. You always say that. Like i say that i like to eat like a child like i twelve year. Old boy Gushers stuff like that. Okay i think i am sniper. But i think at work i've probably do straddle i actually don't know which i'd straddle i think either stratas sniper in stand up or sniper polystyrene stand up. I would agree with that. I mean how often is that when you guys come across this. That humor types vary depending on what the audience yacht that. This is common actually at super healthy so in particular. it's really important to recognize. There's a powerful relationship between humor and status and so what we find. Is that as people get higher in status. Your humor style needs to shift and this is because one of the principles of of comedy is never punched down. Basically never make fun of someone who's of lower status than you and when particular we find for people who are senior executives in organizations is they tend to have more teasing biting edgy humor outside of the office but when they come into the office they really have to use humor. That's more uplifting. Because if they don't that people who are more junior on their team might take it the wrong way or might have hurt feelings so we often find that that's the case especially with senior folks and then the reality is just like anything else the appropriateness of what we say at home versus what we say at work is different. You know we have different responsibilities. We have different relationships with our colleagues than we do with our families. And so it's it's actually really good that you're not making all the jokes around the boardroom that you are around the dinner

Jandiyal Muir Bjork Youtube Alex Carl Carly Midwest
"seventh grade" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:34 min | 1 year ago

"seventh grade" Discussed on KCRW

"US led war. There. She left school when she was young to help support her family. She emigrated to the United States in her twenties and continued to work. And then at 45 is when enrolled in a G E d program. She came to StoryCorps with her teacher, Chris Myers, to talk about what is class meant to her. After the war. My dad was in prison. My mom had to take care of five of us, and I had to go out to work when I was like in sixth or seventh grade. Then when I get to a 10 grade, I just dropped out. You never gave any hint that she would have that kind of childhood. Yes, There's a lot of things that I have about my childhood. I just want to ask you one question. You know, sometime in the classroom, I know that we get on your nerves. Okay, So you wanted to know. Do you guys get on my nerves? Sometimes? Yes. You know, I'm gonna choose my words wisely. Because first and foremost, this is honest to God Truth. So many people work and they don't even like what they do. And they'll tell you Okay, we'll go get that paycheck, right. But if the only time you happy is when you get paid, that's a waste of a life. What a lot of people don't know about instructing when you do it, right. You're allowing somebody to go into you. And take energy away from you. And you have to do that. So I end up very drained sometimes, but at the end of the day, whatever it is that my learner's take out, they put back in me. You go out of your ways to do for us. Yeah, and I really appreciate that. You know, I had a student. Tell me they saw you and you were crying when you pass the last test. Um every bit of work that we've ever done to get you to this point it was worth it just to know that you were crying Tears of joy. It helped you do something that you're so happy about? You had tears. Because with you it wasn't easy mission, like, think about after you took your first test. The first score was like a two right and I know that could be extremely discouraging. I have a lot of things that I don't see any more after that. But then to see you back the next day. I'm like, okay, we're fighting. And when I see a fighter, I get excited. Okay, bring it. You know me and you against the world and that's how I feel. I just want to tell you that I'm really appreciate what you've done for me. You change people live because after I passed my G e d. I feel like I have wings. Now I can fly..

US Chris Myers StoryCorps
"seventh grade" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:45 min | 1 year ago

"seventh grade" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Is Friday, which is when we hear from StoryCorps. And today we have a story about new beginnings knock when was born in Vietnam near the end of the US led war. There. She left school when she was young to help support her family. She immigrated to the United States in her twenties and continued to work. And then at 45 is when enrolled in a G E d program. She came to StoryCorps with her teacher, Chris Myers, to talk about what is class meant to her. After the war. My dad was in prison. My mom had to take care of five of us, and I had to go out to work when I was like in sick to seventh grade. Then when I get to 10 grade, I just dropped out. You never gave any hint that she would have that kind of childhood. Yes, There's a lot of things to tell you about my childhood. I just want to ask you one question. You know, sometime in the classroom, I know that we get on your nerves. Okay, So you wanted to know. Do you guys get on my nerves? Sometimes? Yes. You know, I'm gonna choose my words wisely. Because first and foremost, this is honest to God truth. So many people work and they don't even like what they do. And they'll tell you Okay, we'll go get that paycheck, right, but If the only time you happy is when you get paid, that's a waste of a life. What a lot of people don't know about instructing when you do it, right. You're allowing somebody to go into you. And take energy away from you. And you have to do that. So I end up very drained sometimes, but at the end of the day, whatever it is that my learner's take out, they put back in me. You go out of your ways to do for us. You and I really appreciate that. You know, I had a student. Tell me they saw you when you were crying when you pass the last test. Um every bit of work that we've ever done to get you to this point it was worth it just to know that you were crying Tears of joy. It. I helped you do something that you're so happy about. You had to Because with you it wasn't easy mission, like, think about after you took your first test. The first score was like to write and I know that could be extremely discouraged. And I have a lot of things that I don't see any more after that. But then to see you back the next day. I'm like, okay, we're fighting. And when I see a fighter, I get excited. I'm not okay. Bring it. You know me and you against the world and that's how I feel. I just want to tell you that I'm really appreciate what you've done for me. You changed. People live because after I passed my GED, I feel like I have wings. Now I can fly. I.

StoryCorps United States Vietnam Chris Myers
Cold Case, Right There Before God And Country

Best Case Worst Case

05:30 min | 1 year ago

Cold Case, Right There Before God And Country

"A little welcomes the best case. Worst case is jim clemente retarded bag profiled from nick city prosecutor and writer-producer. Cbs's criminal minds and with me. Today is various francey hague's former state and federal prosecutor jam. We are back at it regular best case worst case behind police lines and today. I'm so excited because not only do we have a special guest. We have a special guest from my own state of georgia. Gen numbered outnumbered. We'll see about that. It's fantastic and our special guest is cheryl mccollum. He's from atlanta. You can hear accent. I love it. Sheryl mccollum tells what your background who you yes. Well on the director of the cold case investigative research institute. But i'm also a crime scene investigator for a local metro atlanta department. So i wear both hats a lot of actual actual badge holders here. We have a real live like vinnie. The cop comedian. We had on a few weeks ago. Now we have cheryl cheryl. Are you a comedian by any chance birdie funny we'll see we'll get it. I knew for us to really interesting though. But mostly it's jim who likes to mock me and he thinks that's funny anyway. Let's talk about you. This is so exciting. I'm so grateful you came on the show because we just don't have very many people from georgia i mean. Jim doesn't let me every time i ask on his own. He doesn't like people from georgia or any stubborn fate or really anyone from anywhere but california saying like that. I'm pretty sure i've heard him say that. But i have you and you're from georgia so tell us about your background. What do you do. And how did you get there will native laden and i was educated through all my years from elementary school. All the way through college in fulton county also delivered academy for hostile which is in college far. And then i went georgia's jay which is right downtown atlanta and my husband and i went to high school in college together and we now have two children. One's in college are sign in our daughters out next year. So big thing to translate to when we use terms of are the general people. Don't understand. I we always like to ask everyone. Okay all right. Yeah fixing a whole lot in new york city office. We use fixing. I'm big in my car. This extreme eight on our facebook page. I guarantee you. They're going to be play people as a jim. How could you not know what she was saying. Everyone loves making sure everybody in the audience. Where because we do have people in australia. For example who are probably fixing their cars and in london who are probably fixing of tea. But i don't know about college. That's what she meant So thank you for all so. Tell us about your path to to the police. I mean how did you you obviously. You're the director of a cold case investment institute. But how did you become involved in police work. My path actually started when i was about four. So you remember way back in the day. We didn't have interstates so there were two lane roads to get to the beach and my mother would tell us these Tastic stories and if you get outside of atlanta about a hundred miles you'd have radio stations. Associated was are entertained. So i can remember her telling us about bonnie by just became so captivated by the idea that this couple loved each other fiercely crisscross. The united states robbing banks. And i'm like yeah. I got i got to get it on that somehow. So so you actually. Considering crisscrossing the united states robbing banks. Or did you go right. Do let's stop. That stop was a time when did an international joel things hard like the mafia really did appeal to me but of course she would tell me things like well. Honey were not add talian. And they're not don't take you in the mob and so they tried to push me the other way a little bit on the hall. They died in a hail of bullets. Said that when i was four she waited any is when they took me to see the dance. Call now eight. I realized what happened. Medef they took alcatraz. And when i was in the seventh grade straight. Weren't they buy that gun. I guess just trying to show me every element you know when i was in the seventh grade I wrote j. edgar hoover fanmail letter did write you back. He did write me back and much basically say stay in school and studying hard which crashed me because i thought surely he's got a holly me up because nobody's going to suspect the twelve year old little southern girl i could you know get inada places unseen

Georgia Jim Clemente Nick City Francey Hague Atlanta Cheryl Mccollum Sheryl Mccollum Cold Case Investigative Resear Cheryl Cheryl Vinnie JIM CBS Fulton County JAY California New York City Facebook United States Australia
Thanks I Made Them! with Bianca Springer

Stitch Please

04:57 min | 1 year ago

Thanks I Made Them! with Bianca Springer

"Everybody welcome to the stage. Please podcast. I'm your host lisa wolford and i am honored thrilled delighted and so happy to have the guests that we have today. I am speaking with bianca's springer of base. I made them and it's very difficult to summarize the aca and all the influence that she has provided in the leadership and the work that she has given to the sullen community. I will start by saying that. She is a blogger. She is a writer. A pattern designer. She's oetzi shopowner. She works in. Supports the international quilt. Show she hosts so in meet us she is a connoisseur of vintage patterns and she manufacturers pattern weights which holds a special place in my heart because i think that pins are the agents of chaos so i am so happy to welcome you here. The thank you so much for being with us today. Thank you and welcome. Thank you so wedged lisa. I am excited to be here and to be talking with you and i'm excited. I am the introvert. And this is not my wheelhouse. But this i am excited to do and i'm excited to talk to you. I am too. I am looking forward to it. So let's get started talking about your soul in journey. Where does your sewing story begin. Oh goodness i grew up in the bahamas and my mom's sewed all the time and functionally though or if felt that way it was such an every day occurrence should the machine was setup. She would make my school uniform. She would make her clothes for work. She do home to core. Whatever we needed she would just whip it up and made it seem easy. I i remember some watching her. Do the pleats. My sister and i went to private school. And all skirts were pleated and she would just sit at the machine. No pattern no markings. Just follow the. Please fold aplly all the way around and had whip on the beltway spanned and ham up at it just seems so effortless and that's what sewing was for me. It was it looked effortless. It look utilitarian. It was functional. But i didn't appreciate it as a creative outlet. It was just something we had to do. It was cheaper for my mom to make our uniform so she did so. I appreciate it to some extent. But i didn't embrace it i did. I would whip up a backpack just for the heck of it. She would make my costumes for the productions. I was in a in drama. And i was in a clown through and she made my clown costumes clown true and sorry. I don't know how gonna be able to get past that. You must tell us. Don't know how you thought you would just gonna slide by the word clown troupe. In that wasn't going to say nothing so pleased small digression to tell us what the clown troupe is okay so i went to private school and that is not helping me learn about clowns. I know i did not realize that. Somehow clowning wasn't essential characteristic. But that's okay. I'll let you continue on with the private school and then through very complicated story is so i. One of my one of my classes was drama and his inner drama class and then one of our teachers who my homeroom teacher started a little getting together to do little skits and we do little gets performed the chapel and the assemblies that our school and then she started to do. She took over the drama production of the school and i got excited in seventh grade. I was in joseph on the mazing technicolor dreamcoat. I was in the how i at. My excitement for drama started there and threw out junior high and high school. She created a group call street lights. It was a drama ministry through and we would put on drama sketches our school and go to churches and travel around the schools in the bahamas and then ultimately part of that drama turned into a clown ministry where we would perform for younger kids in schools at parties and some of those parties actually funded trips to cuba and the uk in wales. Yes so we were doing clowning with lucrative was.

Lisa Wolford ACA Bianca Bahamas Lisa Joseph Cuba Wales UK
The joy of taking out the trash

TED Talks Daily

03:10 min | 1 year ago

The joy of taking out the trash

"You might not know this just from looking at me by mike. Guess it from smelling me. Why are my favorite things to do. Is take out the trash. It's the laziest way to technically. Pare down your possessions. Because the one thing you can never do enough of in a small new york city apartment like mine is get rid of stuff. The stuff that are modern consumerist carbon powered culture makes us by endlessly and often for no reason. Guingona people never heard either roommate's family members that old lady who's been in your living room for weeks who is she anyway. No squatters allowed care if you're a ghost also not to brag but i've been micro decluttering since before. Marie kondo got big. In fact i've cut out your step of picking things up figuring out whether they spark join me because they already know what sparks. Join me throwing out trash. What kinda trash. Well i'll give you a clue. It starts with an ends with their. That's right it's a lotta hair. Don't try and picture how much you'll feel sick. And if you don't feel sick you haven't pictured enough. I shed like an instagram influencer. Sheepdog was decided for is the only thing holding her career back. We're all trying to reduce our carbon footprints and consumption so by throwing out trash. I also naturally mean recycling. And composting i to do both. In fact i once carried a take takeout container across half the city just to put in the right bin. Where's my inspiring bio-pic but then i learned recycling frequently isn't working even if we all separate out glass cans and cardboard a lot of stuff doesn't neatly fit into those categories paper envelopes lined with bubble. Wrap can't be recycled pizza. Boxes with grease stains can't be recycled memory from seventh grade. When i who am i kidding. All of seven gray can't be recycled. There's even a term for it aspirational recycling. at first. I thought that if you went to spin class last week so it should count for this week. To china. Used to import a lot of. Us's recyclables but they stopped accepting foreign garbage in two thousand eighteen as part of a pollution ban. Whatever happened to one countries. Trashes another country's treasure now a lot of us recycling goes straight to landfills the epa. Says that only ten percent of plastic has ever been recycled. Not that this is about me but this balloons my anxiety the size of the giant pacific garbage patch. We out in the ocean where we'll all eventually gopher next destination wedding. So if you're american how and your political representatives to work on this recycling issue and try to create less waste overall by reusing materials. Your stuff. I've been reusing in my life. Plastic bags salsa jars and old fights with my boyfriend. Now the next time i have to throw throughout the trash i can confidently ask. Hey can i use this loose ball of hair again. And you know what i probably can. In fact i'm gonna give it to that. All goes lady as a going away present. Thank you

Guingona Marie Kondo Roommate Sheepdog New York City Mike China EPA United States
"seventh grade" Discussed on NewsRadio WIOD

NewsRadio WIOD

04:16 min | 1 year ago

"seventh grade" Discussed on NewsRadio WIOD

"Then they start giving it to the front line People and, you know, teachers and you know, of all the people. All the people who are necessary to society will get the shot. By the time it gets down to radio talk show hosts of odds are pretty good. We're gonna have herd immunity because radio talk show host Matter so little. In the hierarchy of humanity. We come in somewhere below homeless people meant the mentally ill. Then you've got radio talk show host and by the time they get down to us We only get the shots because there's some leftover. We live off the vaccine residue that will be living around and that's all good and well because again Thinking way were looking at it because there's a website that my wife found and see it. But my wife is a speech pathologist. She works with severely disabled Children. So she's going to get the vaccine. I think I'm phase two. Something like this. She's fairly early on to get the night. She could've gotten it the other day, but she couldn't get to the place where was happening, So she had the past, But she's gonna get it pretty early. My son's in the seventh grade. We don't have any severe. Religious issues in my house, so he'll get you each week. He'll probably be required to take it when he goes to school. My daughter is a inner third year of college, so she'll probably have to get it because again we have any big religious issues in the house s O. She'll probably have to get it when the opportunity presents itself. So by that, by the time it gets down to Dad There's like I said, We're just going to give the shot because there's some left over and they decided why not? Radio talk show hosts okay, and by that time by the time I get the vaccine because of my importance in the world Um, well, either know that Something's wrong with it, and we shouldn't have. It will know that it's in good shape and everybody can take it or the virus. We'll have mutated to the point where it doesn't matter anymore. Either way, I may be able to avoid it just on principle and the fact that everybody around you will have already gotten. They talked to some people. Susan's the duel. Is one of the people's names, she says. We need to get control of the virus, and that would be me doing my part, She's from Pennsylvania woman named Lisa McAllister from Oklahoma, said. From what I've read, it's going to take about 75% of the nation taking the vaccine in order to create herd immunity, and quite frankly, I don't want to live in a pandemic for the rest of my life. I've actually heard the numbers were higher than that. But whatever it takes to get people a day to get it on the most reluctant to get the vaccine remain the remain unpersuaded in October, 1 in 5, 20% said. They wouldn't take the shot and now or later And now, two months after the fact and identical, 20% said that they will not get the vaccine in the latest survey question, no Your work can make you get it. Your boss could make you get it. There. There there. The system is set up to where if you have to get, I don't know if it was done intentionally for pandemic purposes or whatever, but the system is set up to where you could be required. Tonto, get the vaccine unless you go out and find Jesus or something which is always possible, right? 888 18999 is the number that 881 8999. We got more coming up. My name is Casey Bartholomew and you are listening to this niche show whether any store with use radio 6 10 w y o D. Newsmax TV is exploding, and everyone's talking about it now, a survey says 30 Million Americans are watching Newsmax TV all the time. Million's air, turning off big cable news and President Trump says he loves Newsmax. So watch it and make sure you vote in Newsmax is national poll asking about President Trump conceding the election? It takes a minute. Just text the word open to 39 747 and vote instantly. President Trump wants to know your opinion, so text open to.

radio talk show host President Trump Susan Casey Bartholomew President Lisa McAllister Tonto Oklahoma Pennsylvania
"seventh grade" Discussed on Power 106 FM

Power 106 FM

06:20 min | 1 year ago

"seventh grade" Discussed on Power 106 FM

"Shut up. Sweet These boys working with l A p d in seventh grade. I was selling CDs. I could set it up for me to help them be okay, okay. Mother Love gets their voices Deal Kentucky extent, maybe better, I think. My God. My, my, my, my, my, my, My, My I want to be criminals don't see him in the room here. But I just let the guy have a homely thing I've done with that bullet, Will we? Oh, yo from with sleep blank, But I will be my rock alone when my socks like a holdup. Could've got it goes, but I got no timing off Webb. This is a no. No, I probably wouldn't have, but I'm a solid And I got one of the outside my, my, my, my, my, my, My Oh, my I got here. Where? The jet here hotel when you let down your way. Because I never liked these only like water. Real light. What I always say that don't get me on a friend of a mad way. Really? With the weeds like you just us two. I like because you know how to count Just US two. I like it. She says that when you go from a private trip along big fast, might actually pull up on the top going on on the ground. Big squeeze big press Dunne shakes will be going to the next next. She like all that top down with you on that said she like all night. No. Six baby teddy, more Melissa Rios and coming in at 4 Ft. 11 spray from the Philippines. Hey, for detail. Charisma. We got beat. Before that, in show, Teddy and I didn't know you were talking about your waistline with Ah, How would you know what's not lame? Though it is Friday, it is day is going to be The day that we call Nate Lakers. I'm calling it Melissa Rios. One more game on. I know you got the daily those cooking, though. I see the pot over there with what you guys are way got a lot of good news, and we got some bad about Tori lanes. He's been charged with felony charge Boy Lordy Lordy about that goes is up. Next, they demand the Filipino via cracker. Small time I'm noticing they right, But you'll have a ring a ring on that their heart. You have a problem with what you have. You know the game Go. Should be my hat You want about.

"seventh grade" Discussed on KNST AM 790

KNST AM 790

02:53 min | 2 years ago

"seventh grade" Discussed on KNST AM 790

"The Senate trial for president trump could begin a week from today I'm C. J. pop of fox news that from Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell speaking this past hour now that speaker Nancy Pelosi will hold a vote on Wednesday this the two articles of impeachment to the Senate more from fox's Jerry helper live on Capitol Hill senators could be sworn in as jurors by the Chief Justice later this week to begin hearing arguments in an impeachment trial against president trump on Tuesday there is little or no sentiment and the Republican conference for a motion to dismiss our members feel that we have an obligation to listen to the arguments Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell says after both the house and White House present their cases and senators have an opportunity to ask questions then there would be debate over calling additional witnesses or documents for evidence democratic leaders have been pushing for a guaranteed a here from at least four current and former administration officials CJ all right Gerry Bridgegate a black guy on the legacy of former New Jersey governor Chris Christie and now that case working its way to the highest court in the land concerning the conviction of two was closes out aids fox's colonel Scott has more lives CJ observe observers of the arguments before the Supreme Court justices seem skeptical about the sentences given to Bridget Kelly and bill Baroni former staffers to then governor Christie the two were convicted for creating traffic tie ups as retribution for fort lease democratic mayor not backing Christie's reelection bid lawyers for Kelly amber only say their clients committed no fraud for which they have served time during high court arguments the justices suggested the convictions may have been an over reach by prosecutors the Supreme Court will not make an immediate decision on this CJ all right thanks great all of Wall Street the Dow is one eight thousand nine hundred fifty six working with twenty nine thousand Americans listen to fox news for the seventh grade gets delayed in the Arizona Senate I'm Greg all KNXT news Republican state senator Sylvia Allen's bill because heated debate last week because along with the sex ed band before middle school the legislation also removed homosexuality from being discussed she said her bill was misinterpreted and took that part out the hearing for S. B. ten eighty two has been scrapped as Alan revises her bill the Florence state prison will be closing governor do see announced the closure of the ageing facility in his state of the state address there will enhance safety in our remaining facilities and save taxpayers two hundred and seventy four million dollars inmates from Florence will be re located in staff will be transferred to the nearby I'm in prison the governor says his budget will fix locks at the other state prisons and give raises two corrections officers Donnie cheek KNSD news I'm Gregg Paul Kane S. T. A..

trump Senate president
"seventh grade" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

06:39 min | 2 years ago

"seventh grade" Discussed on WGN Radio

"When I was like in seventh grade I had the opportunity to dissect different animals and that's when I realized that maybe I could like pursue something I am a career in stem and then just my chemistry class right now I'm really enjoying it it's like one of my favorite classes yeah and also my computer science class I was able to create like a lot of things with code and it was just a wonderful experience that's Melanie via a Delilah queen and destiny the got the other three of the age of the scholars that we're talking to tonight who are being mentored by Hector and come in when it comes to stem and stem education Melissa Washington's here as well who's a V. P. at comment I'm I'm interested in when you hear the stories when you hear these young women talking about their high school experiences is that what the expectation that they're going to be introduced to stem at an earlier and earlier age I mean is that surprise you that they're interested in this based on the fact that you know the many many young women and women of color have they have have different stories and different generations so it's a Friday night you know it's kinda over can so we don't have a clear view but the bright light of my night was just listening to them talk about the interest because that's exactly what we desire we have a suite of programs that we offer students to be able to expose them send you know you have people at different levels sometimes you'll have a student who has no clue what they want to do when they grow up and they have no exposure to the sciences except the programs that they have to do in school in the interest is not there and then we have programs for someone who's already a where in fully focused on what the future's going to be and they know they want to be then and there so what we try to do is meet them where they're at and this particular program is one that will be with them for four years you know all of the students here in their sophomore year right now and so their interests their desire what they're going to get exposed to is going to continue to build and they will be in the same seat that Hector is in at some point being the future mentor of students who are excited but not quite sure about what they want to do so this is exactly what we we achieving this is exactly what we're trying to achieve by getting people exposed to us I'm just excited to listen to them talk when when you're when you talk about this to me which are you you know you read between the lines it's also just a it's a pipeline for for you to be able to get good talent to work in the energy sector in the future right so before this before mentoring programs like this and and obviously the the the impact that the stem program is having it where did you find engineers were were people coming from before you had access to the mentoring programs like this was just college well yeah you're going to have your traditional in a way in which you would do your recruiting you're gonna have a company like you know comedy which is a significant employer in the state of Illinois very stable we we've established a red reputation of high performance because our customers expect hi performance and especially tonight is actually on nights like tonight shout out to all of our lovely comment people that are prepared for storm duty make sure the lights stay on so they would come to us it was a little easier right but you're gonna get a pool of people who maybe when they were growing up they may have an uncle in on her cousin parent that was an engineer and they decided they want to be with their parents are but the students that were tapping into now are people that are probably first generation maybe to college you know maybe to engineering or the other sciences and and that is where we're going to get a diverse work force which is what we strive to do because of the business an act you know is just astronomical the things that we can see an innovative space when you have different people different backgrounds coming together Hector wanna bring you back into this conversation just because as an engineer when your mentoring young students who want to get to the field what are some of the specifics that you work with them and what are some of the things that are part of that mentorship to to get the students in well first when we think on stem and I I think that I will be back open but this thing you were saying there is still being problems and and and the problems that we sold are the ones that we see in in our life so when we think understand we there is a question that straight for what comes in tune into mine and how we can address the challenges our society hats and how we can be sure that they know what the solution is driving us to assist in future are up to me and that's what we do and that's how we think when we are doing the stand so that in the last year for example we were thinking on what are them this solution is that we will the weekend do through clothing and what are some devices that we can create them some prototypes that we can create that can help no the only to have this is sustainable future but also they can I help for example one of the teams that create device that help people down the people that do not that day I know that if they're available to to see the two have a device does that give us sound for example when something except when an object is approaching the okay so that's that's a stem that's because the working as usual being problems that we've seen in society and how can we improve the way we we dress technology we're talking to we're talking about the national mentoring month here in Chicago and we're talking about the programs that that partner comment in the HFS Chicago scholars to offer students stem learning environments I'm interested I want to get a last word to students here the energy is a big area and there's a lot that's going on with the specials we try to grapple with some of the reasons you know we've seen in the past and and the fact that that energy consumption and energy production has had on the world that we live do you guys think about that is that something that you think about the new ways that you might be able to lend your young brains to to the way that we use energy and and consume yeah I think that right now especially with like climate change and how things are changing I think that in the future we could work towards making that better for everyone and the environment.

"seventh grade" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

11:55 min | 2 years ago

"seventh grade" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Seventh grade son made a bad decision when things get in trouble but I just never would have thought that they just put a threw him in jail with those one of the police are charging him as an adult after the date he were mine anymore he Bologna and draws the line between child and adult well the next reveal tonight at eight on NYC welcome back all of it on W. NYC I'm sure the bathroom filling in for al since they were today the tabloid paper the national Enquirer became a household name by going after celebrity news political gossip and even outright gore over the decades the paper increased its notoriety leaning into conspiracy theories and half truths in order to build a multi million dollar media empire and now a new documentary chronicles the story of that rise end of the ruthless tactics and limitless expense accounts that it took to get there scandalous the untold story of the national Enquirer will be out in theaters this Friday November fifteenth and joining me now in the studio to talk about it is the director mark Lancement mark hi welcome to all of it thank you she was and it's nice to be here and you know we thought that would have some fun with this mark I thought maybe we could invite some listeners to call in and join our conversation if you ever had any ties to the national Enquirer so did you work for the paper at any point in your career it's possible were you photographer maybe a freelancer give us a call if you ever worked for the national Enquirer you want to hear your stories our number is two one two four three three W. NYC that's two one two four three three nine six nine two mark let's start with just a little bit of history Generoso pope purchased the New York Evening Enquirer which was an existing paper yeah in the fifties and his first big move was to rename it the national Enquirer what was popes vision for the paper in its early years yeah well Generoso pope junior was the son of one of the most powerful telling Americans in New York City generous support senior who had a company called colonial sanded cement which poured the foundation for Rockefeller Center and Radio City Music Hall he also was publisher of the progress so which is the largest Italian American weekly in the country at that point so as you can imagine he was a very influential figure not only in New York City but nationwide and when he died his his son general support junior was a black sheep of the family was sort of on the outs with the rest of his family and he really was struggling to make a mark for himself and in nineteen fifty two with seventy five thousand dollar loan from his godfather was Frank Costello the Gambino crime family right he started the New York he bought the New York inquire which is a tiny little racing paper that had a circulation of under twenty thousand and that was a bit of a sticking point right where the money came from to actually purchase the paper and its ties to crime family is in New York yeah I don't know if it was a sticking point it's just facts it's just history it's what happened and that paper never satisfied Jean pope yet very big ambitions he had very big shoes to fill hits me to prove end up with the content of the New York New York inquire was just dull and wasn't doing it from and then you know the story goes that in the mid fifties he's driving down within your parkways and he comes across a horrific car crash and there are mingled bodies and blood and broken glass strewn everywhere but the thing that catches his attention is that there are hundreds of rubber Necker is angling to get a view of the carnage and he has disappeared from at that moment that's exactly what I should do with my paper this is what people want to watch and he's ships the content almost overnight to gore so sort of Weegee style crime photos you know spike's through the forehead headlines like I ripped out her heart and stomped on it really graphic nasty stuff and his circulation shot through the roof he peaked at a million now another another tactic that I guess he used was this idea of getting supermarkets to agree to carry the Enquirer and especially right next to the check out so this is two ideas for me at least for a little long in Congress right the idea of like core on the front page and then put him in the supermarkets where your kids are being pushed through the the strollers and cashiers totally in Congress and how was this a successful model has managed to do I will he was a bit of a of a marketing genius and he was very oppression and she saw that the urban you stand was going away Smith most America there's a large migration into the suburbs and with it went the newsstand in the news boy yelling extra extra read all about it and he had to figure out a way to get high boss for his paper where were all the people in the at this time in the supermarkets and he thought well we're in the supermarkets are and I can have a captive audience and that's when you identified this piece of real estate at the front of every supermarket checkout counter America but the gore paper was not gonna cut it union I can have that competing with Cheerios and milk because it was disgusting so and and neither did the heads of the supermarket into the largest supermarkets wouldn't wouldn't even consider any a horrible reputation so he decides that he's going to radically change is content and he's going to embrace the kind of content that he thinks that the average American woman he called her Mrs Smith in Kansas city he identified her who was in the grocery store once if not twice a week what would she most want to read what she most want to talk about with her girlfriends in the beauty parlor or come back home and tell her husband about on and he said he created this formula celebrity gossip miracle cures fad diets psych effect psychic phenomenon and these human interest stories that he called Gee whiz stories yes call them Hey Martha stories because I he he as he would say you know the husband would be in his sort of Archie bunker check in reading the national Enquirer and you would read some story about an arthritis security would yell across the hall the Kmart yet stories you want to turn into a lease around to spread by really was social media early social early social media that's right I'm speaking with the director mark lanes man we're talking about his new documentary scandalous the untold story of the national Enquirer and I was amazed that you got so many former Inquirer employees reporters and editors to talk to you for this documentary there must have been dozens of them in the film how are you able to find so many willing participants because the Enquirer does have a bit of a a checkered reputation that said I lied to say the least yeah you know getting people to talk for this film was a very this is the sort of like a film behind the film with that I mean you know you had people that the whole thing started actually we're at the stores were found me my my wife's best friend's father was in town in California visiting and we got invited to a dinner and at that dinner over several rounds of drinks she kept regaling us with stories of his former career as a tabloid reporter at the earliest during the earliest years national choir seventy three seventy four and he just went on and on about bribery disguises espionage checkbook journalism global travel you know if Liz Taylor was staying at the rich you were staying at the Ritz in nam and just this whole you know I think we compromising universe that you know was really fascinating and sort of sounded like a great spy novel and the more he talked more seconds could be an incredible film and we talked a little bit more all this was before Jeffrey Toobin story in The New Yorker had broken July twenty seventeen and so you know when that story broke about the the alleged relationship between Packer and trump and sort of the papers getting behind the candidacy early on that's when I called this man back his name is Malcolm bow for and I should not we should meet this one come back to LA and I'm having some drinks with some old inquire buddies who live in that are you should come out with us and I did and I just sat there gobsmacked because they just swap stories from these trenches lake like war buddies and and they weren't holding back and they weren't particularly expressing any remorse they were just kind of it was like glory days that's again this could be a great film and that's that's where got started yeah the and that was something that did strike me was just how brazenly eat some of the former staffer spoke about the tactics that they were encouraged to employ a like the the get the story at all cost ethos that was really there how did you as a filmmaker feel responsible for portraying their work I think you know is a documentary responsibility is to get out of the way and allow the story to be told in the most authentic way possible you know unless you want to be making a piece of propaganda yourself the idea is to step away from that and and let let people tell their first hand accounts of what happened and that was really our goal on you know the fact of the matter is is that there are really the Enquirer is the main character in the film and like any great character in a film there's the origin story and then there's this trajectory that has all kinds of transformations in it you know before it leads to something else and that's what happening choir is like a Frankenstein story you know there was a mad scientist back in the fifties who created this formula identified you know you know Generoso pope had a background in psychological warfare keeps worked for the CIA he had been in and my chief engineer he he had this incredibly uncanny understanding of the American mind and what it craved and so he keeps secret he did that on and the inquires intention was a political in the beginning it was escapist I was like okay listen you know cities are burning around you your sons are often Vietnam Watergate is percolating all around you here's this form of escape that is going to sort of take you away and you know that monster more so over time in different hands until it arrives at a different mad fill in the blank and we have the situation we're in now we're at the paper becomes a piece of blatant political propaganda so that your gentry was fascinating how do we tell that story of connecting the dots in asking a fundamental question you know how in the world to get here you know to a place where you know the country can't even have a civil debate on what constitutes a fact how did we get here and what role did this publication happen that I am guessing that you tried to get current staffers in current leadership at the Inquirer's parent company perhaps on on camera where they just outright not interested futile effort yeah I know we made very concerted efforts to extend an invitation to current and I'm place to David **** to John Howard and we were declined we tried we tried and we tried to get past Sir certain past employees and we were met with you know a brick wall and some people just flat out I can't violate my NDA others wouldn't return my calls or you know just said this is a fantastic project I would love to talk about it but I just can't because I've got a book coming out this area thing but what we were able to get were people who were really important seminal figures as this paper was being created and then has a transformed over time and some of them were there under the under the Packer era as well which is great so we were able to cover you know a large a large swath of time were any of these people people who had signed and DA's and were choosing to speak yes there were a few one of them the late Jerry George.

two one two four three three W seventy five thousand dollar million dollar milk
"seventh grade" Discussed on The Bone 102.5

The Bone 102.5

03:55 min | 2 years ago

"seventh grade" Discussed on The Bone 102.5

"Was my first date ever yes in seventh grade is and given the. she was in a band two I think right tines yeah his his wife or girlfriend whichever she is was my was my very first date Suzanne and I went to see that Steve Martin movie pennies from heaven or dead men don't wear plaid I'm sorry and Steve Martin my favorite comedic actor my favorite comedian growing up he had a movie called dead men don't wear plaid it was like a private detective spoof ad it's Suzanne I went sure later hose in and then she later became a punk rocker got a Mohawk got kicked out of her parents house and I believe moved up to Atlanta around eleven or twelve grade and then now she's in now she's with the dude from Massillon that's yet another one of those crazy thing yeah let out very to me that is very interesting is that her real I've been there may be another guy mastodon I don't know what was her name Suzanne with an S. O. S. U. S. A. N. N. E. and I'm almost positive that she still with him seven two seven five seven I wanted to but that's my first date do not alive who are you. sorry hi don has your day. wait I am on vacation now. whole wheat hell yeah I'm glad to hear that you know a lot of people going up to parents weekend this weekend to go see their kids at the various universities are all of you should be very very proud of your kids and I hope that you enjoy your time with them this weekend in the U. party hearty was Gabby a weird feeling going raging character with your with your kids slam into a taxi as what do you what you got going on a vacation where you going to go anywhere you have a staycation would be doing. in the U. S.. numbers three one going actual North Carolina beautiful up there in Facebook friends your head up there right now I think I just tell you this morning yeah yeah yeah yeah that's who it is you're absolutely right I Kelly who used to be a Spanish is still a good friend of mine yeah I saw her the first time in literally for ever on Wednesday night and she was talking about our trip up there it's it's really really cool I love the Carolinas they call it god's country which it it's beautiful up there. I'm excited cited for you so you okay or not okay with banning love when it comes to elementary school kids. okay I am okay with. we. okay they are both boys black was a girl and when no not you that of your old rule that as you know you're not dating and filled it or whatever all. who atmosphere is all of the kids even in elementary school are constantly going out with each other and the two day thing they were talking about it so we all especially for girls every other day they were breaking up and crying their eyes out can't focus on school the boy is there really my boys never really had that issue but. I found that he was you were distracted all the time by the constant. you know I love a new one. yes some interesting. mass what your orgasmic bone sound like it's a very similar to that I picture it and I hope you have a lot of them on your vacation but I I picture you in bed making some of those noises that you just made. I don't know that air ball now all right I'm sorry I mean it is it because she's a mom before that it's terrible I'm sorry you know that No Way gate I made yeah now all those already okay I thought you meant it was terrible I said that okay so your your orgasm noises are much better than that it. to come on yeah this Friday yes Friday like everybody needs here I'll tell you what all of my calls for you we do it at the beginning of the show all hog by called for you in the five o'clock hour if you'll give me just a little taste of what it sounds like when you get to that special place. all.

Suzanne I Steve Martin Facebook S. O. S. U. S. A. N. N. E. North Carolina Massillon Gabby Atlanta don Kelly two day
"seventh grade" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

02:26 min | 3 years ago

"seventh grade" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

"Much overtime and I've been you know you'd be you start seventh grade or you can start seven starting time but a lot of the guys that are on the team now we started in seventh grade we think riding together get to know each other we're we're so tight and it's like there's now that I've had so much time with them there's a reason for me to go harder practices are read and reason for me to do extra stuff at home as a reason for me to show up even when I don't have to so you know it's really I'm I don't even really do it for myself as much I really go for my teammates and just my love for them I respect for them and just you know just the fact that we've been through so much together you know we were going to come back swing in nature his name is miles Tikriti's a talented senior from UT Jesuit met Jarmo in his first year givers are in a transition back to him as well you can run the wing T. that's something you were familiar with as you in the west when you coach there is an assistant just talk about what it takes to implement an offense like that again well it's it's a little different when you see a lot of times now in high school football spread often scan popular obviously has been popular for awhile and you know I think it's just execution get off the ball more people know fundamentally sound and frost compete this division we have to do that you know it's a grind every week planning is kids like miles and other athletes know you'll get a break I took his all time to play against men in the Catholic League now you know and you're bringing a game and frost when we have to be very sound offense Lee deception with an offense no known are Simon's no we're going who were black and you know just give up the balls biggest thing you know and that's we compete the same thing defense we we have to bring that in transition over your defense and make sure we're ready to play every week alignment assignment or we're going on a lot of different routes and you know like I said that's how you could be misleading tell you get ahead and you know with us not having seems of athletes all times or schools how we make up the difference we talk about that a lot and you know you have to do with their intensity and how you come prepared every day practice prefer games and put on the feel for your brothers use our own for lance obviously when a part of that between seven overall how much have you and everybody hasn't come together maybe as a whole unit so far as is we really get into full collectivities pretty soon but how much have you talked about goals with them and in terms of no washing away maybe last year and getting back to what was two years a great year yeah well this was kind of transition year our kids are hungry they work well play hard and starts week one against Clio you know it's like I said we give the division it's not easy and we wives can improve every day.

two years
"seventh grade" Discussed on 600 WREC

600 WREC

05:12 min | 3 years ago

"seventh grade" Discussed on 600 WREC

"There's your congressman. And that's what he's done to our city. Gary, you're on the Ben Ferguson show. Hi. Are you doing today doing well, sir? How are you? Interesting. The only time Colin gets any national exposure is when he makes a fool out of the other caller mentioned the purple heart. He was on national TV about three or four weeks ago. He made some smart reference to Notre Dame burning down and referenced it to Washington. And then of course today with the fried chicken. Seriously. I don't think anybody in Washington. Even knows he exists and less. He makes a fool out of himself. And you were right about legislation any legislation he passes typically, he'll only get two or three or four Democrats to even side with them. So don't even support him. So he is an embarrassment to Memphis, and he makes us look eight makes us all look foolish. Not not only does he make us all look foolish. It does damage to our economy. And that's where I would say to the higher unemployment rate of his district to those that are suffering district to those whose kids are failing school district. How did he help you today? How did this stunt do anything outside of maybe self serving his interest to get some TV time? It did not help the constituents of his district. It didn't help anybody. Take him seriously in his district. It didn't help with the crime rates in his district. Nothing was helped by in the people of his day because these antics except for two in barris our city and to make us the laughing stock of the it's one percent, Memphis, as you know, what that's what he did today. This is the lowest of the low. There's no other congressman history that's done that she went to why. Because it's been Neath the the. A congressman to do. This is what a seventh grade prankster does. Well, you know, he continues to hang the carrot out to constituents promising that someday things will be better in. He hasn't done a thing for him. And you know, he he attacks. He couldn't even carry Mars briefcase when it comes to be in an attorney. Well, I don't even care about all that crap. What I will say is this did nothing to serve the people in Memphis today. What it did do was it was an embarrassment to the city of Memphis. And if you're a serious businessman, if you were a serious businessman, and you saw this. You would never think about coming in doing business in the city. I agree. I agree. Good. Thank you, brother. Good to talk to you five three five nine seven three to five three five nine seven three two Bill. You're on the Ben Ferguson show nights heavy with us. Hello. Yes. Been nice for being on your show. I want to say is is that tone is ribbon. Why they needed staffers ask more questions because the house of representatives a democrat rather than it is knowledge of the intelligence. That's the question they had to bring people in to ask questions to bar, and that's got to say about the situation. By the way. Steve Cohen right now is biggest accomplishment. This afternoon is people that are questioning him. He's blocking them like crazy on Twitter. That's what he's doing her about that too. He's blocking constituents on Twitter. That's your congressman. I'm waiting to see if he's going to block me. So so far he hasn't. I think he knows that would be a bad decision. But he's blocking other people have liked my tweets about him. He's blocking them. Think about I mean, this what what congressman has time to block people. That's I mean, you know, you wanna talk about a chicken, only, chicken blocks people. I mean, if you can't take a little mom and pop person tweeting at you, and you block them who's the real chicken you've dummy seriously, who's the real chicken, you're going to have a chicken prop and eat chicken. But your chicken from basic people that that tweet at you. Just just think about that. For a second. Think about that. Who's the real chicken? Now, you you're blocking people left and right on Twitter. Five three five nine seven three two. Hey, if you're a guy, and you deal with a real medical condition e d then I want you to check out the Memphis men's clinic. The Memphis men's clinic is a place for guys just like you who deal with a real medical condition e D the board certified physicians at the Memphis men's clinic,.

Memphis congressman Steve Cohen Ben Ferguson Twitter Washington Colin Gary attorney one percent four weeks
"seventh grade" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

KDWN 720AM

07:31 min | 3 years ago

"seventh grade" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

"We have a row Nelson here from southern fidelity mortgage walk. Murrow. Thank you. Thanks for having me. Glad to have you back. We also have with us today. We have Jennifer how and Melissa Rios from the LV YO, which is the Las Vegas. Young artists orchestra. Correct. I did that. All right. So proud of myself. The name. I know there's actually there is there's more to name now. Right. So watch the whole name the whole name is the doctor Shirley Lindsay young artists orchestra of less vague, Shirley Wednesday. Yes. Indeed. Well, you guys just had a wonderful event over at the Smith center, and I have to commend you guys that was phenomenal. And for those of you who missed out, and we were we were marketing in advanced. But for those you missed out, I gotta tell you. It was amazing to see these kids perform and then in that venue. Just just I mean class. I mean, one of the best in the world is whereas I you know, I aware, but just an incredible event the kids sounded great. I don't know if it was just the room or maybe it was the kids. Talent. With that. They really were amazing. The music was terrific. Everyone got into it. And and there's there's a I've seen some of the the follow of videos on social media. You guys been posting a few of those things as social media. So if anybody wants to follow up on that we have a full production of concert, and it's all going to be in our YouTube page, it's the a full thirty minute video, and then there's like little videos here, and there of other small performances that we had through the music of west side story classic classic stuff. Just great music wonderful music. And they did they did they they just knocked it out a park. They did a great job and it had a couple of soloist performing as well. Which was wonderful amazing voices veteran singers local singers here in Las Vegas. Yes. They were wonderful to collaborate with the kids like that. I was I thought that was a lot of fun and actually one of the seniors. He played you know in phantom. Many other Broadway shows and we saw him the other the other than that night after. And he was just amazed with the young talent. There was I can tell you that she was as well. I know I know Nikki, very well. And she was very impressed with the level of talent. And I'm I'm sure she's anxious to do it again, actually. So might be back and the music was amazing. But you guys have another concert coming up soon. Don't you? May fifth. That's the Sunday. And that's going to be Vivaldi in Spain. And you have a couple of feature performers or you have a feature former his name is Mikan Walsh Wallace, and it's going to be a guitar crescendo with orchestra noise that's going to be him. As a solo is performing with the. And also some of the professional musicians around town. Yeah. I think that that's that happens on most of concerts. I've seen some some people if they didn't you know, they had beards and stuff. So I was thinking he's not, you know, he's guys are exactly in seventh grade here. The reason why we do that is because they have the the especially the younger musicians there side by side with the professional musicians. And they they're being educated learned how to perform how to behave on stage. I think it's great. I think it's amazing. And the fact that those guys are willing to give of their time to do that with the kids and you're right. It's what a great experience for the kids in the sense that they get to learn how the pros operate not only just just performing, but how they operate between and so forth, you know, getting prepared. And all that those those life lessons are just invaluable. I know my son Ethan who was a participant for many years. He felt the same way you really loved it. When somebody came aboard, it was it it it just made a little more interesting for the kids. And so so that was. Okay. So that's this Sunday, and that's going to be over at the windmill library. Yes. Yes. At two pm. And they can get tickets at L V Y O dot org right now on your website or at the door to door, and how much are tickets going to be they're going to be ten to twenty dollars. Ten four students and twenty dollars for adults. Okay. Fantastic. So that's that's your last concert of the season. Yes. Yes. That's the last one. Yes. So I'm gonna courage you guys all of our listeners participate in his it's the only tuition free program for for kids here in the state as far as I know right into the state, and it's a wonderful program. These kids get to perform hand bay are amazing and the program unions developed with Emma's is just amazing. I mean, the music is first rate. You know, I'm not an expert, but I can tell you. I just love it. I absolutely love it. Now, if if got some parents out there who maybe have some children that might be interested in participating can they can become a part of this group can get involved. What can I do? I mean, if they go to LV wile of LV y. L dot org. Auditions all the excerpts are on there, and they can print it out. You know, try to learn music, and you know, addition either sent a video or do a live it live edition either way, we'll work. It's just fifty dollars to for that location fee. Once they get in it's free. It's free as long as we continue to get people's support and buy tickets that he's events. Right. As long as we have the support of the community. That's it. And we need this community needs to support these kids. It's phenomenal. What you guys are doing and what the unions developed there. And I think it's great. And I know it was it proved invaluable for my son, Ethan all the kids are participate. Really enjoy it. They love it. They get to perform outside of school, which I think is really important. I mean, I think being at school in taking up music and playing a musical instrument schools. Great given the opportunity to do it outside of school that really just enhances the education here from a different person to get taught two ways perhaps and these programs at junior actually put together they're not the short little snippets of. It. Oh music. It's a full on an you. You'll hear it some of these pieces the orchestras professional orchestras playing. So it's not just for them. Take these kids. I heard I heard no he does not take any. But that's great. What a great experience for them to learn from somebody who's going to hold them accountable. And it's the way he says that when they graduate, and they go to college, and especially if they study music the conductor for the workers, rather teachers are not going to be easy on them. So it kind of prepares them for what's coming and a lot of kids coming out of this program scholarships. Hundred percent of them a hundred percent. That's pretty good with full rights outstanding. Yeah. My son got a full ride UNLV. Just fantastic. You know, amazing. Well, I, you know, I want to thank you for coming in today. I'm going to we have more to talk about with you guys. But we're going to step away for just a few minutes, and we're gonna come back, and I wanna talk to row about mortgages and interest rates right now because I think we probably should at this point sneak in some real estate since.

Las Vegas Ethan Murrow YouTube Nelson Shirley Lindsay Mikan Walsh Wallace UNLV Jennifer Spain Shirley Wednesday Smith center windmill library Melissa Rios Nikki Vivaldi Emma
"seventh grade" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

03:34 min | 3 years ago

"seventh grade" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Actually. Last year. Did not win one game. The riskier is will it ever get better for Patrick or appeal to early? Seventh grade you do not want to be the kid. Well, that's nothing. But trouble it's expert now, he's Sepah, Justin. You're talking to him champion to champion, Patrick, and if you're listening, I'm a three time softball sixteen inch softball champion. And what you need to understand that you were better than everybody else. And that is a rub it in their face. Rub. It in their face. Congratulations from champion to champion. Patrick happy birthday. He tricked to sister. When we got home last night. He told her we lost by one point. And she said that you deserve that. Because you tricked me last night and said you lost when you didn't. So she believed the second round loss because we all thought they were gonna lose because it's a horrible team with mean parents and then. Forget the part where he's still listening. Yeah. Yes are knows? I don't like these parents. But then we were like, no he actually won. It was even a boring fourth quarter because we had such a big lean. So but did set a pick. That was so cute. His arms pinned to the side of his body for the team. I love it. Yeah. He he felt that the teams. Celebration was a little lackluster where do you want to go out drinking? Yeah, he wanted to go to graders. But if it's a school night, and so that was shot down. So it's a little upset about that. Birthday. Happy birthday, buddy. My my pal. Billy Gardell here is going to be at the improv tonight and tomorrow night and Sundays get a brunch show a lunch. The folks in Chicago are good to me. That's a good room to. Yeah. It's a great room. You don't man, I'm doing great. Thanks for having me back. Good to see you good. I actually performed in this club before Mike and Molly began, and so I'm I'm getting ready for another pilot with Chuck Laurie in April and sharp figured, you know, tell us. Can you tell us oxide, can you? Tell us what the shows were jets kill us. No, I can tell you. It's about a certain tell you before we came on a guy is in Detroit a compression socks business, which I mean, what else would I be doing right now? Distrusted the business and his brother and sister mother the guy has a heart attack. So then he wakes up in the hospital after a surgery and his nurses there. Florence Nightingale affect and she's from Nigeria, and they could not be more different. And so the whole first part of the series is about seeing the he can just get her to give him a chance. Even though they're very different. It's love at thirty days say, hey, man. Let's hope. Yes. Hope it's five years in syndication. Right. One hundred episodes. Dishonoured Chuck wants to do something. No kidding. It's not like a little success come on. He can work with anybody. And you should just trot out running back with one good knee left show. But I'm very very grateful. Yeah. I don't know if you want to pitch an extra, but maybe something evolve in you and me, and we're nerds. What are we doing? We're nerds and confirm nerd or nerds in a laboratory. And I don't know I'm here at big bang. I don't know if they've ever done anything like that. But I think you, and I regret in it that is that is that is the golden egg that one is coming finally to their clothes eleven mazing years. Yeah. Molly could have gone three more. Oh, I did too. But what get miss famous head to go off and make all our movies. Not true. That's not true. That's all internet. No, no. We love her. It was all between, you know. She's from here. Peoria to be specific street puree and Plainfield and the Warner Brothers and CBS or couldn't quite come to an agreement. Big.

Patrick Billy Gardell Florence Nightingale Chuck Laurie Sepah Molly softball Detroit Chicago Warner Brothers Peoria Nigeria Plainfield Mike CBS sixteen inch thirty days five years
"seventh grade" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

AM 970 The Answer

11:45 min | 3 years ago

"seventh grade" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

"To be empowered motivated, and inspired. Here's your host, former English teacher director and producer of hundreds of stage productions and CEO president and creative force behind acting apart and AP franchising, Erica Lupo. Good morning everyone. Welcome to women in the loop. The show about women entrepreneurs and their stories. I'm your host, Eric Liu pout. I'm excited. I have two really great guests in my studio here today. One of them. I have had on before Diane arresthe. She's a speaker coach and author of knockout presentations, and I also have a mom of her clients. Kathy Connors, good morning to both of you. Good morning. And that makes me feel old clients. So nice to have you both here. So it's interesting Diane, you did a class called confidence class. Yes. And I want to hear a little bit about that. Because I have the theatrical background having acting apart and teaching it, I think this is really key. And I know Kathy your girls went through the class is they do. So how did it start Diane? I I should tell your listeners that I work with adults corporations in helping them to be more impactful in their presentations and one day, I got this call from a mother in Staten Island. And she said her daughter got really nervous standing up in class, couldn't speak and would I help her? And I said, well, I used to be a speech pathologist. I no longer work with children. But she was so persistent. She kept calling me I said, all right. If you can get ten girls together, I'll do it. And she did. So that was her name was Donna fortune, and we ended up working in her living room with ten girls from the same school and we worked for a period of eight weeks on sale. Saturday afternoon. And that's how confidence class got started. That's wonderful. And what did you do with the kids the same thing? I do with adults. We worked on delivery skills. How to give feedback? How to stand up and give a talk. How to organize your thoughts? How to handle questions, and it was amazing because you'd see these girls giving each other feedback, and they'd say things like you did a great job on eye contact because you were looking one on one with everyone you might want to try using more gestures next time they were so good and these are life skills, absolutely and Kathy. How did your girls get involved in this? We would lucky enough to be friends with the mom organiz dollar this at the beginning. And she invited my daughter. My oldest daughter to come and be a part of that group. And there was some reluctance solid net initially until she went through the first class. And then she would look forward to every Saturday being with Diane. That's wonderful. How long were the girls in the program the intention was eight weeks? And I I recall it ended up going. Longer than that. Because nobody wanted to. And and how did you realize when it was to end? I mean, something like that. Because I had a certain number of sessions that I did I think what happened was we started with one group with four. And then we convinced the parents to add onto the other four, but it was generally eight weeks and always on a Saturday. And what was great is these girls knew each other from seventh grade. And so they would come in the morning they have bagels with each other. And it got reinforced because they would go back to their classes, and they would say things like they point to feed watch your feet as they were speaking in front of their classrooms. What grade were they in? When they started to believe, it was seventh grade, and they stayed with it just for seventh nine, you know, that's a great age to start because seventh grade and sixth grade and eighth grade. They are challenging years those middle school years. Now, I remember me personally getting involved in theater at those ages, and it changed my life because the confidence you need at tho those were tough. Years. You got the bullying the self confidence. That is a perfect age to start something like this. So you stayed with it for four months or so whatever the eight weeks turned out because you're always challenged with their sports schedule and things so we pretty much eight weeks. So what did you work on with the girls? Well, the good news is we were able to use their real world material because they had a class where they had to give a seven minute speech. So they each had to do that speech throughout the eight weeks, and we would give them feedback. We break down we'd work on their confidence skills. What gestures eye contact how to stand how to walk how to articulate how to project your voice? And so each girl had something specific to her that she needed to work on and we would help her get to that next level. And you said, Cathy, all three of your girls did this all three of the same time. No, no, they're they're different ages. And so we win the class three times. And I will say Diane one of the things that my daughter's talk about was how much they enjoyed it technique that that Diane us where she filmed the girls, and then as they spoke, and then she would have the group. Critique. The speaker. And the speaker was able to see herself speaking after this wonderful. Yeah, I do that in my film class. That's that's a great skill. And I think you do that with your clients. Now, always I thought is so important. So they really could see what they needed to work on. And be honest about it because that's kind of scary, especially at that age. So did you see the children evolve? Oh, yes. Really very much. So I'm really proud to say that many of the girls including two of my children went onto join forensics teams in high school. Wow. Three of them went to national competition. One of them all is considering becoming a speech coach and going to be your competitor. Hiring. She told me all about that. That's amazing. So I mean, you hearing that that must Diane that must make you beyond proud. I don't even have words for that. I feel like I've left a legacy. And it's so inspiring to hear that now. Keep in mind her children are walk stars. I have to tell you are really great parents. But they really learn the skills, and I remember on our last class with the third daughter. I created a recital. We went into their school invited the parents and her older daughter who was in the first class was in from college. I said, would you mind coming in and saying a few words to the girls about what it was like for you? And she came with a speech, and she got behind electron and gave a talk and actually said that she was using these skills today in her college experience that she learned in seventh grade. That's amazing. Do you keep in contact with all the students? I don't but I hear through the grapevine you hear through the grapevine. Routinely. Moms of these children, thank me when they see me on the street in the supermarket now this day. That's how grateful they are. And not to say, how did you know when to stop the class, and then started up again. Well, here's what happened the intention was to help MRs fortune and her daughter, and it was supposed to end there. But then Cathy said, you know, I have another daughter and in two years, she'll be in seventh grade. Could we run it again? Then said, okay. And we did. And then one day a couple of years later. I ran into her in a Barnes and noble bookstore with her her family. And she said when my youngest daughter is in the seventh grade, would you run this again, I said I don't care where I am in the world. I promise you, they will all get the same experience. And then that was it. That's incredible. And you see them using these skills now to absolately to do and not to say it was several years ago. Correct. Yes. Yes. S eight thousand four or something like that. Or well. My my youngest is twenty now. So it has been a while. But they still use the skills. They're very very comfortable speakers, it was really a gift for life. I think it is. I think that that is very much of a gift for life. I think any kind of confidence building especially in women and girls anything at an early age is incredible. And they will take that they will take that with them. So what are the things that you worked on with them that you feel you work on with your adults because you do that now? Correct. I do it now all of the above. And so let me tell you that. I did not dumb this down. I didn't give them my book knockout presentations, because it's more business oriented, but I gave them a handout, which I created for them with templates and checklists and basic skills, and I took them through the call process. So what does confidence look like from a visual standpoint? What does? Confidence sound like from your tone. And what does how do you speak the language of confidence with your words? And I do that with all of my executives because what I've discovered is that people who have executive presence are fully aligned in their visual vocal verbal communication. So these girls learned how to do that. Now. What's interesting is when you said earlier about how they it's nerve racking to see yourself on video. Yes. Adults don't like it either. But when you teach them away of giving feedback it becomes less intimidating. So if you think about the long-term effect now if you're in a management role, you know, how to give feedback during a performance appraisal, so many skills. Yeah. Learn how to receive it as well. So when we did the recital there was a debate teacher there, and she said, would you mind if I sat in on this event, I'm recruiting to have kids on my debate team. And I said sure, I have no problems. So afterwards, she came up to me. And she said every one of these girls is debate ready. I put them on the team right now. So these are real life skills you teach you really do. And I think it sounds like it stays with them throughout their college. There. It's incredible. And just eight weeks, it took aches and Jerry point about the age. I didn't choose that that came to me. But this is that turning point as you mentioned when girls start to lose confidence, you see the boys raise their hands the girls. Don't I think Kathy was telling me a story retailing me about. Yes. Yes. I was at a college close by just last week in listening to a lecture given by a very well known if not controversial economists, and at the end of the lecture, and this was to lecture to a packed auditorium. He said are there any questions? Well, hands flew up. When I looked around the room the men had their hands held high the women those who raise their hands only raise them maybe half way sin. Every question that he answered was asked by a man there wasn't one question by a woman he had to leave not long after the lecture to catch a plane, and he left not hearing from one female and most of the females in the audience were college students who are majoring in business. What a lost opportunity. Absolutely. And it's interesting you observe that. That is a lost opportunity..

Diane one Kathy Connors Donna fortune Diane arresthe Cathy Eric Liu Diane Staten Island Erica Lupo director CEO Jerry president Barnes producer executive eight weeks one day seven minute four months
"seventh grade" Discussed on KSFO-AM

KSFO-AM

03:57 min | 3 years ago

"seventh grade" Discussed on KSFO-AM

"President Trump criticizing US trade partners. He did. So during a White House meeting. Thursday was discussing the US reciprocal Trade Act, which would put the same tariffs on other nations that those nations place on U S products. You look at Apple's Japan. Foreign tariff seventeen percent United States nothing. We get nothing. They get seventeen. Same. Apple actually, a better you want. Another to go down. Look at motorcycles. As an example. India fifty percent or one hundred percent I got him down to fifty percent just by talking for about two minutes. But it's still fifty percent versus two point four percent again other than that. It's a very fair deal and something like whiskey from India. And other things from India, India's a very high tariff, they charges a lot of tafs, but you look at whisky. So India gets fifty percent. We get nothing. I will tell you that those are just a few of the products is actually much worse than that as bad as it always saying if you're to judge us one hundred and fifty percent going to judge you one hundred and fifty percent will happen. In many cases, is what both charge each other nothing or we'll get one hundred and fifty percent. That's okay. Too. I spoke to a couple of senators about this that aren't really into this stuff. And they said, hey. Fair to me. Republican Representative Sean Duffy on Thursday introduced White House drafted legislation that would give President Trump more power to Levy tariffs on imported goods in an effort to pressure other countries to lower duties and other trade barriers and that measures already been declared unacceptable by some Republican senators including and the Senate finance committee chair Chuck Grassley. Well, following an expose that claimed. Bryan singer's seduced and molested several underage men are the film company millennium films. Thursday said it is staunchly supporting the director in a statement, AVI. Lerner founder and chief executive of millennium said that the company's going forward with a remake of the fantasy adventure. Red Sonja with singer set to direct the over eight hundred in a statement learners learner said the quote over eight hundred million dollars bohemian rhapsody has grossed making it the highest grossing drama in film history is a testament to his remarkable vision and acumen. He said, quote, I know the difference between agenda driven fake news and reality, and I'm very comfortable with this decision in America people are innocent until proven guilty. An article published this week in the Atlantic alleged a pattern of predatory behavior by singer, including sex with a fifteen year old in one thousand nine hundred ninety seven three men spoke on the condition of anonymity and a fourth. Said he was molested by singer on this set of nineteen ninety eight apt pupil when he was in the seventh grade a singer denies the claim and he calls the report a homophobic smear piece. Now in other news this morning here on eight f and Comcast continues losing its US cable customers, but he racked up more internet subscribers and got a revenue boost from sky. It's big bet on European TV the Philadelphia the Philadelphia company says it lost twenty nine thousand US cable customers in the fourth quarter, but added three hundred fifty thousand internet subscribers it also gained customers in its new cell phone business plan. And finally this morning. Speaking of tack it only takes a relatively small amount of poison to taint something a new report suggests it doesn't take many people on Twitter to spread most of the fake news that hit the micro blogging site in two thousand sixteen at team of scientists looked at more than sixteen thousand US Twitter accounts and found sixteen of them tweeted out nearly eighty percent of the misinformation masquerading as news the journal science has that works out to less than a tenth of one percent of Twitter users by contrast ninety nine percent of the Twitter..

US President Trump Bryan singer India Twitter Apple White House Philadelphia Comcast Sean Duffy Chuck Grassley Japan Atlantic director Lerner Red Sonja Senate finance committee Representative America
"seventh grade" Discussed on WFAN Sports Radio_FM

WFAN Sports Radio_FM

01:44 min | 3 years ago

"seventh grade" Discussed on WFAN Sports Radio_FM

"In seventh grade. It was like such you can see how the thought was there seemed like a good idea at the time should have prerecorded at bro. But also like just practice. Sound a little natural. You sound like you're reading it off the cue cards. I first week would Rosetta Stone. Seriously that in my seventh grade Spanish class, we all sat in a circle around the room at our desks. And Mr. Diaz would go around the point to you. Could you read this? Oh boy. Day Farrell column. Come on, bro. You should that was great. You should see. How old is ours? Pretty good there. The. But I would have to do that. No. Pass it in college. And I just think of my legs, man. I got a game. Are you gonna make you pro I tried? I showed up every day. I go Jeff forty doing a life of an nickel talk more time. No, Astro L. Ultimo new wave me on bro. Memento far Acer. Bros. Oh, man. Komo elsa. Goon dole menu law. Gra L muscle tone air base. Google translator. Thank you note of adobe reading it to your taxi driver when you land in Mexico, just like your voice. Hello hotel. He should've read the whole thing into.

Goon dole Astro L. Ultimo Rosetta Stone Acer Mr. Diaz Google Farrell adobe Jeff forty Mexico
"seventh grade" Discussed on Mason & Ireland

Mason & Ireland

03:52 min | 3 years ago

"seventh grade" Discussed on Mason & Ireland

"Schuessel tack. All right mates is air marshal. A seventh grade quarterback at MacArthur academy in Southfield Michigan. Yup. Has been offered us collar ship to play football at Michigan. According to his father, Brian wolverines coach, Tim Harbaugh. Extended. The after after watching tape of the thirteen year old quarterback the offered is not buying the kid to Michigan. He can't even sign it until he's in high school, but Michigan is probably mound to it. Because if they pull it back every other school use it against them. Right. So considering that is it smart or stupid for Harbaugh. Offer a scholarship to a thirteen year old. Well, this happened. I think with lane kiffin and a kid named David sills Cray was pretty good wide receiver out to be a really good wide receiver at West Virginia. I I think it's a bit much. I think there should probably be a first of all for the kid. He just he's committed to a Michigan education mean he's got a he's got a free degree from Michigan. If he wants it. So I've got no problem on that side on the other side. I think it is professionalizing little kids wholly agree with you. I think that this is stupid. They NCAA should just put in a rule. No offering scholarships to kids in junior high. It puts a tremendous amount of pressure on the kid and most of the time it doesn't happen. Anyway. Why can't you just say it to the kid without offering a miscarriage hip? He knows kid is thirteen. He's got a media spotlight on him. And other teams are gonna game plan against a junior high school kid love to talk to David sills and find out what that experience. Remember? We had him on the show. We had him and his dad on the show when he was still a kid. Yeah. And they thought it was great. They were like what does he think he was at high school in Delaware? Yeah. And I wonder what Steve cards and things. Clarkson, who's a quarterback coach working would probably have an opinion on this. But it doesn't make any sense to me to allow a scholarship to begin to thirteen-year-old agree chess. All right, John. Our votes are due for the sag awards on Thursday. We've gotten screeners are. Yeah. Everyday. I got some more good ones. I'm guessing you haven't had a chance to watch a lot of these mug. No, Lisa's been watching them. I haven't seen most of them. But I'm gonna give you a cat of category. You tell me how you're gonna vote. Okay. Best actor who's in it Jinbao for vice Bradley Cooper for stars born Rami Malik for bohemian rhapsody Vigo Mortenson for green book, and John David Washington for black klansman, I which movies have you seen green book. And that's it. You didn't see stars? Born didn't Lisa see black klansman didn't have it. I have the screener. Well, so I would probably Lisa seen all those. I'd probably tell her. Vote. You've seen them all who voting for its between Christian bale and Rami, Molly. And I can't believe you haven't watched vice yet. I don't know if I have it have the screening. You've got it. Okay. It's fantastic. He's unbelievable. Yeah. Areo like Dick Cheney I will vote for Christian bale over Romney Malik. But it's really comes down to check. All right last one from me. I have a game, Greg. You can play a Michael funchess in for Corrales today. You can play. It's true or false. All of these are facts about the Super Bowl. The Rams are hitting having heard Super Bowl. All right. So you guys tell me true or false Super Bowl Sunday is the largest day of food consumption in the United States, Greg true or false. It has to be true fund. True. True mace. I gotta say true. All three of you..

Michigan David sills Lisa Tim Harbaugh Romney Malik John David Washington Rami Greg Southfield MacArthur academy lane kiffin Brian wolverines NCAA Dick Cheney West Virginia Clarkson United States
"seventh grade" Discussed on Mason & Ireland

Mason & Ireland

03:52 min | 3 years ago

"seventh grade" Discussed on Mason & Ireland

"Schuessel tack. All right mates is air marshal. A seventh grade quarterback at MacArthur academy in Southfield Michigan. Yup. Has been offered us collar ship to play football at Michigan. According to his father, Brian wolverines coach, Tim Harbaugh. Extended. The after after watching tape of the thirteen year old quarterback the offered is not buying the kid to Michigan. He can't even sign it until he's in high school, but Michigan is probably mound to it. Because if they pull it back every other school use it against them. Right. So considering that is it smart or stupid for Harbaugh. Offer a scholarship to a thirteen year old. Well, this happened. I think with lane kiffin and a kid named David sills Cray was pretty good wide receiver out to be a really good wide receiver at West Virginia. I I think it's a bit much. I think there should probably be a first of all for the kid. He just he's committed to a Michigan education. I mean, he's got a he's got a free degree from Michigan. If he wants it. So I've got no problem on that side on the other side. I think it is professionalizing little kids wholly agree with you. I think that this is stupid. They NCAA should just put in a rule. No offering scholarships to kids in junior high. It puts a tremendous amount of pressure on the kid and most of the time it doesn't happen. Anyway. Why can't you just say it to the kid without offering them scholarship? He knows this kid is thirteen. He's got a media spotlight on him. And other teams are gonna game plan against a junior high school kid love to talk to David sills and find out what that experience. Remember? We had him on the show. We had him and his dad on the show when he was still a kid. Yeah. And they thought it was great. They were like what what does he think he was at high school in Delaware? Yeah. And I wonder what Steve cards and things. Clarkson who's a quarterback coach was working. Would probably have an opinion on this. But it doesn't make any sense to me to allow a scholarship to be given to thirteen year old agree chess. All right, John. Our votes are due for the sag awards on Thursday. We've gotten screeners are. Yeah. Every day. I got some more good ones. I'm guessing you haven't had a chance to watch a lot of these mug. No, Lisa's been watching them. I haven't seen most of them. But I'm gonna give you a cat of category. You tell me how you're gonna vote. Okay. Best actor who's in it Jinbao for vice K, Bradley Cooper for stars born Rami Malik for bohemian rhapsody Vigo Mortenson for green book and John David Washington for black klansman, I which movies to be seen green book. And that's it. You didn't see stars more. Didn't Lisa see black klansman didn't have it. I have the screener. Well, so I would probably Lisa seen all those. I'd probably tell her vote you've seen them who are voting for its between Christian bale and Ron Melik. And I can't believe you haven't watched vice yet. I don't know if I have it have the screening. You've got it. Okay. It's fantastic. He's unbelievable. Yeah. Areo like Dick Cheney I will vote for Christian bale over Romney Malik. But it's really comes down to check. All right last one from me. I have a game, Greg. You can play a Michael funchess infra Corrales today. You can play. It's true or false. All of these are facts about the Super Bowl. The Rams are hitting you haven't heard Super Bowl. All right. So you guys tell me true or false Super Bowl Sunday is the largest day of food consumption in the United States, Greg true or false. It has to be true fund. True. True mace. I gotta say true. All three of you..

Michigan David sills Tim Harbaugh Lisa Romney Malik John David Washington Greg Ron Melik Southfield MacArthur academy lane kiffin Brian wolverines NCAA Dick Cheney West Virginia Clarkson United States