35 Burst results for "Seventeenth Century"

April, 1779: Spain Enters the War

American Revolution Podcast

02:20 min | 2 months ago

April, 1779: Spain Enters the War

"April seventeen seventy nine. France and spain signed the treaty of iran. Wes which effectively drew spain into the war. With britain for the past couple of centuries spain had been francis traditional ally and britain's traditional enemy while spain did not share francis enthusiasm for american liberty. It did harbor grudges against britain and welcomed an opportunity to settle some of them by entering the war in the late seventeen. Hundreds spain was near the height of its worldwide empire. Spain of course had been their first european power to colonize the americas following christopher columbus's revelation that an entire western hemisphere existed and was available to be conquered after columbus returned from his first voyage. Spain claimed sovereignty over the entire western hemisphere. It did so. Even though columbus only had limited information about a few islands in the caribbean about a year after columbus's return spain and portugal sign the treaty of tour to see us which essentially recognize spain's claims to all lands west of vertical line drawn through the atlantic ocean the treaty was designed to recognize portugal's claims to some islands in the atlantic while seating to spain all the unknown lands further west in fact unknown to both parties at the time. The line seated. What is today the eastern part of brazil to the portuguese which is why brazil became a portuguese colony. In truth though when the vast size of north and south america came to be understood there was no way. Spain would be able to occupy or defend its vast claims to the hemisphere britain france. The netherlands and other european powers were not parties to the treaty and did not recognize. Spanish claims to the entire western hemisphere but spain was the first to establish a colonial empire for more than a century. Spain conquered most of south and central america as well as many caribbean islands. It was not until the early seventeenth century that other european powers seriously began to consider american colonies of their own

Spain Britain Columbus Francis WES Portugal Christopher Columbus Iran France Americas Brazil Atlantic Ocean Caribbean Atlantic South America The Netherlands Caribbean Islands America
Why Is the Media Attacking a Safe, Effective Drug?

Dennis Prager Podcasts

02:16 min | 2 months ago

Why Is the Media Attacking a Safe, Effective Drug?

"Ivermectin works. You're being lied to by corrupt medical profession. it is. I never thought i'd say this is as corrupt as the teachers unions. There was no difference between the american medical association the cbc the nih and the teachers unions. They're left wing activist groups. They have no commitment to what they claim to have. Commitment to there are some wonderful teachers. There are some wonderful people at all. Cdc and nih. it's corrupt it's been corrupted by big pharma. They want you to take the vaccine. Because if you can get healthy by taking a cheap pill like ivermectin or hydroxy chloroquine and zinc. They don't want you to do so. They wanna make billions by pushing and shoving the vaccine down americans throats. That's the reason for the war against ivermectin in india. They used it and listen to the story. Okay just listen to it that this is a A doctor writing from the desert review dot com republished in zero hedge. There's a black on any conversation. About how ivermectin beat cova nineteen in india when i discussed the dire straits that india found itself in in earlier this year with four hundred fourteen thousand cases per day and over four thousand deaths per day and how that evaporated within five weeks of the addition of ivermectin often asked. Why is there no mention of that in the news. Yes exactly ask yourself why. India success against the delta variant with ivermectin is such a closely guarded secret by the nih and cdc. Second ask yourself. Why no major media outlets reported this fact but instead try to confuse you with false information by saying the deaths in india are ten times greater than official reports perhaps. Npr's trying so hard because npr's essentially government mouthpiece the us government is all in with vaccines with enthusiasm. A seventeenth century catholic. Church all in with a jia centric metal of the geo centric model of the universe disputing galileo

NIH India American Medical Association CBC CDC NPR Us Government
"seventeenth century" Discussed on Jewish History Matters

Jewish History Matters

03:51 min | 7 months ago

"seventeenth century" Discussed on Jewish History Matters

"In the light of what they already thought the cultural formations and religious formations which they brought into it or the people around them hat right. If you think of it in those terms we really cannot just ever look at one or other the tragedy on its own terms. You really have to see eight in a continuity of development drag. You could say that the destruction of the temperature an incredible dramatic break but it was working within a context to understand it in that context. And only in that context. Can we understand. The change came in its wake and it's real term the other thing that i would say that it was very important to me in. This book is once again. I focus very heavily on this question of reconstruction how you manage to reconstruct their lives. How it was for example in eastern europe with not only back on their feet but were taking up major roles twenty twenty five years later very very soon bearing in mind the number of dead in the size of refugee crises. You could say the same about the expulsion from spending four thousand. Nine hundred. Ninety does not take in historical terms very long before the jews are back on efi doing extremely well that raises a really interesting question in my mind that nobody had asked and that is the jews have culturally determined ways of dealing with this kind of crises. There are enough of them in the very long course of jewish history fast to start thinking about the strategies of survival the strategies a reconstruction overtime. And my guess is that research begins to be done. We will see that. There are ways in which jewish society deals with it that have been found overtime to be effective. And the tell us time off the time. And it's why burr on argue. That is not so important not to put. It wasn't important because actually the jews are very successful. At overcoming overcoming its consequences. Negative and so yes. I think that's a really important aspect of jewish life and jewish experienced that borodin's approach shot. Hit you couldn't understand it. Through what baron want but in fact it seems to me something very deep and that needs to be understood in a much longer chronological term. Certainly than i did. I was just looking at the my one moment. But i think it's a key phenomenon. Well right i mean. I think that especially going back to something that you said earlier. In our conversation it is really fascinating and really critical. I think to understand how. And why. And in what ways eastern european jewry was able to bounce back which is to say that for instance. If you look at two other major tragedies in jewish history we already mentioned the holocaust but you pointed to the fourteen ninety two expulsion of the jews from spain. These communities are able to bounce back but in new places in many respects. What is it about the aftermath of sixteen forty eight the allows jews to bounce back in the same place where this violence taking place in the first place and especially in the context as you mentioned earlier that this is a key moment where you see the ascendancy of western and central europe in kind of broader european historical terms and then in the aftermath of sixteen forty eight poland and lithuania beginning this process of To some extent it's already taking place but you have this process of declining power in the region leading up eventually one hundred years later to the partition of poland by russia prussia and austria. So what is taking place here in terms of allowing the jews to bounce back in this location in relationship to the broader transformation of europe in the aftermath of the peace of westphalia..

spain four thousand Nine hundred eastern europe lithuania Ninety twenty twenty five years later two other major tragedies westphalia jewish one hundred years later one moment eight austria first place europe baron central europe jews fourteen ninety two expulsion
The Great Jewish Refugee Crisis of the Seventeenth Century

Jewish History Matters

02:05 min | 7 months ago

The Great Jewish Refugee Crisis of the Seventeenth Century

"Today i'm joined by adam teller. Who's going to be speaking with us about the century jewish refugee crisis following the sixteen forty eight on. It's key pogroms. Aman how it helps us to understand the transnational transformations of jewish life in early modern times as well as when we want to think more deeply. Broadly about refugee issues on water scale both in history and also this is something which is still very relevant today. Adam teller is a professor of history and judaic studies at brown university. He has written widely on the economic social and cultural history of the jews in early modern pulling lithuania and his most recent book. Which we're going to talk about today is titled rescue the surviving souls the great jewish refugee crisis of the seventeenth century. This is going to be the starting point for our conversation today but in many ways it's not just about the book we're gonna be talking about the big issues that surrounds it. It's really an exciting book. It was recently a finalist for the national. Jewish book award in history is a pleasure to have adam here with us. Thank you so much. Adam for joining us on the podcast. Welcome really glad to have you. Here it's a real pleasure. Thrill pledged to be here. Jason absolutely i want to get us started by thinking about kind of what is this history in the first place when we look at the story of the malinowski pogroms and aftermath in the mid seventeenth century. What is going on here. And why does it matter when we wanna think about early. Modern jewish history well in the early period poland lithuania which was then called. The police between commonwealth was the largest wealthiest most develop jewish center in europe with in world terms. It was only rivaled by the ottoman empire and had gone through about one hundred fifty years very strong social economic cultural development. Making it this powerhouse. In the history of european jewry and the place where all of your looked in a number of different fails perhaps most particularly in terms of the jewish law. But not only that

Adam Teller Aman Lithuania Brown University Adam Jason Poland Europe
"seventeenth century" Discussed on Jewish History Matters

Jewish History Matters

02:05 min | 7 months ago

"seventeenth century" Discussed on Jewish History Matters

"Today i'm joined by adam teller. Who's going to be speaking with us about the century jewish refugee crisis following the sixteen forty eight on. It's key pogroms. Aman how it helps us to understand the transnational transformations of jewish life in early modern times as well as when we want to think more deeply. Broadly about refugee issues on water scale both in history and also this is something which is still very relevant today. Adam teller is a professor of history and judaic studies at brown university. He has written widely on the economic social and cultural history of the jews in early modern pulling lithuania and his most recent book. Which we're going to talk about today is titled rescue the surviving souls the great jewish refugee crisis of the seventeenth century. This is going to be the starting point for our conversation today but in many ways it's not just about the book we're gonna be talking about the big issues that surrounds it. It's really an exciting book. It was recently a finalist for the national. Jewish book award in history is a pleasure to have adam here with us. Thank you so much. Adam for joining us on the podcast. Welcome really glad to have you. Here it's a real pleasure. Thrill pledged to be here. Jason absolutely i want to get us started by thinking about kind of what is this history in the first place when we look at the story of the malinowski pogroms and aftermath in the mid seventeenth century. What is going on here. And why does it matter when we wanna think about early. Modern jewish history well in the early period poland lithuania which was then called. The police between commonwealth was the largest wealthiest most develop jewish center in europe with in world terms. It was only rivaled by the ottoman empire and had gone through about one hundred fifty years very strong social economic cultural development. Making it this powerhouse. In the history of european jewry and the place where all of your looked in a number of different fails perhaps most particularly in terms of the jewish law. But not only that

Adam Jason Adam teller europe adam mid seventeenth century Today seventeenth century adam teller Jewish jewish one hundred fifty years today jews brown university both lithuania first place malinowski early period
The Irish Border, Why Is It There, What's It Like?

Rear Vision

02:00 min | 8 months ago

The Irish Border, Why Is It There, What's It Like?

"Hello i'm at about grint on this. Revision carey phillips revisits. A journey along the irish border twin on the message and dommage into political games and antics of the tories in london northern ireland park if the single market for goods that means you. Import procedures are applied on products. Arriving from the rest of the uk on the springfield road. Several dozen republican youths attacked police vehicles spin increasing unease about the brexit arrangements for northern ireland's loyalist seeing a treat border with the rest of the uk as diminishing their british identity. The last two weeks have seen violence erupting on the streets of northern ireland unions. Fear the bricks at agreement which leaves northern ireland following e you customs. Rules will undermine their place in the united kingdom. The arrangement agreed to by all sides during the brexit. Negotiations is to protect the land border dividing the republic of ireland and he yuma nba and northern ireland. Part of the uk from any customs infrastructure. Like cameras aboard posts. The five hundred kilometer border is considered an absolute priority for the northern on pay steal the good friday agreement and needs to be protected at all costs but this raises an interesting historical question. Why is there a border across the island of ireland and had it northern ireland become part of the united kingdom kerry picks up the story in the seventeenth century when all and was essentially part of the british empire. The british ascendancy in ireland supported by the arrival of thousands of

Ireland Carey Phillips Ireland Park Grint London United Kingdom Republic Of Ireland NBA Kerry
A History of the Industrialization and Commercialization of Niagara Falls

Stuff You Missed in History Class

02:08 min | 8 months ago

A History of the Industrialization and Commercialization of Niagara Falls

"And we're going to start off with a little bit of a brief history of industrialization and commercialization at niagara because this whole barrel trip was part of a much bigger story of tourism and dare-devils at this natural wonder so niagara falls is a collection of three waterfalls on the border between the united states and canada ontario. On the canadian side and new york on the us side in. They're on the niagara river between lake erie. lake ontario. the falls are the horseshoe falls the american falls. And the bridal veil falls sometimes horseshoe falls is known as canadian falls. Most of the horseshoe falls on the canadian side of the border. Paul american falls and bridal veil falls are both in. The united states horseshoe. Falls is the biggest of the three. It's the one that's shaped like a horseshoe like its name suggests and it's what comes to mind for a lot of people when you say niagara falls. Yeah it's impressive in persons. It's it does have sort of the iconic aspect to it. The area around niagara falls has been home to a number of iraq orient speaking indigenous peoples leading up to the seventeenth century. A confederation known as the neutral lived on what would become the canadian side of the river. And this name comes from the french describing them as neutral in conflicts between other iroquois nations and confederation so this is a guess it pronunciation because we couldn't find a clear one but the When roaring on or winrow lived on the other side and the neutral confederation and the wind row were allies until sixteen thirty nine after that a combination of wars epidemics and other factors led to both of them being dispersed by and absorbed into other iroquois tribes and nations. There are descendants of these people. Surely living still today but there's a whole complicated history of all the various iroquois and peoples that are not a monolith so some people wound up going completely different parts of the country other sort of made their way into other tribes and nations.

Niagara Falls Paul American United States American Falls Niagara River Horseshoe Falls Lake Ontario Niagara Lake Erie Ontario Winrow Canada New York Iraq
Why Farm Reforms in India Have Been Met With Widespread Protests

Planet Money

01:52 min | 8 months ago

Why Farm Reforms in India Have Been Met With Widespread Protests

"It was january. Twenty six republic day in india. It's this big national holiday. Normally there is a massive military parade in the capital delhi. Everybody watches it on tv but this year. The holiday gets completely overshadowed when tens of thousands of farmers roll into the cd on their tractors waving flags and they are angry and the reason they're angry is that the government has passed these new agriculture reforms. Laws that basically let the free market into what has been a pretty closed system. So i'm watching this tractor rally on tv from the other side of the country and mumbai where i live and all of a sudden things escalade farmers just bust through police lines and then they're getting teargassed and you can see them storm. The red fort like in real time. I'm watching them scramble. All over the ramparts of the seventeenth century palace and the whole thing is just shocking so a book it down to this cricket field in downtown mumbai where farmers from this part of the country are gathering in solidarity and some of them had literally walked hundreds of miles days to get here and while there overturning buses. And it's like mayhem in delhi here. It's like a music festival. It's this amazing atmosphere. You you look around. And it's kind of surprising mixture of people there their farmers for sure but then there are also like mumbai hipsters and housewives in their fifties and it just shows you that even in india's biggest megacities a lot of people have a connection to farming. I mean a lot of people. Even if they aren't farmers themselves through grandfathers were their fathers were maybe their mothers and i mean even now like half of indians make a living from

Mumbai Delhi India Red Fort Government Cricket
The Mystery Of The Wicked Fairy

Mythical Monsters

05:04 min | 9 months ago

The Mystery Of The Wicked Fairy

"Of all the classic depictions of the wicked fairy ruining a royal christening. The most popular is likely cheryl. Perrault's the sleeping beauty in the would from sixteen ninety seven. The passage reads just when they were all about to be seated. A ferry who was getting on in years entered the palace. She had not been invited because she had not left the tower in which she had been living for more than fifty years. Everyone thought that she had either died or fallen under a spell. Her head trembled more with malice than from old age as she decreed the princess will die after piercing her finger with a spindle but the wicked fairy is actually much older than perot's tale. She is first mentioned in thirteenth century. French epic poem called yuan of bordeaux in it a night in his party. A tense meeting with over on the king of the fairies who tells the night that the wicked fairy cursed him at birth to stunt his height she also appears in the seventeenth century tales of. Marie had trine mel. Do barna viel. Who wrote under the name. Madame dune wa. She coined the term fairytale and depicts the wicked fairy in three different stories. Behind in the would princess may blossom and the blue bird in each a wicked fairy named cara boss the fate of the night presents as dangerous. Take on the standard fairy godmother she avengers every slide against her and her goddaughter often at the expense of the girls rival another young woman who's been blessed by other fairies with beauty grace and talent. It's interesting to note common themes in delwan and perot's choices as they were contemporaries. The wicked fairy is almost always old and forgotten by the royals due to the assumption that she'd been lost to time. Her curses vary but they tend to involve animal transformations and last a set length of time and the person she's punishing is almost always an innocent. It is said that every fairy worth her magic had god child but getting one wasn't easy it required an invitation to opulent christenings thrown by fussy parents with a taste for gold and jewels. Each jerry had to present her gifts to the child which had to be equal in beauty and value only then did one lucky ferry. Get the job. Sometimes infighting between the fairies broke out and the entire castle was destroyed. Being worthy of a godchild was a tough nasty business. And it didn't matter a whit to carrabba's the one ferry who had never had a goddaughter of course she went to the parties and gave the children her usual blessings which reflected her dominion over the night. An owl to act as a pet and messenger a cloak that would glitter like the stars if the princess so wished to caribou. These were enviable gifts. But her sister's the ferries of the day summer spring fall and winter lavish princesses with traits and talents. A perfect singing voice or promises of unrivalled beauty. Even they'd made the same vowed to another princess the month before but cynical shadow loving care boss had given up on a god of her own until the birth of princess i e shah of the day. The princess came into the world bamboo flutes musical bows and liars announced her arrival. All of ethiopia held dances aisha's honor and her parents. Through the expected ferry feast when caribous arrived she was bored by the jubilation and the piles of gifts. She watched only half interested as each of her sisters approached. The princess's cradle to present their gifts. This was a party like any other but all that changed when she saw the child when she looked over the edge of the infant's cradle everything the music. The dancing all faded away. There was nothing but the tiny princess looking back up at her carrabba's took in aisha's large round eyes and wide nostrils with the tenderest affection. She brushed her finger against the princess's soft skin admiring the rich black as warm and dark as a midnight lily under the summer moon. The baby laughed and the fairies heart leapt with joy.

Perot Trine Mel Barna Viel Delwan Perrault Carrabba Cheryl Bordeaux Cara Marie Royals Jerry Caribous Aisha Ethiopia
Culture Myths and a New Science of Culture  Dr. David White - burst 04

A New Direction

05:14 min | 9 months ago

Culture Myths and a New Science of Culture Dr. David White - burst 04

"At the top. Okay david. Help me out here wool. You mean culture doesn't are you saying culture doesn't start at the top so the prevailing wisdom is that the leader says the culture right. This has been true. And it's the most complicated mantha one eyed about the most inc to Because it's the one that's most pervasive is most entrenched in our in our society and for good reason right. I go into a lot of his historical lot of it. Is this country. America founded on this sort of faith of the individual of pia rugged individualist myth right Quaker cavernous Protestant settlers from europe in england. Who came over in the seventeenth century. You know believed firmly in the in the power of the individual leader to make change happen. All that carried forward into our society today The problem is that there is almost zero evidence in anthropology and other related social sciences. That supports the idea. The leaders somehow set culture create culture cultures. Form perfectly well without leaders. Any group tasked with any any task though cultural form generally speaking of the former around the task. The the the thing that you're doing now i as i get into in the book. The this myth about leadership came became super prominent in the late seventies early eighties. Because corollary to that. I mean along What was going on that time. Is that Folks in the business schools were discovering researching that this idea that basically humans in organizations are unmotivated people. Basically don't need you know need to be directed and manipulated in cajole to work to get work. Done that idea which had been around. Since you started the twentieth century was debunked in the late late sixties early seventies mid seventy s by researchers at mit and other universities in the idea the new idea of management. Was that essentially. If you could unlock the human potential of the individual you know and let them flourish in organization. Great things will come. You don't need to sort of manipulating coercing control and direct people to do work because people actually need their creativity unleashed so that was the famous so-called theory of motivation of organizations talk. The douglas mcgregor stuff like three x three x theory. Why right was the was the whole idea. So theory why. When theory y became the de facto new way of thinking about management in organizations culture became the convenient vehicle to enable theory y so in other words if you just let if you just create the right culture in the organization good things will happen and that's the simplest way of saying the most most predominant Myth that has lived with us to this day. That if you just make make the right. Climate make the right environment. Good things will happen in the organization. A very compelling myth. It's very well intended and got a lot of. There's a lot of good to there's no question there is. it doesn't support it right so huge you list five problems with why this myth that culture starts at the top is an issue problem. You leaders of overestimate thrown influence problem. Too complex change is not happy through individual influence problem. Three for leaders beliefs take hold in the organization. They have to be there to begin with and four cultures not the summer personalities and problem five language alone does not change culture and your research the research that well not just your research with research. That's been done here in cognitive anthropology has kind of blown open this idea that you know as leaders. We probably don't have nearly as much influence as we think we do. When it comes to culture because culture is going to exist with the leader. That i am i in that well said Because i think i think i consult businesses to and every because we need to change your culture. You change you your culture your culture you. You didn't create it. It happened right. It's kind of an organic thing. Isn't it in reality. Well as i as. I write about the book. It culture is as we'd like to say culture follows task right. The common way of thinking about it is that castles culture might just set. The culture in the task will actually goes the other way around what you do. This is the cognitive science of culture in on the brain. What you do shape how you think and to some extent you know. We talked about this cognitive science and culture being kind of academic kind of newfangled but in some ways. It's incredibly intuitive. You know this is culture shapes how you think so.

Company Culture Myths Mantha Douglas Mcgregor David England MIT Europe America
This Land Is Whose Land?

The Book Review

04:26 min | 10 months ago

This Land Is Whose Land?

"Simon winchester joins us now from the berkshires. His latest book is called land. How the hunger for ownership shaped the modern world simon. So good to have you here. Well lovely to be a thank. You bye here. We mean of course a little bit far. The last time i think you were on this podcast it was in person but perhaps it is fitting that you are on your own piece of land for this conversation. How'd you come to want to write a book about land and land ownership by used to live in hong kong and came back in ninety seven had passed back into the hands of chinese coast. Should have done then decided largely on the advice of old enough. See then new york times correspondent in hong kong. That i should perhaps move to new england and so rather than go to london. I came to the new world. I'd be correspondent here in the seventies the eighties for the guardian and bought a little cottage town code west. Saic about one hundred ten miles. North of new york in duchess county has had few acres of garden and stuff around it but there was a a plumber from the bronx code. Caesar luria who owned a fairly tracts surrounding the house needs to come there and hunt and he was very nice man and he would off to hunting each season he would leave me a cooler with venison doorways a bottle of cognac which was particularly nice then after three or four years. He said to me that he was tired of paying the taxes on this land would i like to buy it and he named price and mice but guess why not okay so i bought the land and it was pretty useless. I have to say smith scale the north face of mountainside so. It wasn't good for raising animals. Now this fake fantasy. But one day i might but it was sort of beautiful in were couple of little streams lots of trees some of them quite magnificent they oak and hickory and of course north florida pine cherry and ash of animals. We bob cat. Once there were dare of course apply. Gm rabbits and i liked it but it was not particularly useful and eventually with this sort of fantasy. I had maybe one day. Having animals i came up here to the batches. I so that sam the house done death but kept the land and then there was this sort of major shift in my attitude towards it. When in twenty eleven i became a citizen of this country. Suddenly i realized the by owning these one hundred and thirty acres down in duchess county. I was actually invested in the country. To which is not become a citizen so then became rather interested more interested in the land itself and in history so i started digging around realized overstated. I aborted from this mr aaron. He had deep fried to that body from someone else and so the chain went back until it stopped in about the late seventeenth century. There was paperwork all the way back to then. Then i know strode duchess county in poughkeepsie. They've got all the papers but then he came to a shuddering halt because it was at that time that the documents were mainly written in dutch. Where henry hudson's explores who had come up the river. That is his name but he was working there. Being for instance she was working as an agent for the dutch. And he had first acquired land from the original settlers by non who were the mckeekan indians. But they didn't have the concept of ownership say hunted and they gathered and they settled and all the rest of it superintendent but didn't own and then i began to think well the difference between their attitude land. They're feeling was that you can never own land than you could. Own the breeze with the ocean. To maya too is. This is mind. Shoo everybody away. You start at the right to do so. That was an interesting development. And i thought maybe there would be a book and so i put it to my editor and she said yes. That would be an admirable idea. But don't keep the united states only have a look at where this originated and how it's because around the world and so that was not traveling and wondering about oh beginning in duchess county.

Duchess County Caesar Luria Simon Winchester Hong Kong Bob Cat Saic Simon Mr Aaron New York Times New England North Florida London New York GM Smith SAM Poughkeepsie Henry Hudson
Guanajuato And Quertaro

Travel with Rick Steves

03:40 min | 10 months ago

Guanajuato And Quertaro

"Moon guidebook author. Julia joins us now in an interview. We recorded prior to the kobe outbreak. One reason i haven't explored mexico as much as i'd like to. Maybe because i have a hard time pronouncing the pounds. But i think three towns near mexico city that really are like household words for anybody who loves exploring. Mexico are what those three towns. There's semi i n de guanajuato and kenneth at all and you could rent a car and being these towns. What a couple of hours. Yeah it's probably about two and a half to three hours to cut it that. Oh that's the closest san miguel. You're looking at probably about four hours to get there from mexico. City you can hop in a bus doesn't really nice comfortable bus lines or you could rent a car to. Would you do it. If you're flying into mexico city to get to these towns you know. I would take the bus. There are actually buses that come right out of the airport in mexico city to get at that oh and for their. It's you know striking distance to san miguel. So it's it's pretty easy to get around by bus. There's lots of great bus lines. They make it convenient so julie just so we can kind of get our bearings. Give me a quick thumbnail. Sketch of the three towns. Well going to what those starting with. That is a university town with a beautiful colonial central. San miguel day in day is a very laid-back. Small town that also has a very rich history and at the is a medium sized city where you'll get a mix of a lot of different things some business and a beautiful centro also plays really worth visiting julia. If you had to do your sightseeing before you started your actual bake ation. We'll be on your list. What are the top two or three things you gotta see in this town. Well i would start by wandering around the plazas and looking at all of the churches and baroque mansions throughout the central. One place worth visiting. Is the candidate that oh art museum. It's housed in an augustinian convent from the seventeenth century. So the building itself makes it worth a visit but they also have very interesting contemporary work by mexican artists other local artists. So i would definitely put that on my list in between to the market. The makoto crews would you find Artisanal things that come in from the countryside is at a farmers market. What would you be wondering through there. It's mostly a food marquette. And i really recommend visiting it because it gives you a very unique opportunity to wander through a really big bustling city market that again is not touristy at all so you're really getting a glimpse in mexican culture but you're not You know there's other people with their cameras out you feel like you're really getting an authentic experience there but it's also very clean and friendly and easy to navigate. It's not as overwhelming some of the big markets in mexico city say but it has a very similar atmosphere so i think it's a really cool place. I love visiting that. I mean in get at the dell in when you're there wandering through that market and just a little bit hungry. What are some of the regional. Specialties you look forward to trying well. One thing that is very typical of kenneth at o. Are gore dita's which is a big round. Corn cake flattened by hand. And then it's cooked on a griddle and it's usually stuffed with something like pork or she's no prickly pear cactus which is very popular to eat in whole area because the grow everywhere negro really the cactus pear do you call it Yeah and it's called the in mexico tuna. Yes and when you see tune on the menu. It's does not. Tuna fish actually refers to prickly pear fruit. Which is very popular especially in this region because these Cactuses grow everywhere. Wild

Mexico City Moon Guidebook Julia Joins De Guanajuato San Miguel Mexico Kenneth Julie Julia Dell Gore
Unlocking the Black Box of Pricing: Why Pricing is So Easy in Theory but Not in Real Life with Alessandro Monti

Impact Pricing

04:34 min | 1 year ago

Unlocking the Black Box of Pricing: Why Pricing is So Easy in Theory but Not in Real Life with Alessandro Monti

"On march diving to his allesandro. Monte here are three things you wanna know about allesandro before we start. He is a professor for corporate management and organization at cologne business school. He's done stints at both s. Kp and wolters kluwer two companies. That i truly respect in rural the pricing and he went to uc. Berkeley as did i. Welcome alessandro i'm mark. Thanks for having me on the show. It's to be here they. How'd you get into pricing in the first place. Yeah we all have Have a story That we can tell and it's always interesting to know how we kind of entered into this adventure now. The first touch boy was of course during studies microeconomics on the train. Sort of a communist. Of course you get the standard pricing approach the supply and demand things there but the real id say management world touch point with pricing. Ause my first job which was at a skippy. and since then this s- topic while yeah caught my attention and all in topic. So that's that's the that's the story. So why do you stay. You're all in but why it's I think prices. In general. They i once i think once read wasn't article into quote woes welded the central hinges of the economy so the price at the end of the day clears markets. Price is something that you feel as a consumer immediately. it's sometimes pain and sometimes pleasure. So it has the behavioral component and yet. That's i think that's. That's what makes prices annual dealing with. I sing quite fascinating for me. At least so. I'll buy into the fact that it touches almost everything so it's so powerful and yet i love the fact that so few people understand it and which means that when we can advise them we can have huge impacts in their lives and their businesses. So definitely i that nice. So you got a phd in business history. I have never heard of that before. And then you went to work for escapee. How did a phd in business history. Help you in escapee while it helps out first of all from the let's say methodological perspective you know learning the same more scientific tools and techniques. So it really does help in then tackling all those pressing questions. that of course should be tackled from. Let's say a more profound way. Okay so i always go the fundamental way when it comes to pricing so it helps you know to to have the tools and techniques sort of this research perspective had so definitely helped while just on a side note when when i talked to my escape you partners because i actually did the phd wild being escapees. So they kind of allowed me on sabbatical end. When when i talk project say while hd and has a history component. Yeah i I i saw some some question marks there say well how does that now. Kind of translate into our everyday business and dan. I think at the end. The research the businesses. Phd helps you to understand. Probably the president and also get sort of a a hint on what will come eventually in the future and so is it a quantitative phd when you do business history. you're still doing a bunch of stats and quantitative research and things like that. Yeah while you can do both ways. You can approach both waist. Now what i did actually is i. I went into historical archives. So i really dig deep into the documents from the. Let's say early seventeenth century and had to research him and had to read them and had to understand how much let's say executive spec at that time decided on pricing pricing strategies. Of course you can do to quantitative approach. You need to have the data said so you need to have some numbers eventually for that period in history. It's already like a jackpot. Having documents at all so the point here was really to understand the decision making at that time. So it's a more qualitative. Approach the

Allesandro Cologne Business School Wolters Alessandro Berkeley DAN
Lothbury

London’s Best Office Spaces – The Links Between London’s Past and the Modern World

01:14 min | 1 year ago

Lothbury

"The name loath burri is believed to derive from the word burr or enclosed area belonging to low this or flow. This people was a family name that dates back to the seventeenth century. There is also evidence of a roman settlements at lowe's as remnants of deepest ten feeds found the streets more recently the iconic building at forty one life bray became an important piece city banking history. The story of fourteen loath prayed began in eighteen. Thirty three. when william roberts keith. Douglas gathered a group of business. Shit together. it consider founded joint stock bank in london. This entity evolved to become the national westminster not west by and the building became its head office. Eight hundred two nine thousand nine hundred.

Burri William Roberts Keith Lowe Joint Stock Bank National Westminster Douglas London
Thanks-myth-ing

Your Brain on Facts

05:25 min | 1 year ago

Thanks-myth-ing

"Most without equal for this recipe you will need one each skylark thrush quayle ortolan lapping. Golden plover partridge woodcock. -til guinea hen guinea fowl. Wild duck red pheasant. Wild goose boostered and fake pecker pluck and got the birds then stuff the smallest bird into the next smallest birds cavity and so on until you have one neutron star of bird meet paraphrased from seventeenth century cookbook and you thought her duck in was a new thing. My name's moxy. And this is your brain on facts. Two days after this episode drops. It is thanksgiving in the united states and the supporters at patriot. Dot com slash. Your brain on facts voted to go. Turkey talk today. So let's go through the myths and misconceptions by working our way through a painting an odd choice as this is an audio only medium. Certainly luckily we don't have to pick just one painting. Most paintings depicting the first thanksgiving in giant air quotes of sixteen twenty. One contain the same things about of puritan settlers dressed in austere black clothing. With bright metal buckles gathered around a table laden with food. Maybe the family patriarch is offering a prayer and a small group of native americans can be seen in the background. Maybe one or two in the foreground. If i were to show you jennie. Augusta browns combs. The first thanksgiving or the first thanksgiving by louise jerome farris painted within a year of each other in the early twentieth century. Incidentally you'd say oh. Yeah that was in my history book which year all of them probably. That's how we've been taught to think of historical thanksgiving's but we're not school kids anymore. So it's time to update that image paintings of the first thanksgiving referred to that feast in sixteen twenty one in plymouth massachusetts. What we actually know about the feast. Concretely is very limited. It mostly comes from a single letter. Written by a communist named edward winslow two hundred and twenty years later in eighteen forty one. His letter was published in chronicles. Of the pilgrim fathers by boston writer and publisher alexander young and it was young. Who called the gathering. The first thanksgiving even though the word thanksgiving doesn't appear anywhere in winslow's letter that feast wouldn't have been thanksgiving to the pilgrims. Puritans did observe thanksgiving days after fortunate events like a good harvest. The were religious observances. People spent the day in church often in silent prayer and they fasted rather than feasted. It's almost the polar opposite of the way we celebrate thanksgiving today. So that day wasn't thanksgiving and it wasn't even the first for a few reasons for starters. It didn't happen a second time. Let alone annually. So it can hardly be said to be the first of anything it would take more than two hundred years for an autumn. Feast referred to as thanksgiving too widely proliferate second. It wasn't the first meal shared by europeans and native americans in the new world. A reasonable drive from my home here in. Virginia is the berkeley plantation where a thanksgiving feast was held this one by the europeans alone. Three dozen settlers arrived in the chesapeake bay in sixteen nineteen on a ship. Captain by a man who had survived the winter of sixteen o nine in the jamestown colony a winter referred to as the starving time after a rough two and a half months at sea and another week on inland waterways. They finally arrived at berkeley hundred later called berkeley plantation on december fourth. They disembarked assembled a meal. From what shifts rations. They still had ham and wasters probably and said prayers of thanksgiving. It was declared that their arrival must be yearly and perpetually kept holy as a day of thanksgiving to almighty god end so it was for two whole years in march of sixteen twenty two. The poyton having noticed that the settlers weren't leaving and in fact were expanding their territory and kept trying to convert and civilize them attacked berkeley and other settlements killing over three hundred fair playboys if you ask historians in maine they'll tell you the first. Such meal happened not in sixteen twenty one in massachusetts but in sixteen. O seven in papa main. The popham colony barely lasted a year. Thanks to a fire in their storehouse during the particularly harsh winter and miscalculations like staying in a four right on the shore rather than moving inland where the forest could provide a windbreak. They arrived in the

Augusta Browns Combs Louise Jerome Farris Edward Winslow Alexander Young Guinea Berkeley Jennie Turkey Plymouth Winslow Massachusetts United States Boston Chesapeake Bay Jamestown Virginia Maine
Pirates of the Carolinas

Travel with Rick Steves

03:45 min | 1 year ago

Pirates of the Carolinas

"Let's start with some wild tales of historical characters from the coasts of North and south. Carolina. Terrence Zip key is brought to life thirteen notorious pirates in her book pirates of the Carolinas. She relates stories of ships weighted down with gold crews too drunk on rum to fight treacherous colonial officials, mutineers, privateers, and the sad end of the line for the pirates who got caught. White Barents thanks for joining us. Hi, thanks for having me. Give us some background on this. What was the golden age of piracy in the United States? Well, we really don't know how long piracy's been around It's been around at least twenty, five, hundred years they are, and there was an era during its hey day that was known as the golden age piracy, and that was the light seventeenth century to early eighteenth centuries and The United States it'd be colonial America. It was colonial. America. When they came over here and Interesting Carolina had a lot of the officials had partnerships with the pirates. We were sort of commerce poor place back then. So we actually welcomed pirates like blackbeard until they had the big crack down on piracy and that was the end of that. So is it kind of the fine line between a privateer and pirate? What's the difference? It was such a fine line rick and basically a little piece of paper because a lot of the pirates started out they were privateers. And they were involved in Queen Anne's war wars all over Europe and everything, and they were commissioned to attack enemy ships in order to get money to get booty to help fund the war and they split the money with the crown. So yes. So the the king or the governor would say you are licensed to attack ships as long as they're not our ships and you p half the booty, but you gotta give the rest to us. So we can fight war whatever right and so then imagine when the war is over and your navy is no longer needed. All these men I've ever known. There's no employment. You know it was a fine line anyway between privateer and pirate. So a lot of them just became officially pirates and they got to keep everything. Nice business model. So, now, what was the basic action? It was mostly ships going from Europe to the Americas or where did they get their best opportunities at that time? That was all these merchant ships that were doing these trade routes and so you could just sort of sit out there. It was just like fishing and just block them off. They weren't very well armed or anything they were slow because they were big heavy. Ships with a lot of merchandise onboard now also, and it really didn't matter. This is one of those falsehoods that people realize people thought pirates just want gold and pieces of eight. But the truth is that they wanted what they could sell when they got these merchant ships and they had all these realms of fine linens and silks and tobacco and rum, and all this was this was pay dirt so they would. Get this stuff, and then they would go to the next port and just like you see when you travel a lot people stealing stuff off of ships and setting up a little stand and selling a cheap absolutely, and that's what they did like a lot more in partnership with the authorities here and so when they came into port and all that they would look the other way and then they would get A. Cut for looking the other way and the merchants would get discounted goods. The pilots would get money I mean everybody was happy sounds like a win win win lose situation I'm rick this is travel with Rick Steves speaking with Zip in her books called pirates of the Carolinas. We always think pirates of the Caribbean and your book is pirates of the Carolinas. Why was there so much pirate action and the Carolina? coast. Well at that time, these were pretty poor state. So we needed to get commerce wherever we could. So pirates were good for business. So we saw there were a safe haven for pirate in fact, blackbeard who was one of the probably the biggest chapter discussed in this book, he actually set up shop actually made a home and actually came part of the community and all up and north. Carolina. No,

Terrence Zip United States White Barents Carolina Carolinas Queen Anne Europe Rick Navy Americas Rick Steves Caribbean
Pirates Of The Carolinas

Travel with Rick Steves

04:31 min | 1 year ago

Pirates Of The Carolinas

"When I asked a couple of my friends from Ireland to join us on the show to talk about their country's legends of fairies and benches and things that go bump in the night. They were a little reluctant at first I thought it was because they didn't want to appear superstitious or maybe out of date. And that's what they wanted me to believe. But I wonder if they weren't just a little afraid. Coming up today on travel with Rick Steves we hear how the Irish comedy tells they grew up with very folk lurking in their surroundings in their testing their luck right now by making an exception to talk openly about it with us. We'll also explore San Francisco's legends of Ghost sightings from Al Capone on Alcatraz to a grieving mother who still wonders Golden Gate Park? Let's start with some wild tales of historical characters from the coasts of North and south. Carolina. Terrence Zip key is brought to life thirteen notorious pirates in her book pirates of the Carolinas. She relates stories of ships weighted down with gold crews too drunk on rum to fight treacherous colonial officials, mutineers, privateers, and the sad end of the line for the pirates who got caught. White Barents thanks for joining us. Hi, thanks for having me. Give us some background on this. What was the golden age of piracy in the United States? Well, we really don't know how long piracy's been around It's been around at least twenty, five, hundred years they are, and there was an era during its hey day that was known as the golden age piracy, and that was the light seventeenth century to early eighteenth centuries and The United States it'd be colonial America. It was colonial. America. When they came over here and Interesting Carolina had a lot of the officials had partnerships with the pirates. We were sort of commerce poor place back then. So we actually welcomed pirates like blackbeard until they had the big crack down on piracy and that was the end of that. So is it kind of the fine line between a privateer and pirate? What's the difference? It was such a fine line rick and basically a little piece of paper because a lot of the pirates started out they were privateers. And they were involved in Queen Anne's war wars all over Europe and everything, and they were commissioned to attack enemy ships in order to get money to get booty to help fund the war and they split the money with the crown. So yes. So the the king or the governor would say you are licensed to attack ships as long as they're not our ships and you p half the booty, but you gotta give the rest to us. So we can fight war whatever right and so then imagine when the war is over and your navy is no longer needed. All these men I've ever known. There's no employment. You know it was a fine line anyway between privateer and pirate. So a lot of them just became officially pirates and they got to keep everything. Nice business model. So, now, what was the basic action? It was mostly ships going from Europe to the Americas or where did they get their best opportunities at that time? That was all these merchant ships that were doing these trade routes and so you could just sort of sit out there. It was just like fishing and just block them off. They weren't very well armed or anything they were slow because they were big heavy. Ships with a lot of merchandise onboard now also, and it really didn't matter. This is one of those falsehoods that people realize people thought pirates just want gold and pieces of eight. But the truth is that they wanted what they could sell when they got these merchant ships and they had all these realms of fine linens and silks and tobacco and rum, and all this was this was pay dirt so they would. Get this stuff, and then they would go to the next port and just like you see when you travel a lot people stealing stuff off of ships and setting up a little stand and selling a cheap absolutely, and that's what they did like a lot more in partnership with the authorities here and so when they came into port and all that they would look the other way and then they would get A. Cut for looking the other way and the merchants would get discounted goods. The pilots would get money I mean everybody was happy sounds like a win win win lose situation I'm rick this is travel with Rick Steves speaking with Zip in her books called pirates of the Carolinas. We always think pirates of the Caribbean and your book is pirates of the Carolinas. Why was there so much pirate action and the Carolina? coast. Well at that time, these were pretty poor state. So we needed to get commerce wherever we could. So pirates were good for business. So we saw there were a safe haven for pirate in fact, blackbeard who was one of the probably the biggest chapter discussed in this book, he actually set up shop actually made a home and actually came part of the community and all up and north. Carolina.

Terrence Zip America White Barents Rick Steves Carolina Carolinas Al Capone Golden Gate Park Ireland San Francisco Queen Anne Europe Rick Navy Americas Caribbean
Interview With Sudip Parikh

After The Fact

05:58 min | 1 year ago

Interview With Sudip Parikh

"There was a there was a point in my life where I could spend six months a pulling together experiments. To answer a question and this six months would be drudgery, but there was a moment of discovery even if it was a small discovery that really made all of that worthwhile and I really enjoyed it and I, became an expert in one molecule that is inside of the human body and at some point in my career I I really wanted to expand beyond that one molecule. And it's a very important. It's a very molecule year so. I'm happy to talk about it but but. What I found is that I really enjoy this place where the science meets. Meets the rest of the world. because. One of the things that I've seen over time is that science itself is beautiful. But when you can take that beautiful science that inspires all and then have it become part of the world at large, it makes a gigantic difference in many more people's lives and I found that rewarding. And that that notion that scientists. Beautiful. That's a lovely way to say it. And interact with society should seem obvious right I mean on a U. N. I R- talking via the Internet we aww take medicines we're in the middle of an incredible. Science is all around us yet we sort of feel at least the need to point out that this connection that we have to talk about this connection with science and society when it seems obvious why isn't it obvious to some people? Yeah. I think to some degree success has. Has has been our worst enemy right because success means that you don't see some of the sausage getting made that maybe used to see. and. What you really see is. Instead of you know talking about the Internet, you don't see the mess behind it. You see these wonderful sleek user interfaces that anyone can use, and it creates a separation between the science itself and the end user of that science and much the same way that in the nineteen seventies and eighties we to complain that children didn't know where their food came from. That separation that that takes science and puts it in somehow separate from from the rest of things, and it's not how do you personally and the organization fulfilled this notion of trying to help people better understand this connection? Yeah. For AAA yes. That has become building trust and relationships with influencers in our community, and so I can I can walk you through some examples of that. The triple as sponsors fellowships for scientists who are working in labs to work in policy settings. So to work in Congress to work in the executive branch and to bring their scientific thinking and their scientific experience into that policy realm. because. They're trying to build relationships with people that are that are making policy. We also have programs like that for journalists. So we have scientists who work in newsrooms and very importantly at local papers in smaller cities around the country and local TV stations around the around the country because that is where people get their information, you have to build trust with those influencers. We also have a program for seminary. INS. So that might not be the most intuitive thing, but it turns out that if you build trust early with. With seminarians of with people of faith. Even when there's disagreement, there's a level of trust in a relationship that you can build on. Later when it becomes important to build on it, you have to build that trust beforehand not. Not when you need it right and so that's what AAA tries to build those bridges with with the influencers our society. Let's talk though about trust Pew Research Center polling shows that. The public trust and scientists is perhaps not as high as we would have expected it to be what what do you attribute that to I mean you're working to improve it. So why is it where it is? Yeah. Science when we're when we're when we hold a mirror to ourselves the scientists. We have made mistakes, right? You have to look backwards a little bit and say, what are what God us to where we are today and if you are. If you're from the black community you know about to ski and the ethical violations that took place in that human subjects research you know about eugenics. About. Some of the. Some of the areas where science has had challenges with itself as as society has and so we have to we have to be able to hold up that mirror to ourselves. Say It's not that science science as a human endeavour. Fallible. and. So we have to make sure that we are building a human interactions of human trust points. So that people realize that the person they're talking to the scientist, but they're also a member community. And that member of their community has the same wishes and hopes for their children as they do. That they're going about it in a way of looking at research looking at evidence to try to answer questions to guide individual decision-making, and they're willing to share that with me a trusted person in the community, and that has eroded over time as as science has become much more removed from the everyday practical. In the seventeenth century. If you wanted to be a scientist, you could be a scientist. You a everything that was known could be found in encyclopedia type. Type of book. It's not possible today, and so when now sciences removed because the necessity of speaking with precision creates jargon in jargon takes a completely out of the realm of of the late public, and so it becomes a special skill set to be able to break out of the audience of scientists and break into the audience of the interested. Of the allies of scientists of the general public, and that becomes a skill set all its own

Scientist Pew Research Center Congress Executive
Having the Last Word

Your Brain on Facts

04:59 min | 1 year ago

Having the Last Word

"I am about to or I am going to die either expression is correct. These were the last words of seventeenth century, French, Jesuit, priest grammarian, and man after my own Heart Dominique Boehner. Narrowly, edged out by eighteenth century French Aristocrat who declared I see you have made three spelling mistakes. As. He read over his own death warrant. We assign a lot of significance to last words hoping that we'll leave some deep philosophical epitaph or something funny like what's this button do? But you may end up with last words like American author, Henry David Thoreau who simply said Moose. Indian. My Name's Moxy and this is your brain on facts. Many people think Irish playwright and poet Oscar Wilde's last words were either this wallpaper goes or I do. That would be typical wild but there are two small factual inaccuracies in this retelling. The actual quote is this wallpaper and I are a duel to the death either it goes or I do. And he said that a few weeks before he died. Oscar Wilde's actual last words were a mumbled prayer. He did also say toward the end of his life as he lay in bed sipping champagne I am dying beyond my means. With about a third of the world being Christian it's not surprising that God gets mentioned a fair amount. As the clock was winding down for one of the baddest. Of Golden Age Hollywood Cancer Stricken Joan Crawford her housekeeper began to pray aloud at her bedside. Crawford summoned her remaining strength and said, don't you dare ask God to help me. A priest was at the bedside of Francois Marie Oh, Rhett the philosopher firebrand known as will tear. The priest implored him to renounce the devil voltaire considered his advice but decided this is no time to be making new enemies. German romantic behind took a different view as he lay dying of tertiary syphilis. God will forgive me. He said that's his job. A quick tangent while the dead have been in our collective fears and folklore since the caveman days, our modern interpretation of Sambas is strongly influenced by the ravages syphilis. Its Body count his paltry when compared with things like the black death. But the five million people at killed in the Fifteenth Century alone definitely qualify for epidemic status. Syphilis comes in distinct stages. Primary Syphilis is characterized by painless sores on the genitals or mouth, which typically heal on their own. The second stage usually presents with a rash and fever. These resolve and the disease enters the latent stage which can last for years. You're not infectious in the latent stage, but the bacteria may still be damaging your heart bones, nerves, and brain. People would think they were no longer sick which was just as well since there was no cure anyway. Tertiary Syphilis the third stage. The skin may be covered by growths that break down into lesions that spread unchecked. The disease can away bone and caused tremendous pain. Sufferers could also experience numbness and difficulty with motor functions, vision problems leading to blindness and dementia. which combined left people shambling down cobblestone streets with their faces routing off. If you bumped into such a person under a ready gas lamp on a cold Monday night, you'd probably be willing to believe they were a corpse who had gotten elusive. It's grave. Will Save, the debate for the spread of syphilis whether it started in North America or Europe for another day. We have these last words because someone was there here in record them. Sadly, that wasn't the case with Albert. Einstein one of the greatest scientific minds in history. He was not alone in the room when he passed away but he understandably spoke his final words in his mother tongue and the nurse that was attending him didn't speak German. Perhaps his final wish was something along the lines of don't let anyone steal my brain and keep it in their desk for years. As, you can probably guess that is what happened but that is also a topic will cover on another show. Many people can feel the end is near and leave prophetic pronouncements behind. Reputed Future Sier and tabloid staple. nostradamus correctly forecast tomorrow when the sunrises, I shall no longer be here. Similarly. The Godfather of Soul James Brown said, I'm going away tonight. Less

Syphilis Oscar Wilde Dominique Boehner Joan Crawford Henry David Thoreau Einstein Francois Marie Oh Sambas James Brown Sufferers Albert Rhett North America Dementia. Europe
know your rights before you talk to the police

Sword and Scale

04:52 min | 1 year ago

know your rights before you talk to the police

"The criminal justice. System. It's a pretty elegant thing crafted over centuries of refinement. You know some people don't even realize that our system of law and justice predates the birth of this country. By centuries. When settlers came to America, they brought English common law with them. And although there have been modifications and additions to that system, the basic structure remained. Things like precedent, which is the basic concept of relying on previously decided cases and using those established guidelines traditions. If, you've ever heard to lawyers argue they'll say things like Miranda, the Arizona. That's a reference to a prior already decided case that instructs the judge on how to rule on the case before the. It's up to the judge to weigh all the various arguments for a fair decision. And if there's clear precedent than the judge will usually rely on that previous ruling. Otherwise, he may decide to go the opposite way and in doing. So create new law and set a new precedent. That's often not the case and doing so could lead to an appeal and a reversal from a higher court. Anyway. This is starting to turn into a civics lesson, but it's funny just how many normal everyday citizens don't even know the basics of how our system of laws and justice works. It's really quite something. Even before the English, modernized in the seventeenth century, the roots of law date all the way back to Greek and Roman civilizations. In Ancient Greece if you killed somebody, their family had the right to kill you. At the end of the seventh century BC a man named Drako. The first legislator of Athens wrote a series of laws regarding intentional and unintentional homicide. The punishment for most of these cases was death. That's where the term draconian laws comes from. It refers to the overly harsh antiquated punishment for a crime. Thankfully since then we've made a lot of modifications to the law and our Constitution reflects the society that puts the rights of the individual before the needs of the state. For example. That case I mentioned a minute ago Maranda v Arizona. Well, that's the case where the concept of Miranda rights originated. We'll talk more about that later. But for now, all you need to know is that you should never talk to cops. They're not there to help you or be your friend. They're not looking out for your best interests when you're sitting in that hard cold chair of their eight by eight foot interrogation room. Oh. And before you start constructing your angry emails, I don't care if your husband or father best friend is a cop. I'm not saying all cops are bad. So calm your outrage. I'm giving you good solid life advice based on years of experience with cases like this. When you find yourself across from a COP whose? Questions about a crime. The only thing they're trying to do at that point is to get you to slip up so they can put you in jail. That is after all their job pudding criminals in jail. So, if you did something, don't talk to cops. If you didn't do something. Don't talk to cops just say it with me folks. Don't talk to cops. Ask for a lawyer at follow their advice. Or you may find yourself in the same predicament. That William hurt that. Jones statistically talking earlier. Wouldn't the information you'll and make sure we know who we're talking to. We can this all the time. Give me your personal. Legal name is middle. Name Jeffrey. J.. or You. Anyway. Evansville Indiana is sometimes referred to as Kentuckiana. The EVANSVILLE metropolitan area includes counties in both Kentucky and Indiana Google Map it's confusing. It is however a great example of Gerrymandering. Evansville directly borders one section of the Ohio River. In the summer of two, thousand, twelve, eighteen year old William hurt an Evansville. Native had just found himself in that cold ugly interrogation room. He was talking to Kentucky State Police officers about his alleged involvement in a suspected murderer.

COP Evansville Arizona William America Miranda Greece Athens Kentucky State Police Ohio River Indiana BC Kentucky Jones Kentuckiana Jeffrey
"seventeenth century" Discussed on AP News

AP News

02:54 min | 2 years ago

"seventeenth century" Discussed on AP News

"The sister ship of the famed seventeenth century Swedish warship sunk on its maiden voyage Swedish archeologist Jim Henson says divers found the vessel on Tuesday in an area with several ships and known to be at the bottom of the sea it includes applet sister ship of the Vaasa which sank in sixteen twenty eight and was raised in nineteen sixty one and now has its own museum German exports rose unexpectedly in September feeling speculation that Europe's biggest economy may avoid sliding into a shallow recession Germany's statistics agency the status said exports rose by a monthly one and a half percent in September way ahead of market for cost for north point three percent increase services companies and the jobs market have held up well in Germany but the industrial sector led by autos and factory machinery I've seen a decline in activity the trade dispute between the US and China along with uncertainty about Britain's departure from the European Union have been major factors in the German export market French actress Catherine Deneuve has had a mild stroke while filming her latest movie the seventy six year old and nerves suffered a very limited and therefore reversible stroke according to a statement released by the family dinner was hospitalized in Paris but the family didn't say which hospital no details were given on when she had the stroke the French media reported that it happened late Tuesday or early Wednesday do nervous been filming disowned evil or in one's lifetime the story of a mother who loses his son to cancer with her long blonde hair heavy eye lids and sold to stern Oscar nominated dinner first came to prominence inject condemned these and nineteen sixty four musical the umbrellas of ship Aug it was arguably her prize winning ten in the nineteen sixty seven film Belle DU jour for which she may be best remembered transcript ascribed trade I'm to a wider than a P. newsman in transcripts released today by the impeachment enquiring armor colonel Alexander been been told the committee is there was no ambiguity president trump's deal with Ukraine was a straight out trade an oval office visit in exchange for a public investigation into Joe Biden and his son trump says the inquire re hasn't heard and put in no cases of I've been hurt in no case is that I see have I been hurt trump's lawyer say they'll ask the Supreme Court next week to hear an appeal of lower court rulings allowing New York state prosecutors to obtain his tax records as part of a criminal investigation Iowa's court of appeals rules against Benjamin Shriver serving life for beating a man to death in nineteen ninety seven he claimed he fulfilled his life sentence after dying five times during a health emergency the appeals court upheld a lower court ruling saying Schreiber's either live in which case he must remain in prison or he is dead in which case this appeal.

seventy six year three percent
"seventeenth century" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

02:14 min | 2 years ago

"seventeenth century" Discussed on KTOK

"Do you remember pensions so if you have a but they're pretty much gone now so and so many people are struggling today to find a way to know absolutely know that they will have income as long as they live and having these billion dollar companies willing to guarantee you a lifetime income provides a lot of comfort a lot of relief. and a lot of peace of mind for my clients. but back to the sim Talib have you heard the term black swan event. that term is what he calls these events that are rare and unpredictable. the term refers to a seventeenth century idea. Intel the sixteen hundreds it was an accepted truth that all swans are white in fact all swans are white have been used for a long time as the standard example of a scientific truth the equivalent today might be the earth rotates around the sun today would call that an undisputed all scientific truth. so what were the odds of seeing a black swan at that time. well impossible to calculate but considered impossible Intel sixty ninety seven when explores found black swans in Australia imagine that they had a black swan event finding blacks ones in Australia when that was considered impossible. as I mentioned earlier we had a black swan event in two thousand one didn't way. and we're having many others these days. if you live in the Oklahoma City area like I do you know all about the earthquakes the other day I think we had five in one day and there's volcanoes and not here but elsewhere terrorist strikes as you know and so on the chances of blacks want events today seem much higher than just a decade or two ago and yet many people continue to invest as though the twenty five year bull market of nineteen eighty two to two thousand seven is in full force again and will continue forever with no significant blacks one events along the way. doesn't that seem a bit odd..

Intel Australia Oklahoma City twenty five year billion dollar one day
"seventeenth century" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

02:14 min | 2 years ago

"seventeenth century" Discussed on KTOK

"Do you remember pensions so if you have a but they're pretty much gone now so so many people are struggling today to find a way to know absolutely know that they will have income as long as they live and having these billion dollar companies willing to guarantee you a lifetime income provides a lot of comfort a lot of relief. and a lot of peace of mind for my clients. but back to the same Talib have you heard the term black swan event. that term is what he calls these events that are rare and unpredictable. the term refers to a seventeenth century idea. Intel the sixteen hundreds it wasn't accepted truth that all swans are white in fact also ones are white have been used for a long time as the standard example of a scientific truth the equivalent today might be the earth rotates around the sun today would call that an undisputed all scientific truth. so what were the odds of seeing a black swan at that time. well impossible to calculate but considered impossible Intel sixty ninety seven when explores found black swans in Australia imagine that they had a black swan event finding blacks ones in Australia when that was considered impossible. as I mentioned earlier we had a black swan event in two thousand one didn't work. and we're having many others these days. if you live in the Oklahoma City area like I do you know all about the earthquakes the other day I think we had five in one day and there's volcanoes and not here but elsewhere terrorist strikes as you know and so on the chances of blacks want events today seem much higher than just a decade or two ago and yet many people continue to invest as though the twenty five year bull market of nineteen eighty two to two thousand seven is in full force again and will continue forever with no significant blacks one events along the way. doesn't that seem a bit odd..

Intel Australia Talib Oklahoma City twenty five year billion dollar one day
"seventeenth century" Discussed on Hijacking History

Hijacking History

08:08 min | 2 years ago

"seventeenth century" Discussed on Hijacking History

"Today we look at another important component of the first unit of our course the age each of absolutism with the Scientific Revolution Scientific Revolution was important not just for specific discoveries but for its new view view of how we come to know what is true we see this with astronomy by looking at the medieval view of the solar system in contrast to the view of the seventeenth century scientific revolution which resulted from the discoveries of Nicholas Copernicus this in fifteen forty three the medieval view of the solar system place the Earth at the center of everything an object that cannot Hannah move but around which everything else moves including the sun the Planets and the stars this view resulted from the notion that science was supposed to bow to theology on any questions including questions about the natural world that science should rely on sense impressions the impressions of our senses and a respect for Christian thought we do not feel the earth move but we see the sun rise and set therefore we told ourselves until the seventeenth century entry that the earth is fixed and that the sun is in motion and where else would God place his highest creation man but at the center of everything the Christian Church endorsed this comforting view well of course the seventeenth century discovered that this was all completely wrong and that neither our senses nor the Bible can lead us anywhere close to the scientific truth. Move it turns out that the earth occupies a nowhere corner of the universe and moves just the same and for the same reasons caissons as the moon and the planets around the sun but how can this sinful Earth Act like the heavenly bodies moving on its own it turns out that the earth moves for the same reason the so called heavenly bodies move because of something entirely Charlie natural namely the gravitational pull on it by the sun which whips the earth around the sun in one complete orbit every three hundred sixty five days more importantly this must be only one of an endless number of other laws of nature which are mathematically perfect and can be no must be discoverable entirely with our reason an intellect not with references to anything in a supernatural book like the Bible furthermore reason requires wires freedom to work. Its magic without the freedom to experiment. How are we to discover the laws of nature but the institution addition of the Church was not going to permit this freedom because it was leading to theories that contradicted the church's view of what the universe looked like science would have to be separated from theology and that would require revolutions of a political kind as I indicated capron. ICUS was the first to describe the modern view of the solar system in fifteen forty three but nobody believed him because he could not come up with the mathematical equation for gravity. He was also not willing to come out. Ah published his views in a positive way where he would say. I have no doubt that this is true because he knew that the church. Condemn him and he might be killed for presenting his views so he expressed considerable doubt about his certainty. Even though that doubt was really just a cover to protect his life a layer scientists in the early seventeenth century Galileo discovered moons orbiting the planet Jupiter he was the first scientist to use a telescope but Galileo L. could not prove that there was a law of nature explain this motion because he could not calculate it even though it turned out that it it was something that could be calculated mathematically it would remain to Isaac Newton at the end of the seventeenth century to discover the mathematical equation demonstrating without a doubt that there was a law of nature called gravity and that things can move on on their own or really not on their own but as a result of a natural law the reason why Galileo's discoveries were important is because if a moon orbited an object that was presumed to go around the earth in the old medieval sense that moons go around other objects and so our Earth must be one of those objects nothing special in the universe Galileo was threatened with torture for this point of view so he wisely did not publish but by the end of the seventeenth century Isaac of new not only published his theory in sixteen eighty seven but he convinced everyone of its correctness because you could no longer doubt it since he had discovered the mathematical proof behind it. Newton was thought to be the last word on this question. And he seemed to create the image of a world or a universe. I should say that was well. Ordered perfect that was mathematically describable and that could be understood only with the use of human reason the significance of these scientific theories can be summed up in this matter. If you had lived in the early seventeenth century you would live at a time when people still believed in witches. These people still believed that comets were portents from the supernatural world but if you lived at the end of the seventeenth century at the time of Isaac Newton you knew that comets were simply pieces of ice in the solar system moving about because because of gravity and you knew that supernatural things like witches could not exist in other words from a scientific point of view. If you had lived lived at the end of the seventeenth century you would be thinking in a modern way about science but if you lived in the early seventeenth century you would have a medieval move view of the world around you in your five hundred word essay find something that Isaac Newton is important for something something that Isaac Newton discovered or some method he used that marks him as a modern scientist or or if you don't want to talk about Newton find something that was not described here that Galileo discovered that also marks him as a modern scientist and only one thing you need only talk about one thing that you found it was not discussed here and the rest of your fifty to seventy five words on the scientific revolution and how it fits in the age of absolutism can be based on what you learnt in this case for now happy historic..

Isaac Newton Galileo L. Bible scientist Nicholas Copernicus Charlie Christian Church Hannah three hundred sixty five days
"seventeenth century" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

02:12 min | 2 years ago

"seventeenth century" Discussed on KTOK

"Dear remember pensions, some of you have them, but they're pretty much gone now. So, so many people are struggling today to find a way to know. Absolutely no that they will have income as long as they live. And having these billion dollar companies willing to guarantee you a lifetime income provides a lot of comfort a lot of relief. And a lot of peace of mind for my clients, but back to the sim Talib. Have you heard the term black swan event that term is what he calls these events that are rare and unpredictable. The term refers to seventeenth century idea. And tell the sixteen hundreds. It was an accepted truth, that all swans are white and fact, also wants are white Ed been used for long time as the standard example of a scientific Ruth, the equivalent today might be the earth rotates around the sun today. We'd call that an undisputable scientific truth. So what were the odds of seeing a black swan at that time well impossible to calculate, but considered impossible until sixteen ninety seven when explorers found black swans and Australia? Imagine that they had a black swan event, finding black swans and Australia when that was considered impossible, as I mentioned earlier, we had a black swan event in two thousand one didn't we? And we're having many others these days. If you live in the Oklahoma City area like I do you know all about the earthquakes the other day, I think we had five and one day. And there's volcanoes not here. But elsewhere terrorist strikes as you know. And so on the chances of black swan events today seem much higher than just a decade or two ago. And yet, many people continue to invest as though the twenty five year bull market of nineteen eighty two to two thousand seven is in full force, again, and we'll continue forever with no significant black swan events.

Australia Oklahoma City twenty five year billion dollar one day
"seventeenth century" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

02:18 min | 2 years ago

"seventeenth century" Discussed on KTOK

"These large companies provide many guarantees de remember pensions, the some of you have them, but they're pretty much gone now, so, so many people are struggling today to find a way to know. Absolutely. No that they will have income as long as they live. And having these billion dollar companies willing to guarantee you a lifetime income provides a lot of comfort a lot of relief. And a lot of peace of mind for my clients. But back to the sim Taliban, have you heard the term black swan event that term is what he calls these events that are rare and unpredictable. The term refers to seventeenth century idea. And tell the sixteen hundreds, it wasn't accepted truth, that all swans are white and fact, also are white had been used for a long time as the standard example of a scientific truth, the equivalent today might be the earth rotates around the sun today. We'd call that an undisputable scientific truth. So what were the odds of seeing a black swan at that time well impossible to calculate, but considered impossible until sixteen ninety seven when explorers found black swans, Australia, imagine that they had a black swan event, finding black swans and Australia when that was considered impossible, as I mentioned earlier, we had a black swan event in two thousand one didn't we? And we're having many others these days. If you live in the Oklahoma City area like I do you know all about the earthquakes the other day, I think we had five and one day. And there's volcanoes not here. But elsewhere terrorist strikes as you know. And so on the chances of black swan events today seem much higher than just a decade or two ago. And yet, many people continue to invest as though the twenty five year bull market of nineteen eighty two to two thousand seven is in full force, again, and we'll continue forever with no significant black swan.

Australia sim Taliban Oklahoma City twenty five year billion dollar one day
"seventeenth century" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

04:10 min | 2 years ago

"seventeenth century" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"Was appropriate. Good. Anyway, this skip. This is a great line ready. Everybody trumpet fanfare for a great line from the seventeenth century. Yeah. How to be even when he was eleven. Heritage is if only if one only wished to be happy, this could be easily accomplished. But we wish to be happier than other people at this is always difficult. I know that there's more I just wanted you to enjoy that. I just came across the living, martyr found that actually and it's brilliant. It is up there with great Helen to Licken line, which will give to you in a moment. But so then I'll I'm gonna give you the rest of his line, but I'm going to start it again. If one only wish to be happy, this could be easily accomplished, but we wish to be happier than other people. And this is always difficult for we believe others to be happier than they are. That if you. That is hilarious. I have to give triple g credit for saying something truly hilarious. Helen foolish stole it from. Jokes. That's right at she didn't even site him. Oh, G. Oh, G, double obation point. Bella Tillis giving the is the late mother of my, dear dear friend, since high school Joseph to listen and we were in her kitchen in her home and Brooklyn talking about other kids in our class. And she overheard the conversation we're talking about. I don't know. I guess we talk about who we felt was happy or unhappy. And she closed the refrigerator door. And she said boys, tell you something. The only happy people, I know people, I don't know. Well. Stay with me my whole life. It was it was, obviously a brilliant wise, comment, and it perfectly follows the multi the comment I think it's great people don't want to be happy. They wanna be happy in the tech sky. And they think the next guy is happier that he really. Great so great. This is why let me tell you this is why wisdom is so important both assert for morality morality doesn't work without wisdom. Good intentions, mean nothing. You need wisdom and the same thing with the rest of life. Because if you really understand this, I realized that a very young age that suffering is part of the human condition. It. I never assumed that life could be lived without pain. It never I it was great. It was it was a great help in my life because every day, hey, we got the give me, Sean. Give me if nothing's horrific life is terrific. 'cause I realized this at a very early age. Nothing horrific. That Prager came up with that. It's not for months. Give and my first name is much simpler than his Dennis. It. Yep..

Helen foolish Sean Bella Tillis G. Oh Prager Brooklyn Licken Joseph
"seventeenth century" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

02:19 min | 2 years ago

"seventeenth century" Discussed on KTOK

"Seven two three three these large companies provide many guarantees dear remember pensions. Some of you have them, but they're pretty much gone now. So so many people are struggling today to find a way to know. Absolutely. No that they will have income as long as they live and having these billion dollar companies willing to guarantee you a lifetime income provides a lot of comfort a lot of relief. And a lot of peace of mind for my clients. But back in the sim Talim have you heard the term black swan event that term is what he calls these events that are rare and unpredictable. The term refers to seventeenth century idea. And tell the sixteen hundreds it wasn't accepted truth that all swans are white. And fact also wants are white had been used for longtime as the standard example of scientific truth. The equivalent today might be the earth rotates around the sun today, we'd call that undisputable scientific truth. So what were the odds of seeing? A black swan at that time well impossible to calculate but considered impossible until sixteen ninety seven when explorers found black swans Australia. Imagine that they had a black swan event finding black swans Austrailia when that was considered impossible as I mentioned earlier, we had a black swan event in two thousand one didn't we and we're having many others these days. If you live in the Oklahoma City area, like I do, you know, all about the earthquakes the other day. I think we had five and one day. And there's volcanoes not here, but elsewhere terrorist strikes, as you know, and so on the chances of black swan events today seem much higher than just a decade or two ago, and yet many people continue to invest as though the twenty five year bull market of nineteen eighty two to two thousand seven is in full force again, and we'll continue forever with no significant black swan.

Austrailia Oklahoma City twenty five year billion dollar one day
"seventeenth century" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

02:30 min | 2 years ago

"seventeenth century" Discussed on KTOK

"These large companies provide many guarantees do. You remember pensions? The some of you have them, but they're pretty much gone now. So so many people are struggling today to find a way to know. Absolutely. No that they will have income as long as they live and having these billion dollar companies willing to guarantee you a lifetime income provides a lot of comfort a lot of relief. And a lot of peace of mind for my clients. But back in the sim Talim have you heard the term black swan event that term is what he calls these events that are rare and unpredictable. The term refers to seventeenth century idea. And tell the sixteen hundreds it wasn't accepted truth that all swans are white. In fact, also lawns are white had been used for a long time as the standard example of a scientific truth. The equivalent today might be the earth rotates around the sun today, we'd call that an undisputable scientific truth. So what were the odds of seeing? A black swan at that time well impossible to calculate but considered impossible until sixteen ninety seven when explorers found black swans and Australia. Imagine that they had a black swan event finding black swans in Australia when that was considered impossible as I mentioned earlier, we had a black swan event in two thousand one didn't we and we're having many others these days. If you live in the Oklahoma City area, like I do, you know, all about the earthquakes the other day. I think we had five in one day. And there's volcanoes not here, but elsewhere terrorist strikes, as you know, and so on the chances of black swan events today seem much higher than just a decade or two ago, and yet many people continue to invest as though the twenty five year bull market of nineteen eighty two to two thousand seven is in full force again, and we'll continue forever with no significant black swan events along the way. Doesn't that seem a bit odd? So just call eight seven seven five four eight safe. That's eight seven seven five four eight seven two three three..

Australia Oklahoma City twenty five year billion dollar one day
"seventeenth century" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

02:24 min | 3 years ago

"seventeenth century" Discussed on KTOK

"These large companies provide many guarantees do. You remember pensions? The some of you have them, but they're pretty much gone now. So so many people are struggling today to find a way to know. Absolutely. No that they will have income as long as they live and having these billion dollar companies willing to guarantee you a lifetime income provides a lot of comfort a lot of relief. And a lot of peace of mind for my clients, but back to the Taliban. Have you heard the term black swan event? That term is what he calls these events that are rare and unpredictable. The term refers to seventeenth century idea. And tell the sixteen hundreds it was an accepted truth that all swans are white. In fact, also lawns are white Ed been used for a long time as the standard example of a scientific truth. The equivalent today might be the earth rotates around the sun today, we'd call that an undisputable scientific truth. So what were the odds of seeing? A black swan at that time well impossible to calculate but considered impossible until sixteen ninety seven when explorers found black swans and Australia. Imagine that they had a black swan event finding black swans in Australia when that was considered impossible. As I mentioned earlier, we had a black swan event in two thousand one didn't we and we're having many others these days. If you live in the Oklahoma City area, like I do, you know, all about the earthquakes the other day. I think we had five and one day. And there's volcanoes not here, but elsewhere terrorist strikes, as you know, and so on the chances of black swan events today seem much higher than just a decade or two ago, and yet many people continue to invest as though the twenty five year bull market of nineteen eighty two to two thousand seven is in full force again, and we'll continue forever with no significant black swan events along the way. Doesn't that seem a bit odd? So let me ask you a question. How would.

Australia Taliban Oklahoma City twenty five year billion dollar one day
"seventeenth century" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

02:19 min | 3 years ago

"seventeenth century" Discussed on KTOK

"These large companies provide many guarantees do you remember pensions? Some of you have them, but they're pretty much gone now. So so many people are struggling today to find a way to know. Absolutely. No that they will have income as long as they live and having these billion dollar companies willing to guarantee you a lifetime income provides a lot of comfort a lot of relief. And a lot of peace of mind for my clients, but back in the Taliban. Have you heard the term black swan event that term is what he calls these events that are rare and unpredictable. The term refers to seventeenth century idea. And tell the sixteen hundreds it was an accepted truth that all swans are white. In fact, all swans are white Ed been used for a long time as the standard example of a scientific truth. The equivalent today might be the earth rotates around the sun today, we'd call that an undisputable scientific truth. So what were the odds of seeing? A black swan at that time well impossible to calculate but considered impossible until sixteen ninety seven when explorers found black swans and Australia. Imagine that they had a black swan event finding black swans in Australia when that was considered impossible. As I mentioned earlier, we had a black swan event in two thousand one didn't we and we're having many others these days. If you live in the Oklahoma City area, like I do, you know, all about the earthquakes the other day. I think we had five and one day. And there's volcanoes not here, but elsewhere terrorist strikes, as you know, and so on the chances of black swan events today seem much higher than just a decade or two ago, and yet many people continue to invest as though the twenty five year bull market of nineteen eighty two to two thousand seven is in full force again, and we'll continue forever with no significant black swan events along the way. Doesn't that seem a bit.

Australia Oklahoma City twenty five year billion dollar one day
"seventeenth century" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

02:19 min | 3 years ago

"seventeenth century" Discussed on KTOK

"These large companies provide many guarantees do. You remember pensions? The some of you have them, but they're pretty much gone now. So so many people are struggling today to find a way to know. Absolutely. No that they will have income as long as they live and having these billion dollar companies willing to guarantee you a lifetime income provides a lot of comfort a lot of relief. And a lot of peace of mind for my clients, but back to the Taliban. Have you heard the term black swan event? That term is what he calls these events that are rare and unpredictable. The term refers to seventeenth century idea. And tell the sixteen hundreds it wasn't accepted truth that all swans are white. In fact, also lawns are white have been used for a long time as the standard example of a scientific truth. The equivalent today might be the earth rotates around the sun today, we'd call that an undisputable scientific truth. So what were the odds of seeing? A black swan at that time well impossible to calculate but considered impossible until sixteen ninety seven when explorers found black swans and Australia. Imagine that they had a black swan event finding black swans in Australia when that was considered impossible. As I mentioned earlier, we had a black swan event in two thousand one didn't we and we're having many others these days. If you live in the Oklahoma City area, like I do, you know, all about the earthquakes the other day. I think we had five in one day. And there's volcanoes not here, but elsewhere terrorist strikes, as you know, and so on the chances of black swan events today seem much higher than just a decade or two ago, and yet many people continue to invest as though the twenty five year bull market of nineteen eighty two to two thousand seven is in full force again, and we'll continue forever with no significant black swan events along the way. Doesn't that seem a bit.

Australia Taliban Oklahoma City twenty five year billion dollar one day
"seventeenth century" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

04:57 min | 3 years ago

"seventeenth century" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

"February sixteenth and seventeenth century link fields events center big deal, Kris Kristofferson. So this guy didn't Ken Bellingham, some people got mightily upset because among many many things he wrote on some cookies, he's a Baker. And Edmonds he wrote build that wall. And some people got really upset hurt angry. He talked to joy Munson on car radio. I apologize. My apology was rejected. And so yesterday I had such an outpouring of support. I think people came out of the woodwork to come just to the bakery. I had two women drive from Spokane all the way just to buy something at the bakery. And we sold out we saw everything which never happened before. So there's that. What is nice? You feel good about that? Yeah. Apologize. Which of course, means his apology wasn't rejected at all. Dub rejected by some some people were saying. Ebeid a bang-up business out of this. This is now you're now you're reading ahead. Mike Lewis had because. He's UN apologies. First of all. Can you own apologize? Sure. To say, I'm sorry. I was sorry. But I was never sorry. So sorry. Sorry. Right. Okay. So he's sorry. Sorry. This is from q thirteen Bellingham says he's gotten a couple of letters calling the cookie races. But he also says he received thousands of orders for the build the wall cookie from across the country. Now, we are selling because people ask for them. No, I don't think it's racist. I think it's it's about border security Bellingham says he's never been busier says the post went viral, and he'll keep making the cookies as long as people want to buy them. But he has no plans to ship them across the country ought to want to get into all that, you know, I. I just want to be a Baker. But I want to have the right to to bake what I wanna do. But she's always had. Yeah. But let me ask you this. Like he doesn't want to build the fiber optic cable. Why that doesn't fit on the cookie right Bill? Okay. Do you think this guy is in the wrong for now capitalizing on his newfound, cookie fame? No, it's his business. Here's here's my question. How excited are we to live in a world where bakeries are now politicized? How excited are we have red and blue and democrat Republican business bakeries go to the supreme court? No. But. For the size. I remember something about. That. Yeah. Exactly. I remember that. But how how what those guys were forced into that? They were they were they were, you know. In what he should be doing right now is just thinking about like how this is all played out for him, which has been way more positive than negative one. What are absolutely? And maybe say, you know, that first person who posted that cookie picture. I. Oh them a little bit of a cut that actually was the thing that sort of like you blew this up in the best possible way for him. I once got a piece of hate mail on the radio under that a freak people out but ever got hate mail or any hosts, do you? Yeah. I know it's really weird. And I read it read it in dramatic fashion. And it went over really really people loved it. And then the person wrote me back saying I demand I listened to the ads before and after my letter, and I wanna cut set me and sent me an invoice for that. Ben and Jerry's they do their flavors based on political messaging all the time and people buy them or they don't at least Henze spice mix, which we talked about already. You know, the the the big spice coupley I've actually purchased quite a few of their spices. And weirdly enough. I'd miss this whole thing that their political the catalogs are pretty great. I will say that. And they do make really good spices. And they've been overtly political in their in their company newsletter. I man see I just hate politics. I hate it. No, you don't hate it. You talk about it all the time. I talk about it because it's important. Okay. Let me ask you this. Do you ever meet a cancer doc who says man, I love me some cancer? They love the journey to solve the problem of cancer. Right. So you're you're actually you're actually gonna solve the problem of politics. What are we doing research? Was unaware if we weren't I didn't put on my lab swear. I thought you were going to say you're not compare yourself to a brain surgeon. That's no, here's what I'm saying. The you know, what they love you said, they loved the cure. For the care. See what I love is the governance. And I love the ideas. And I love what politics could be if if we were actually functional right? But we're not functional. At least we've got this going for us. Nasa NASA is going to knock an asteroid out of orbit. And just so, you know, nothing can ever go wrong with this..

Mike Lewis Kris Kristofferson Baker Ken Bellingham Edmonds Spokane Bellingham NASA joy Munson Ebeid supreme court Bill Ben Jerry
"seventeenth century" Discussed on News Radio 1190 KEX

News Radio 1190 KEX

02:17 min | 3 years ago

"seventeenth century" Discussed on News Radio 1190 KEX

"It was a home built in the seventeenth century has Blenheim palace. Okay. Now, this point you're probably thinking, what is this a travel show? Okay. Come on back. This is where Sir Winston Churchill was born in eighteen seventy four. But now the palace has a robotic tour guide by the name of Betty, the five foot robot is programmed to greet visitors answer their questions take them on a tour of the grounds. And get this Betty will even take selfies with you, isn't that great and upload them to social media Betty was developed by scientists at Oxford's department of. Engineering science and palaces full of antiques. And so the staff has to make sure that Betty doesn't get too close to anything. Now Churchill once said to improve is to change to be perfect is to change often. There's a lot of change going on their palace. But that's not the only museum is trying to attract visitors. I mean, what about a basic robot when you can have a real robot was artificial intelligence based on the replica of a famous painter. And this painter has been dead for thirty years. Salvador Dali was a serious painter who died in one thousand nine hundred eighty nine at the age of eighty four. Well, now at the Dali museum in Saint Petersburg, Florida. They've just unveiled well a clone of the late artists that will interact with visitors. The replica was created with archival footage and it made its debut in a video called Dali. Liz on the museum's YouTube page is really something in this short video is really difficult to tell. But this is not a real person or one of the latest CGI effects used in movies, especially when it says, I do not believe in my death, do okay. It's obviously not his voice. But since the replica, we'll be able to speak with guests about dallies life current events the exhibit opens in April, and it's appropriate called Dali lives, art meets artificial intelligence. I mean, you should go to if you're in the area, it'll be fine. Don't dilly dally around. Bad. What I know. All right. Let's talk about your home because no.

Salvador Dali Blenheim palace Betty Dali museum Sir Winston Churchill YouTube Saint Petersburg Florida Liz Oxford thirty years five foot
"seventeenth century" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

Stuff To Blow Your Mind

01:56 min | 3 years ago

"seventeenth century" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

"All right. We're back. Now. One thing I wondered about is how long have people been reporting globs tres like how far back does the does the sun article about the beach blob go that's true. Because if certainly this would seem like the kind of thing that would have occurred throughout human history. Of course, it would. I mean, nothing like nothing that we know of change suddenly in the seventeenth century to make this stuff start happening. So let's take a look at old. Plenty of the elder is kind of a late appearance for planning usually shows up earlier in an episode. That's true. Yeah. Well, he's making a fashionable appearance. Okay. So plenty of the elder in his natural history. Is in a section talking about narrates, which are the sea nymphs or the ocean fairies or mermaids, and he writes about how the governor of goal once wrote a letter to Caesar Augustus reporting than a number of dead area. Dhs had washed up on shore. His territory and that they're quote mournful song. Moreover, wind dying has been heard a long way off by the coast Weller z- later, he writes, during the rule of Tiberius in an island off the coast of the province of Leone, the receding ocean tide left more than three hundred monsters at the same time of marvelous variety in size and an equal number on the coast of the saints, and among the rest elephants and Rams with only a white streak to resemble horns and also many near hits. And then later he writes about a couple of other monsters cashed cast ashore one story, quote, the skeleton of the monster twitching drama in the story was exposed was brought by Marcus scour us from the town of Jaffa in Judea and shown at Rome among the rest of the marvels during his his eat, I'll ship it was forty feet long. The height of the ribs exceeding the elephants of India and the spine being one foot. And six inches thick..

Caesar Augustus Dhs Marcus Rams Rome India forty feet six inches one foot