35 Burst results for "Seventeen Years"

Hope Vs. Despair

The Indicator from Planet Money

07:48 min | 5 d ago

Hope Vs. Despair

"Everyone Stacey Incarnate Cardiff here. This is indicator from planet money and it has been a while since stacey naive put on our holsters stared across from each other for a good old fashioned gunslinger and shootout. Right we know Cardiff. That these things are very hard on you so try not to make them frequently you know as it or not. I am talking like I'm in a Sergio Leone flick. So because we should always be talking like we're in a Sergio Leone movie. We need the music fistful of dollars, the DOODOO. Of. The US economy is in this very uncertain place right now, there's the election coming up Congress and the White House have not agreed on a new bill to provide aid and stimulus, and the economic indicators are pointing all kinds of different directions. Yes. So based on those indicators is the case for hope stronger or weaker than the case for despair. To end the show station high debate, we take sides and to decide which side we're flipping a coin flip out at the O. K. Corral, Dang right? Heads I. Make the case for hope and Stacey you are despairing and if it's tails, you get to be hopeful. So I'm hoping for hope. It's tails, which means you get to be hopeful I. Spring the despair. Oh, I'm so excited I. I'm excited to be the voice of hope Cardiff. I feel like I feel like there's a part of you. That's excited to be the voice of despair. AM I. Wrong. Little bit a little bit. So yeah US economy after the break the good the bad and the I guess in our case the Smug League own nice. Prepare to rush Garcia prepared to do Rashed it's happening. Support for this podcast and the following message come from. Google, from updating their hours to adding takeout and delivery information. Small businesses around the country are using free google tools to adapt learn how at Google dot com slash grow. Okay folks. I will be arguing the case for pessimism for despair about the US economy stacey is arguing the case for hope. Stacey. You get to draw I. Okay. Cardiff here it is the case for hope the US economy is coming back. Economists are forecasting that the economy rebounded very strongly in the third quarter of this year after a very terrible second quarter the official numbers for the third quarter have not been released yet. They come out next week, but it is possible that the economy was up to eight percent bigger than it was in the second quarter that is just enormous definitely for sure it would be A. Really strong number but let's remember that the third quarter included the month of July when the economy was still running on the stimulus provided by the cares act that was the big government spending bill that provided an extra six hundred dollars a week in unemployment benefits to people who are out of work but those extra benefits expired at the end of July. So the stimulus by now is probably wearing off and also we still have almost seven million more unemployed people in the country. Then back in February before the pandemic started and I'm really worried about them now that they're not getting that extra help. Yes, you are totally Right that the high unemployment rate has been absolutely crushing, but the reason for hope is that Cardiff this very great that you referred to has actually been falling. So remember the worst economic damage from the pandemic was in the early months of March and April since then the unemployment rate has fallen from about fifteen percent where it peaked down to about eight percent as the economy has recovered, that is a huge recovery in a pretty short amount of time. That's true for sure and a hopeful sign but we have to recall that not all unemployment is the same most of the people who've already gotten their jobs back only. Lost those jobs fairly recently, but the number of long-term unemployed people is actually still going up each month. These are people who lost their jobs more than half a year ago and they have not been rehired and the longer they go without a job. The more likely it is that they're gonNA, lose their contacts and lose their skill sets and really struggled to find work again. Later you make some fair points Cardiff and I would respond that if the economy keeps growing though eventually those jobs will come back and there is a really good reason for hope that the economy will, in fact keep growing and that is consumer confidence. In September consumer confidence shot up by the most it has in seventeen years, which means that people in the US are planning to keep spending money because they are optimistic about the economy. For example, the sheriff people who are planning to buy a major appliance like a refrigerator, a stove or something like that is the highest it's been in seven months, and all that spending is going to keep the economy growing. There we go. Cardiff Garcia mic drop I. Think we should just call it right now I have one because consumers can be wrong I. Mean just because you're planning to buy the latest oxo coffeemaker with that sleek. Thermal Carafe does that mean you actually will if suddenly the economy goes bad but I would also point to a big split in precisely what people are spending money on. So specifically, yes people are spending more and more money on goods for the home like furniture and electron ix. But consumers are still not spending much money on services on things like eating at restaurants on traveling, and that's a problem because for example, restaurants and hotels are a huge source of employment for low income workers. So I'm just worried about people who rely on those jobs coming back especially since remember again, those extra benefits for the unemployed already expired. Almost three months ago card. If I think you should go ahead and splurge and buy yourself fancy coffee Raffin. Here's why. So you keep mentioning that the benefits for unemployed workers have expired and that is true but it is also true that not all of the money from those benefits with spent right away. A lot of that money was saved plus people who kept their jobs have also saved more money since the pandemic started because all the business lockdowns meant there were fewer opportunities to spend their money and you know people were maybe hunkering down a little bit too and what this means that a lot of households out. There still have money saved up money that they can start spending in the economy on things like fancy coffee carafe indeed though we also do know that a lot of the unemployed workers have already spent down a lot of their savings according to the J. P. Morgan, Chase Institute the unemployed spent about two thirds of their added savings in August that was the first month after the benefits expired, which means by now their finances could be getting really tightened. So they may have to cut back on some of their spending card. If you've now perfectly set up my final argument in the case for hope hated when I do that. That is policy. It is not too late for the president and Congress to make another deal before the election in order to stimulate the economy, those negotiations are still happening and also the Federal Reserve has been using monetary policy to help boost the economy. For example, low interest rates have given a big boost to the housing market, and historically the housing market has been a good sign of where the rest of the economy is headed and housing market is doing quite well. Yeah I definitely concede. The point about the Fed and the housing market. But the Federal Reserve itself has also said that what would be really useful for the economy is another bill like the cares act from the president and Congress, and all I'm saying to you is if the case for hope relies on politicians striking a deal agreeing on something that might be the most despairing

Cardiff United States Stacey Google Sergio Leone Congress Federal Reserve Doodoo President Trump Garcia O. K. Corral Smug League J. P. Morgan Official White House Chase Institute
Wrestling on the Road

Talk Is Jericho

04:52 min | Last week

Wrestling on the Road

"Let's talk about you. Jane. Danny told me you had a pretty bad crash was that during one of these tours it was not know it was it was all my family runs a business here locally. So I was heading home from work onto a pretty serious head on. Car Collision. Thousand Fifteen and so. Was it one of those career enders at first sort of thing it? It has sort of put me on the shelf about fourteen months iodine shattered my hip fractured my pelvis broke wrists broke a hand a knows Where they're a bunch of fun stuff and then even while in the hospital had a blood clot just prior to surgery blood clot, almost go into my long or or my heart or whatever it was. So the communist chauffeur in hostels about six weeks, recovery and all that on the shelf fourteen months and doctors explained that because of the surgery dot steel and ends in my APP and my wrist and my hands and. It's sad that you probably should not do anything physical because I got no cartilage left in my hip. So it's essentially bone on bone. So I wasn't sure how things are gonNA. Go after time and was just kind of taking by date and then to Rehab and all that fun stuff I started feeling quite good and and getting Jim and and feeling good doing all that stuff running and whatnot. So I decided to test the waters after about fourteen months and get some shows out now verte and Ever since then I've applied in the busiest, I ever have been with these tour staving off and then bustling at least one hundred times a year give or take go ask couple years. That's great. So it didn't affect you overall these still feeling good in the ring. Go feeling all right Other than getting a little late in gaining a couple pounds I'm still able to do all the stuff that you know was that all he's able to do essentially a pretty big guy hundred and sixty pounds. I'm still able to do backflips and all that fun stuff. So it hasn't really affected me in the rain just yet a couple of years down the road will be saying something a little different but so far so good. So I can complain. So as we start to wind down here, I mean like I said great concept and a really appreciate and respect the fact that you do this I wish I wish you were around. Twenty five years ago when I was on the local scene because I would've been signing up for every single one of these things. On a bigger basis for both of you guys have you had WB tryouts have you worked in the states What's your overall aspirations? Do you want to continue to forge your own identity with CWA? Are you looking to try and get booked in another other places are a little bit of vote for myself. I I've been wrestling. Now will be seventeen years coming up next month and I've been very blessed I. Have I been doing work with? W. I actually did a segment with you on television couple years back with you Kevin O. Rawlins's security guard doing four-part stuff. I've done. Like four three years ago in Minneapolis, we did a full part in got knocked over by guys was nice you. You're great. Very nice. Actually, I actually told the story how like how good of an experience that was in the sense of just minimal and unimportant as our role was as an extra in as a security guard just learning psychology of war body needs to be for the cameras to catch your facial and things of that nature was a really good rewarding experience Just take away and bring back home and then put your pocket for another day. But I I've been very very like. Two thousand ten I'm used pretty regularly in the mid West move when they do extra work there I've done a dark nancy no prior to smackdown as well done a PC trial of I've been lucky enough to go to Japan a few times and do some work with ring of honor. So former I still stay like very motivated driven that. Want. You continue pushing forward and be successful as as a professional wrestler first and foremost But at the same time this thing taking off and then gained much traction as it is. It's got my attention as well and it's kind of you know they always say to have a backup plan I know they probably have a back or anonymously backup plan. But just being able to promote tours and provide for myself and my family. If I can get, you need to do that in the meantime pursuing you know things that are professional wrestler as well. Open up doors. I'm definitely happy doing that as well. How about you AJ Yeah. So I've had the opportunity I've worked You know all throughout Canada down in the US and then in two thousand, twelve I got the opportunity to go down and train Mexico to play. And as far as like present day, you know wrestling's kind of paying the bills right now. So just trying to stay as business basel, but if something. Bigger opportunity or more ever popped up You know I would not be opposed to try that as obviously the window for something like that is starting to close as time goes on so I've just looking. Busy and like I said, restaurants paying the bills. So it is better

Danny Wrestling Jane Minneapolis CWA Kevin O. Rawlins JIM Japan Mexico Canada United States
Climate activist Greta Thunberg endorses Joe Biden.

THE NEWS with Anthony Davis

01:11 min | 2 weeks ago

Climate activist Greta Thunberg endorses Joe Biden.

"Teen Climate Activists Greta Tune Berg endorsed Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden on the weekend asking her twitter followers cast a vote for him in the upcoming November election I never engage in party politics but the upcoming US elections is above and beyond all that tune bug tweeted along with an editorial from the scientific American urging people to avoid voting for Donald. Trump. Just get organized and get everyone to vote Biden, tune bugs said. The seventeen year old is an activist from Sweden who made headlines for leading climate strikes across the country she also interrogated large organizations and groups like the United. Nations in the US Congress on Climate Change Policy and is regarded as the face of the youth climate movement she was nominated for Nobel Peace Prize in two thousand and nineteen and to efforts landed her recognition as Time's person of the year which drew trump's are tune bug in December interview said it was useless engaging trump on climate change because obviously he's not listening to scientists experts. So why would he listen to me?

Donald Trump Greta Tune Berg Joe Biden United States Twitter Congress Sweden
Dont Mess With Notorious RBG: How to Fight For The Supreme Court

On One with Angela Rye

05:55 min | 2 weeks ago

Dont Mess With Notorious RBG: How to Fight For The Supreme Court

"To this week's on one with Angela. Arrived podcast. NATORI is a CB does not have the same notoriety as notorious RPG and what is really notorious is the Senate Republicans for trying to bulldoze the traditional Supreme Court nominations process. So we have assembled an all star legal panel today that also reflects how Supreme Court should look it probably also think here to break it all the way down like a fraction are Kristen Clark President and Executive Director of the National Lawyers Committee for Civil Rights Under Law Christopher. Kane. Chief counsel of demand Justice Ellie Misao justice correspondent at the nation and Tina Johnson President and CEO of times up. Hello everybody. Angela. Thank you so much for being here. So I want to start with giving honor where honor is due in. That is to start with Ruth Bader GINSBURG who we lost on September. Eighteenth. I feel like she held on just as long as she possibly could end for that I say thank you. To our BG to the to the real story is and I just wanted to give you all the opportunity to share some thoughts on route Baiter ins, birds passing on her impact in jurisprudence in which he wrote some phenomenal opinions including just two words, I dissent and you know anything else on your hearts to share about that because then we're going to get into the battle that is the Supreme Court nominations but I really WanNa give her some some time just do. Well, if you're a lover of justice than you definitely are feeling this, you're feeling the loss of Justice Ginsburg on the court right now having been inside the court was always great to see her in action. She was always an active questioner questioner always asking all of the tough questions and and really pushing. The. The Orleans before her. I also think though about Thurgood Marshall and what he meant for the court and Thurgood Marshall is somebody who dedicated his career to the practice of civil rights law when he was appointed in one, thousand, nine, hundred, sixty, seven, and justice Ginsburg frank lease the only a second civil rights lawyer to sit on the court. So right now we're at a moment where there's that void that vacancy in terms of somebody brings that lens to the issues that come before the court. So for me that really matters because we're not getting that with this nominee has been put forward. I'm. Christian I agree with you completely, I mean this this her career even before she got on the court is astonishing in all of us who are working women who are women who can sign around credit card applications and hold a mortgage in our own name and pursue our careers including. Alexis. Johnson wrote this morning you know including the current nominee to the court. We are -bility to do that to repair Berg I mean she dreamed up the idea that the equal protection clause should cover women equally as we weren't in there we were you know the kinds of. Laws kept women out of the economic life of our country. Were not challenged until she had the foresights quite frankly and the legal ability to think that up and percents that and so even before she got on the court Mike Thurgood, Marshall's she had transformed landscape forever for all of us and my dog is Getting this okay. Tina go ahead see. My my story about Ginsburg is is a personal one. So I was in high school I was on trial and a week with states or nationals whatever and one of the guest judges was at school year. And then after the thing he he gave a talk for for the kids and we got to ask questions I asked him a question and answering made fun of. I I asked him how he squared his opinions about originalist. I didn't know what was called originalism. Downing intangible whatever. But how he's wearing those opinions. Brownie. Be Bored event, which was obviously against the original intent of the founding slavers. Yet like super important right and he laughed at me and then everybody else laughed and you're like I. Don't know what they're teaching school and everybody else. A bunch of jokes and then some like really not really credible answer I would later. So he kind of any make of me dismissing it is sat down kind of embarrassed son how GINSBURG heard this story? I am magid now that since they were friends was probably bragging. Point about how? Of. This seventeen year old or sixteen year old. But anyway she's GonNa Message to remark. That was held back. Kids they keep descending. which you know is again, I didn't even realize how awesome and amazing was. Sixteen seventeen year old kid. But it really to me goes to show that at even kind of social setting in A. In a private setting as it must have been for her earth the story. The her her commitment to raising credible questions and raising the sense not backing down She lived at right and she gave me a nice little note when I was a kid. To keep trying.

Ruth Bader Ginsburg Supreme Court Thurgood Marshall Tina Johnson Angela Justice Ellie Misao President And Ceo Kane Senate Chief Counsel Mike Thurgood Kristen Clark National Lawyers Committee President Trump Executive Director Magid The Orleans
A Discussion with David's Former Investment Firm

Money For the Rest of Us

04:48 min | 2 weeks ago

A Discussion with David's Former Investment Firm

"Welcome back to David Star. Great to be here. Thanks for having me. Yeah we'll works cited. We could we need some help with this podcasting thing and before we do a deep dive, we thought maybe we start out with the effigy year. So first things first, you often reference at Bejesus has not by name but your previous job. So listeners, what did you actually do it E. G. DE MATURE? So I joined Effigy Nineteen Ninety five it was a very small firm at the time only twenty five employees and then I was there seventeen years left in two thousand twelve and at twenty five person firm We pretty much did everything everybody did everything? So I was an analyst consultant. Research then I became a partner in nineteen, ninety eight eventually was on our effigy executive committee for many years I co founded what became effigies Osceola effort at the time it was called managed portfolios, and so I oversaw portfolios and then when I left I was. Co leading the research group is chief investment strategist and chief portfolio strategist. So it was it was a great. Have Very fond memories of a years at effigy and learned to bunch. He is you even prior to your came up we were. Looking at a research report and I said, well, how does that researcher Borno Greg is so old it David Stein road like oh boy. Update that one exactly a what are some of your favorite memories are lessons learned from your time at you? As a young firm at the. Twenty five employees there's always been very low turnover both from co workers, partners and clients, and so it's just it's those years of being with colleagues and clients and the trust that you. You have in in your fellow co workers and that that's one thing I miss about not being with a firm is just the trust you have in your fellow partners. What learn was just we were all curious. And we were all trying to figure out how invest markets work, navigate, increasingly complex capital markets, and so I I really liked the constant change and that's that's one reason I got into investing instead of having to move to the next job all the time. Everything else was moving around us in terms of how markets revolving and so that that was great and the big takeaway from that is as you know, you learn humility as an investor and and the reality is no one really knows what's going to happen. I thought when I was an advisor that I had to know that like people were paying me to predict the future and you realize that you can actually manage assets an allocate assets without having perfect foresight. There's ways to manage risk and to do that and make decisions and just recognize that we don't know and the humility that comes from that longer you invest. Great there's definitely a difference between risk and uncertainty, and sometimes you you just have to embrace the the uncertainty and I thought that was that was very well said I certainly recognized I know a lot less than that I, thought I, did each year. I know less. Is a great a great mark I remember the day we're we're at A. Orders RETREA. I'm just GonNa retire and your whole life David. You're you're too young to retire like. See Retire and do what you did immediately. Turn podcasting you retire what happens next. Well now. So I left in two thousand twelve and I launched the podcast in two thousand, fourteen I I spent a couple years writing about investing I was a number of. Businesses. I started. Shut Down Because I. Was Afraid Somebody would hire me I had been investment advisers for so long I just I loved investing I just couldn't find. The way that wanted to continue to do it without. So I didn't have to manage assets and have that that Wade of that fiduciary responsibility i. was a guest on a podcast in two thousand fourteen realized that that was kind of fun because what I missed about. Effigy was an opportunity to teach to go to. An endowment, Investment Committee and to just talk about investing and talking about our latest research and so. After that guest appearance few weeks later, experimental launch a podcast though structured kind of like an investment committee just not do interviews do more a solo show twenty-five minutes talking about money the economy investing and at the time. Everyone, was more people were getting smartphones, they had data plans, and so I saw a shift. And podcasting timing turned out to be very good. As, there were not really that many investing podcasts. At the time and so that that's what I've been doing since. So it's been six over six years now.

Investment Committee David Star Partner First Things First Borno Greg Wade Executive Committee CO Analyst Researcher Advisor Consultant Fiduciary
Proposition 18: Youth Voting

Bay Curious

06:08 min | 2 weeks ago

Proposition 18: Youth Voting

"Politics reporter Guy Marzorati has been covering profit teen for K. Q. E. D. Hey? Guy. Hey. So walk us through what we're voting on here. So the very basics is that proposition eighteen would allow seventeen year olds to vote in primary and special elections if they turn eighteen by the general election. So to clarify, this would not have helped to, for example, me who was seventeen during the two, thousand, four, general election and was. Pretty disgruntled that I wasn't able to vote right right and I was in the same boat seventeen in the two thousand, eight election. This does not change that if you're seventeen when the general election is happening, you still won't be able to vote. This is really aimed at the voters who turned eighteen in the window between the primary and the general election. It would let them kind of get a headstart and voting and let them. Vote in the primary. Now, some people may think you know it's only the primary it's not a huge deal. You still get to vote in the general. Why does it even matter that you know young people would be voting in primaries? Well, proponents really make two arguments and the first is question of fairness. They say it's only fair that voters in the general election also gets a have a voice in the primary Elliott Talkie. Of San Francisco was a freshman in college. But for the past few years, she's been advocating for this change for exactly that reason I was cheated out on this election cycle and thousands of others were cheated out to not be able to vote in the twenty twenty primary such. An exciting primary I should add was really disappointing and I'm not the only one thing about all the people who are born between March and November and In the second argument is really around habit building. So supporters say that voting is a habit, the more you do it the more you're likely to do it in the future and that if you let seventeen year olds vote in the primary when they're still in high school, they're getting civics education that education could be enriched by actually participating in the electoral process it's building a habit for the future and make these young Californians. Habitual voters. Okay and there are definitely some people who are not excited about the prospect of seventeen year olds voting at all Let's hear a little bit about what they argue. Right. So when this was put on the ballot by the state legislature, mostly all Democrats supported mostly all Republicans opposed it and antitax groups are also against this measure they say seventeen year olds most of them are still in high school and their captive. Audiences in classrooms who could be swayed by teachers especially on school bonds and school taxes they say, basically, they might spend a whole day only once side of a campaign and while there's eighteen states and the district of Columbia that allowed this changes well, the opponents of prop eighteen say California's different because we directly vote on taxes, school bonds, parcel taxes, and they say that these seventeen year olds are not to be trusted in. Those votes here's Susan Shelley with the Howard Jarvis Taxpayers Association. So of seventeen, year, olds are seeing this in high school and then they're voting in a primary on school taxes school bonds they can be influenced to vote for these taxes without seeing the full argument or having the knowledge of the previous tax increases that may have been passed for the same purpose. Another argument that I read was because our primaries have moved so early. Some of these voters will actually be I, mean closer to sixteen than they are to eighteen when they would be voting in these primaries. Yeah and I think that's another argument made on the No side really about brain development that you know we've set this legal age eighteen and we shouldn't go any farther below it. I haven't seen a whole lot of evidence to suggest that seventeen year old or somehow less likely. To make these decisions than eighteen year olds, there are seventeen year olds who pay taxes after all but that's definitely something you're hearing from the no campaign. Now, it's not often that we actually sea propositions that benefit teenage Californians. How did this one? Make It on the ballot in the first place? This was on the ballot by the state legislature, a two thirds vote and it was largely Democrats who backed it There was only one Democrat who voted against it in the legislature only two Republicans who ended up supporting it. Okay. So even though the legislature has already passed this law because it's basically going to be an amendment to the state constitution, they have to get a public approval for it. That's right and you might be thinking wait doesn't the constitution of the United States kind of set the voting age and it? Really Only, addresses the fact that you can't deny the right to vote to citizens who are eighteen. It really doesn't speak to allowing younger citizens to cast ballots, which is why you've seen a number of states moving this direction and allow seventeen year olds to participate in the primary. At least if they turn eighteen by the general election, is there any idea on what kind of impact this will actually have a voter turnout? Well, we have some idea and that's because of a study by the Public Policy Institute of California which took a look at what they called the so-called prop eighteen voters, and there were two hundred, thousand such. Californians in this boat in the last couple elections, these voters are potentially a significant block especially for primary elections where votes can often be very close decided by a few thousand, a few hundred votes even but another key finding the study found was that the participation of these group of voters is really far from being guaranteed experts and civic engagement say that passing this measure alone is not going to be enough to boost. Turnout rates among young voters I talked with Ron Tariq has about this. She's a sociology professor at UC Santa Cruz I think that propositions eighteen if it passes will be very successful at increasing turn out if it is coupled with civics education at the secondary school level, it creates an opportunity for a secondary school educators to really concentrate more time and resources to developing the curriculum that excites people about voting. So even folks who are backing this change say it's not a panacea. A won't solve all the issues around voting rates in participation of young voters. Alright. K Q d politics, reporter Guy, Marzorati thanks for your help. Thank you.

Guy Marzorati Reporter Legislature Howard Jarvis Taxpayers Associ Elliott Talkie United States Public Policy Institute Of Cal California Columbia Twenty Twenty San Francisco Susan Shelley Professor Ron Tariq
Ritchie Torres: From The Bronx to Congress

LGBTQ&A

05:25 min | 3 weeks ago

Ritchie Torres: From The Bronx to Congress

"Something, I was thinking about wall preparing to talk to you is about how everything and politics and our country right now is just trump obsessed. Does it feel to you like we are paying less attention to congressional races like yours? Yes, and no Donald Trump represents an existential threat to our planet and our democracy in our social contract. So naturally, he's going to be the focus of our politics, but you know the two not mutually exclusive Donald Trump is a racist relic of the past. And the new generation of leadership the rainbow wave that has swept United States represents the future. You can think about both because when represents the past than the other represents the future and the next election is essentially a choice between the two. Do we want to turn the clock back? Would we want to move forward with the terminology describing the Rainbow Wave? I get frustrated with that personally because I think the current congressional group has nine or ten out queer people when it comes like nine or ten to me doesn't make up a wave will by wave referring analytic congress immediate t buddha. Judges the first openly LGBTQ, Bible presidential candidate. You're about to have the highest congress industry of the United States and you have nearly a thousand openly, Algebra, two candidates for public office. At every level of government we've never seen a greater quantity or diverse to the LGBTQ representation among candidates running for public office, and that's a sign of Paris and these city and state legislators like yourself. Well, hopefully feed into these more national roles as well. Look I got my start as as a volunteer community board. And then I became a volunteer in the city council. So you have to start somewhere you growing up could not look at Congress and see someone like you somebody gay so an Afro Latino you also dropped out of college. About your biography do not make the quote, unquote typical politician and so i WanNa know did you know that there was a place for you in politics and if not when did that change I never thought as poor lgbtq kit of color from the Bronx that I will ever become a United States Congress I never had LGBTQ role models growing up by rope in public housing had no conception of a world beyond the immediate boundaries of my neighborhood. The first time I met in openly lgbtq person a teacher. Is the moment that inspired me to acknowledge my sexuality for the first time for the first seventeen years of my life I had no openly lgbtq role models in my life in the Bronx I led a sheltered life and so that was somebody you knew intimately teacher what about looking into like politics and saying L. politicians there. There were no real role models for me I saw no one. No I did not see myself in the people running for public office or holding public office. There was certainly no elegantly lgbtq people of color at the congressional level that I know of and and so I felt largely unrepresented and you know my my story begins with the poverty in the Bronx spent almost my life poverty raised by a single mother way to raise three children on minimum wage. which in the nineteen nineties was four dollars and twenty five cents an hour and I grew up in public housing in conditions of bold and mildew leaks lead without reliable. He didn't have water in the winter in my life something of a metaphor grubbing a public housing development right across the street from trump golf course. So as I saw the conditions in my own home, get worse every day the government had invested more than one hundred million dollars to construct the golf in honor of Donald Trump and I remember wondering to myself at the time. What is it say that our society is willing to invest more in a gated Gilded Golf Course Donald From Then in the homes of black and brown low income Americans, and so that experience has been quality is what inspired me to become housing organizer. And then eventually took the leap of faith and ran for public office was twenty four openly gay at no ties to the political machine no ties to the dynasties of Bronx politics but I wish young and energetic with the fighting spirit. And I knocked on thousands of doors went into people's homes. I heard their stories, it was one voter who said to me in the forty years I've been living in the Bronx. I've never had a candidate for public office knocked on my door. was those kinds of interactions at led me to win my first race in two thousand thirteen I became the first openly Q. elected official from the Bronx at several years before then I was at the lowest point I had dropped out of college. I was abusing substances struggling with depression or struggling with sexual identity crisis. I had lost my best friend to inaugurate overdose. They were moments when I even thought of taking my own life I felt as the world around me had collapsed. And then seven years. Later, I became the youngest elected official in the largest city in America, and now I'm about to become a United States congressman. For. The only home I've ever known the Bronx and so I often tell people, my story is the story of the rocks. It's a story of struggle, but also one of overcoming.

Bronx Donald Trump United States Congress Paris Gilded Golf Official Depression Congressman America
No More Mr. Nice Guy | Robert Glover | Write Your Legend Podcast with Apollonia Ponti and Natalie Stavola - burst 01

Write Your Legend

28:10 min | 3 weeks ago

No More Mr. Nice Guy | Robert Glover | Write Your Legend Podcast with Apollonia Ponti and Natalie Stavola - burst 01

"She will, you know, she's strong needs to be done. And so the thing that I learned is that a woman can't follow her a man doesn't lead that's true on the Dancefloor. It's is true in relationship. Now that leadership is not dead. Do it my way, you know, it's not about that that kind of controlling dominance. It's just showing up with a plan and having a sense of confidence about you that you know where you're going and you invite the woman to come along same on the dance floor is it I'm not going to ask the woman in between each move every step. Do you want to have this done now? Would you like a cross body move? Should I do a pretzel with you? Should I know I'm just going to lead her and if she likes the way I lead she's going to relax into that and follow and be blessed by that. If you don't like the way I lead single find another partner to dance with that's fine that it works. Well, but if I don't lead we're just going to stand there on the Dance Floor, you know kind of looking at each other until one of us gets bored and walks away. So that leadership is crucial and when I found when guys are trying to figure out what to make what to do make a woman happy and pleased or there's no real leadership. It's like I said be like me asking a woman every move. What do you want to next? do you want today off? And you're laughing cuz I've asked women in front of men. I'm teaching I'll say do you like it? Well, what do you like when your man says what do you want to tonight? You want to go out? Where do you want to go for dinner in the women go is needed to make a decision. Right? But I don't like it. I'll tell you but make a decision instead of times. I've had that argument with with some dating like I forgot to tell you, I don't like that. I'm going to change my mind you're going to say let's get Chinese food and I'm gonna say I want Italian but it doesn't matter. I just want you to make a decision cuz make a decision. Yeah, and that is super hard cuz that goes back to the man same. Maybe I'll do something wrong. And one thing I've been preaching to men for quite some time in marriage therapy. And otherwise, is that a woman's reaction to anything that a man does does not determine the rightness or wrongness of the thing man did write the man says, let's go get Chinese. You said I was thinking Italian he didn't do anything wrong cuz you had a different wage. Opinion on that. So this is you know, the work that I do with men is learning as a you know, start living life on your terms live life the way you want them live it and invite a great woman to come tag along with you to come join in your great life. Don't try to figure out how do I fit into her life? How do I make her happy? How do I make her want to be my girlfriend? I want to suck Ur clothes off. Don't worry about that stuff. You live your great life lead give her the chance to follow now. Here's the thing with that what if they're already in a relationship and all of a sudden? They're learning about this. How long does that take? Do all of a sudden they just come home and they're like, maybe like a big daddy 301 is here is here and she's like in leading this whole time. Yeah. So how does how do you do you get that like that leading birth? That is such a good question. When I wrote no more mister. Nice guy. I wrote in there I said when I started working with nice guys, and and because it does shake up a relationship if they're in one thousand. It shakes up everything, you know, the guy starts setting boundaries or starts asking for what he wants or start saying no or start spending more time with his guy friends, you know starts pursuing his his passion is going to shake things up and and I say in the book that I when I first started seeing this I gave relationships about a fifty-fifty chance that they would survive the the guy doing a nice guy recovery and I write in the book then over time. I started giving it more of a 60-40 that it wasn't going to work. And by the time I wrote book, I'd 7030. I'm about at 8020 now home and you know, we're kind of laughing about it. But the truth is yeah if if a couple of gotten together and fallen into a routine that that is some level is comfortable. Serve them even if it's painful and toxic it could be challenging to break that up. So mental asked me a lot of times say well sure. I show my wife or my girlfriend your book. I'm gonna go by all means, why am a copy, you know, let them have a copy and let them start underlining and writing in it and you tell them what it is that you're wanting to work on and what you're learning and how you want to be in this world. And and you know, do this is a team effort and in my experience. I'm a say in general women like my book, you know, when the book up published. I think the Publishers are thoughts going to create this big controversial but it never did. I maybe have gotten three angry emails from women in twenty years so women like the book cuz it's teaching men can be honest and transparent and and you know good men. Not not just pleasing nice guys. So I have found that a lot of women are really supportive of this work log. I got to visit a couple had worked with a number of years ago. I started working with the man over time and then he met the woman they got married. They're they're like 50, so they're both like second marriage for each of them and they came down to Puerto Vallarta where I live and did some work with me a few years ago and I forgot to visit them about three weeks ago and and the woman said to me says Robert finished that other book you're working on around what I call positive emotional tension women tend to like the stuff that I teach and couples therapy. You know, when I would start with the man just like in dance class, you gotta start with the lead, you gotta show them how to leave where the followers got nothing to lead. So I start with the man and I get the big two-by-four out smack him upside the head and say, okay, here's how women are wired. Here's what's important to them. Here's what most men get wrong. And here's what we're going to work on and usually the women have gone to look at their husbands or boyfriend and go this guy gets women. I like him. And so So when I found his women are pretty supportive of this Dynamic and many men had told me. Hey my wife gave me your book my ex-wife gave me your book an ex girlfriend gave me your book off. So women are spreading the word and they want men that they can trust that they can depend on who will set the tone and Lead who they can open up and Trust. Yeah because it's an honest with themselves and how can they be honest in a relationship if I can't depend on you to open up and tell me like what's going on? What you need? How can we be a team song? Yeah. I'm very obviously have apple and I are huge fans of the book. Yeah, and another point you talk about in one of your chapters and the no more mister nice guy book is with with life in general, right? I am a true believer that women look at sex differently than men look at 6 and men look at sex differently and intimacy is emotional for women, right? So we need our emotional needs to be met off. Order to want to have sex either with our partner or in our marriage whatever the case may be and sometimes those marriages can end up dying down and then we look up as sometimes what I've seen as well is that the men is looking at this as my wife isn't having sex with me. So I need to push for sex in order to feed the validation from within me. Right and so the woman was like, oh, I'm just not there mentally emotionally because of XYZ. I'm going through a hard time in life. And so what happens is he pushes more so than the relationship gets disconnected when they really weren't disconnected really in the first place. Yeah, but since the sex was pushed it was more and then I've seen that Spectrum happened in a lot of you know people that we work with and then the other spectrum is I mean to have sex with my wife in order to know that she's happy. So then he have a guy that's cleaning the house doing things for the kid. I mean, there's been doing everything. I I was a guy at one time. I was I look I did the dishes look at all this and log My zip I did ex-wife would walk in. How come you haven't wipe the counters off and I haven't finished yet. Now we have sex. I've been there. I've been there were boarded the response that is completely different and you actually talk about this in your book, you know, there's there's so many Dynamics the whole, you know, since we're kind of, you know, kind of leaning towards longer-term relationship here. There's so many dynamics that go into this great book by Esther perel called mating in captivity says it actually intimacy and hot sex don't play em together now intimacy mean we know each other really well, we've gotten comfortable with each other. We've got a predictability to our life the thing that most relationship experts Point couples torque. We have great communication. We work things out or great team, but she says that actually works against the polarity of having, you know, really great hot sex. And so, you know, it's almost dead. I don't think we have to choose one or the other. She's not saying that but we do need to know that in those long-term relationships kind of the Mormon that just be together starts to feel routine that starts to take a bath the sex now there's a lot of other things that they can go in to this change. Sometimes it's is the man is is a lazy lover or a city lover. You know, he just thinks poking his partner, you know, Thursday is a way to do it. Sometimes he's using his own emotional neediness and approaching her to get sex like doing the the kitchen thing and now have sex when they have sex with me and what I found is that a women don't necessarily reject the desire their partner to have sex. They reject the neediness. That's behind it. Come validate me make feel okay by having sex with me think they pushed that away off like no women don't want that that that's that hose hooked up to them where their Partners going to, you know, fuck them and say, okay. I'm loved I'm good, you know, whatever other pieces job. Go into this as well part of it, you know going back a little bit of clarity we've touched on is that most women and culture nowadays are in their masculine so much. They're doing all the time. They getting ready to go work. They go to work deal with customers, you know co-workers management, then I got to get back home from work. Now there's dishes to be done dinners. And if there's kids most often parenting is masculine doing the kids need to get their homework done. They need to have a bath and you'd have dinner they need to get the bed and then, you know, the man gets in bed that night gives her a little shoulder rub off and she's going. Oh no one more thing I've got to do and that's how it feels right feels like oh, I gotta do one more thing which is again masculine and the deepest thoughts and desires to be done its to be open and blessed and but if if a woman has been so much in her masculine all day. There's most women off. Good at making that switch. Right? So one of the things that I teach men guys sent, you know say guys new in a relationship or beshi long-term relationship part of our masculine leadership is leading our partner back into her feminine laughter that feminine State and you know, that might mean she comes home. And first thing you say sit down you take you sit down take your shoes off rubber feet say five minutes, you're on the clock tell me about your day. You got my undivided attention and she gets to you know, decompress or feed her being rubbed. This isn't There's No Agenda. If you're right. This isn't the get her in mood for later on if you get her slowed down out of being in that masculine, I put a quote in no more mister nice guy by a lesbian feminist. A lot of feminists don't like her cuz she actually likes men and I'm glad to hear you guys say do too but she's the quote I use it says that the typical woman out. Workplace is just going going and if she doesn't get throttled that back when she comes home. She's going to castrate everything in the home and not because the woman needs to they're just like this needs to be let's get that to you know, it's just like that and so masculine Leadership can be just okay, you know, what are your room change your clothes go put on your sweats, you know, I've said a glass of wine out or go take a bath go read a book go, you know something that let her just get out of that fast. Got to do got a good you gotta do and then often as you said optional needs I think women have a deep need to be heard to seen. I think if a woman knows she's heard and seen that we guys think that might mean listening to them complain all night long and I give an exact. I was dating a woman few years ago. I met her at the mall. She sold me shoes how I met her and so we started dating and so early on some of our dates would go to like a Ruth's Chris restaurant off. And go to happy hour and have a hamburger when she got off work in the mall. There was connected each other so she'd come over and she'd been working all day and and selling shoes or apparel and she just starting complaining, you know, the customers the management of this and maybe if she talked to her mother that day she'd be in a she's always had a pissy mood after I learned after she talked to other so, you know, she'd come in and sit down and be completely I've already got the two glasses of wine in front of us and I realized you know right date. So I just I took my phone out. Like I said, put it out set the timer for five minutes and said we're on a date. I know you just got off work of my undivided attention for five minutes. Give it all to me and like about two or three minutes in she was done it was enough and and then like she and I've had other women thank God for creating that container that they could just decompress get it all out. I wasn't going to fix anything. They just had you know, my undivided attention for x amount of time and dead. Then she could relax and then we'd have a good evening. So that's you know, it's just an example of the masks and Leadership one of the things that I teach all men and I've taught all the women in my life is full of open the door for them, you know, a woman taught me that about fifteen sixteen Seventeen years ago. She just said hey, you know, I never know if you can open my door not just I don't care what you do either open it every time or Dome. Well, no, that's all right. I'm going to open it so car doors office or stored or whatever. I've taught all the women in my life. Wait, I will open the door. I'll come open your I'll put you in the office completely out of the car. Now. The woman doesn't need me to open her door, but it's it creates a little bit of polarity. I'm the doing it done two. It's not a big deal, but I found that it's profound and I found at each guy says do it, but do it consistently cuz the first time you forget to come around and open her door the first time you forget to open again. She's going to just sit there Staffing. They're going. Hey, you taught me this, you know, so so they you know, the feminine wants that consistency, but that little thing I found personally is so powerful my mum even waits for me to open her door. First time. I did it. She said if I waited my dad's been dead for eleven years. So if I waited for your dad to open my door, I'd still be waiting I said, okay, but I'm opening your life. You know, my granddaughter is should be fourteen next month. She wakes up on her door, you know, she loves what she loves One Big Papi comes around so she loves when Granddad, and it opens the door for so now those again, you know, women can open their own doors women can you know probably decompress in their own ways, but I found that say gift we men can get the women with no attachment is not to get them. Okay, you talk about your problems. We're gonna have sex now, right, you know, it's not about that and talking about the pushing for sex on you mention. I teach men never ever push a woman for sex now cuz I'm such a nice guy and I'm you know, you know doing my oh look at me. I'm a good guy because with a few horrible women have been poked at their entire lives. And since yeah, there's a reason hashtag me to exist women have been poked and I have found if a man is in his masculine setting the tone and leading being himself creating polarity. He doesn't have to push a woman for sex. I felt that the women are often sexual aggressor with me since I you know, got divorced twenty years ago and started Living, you know, this way with women every woman I've been with is one in more sex than me. I never put a woman for sex ever, but cuz here's the thing. I tell guys whether they're you know, so first time they're trying to get a woman have sex or long-term relationship if the woman for any reason. And has her foot on the break free. Maybe maybe you're on a first or second date and maybe she's didn't shave down there. Or maybe she's on her. Or maybe she's just not ready yet. She knows she's going to have sex with u age she's just not ready yet. So the foot she goes is going to happen but not yet foots on the brake and I told men if you have your foot on the gas and she knows you're pushing person again doesn't matter if it's a second date or you've been married twenty years if she knows you're pushing for sex and her foot's even just a little bit on the break. Guess what she's going to do now, push harder on the brake and all guys. You don't want a woman pushing harder on the sex break. So pushing a woman for sex. Not only thing is violating but it doesn't serve you. Well in the woman doesn't feel loved and it doesn't Make Her Say Yeah penetrate me. Do me fuk to God. I'm ready there like this song. They're like this so I know that's confusing. The men's we want a formula we want. Okay, tell me the three steps, but I found that if the guy games setting the tone needing creating the polarity inviting the woman into that feminine space. She's the one that's already planning about when they're going to have sex. Yeah you guys on your head. Yeah, that you know is absolutely I can agree with this more. I'm so happy. I hear you saying this as well, you know, Natalie built a products all around this master is called bedroom, and she talks so much about this polarity and there's something that was out and we talked about this very openly it's called last minute resistance and it was something that pushed in to pick up Community back home. And we've had a lot of guys get in trouble for this and it's about pushing the woman to have sex if she doesn't want to and a lot of times what I've noticed too and what you're saying is the energy behind them. Is is relationship or not relationship first or second date? It's the woman will be able to intuitive intuitively feel if you're pressing the brakes or if you're putting the gas on. Yeah. Yeah, if you're off the formula exactly. So if you're pushing excuse me, so it's not about having. Oh I need to do this specific formula. It's about just embodying. You're like you really knowing who you are as a young man and really standing up to that and positioning herself in that way and I tell like men this all the time and I remind them, you know, you as a guy can probably walk outside of a neighborhood. That's maybe not so good at 10:00 at night. But as a Woman by yourself and a black shirt if you wanted to doesn't matter, but as a woman we can't do that without feeling like we're going to be in trouble. I tell mid all the time to really understand what you you're saying right now. I tell men ask any woman, you know that she feel safe walking in her own neighborhood at night well and Thursday No, the majority of women are going to say ha don't do it. And you know, I'll even you know here in Puerto Vallarta where I live see a woman walking at night on a dark Street by yourself. I'm thinking woman. What were you thinking back? And you know again, I'm not saying that in any way justify like what the whole rape culture thing, but women have never felt safe walking the planet and I told men if you understand that women by nature or security seeking creatures and trust is everything. I was actually doing an interview one time with a couple of women on a television show more Middle Ages actually known no Ashok. So I went to the radio Studios was talking to them and I made the comment on a commercial break that I said. tell men I said if you fuck with a woman's trust you're going to fuck with her lust and the new ones that thought. Oh, yeah, you need to say that when we come back from break and I said guys say that on the radio and they go so if you mess with the woman's trust you're going to mess with the woman's lust and it was funny. Probably about two or three years. Years later, I walked into a coffee shop in the area that lived and and one of those women who did the interview was sitting talking to somebody else that I knew was actually she was a dating coach as well relationship coach wage and she wakes Robert you remember me? I said, yeah. Yeah, I did a radio interview with you just I've got to tell you when said that thing about, you know messing with a woman's trust you mess with their lust she goes I'm you know, fifty-something years old been married for thirty years. I went home told my husband that she said as a woman, I'd never put that two and together in my own head that trust was so essential to open sex is vulnerable for a woman you're getting poked and prodded and penetrated in every way and to enjoy that you've got to let go. Let go you've got to trust and I mean women can bypass that they get drunk enough. They can pray fantasy. They can get into you know, some old trauma-related. You know, I'm with the Jersey And it's saying yeah, but to truly open up an experienced the depth of bliss of and when I say penetration, I don't just mean the guy jack hammer in the woman, you know with this 24/7 hard on. It's about the man bringing all of his Consciousness and presents open heartedness and groundedness and passion bringing all of that yet. Natalie's over there. Yeah. Well, yeah more important because that's the thing is like we were talking about before is the masculine energy. Is that penetrating energy, but as a woman it's all interconnected with how we're feeling and letting go of that guard but also if a man is in that neediness energy needing to validate needing to do this in your intention isn't honest behind why you're even trying to penetrate us a pick up all of your energy you're literally going inside of us. So if I'm sitting there dating a guy and I sleep with him and he's got past trauma. He doesn't love himself. He's you know insecure and he's just trying to log Need to have sex with him validate himself. Now. What was that energy in me? I gotta deal with that kind of pick up your energy now like carry on about my day. So when when you are talking about just that simple thing of like when a woman comes home and you're like they there's a glass of wine for you go change into something comfortable. You've got me for five minutes. It's that and there's no intention behind Old Testament know about that right? There is sexy to a woman and why we would be the ones to initiate sex later because that is sexy to us that right. There is a we get to trust you will just break down anything those break that down even more for men cuz social appears that thing. So yeah again, we'll go back. Let's let's talk about a guy on let's say they got into a third date with woman, you know, and he hears like, you know open he gets laid that night, you know, so he's doing all the stuff to push it and and you know as women you of course know you know why we take out right off. To see you naked that's the whole reason we take you out and you know that, you know, you're not dumb, you know, you know, of course you're not, you know, we're ready. We were that special lingerie off likely, you know, so so and and now that's the point. I really want to make, you know, when you're ready. It's going to happen and I tell guys, okay listen. A woman knows within the first 30 seconds of meeting a guy if there's a possibility she's going to wear that sexy lingerie, right? I can't know for sure if she's going to she just knows if there's not a possibility and you know, then all the guys from there they use the nice guy seduction or the pick up stuff or trying to buy you enough drinks hoping that'll yeah with some wage their insecurities and their alcohol issues. It does happen. But the woman know so I tell the guy so you really don't have to make this happen as Chris Rock Says just don't say anything really stupid. Don't mess up. Right. So the woman knows if it's going to happen right or not. She no she doesn't know when but and and you know, because of all the cultural slut-shaming off and have to Cana like, well I want to do it right now, but I'm going to give it, you know, 15 more minutes before I get, you know, put on the laundry because you know, have to culturally blah blah a bunch of noise, but it off What is so so I tell guys think about it this way if she already in her mind is entertained the idea. She's going to wear that lingerie with you. You don't have to push. All you have to do is show up be you, you know, bring that good vibe cuz you women are so sensitive to energy. Yeah. Yeah, I'll be playful be affectionate took her hand and lead her oldest a way for me to open your door invite her into your great life or she gets to see this guy's got a fucking great life. I'm not talking about a great apartment a great cook. I mean those could be part of it. But that you've got friends. You've got a life. You're you're a social animal you you take care of yourself. Let her see that part of your life. You keep getting the tone and leading what I found when I was dating again. I never pushed a woman for sex put never pushed him to get naked, but I am very affectionate and I will set the tone and I will be Adventures. And I will call a woman up and say I'm at your house in 30 minutes be ready to go. I will do those kinds of things. And what I found is then the women put their foot on the gas and and off, you know, either dropping the innuendo about sex or say come over to dinner in my house Friday night, you know, then, you know, she's going to have the lingerie ready. So I tell them don't push cuz you don't have to you don't have to now that doesn't mean I don't tell I tell guys but that don't mean to be passive, you know be know, assert yourself be bold and when the dog opens by all means walk through that door now you may have to do something like, you know, the woman's, you know been making little innuendo you may just have to do the Bold thing and my kind of was all right, you know take your clothes off and go get in my bed. Oh, I can't believe you're telling me what to do, you know what to do. So I tell men her to do what she already wants to do. Now that again that's not like oh you're going to read her mind off. You guys you you gals send the signals when it's time when you're ready. You're not that hard like me use our mouths. We we think you know those thoughts your hand might end up on his crotch outside of his jeans. There's some signal for the guy to say it happens. It happens and for the guy to say, but I've had to say women this is as far we can go in a public setting somewhere else. So if you do that, Yeah, that's amazing. I definitely oh man, this is so good. I'm like my mind is like

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No More Mr. Nice Guy | Robert Glover | Write Your Legend Podcast with Apollonia Ponti and Natalie Stavola - burst 01

Write Your Legend

28:10 min | 3 weeks ago

No More Mr. Nice Guy | Robert Glover | Write Your Legend Podcast with Apollonia Ponti and Natalie Stavola - burst 01

"She will, you know, she's strong needs to be done. And so the thing that I learned is that a woman can't follow her a man doesn't lead that's true on the Dancefloor. It's is true in relationship. Now that leadership is not dead. Do it my way, you know, it's not about that that kind of controlling dominance. It's just showing up with a plan and having a sense of confidence about you that you know where you're going and you invite the woman to come along same on the dance floor is it I'm not going to ask the woman in between each move every step. Do you want to have this done now? Would you like a cross body move? Should I do a pretzel with you? Should I know I'm just going to lead her and if she likes the way I lead she's going to relax into that and follow and be blessed by that. If you don't like the way I lead single find another partner to dance with that's fine that it works. Well, but if I don't lead we're just going to stand there on the Dance Floor, you know kind of looking at each other until one of us gets bored and walks away. So that leadership is crucial and when I found when guys are trying to figure out what to make what to do make a woman happy and pleased or there's no real leadership. It's like I said be like me asking a woman every move. What do you want to next? do you want today off? And you're laughing cuz I've asked women in front of men. I'm teaching I'll say do you like it? Well, what do you like when your man says what do you want to tonight? You want to go out? Where do you want to go for dinner in the women go is needed to make a decision. Right? But I don't like it. I'll tell you but make a decision instead of times. I've had that argument with with some dating like I forgot to tell you, I don't like that. I'm going to change my mind you're going to say let's get Chinese food and I'm gonna say I want Italian but it doesn't matter. I just want you to make a decision cuz make a decision. Yeah, and that is super hard cuz that goes back to the man same. Maybe I'll do something wrong. And one thing I've been preaching to men for quite some time in marriage therapy. And otherwise, is that a woman's reaction to anything that a man does does not determine the rightness or wrongness of the thing man did write the man says, let's go get Chinese. You said I was thinking Italian he didn't do anything wrong cuz you had a different wage. Opinion on that. So this is you know, the work that I do with men is learning as a you know, start living life on your terms live life the way you want them live it and invite a great woman to come tag along with you to come join in your great life. Don't try to figure out how do I fit into her life? How do I make her happy? How do I make her want to be my girlfriend? I want to suck Ur clothes off. Don't worry about that stuff. You live your great life lead give her the chance to follow now. Here's the thing with that what if they're already in a relationship and all of a sudden? They're learning about this. How long does that take? Do all of a sudden they just come home and they're like, maybe like a big daddy 301 is here is here and she's like in leading this whole time. Yeah. So how does how do you do you get that like that leading birth? That is such a good question. When I wrote no more mister. Nice guy. I wrote in there I said when I started working with nice guys, and and because it does shake up a relationship if they're in one thousand. It shakes up everything, you know, the guy starts setting boundaries or starts asking for what he wants or start saying no or start spending more time with his guy friends, you know starts pursuing his his passion is going to shake things up and and I say in the book that I when I first started seeing this I gave relationships about a fifty-fifty chance that they would survive the the guy doing a nice guy recovery and I write in the book then over time. I started giving it more of a 60-40 that it wasn't going to work. And by the time I wrote book, I'd 7030. I'm about at 8020 now home and you know, we're kind of laughing about it. But the truth is yeah if if a couple of gotten together and fallen into a routine that that is some level is comfortable. Serve them even if it's painful and toxic it could be challenging to break that up. So mental asked me a lot of times say well sure. I show my wife or my girlfriend your book. I'm gonna go by all means, why am a copy, you know, let them have a copy and let them start underlining and writing in it and you tell them what it is that you're wanting to work on and what you're learning and how you want to be in this world. And and you know, do this is a team effort and in my experience. I'm a say in general women like my book, you know, when the book up published. I think the Publishers are thoughts going to create this big controversial but it never did. I maybe have gotten three angry emails from women in twenty years so women like the book cuz it's teaching men can be honest and transparent and and you know good men. Not not just pleasing nice guys. So I have found that a lot of women are really supportive of this work log. I got to visit a couple had worked with a number of years ago. I started working with the man over time and then he met the woman they got married. They're they're like 50, so they're both like second marriage for each of them and they came down to Puerto Vallarta where I live and did some work with me a few years ago and I forgot to visit them about three weeks ago and and the woman said to me says Robert finished that other book you're working on around what I call positive emotional tension women tend to like the stuff that I teach and couples therapy. You know, when I would start with the man just like in dance class, you gotta start with the lead, you gotta show them how to leave where the followers got nothing to lead. So I start with the man and I get the big two-by-four out smack him upside the head and say, okay, here's how women are wired. Here's what's important to them. Here's what most men get wrong. And here's what we're going to work on and usually the women have gone to look at their husbands or boyfriend and go this guy gets women. I like him. And so So when I found his women are pretty supportive of this Dynamic and many men had told me. Hey my wife gave me your book my ex-wife gave me your book an ex girlfriend gave me your book off. So women are spreading the word and they want men that they can trust that they can depend on who will set the tone and Lead who they can open up and Trust. Yeah because it's an honest with themselves and how can they be honest in a relationship if I can't depend on you to open up and tell me like what's going on? What you need? How can we be a team song? Yeah. I'm very obviously have apple and I are huge fans of the book. Yeah, and another point you talk about in one of your chapters and the no more mister nice guy book is with with life in general, right? I am a true believer that women look at sex differently than men look at 6 and men look at sex differently and intimacy is emotional for women, right? So we need our emotional needs to be met off. Order to want to have sex either with our partner or in our marriage whatever the case may be and sometimes those marriages can end up dying down and then we look up as sometimes what I've seen as well is that the men is looking at this as my wife isn't having sex with me. So I need to push for sex in order to feed the validation from within me. Right and so the woman was like, oh, I'm just not there mentally emotionally because of XYZ. I'm going through a hard time in life. And so what happens is he pushes more so than the relationship gets disconnected when they really weren't disconnected really in the first place. Yeah, but since the sex was pushed it was more and then I've seen that Spectrum happened in a lot of you know people that we work with and then the other spectrum is I mean to have sex with my wife in order to know that she's happy. So then he have a guy that's cleaning the house doing things for the kid. I mean, there's been doing everything. I I was a guy at one time. I was I look I did the dishes look at all this and log My zip I did ex-wife would walk in. How come you haven't wipe the counters off and I haven't finished yet. Now we have sex. I've been there. I've been there were boarded the response that is completely different and you actually talk about this in your book, you know, there's there's so many Dynamics the whole, you know, since we're kind of, you know, kind of leaning towards longer-term relationship here. There's so many dynamics that go into this great book by Esther perel called mating in captivity says it actually intimacy and hot sex don't play em together now intimacy mean we know each other really well, we've gotten comfortable with each other. We've got a predictability to our life the thing that most relationship experts Point couples torque. We have great communication. We work things out or great team, but she says that actually works against the polarity of having, you know, really great hot sex. And so, you know, it's almost dead. I don't think we have to choose one or the other. She's not saying that but we do need to know that in those long-term relationships kind of the Mormon that just be together starts to feel routine that starts to take a bath the sex now there's a lot of other things that they can go in to this change. Sometimes it's is the man is is a lazy lover or a city lover. You know, he just thinks poking his partner, you know, Thursday is a way to do it. Sometimes he's using his own emotional neediness and approaching her to get sex like doing the the kitchen thing and now have sex when they have sex with me and what I found is that a women don't necessarily reject the desire their partner to have sex. They reject the neediness. That's behind it. Come validate me make feel okay by having sex with me think they pushed that away off like no women don't want that that that's that hose hooked up to them where their Partners going to, you know, fuck them and say, okay. I'm loved I'm good, you know, whatever other pieces job. Go into this as well part of it, you know going back a little bit of clarity we've touched on is that most women and culture nowadays are in their masculine so much. They're doing all the time. They getting ready to go work. They go to work deal with customers, you know co-workers management, then I got to get back home from work. Now there's dishes to be done dinners. And if there's kids most often parenting is masculine doing the kids need to get their homework done. They need to have a bath and you'd have dinner they need to get the bed and then, you know, the man gets in bed that night gives her a little shoulder rub off and she's going. Oh no one more thing I've got to do and that's how it feels right feels like oh, I gotta do one more thing which is again masculine and the deepest thoughts and desires to be done its to be open and blessed and but if if a woman has been so much in her masculine all day. There's most women off. Good at making that switch. Right? So one of the things that I teach men guys sent, you know say guys new in a relationship or beshi long-term relationship part of our masculine leadership is leading our partner back into her feminine laughter that feminine State and you know, that might mean she comes home. And first thing you say sit down you take you sit down take your shoes off rubber feet say five minutes, you're on the clock tell me about your day. You got my undivided attention and she gets to you know, decompress or feed her being rubbed. This isn't There's No Agenda. If you're right. This isn't the get her in mood for later on if you get her slowed down out of being in that masculine, I put a quote in no more mister nice guy by a lesbian feminist. A lot of feminists don't like her cuz she actually likes men and I'm glad to hear you guys say do too but she's the quote I use it says that the typical woman out. Workplace is just going going and if she doesn't get throttled that back when she comes home. She's going to castrate everything in the home and not because the woman needs to they're just like this needs to be let's get that to you know, it's just like that and so masculine Leadership can be just okay, you know, what are your room change your clothes go put on your sweats, you know, I've said a glass of wine out or go take a bath go read a book go, you know something that let her just get out of that fast. Got to do got a good you gotta do and then often as you said optional needs I think women have a deep need to be heard to seen. I think if a woman knows she's heard and seen that we guys think that might mean listening to them complain all night long and I give an exact. I was dating a woman few years ago. I met her at the mall. She sold me shoes how I met her and so we started dating and so early on some of our dates would go to like a Ruth's Chris restaurant off. And go to happy hour and have a hamburger when she got off work in the mall. There was connected each other so she'd come over and she'd been working all day and and selling shoes or apparel and she just starting complaining, you know, the customers the management of this and maybe if she talked to her mother that day she'd be in a she's always had a pissy mood after I learned after she talked to other so, you know, she'd come in and sit down and be completely I've already got the two glasses of wine in front of us and I realized you know right date. So I just I took my phone out. Like I said, put it out set the timer for five minutes and said we're on a date. I know you just got off work of my undivided attention for five minutes. Give it all to me and like about two or three minutes in she was done it was enough and and then like she and I've had other women thank God for creating that container that they could just decompress get it all out. I wasn't going to fix anything. They just had you know, my undivided attention for x amount of time and dead. Then she could relax and then we'd have a good evening. So that's you know, it's just an example of the masks and Leadership one of the things that I teach all men and I've taught all the women in my life is full of open the door for them, you know, a woman taught me that about fifteen sixteen Seventeen years ago. She just said hey, you know, I never know if you can open my door not just I don't care what you do either open it every time or Dome. Well, no, that's all right. I'm going to open it so car doors office or stored or whatever. I've taught all the women in my life. Wait, I will open the door. I'll come open your I'll put you in the office completely out of the car. Now. The woman doesn't need me to open her door, but it's it creates a little bit of polarity. I'm the doing it done two. It's not a big deal, but I found that it's profound and I found at each guy says do it, but do it consistently cuz the first time you forget to come around and open her door the first time you forget to open again. She's going to just sit there Staffing. They're going. Hey, you taught me this, you know, so so they you know, the feminine wants that consistency, but that little thing I found personally is so powerful my mum even waits for me to open her door. First time. I did it. She said if I waited my dad's been dead for eleven years. So if I waited for your dad to open my door, I'd still be waiting I said, okay, but I'm opening your life. You know, my granddaughter is should be fourteen next month. She wakes up on her door, you know, she loves what she loves One Big Papi comes around so she loves when Granddad, and it opens the door for so now those again, you know, women can open their own doors women can you know probably decompress in their own ways, but I found that say gift we men can get the women with no attachment is not to get them. Okay, you talk about your problems. We're gonna have sex now, right, you know, it's not about that and talking about the pushing for sex on you mention. I teach men never ever push a woman for sex now cuz I'm such a nice guy and I'm you know, you know doing my oh look at me. I'm a good guy because with a few horrible women have been poked at their entire lives. And since yeah, there's a reason hashtag me to exist women have been poked and I have found if a man is in his masculine setting the tone and leading being himself creating polarity. He doesn't have to push a woman for sex. I felt that the women are often sexual aggressor with me since I you know, got divorced twenty years ago and started Living, you know, this way with women every woman I've been with is one in more sex than me. I never put a woman for sex ever, but cuz here's the thing. I tell guys whether they're you know, so first time they're trying to get a woman have sex or long-term relationship if the woman for any reason. And has her foot on the break free. Maybe maybe you're on a first or second date and maybe she's didn't shave down there. Or maybe she's on her. Or maybe she's just not ready yet. She knows she's going to have sex with u age she's just not ready yet. So the foot she goes is going to happen but not yet foots on the brake and I told men if you have your foot on the gas and she knows you're pushing person again doesn't matter if it's a second date or you've been married twenty years if she knows you're pushing for sex and her foot's even just a little bit on the break. Guess what she's going to do now, push harder on the brake and all guys. You don't want a woman pushing harder on the sex break. So pushing a woman for sex. Not only thing is violating but it doesn't serve you. Well in the woman doesn't feel loved and it doesn't Make Her Say Yeah penetrate me. Do me fuk to God. I'm ready there like this song. They're like this so I know that's confusing. The men's we want a formula we want. Okay, tell me the three steps, but I found that if the guy games setting the tone needing creating the polarity inviting the woman into that feminine space. She's the one that's already planning about when they're going to have sex. Yeah you guys on your head. Yeah, that you know is absolutely I can agree with this more. I'm so happy. I hear you saying this as well, you know, Natalie built a products all around this master is called bedroom, and she talks so much about this polarity and there's something that was out and we talked about this very openly it's called last minute resistance and it was something that pushed in to pick up Community back home. And we've had a lot of guys get in trouble for this and it's about pushing the woman to have sex if she doesn't want to and a lot of times what I've noticed too and what you're saying is the energy behind them. Is is relationship or not relationship first or second date? It's the woman will be able to intuitive intuitively feel if you're pressing the brakes or if you're putting the gas on. Yeah. Yeah, if you're off the formula exactly. So if you're pushing excuse me, so it's not about having. Oh I need to do this specific formula. It's about just embodying. You're like you really knowing who you are as a young man and really standing up to that and positioning herself in that way and I tell like men this all the time and I remind them, you know, you as a guy can probably walk outside of a neighborhood. That's maybe not so good at 10:00 at night. But as a Woman by yourself and a black shirt if you wanted to doesn't matter, but as a woman we can't do that without feeling like we're going to be in trouble. I tell mid all the time to really understand what you you're saying right now. I tell men ask any woman, you know that she feel safe walking in her own neighborhood at night well and Thursday No, the majority of women are going to say ha don't do it. And you know, I'll even you know here in Puerto Vallarta where I live see a woman walking at night on a dark Street by yourself. I'm thinking woman. What were you thinking back? And you know again, I'm not saying that in any way justify like what the whole rape culture thing, but women have never felt safe walking the planet and I told men if you understand that women by nature or security seeking creatures and trust is everything. I was actually doing an interview one time with a couple of women on a television show more Middle Ages actually known no Ashok. So I went to the radio Studios was talking to them and I made the comment on a commercial break that I said. tell men I said if you fuck with a woman's trust you're going to fuck with her lust and the new ones that thought. Oh, yeah, you need to say that when we come back from break and I said guys say that on the radio and they go so if you mess with the woman's trust you're going to mess with the woman's lust and it was funny. Probably about two or three years. Years later, I walked into a coffee shop in the area that lived and and one of those women who did the interview was sitting talking to somebody else that I knew was actually she was a dating coach as well relationship coach wage and she wakes Robert you remember me? I said, yeah. Yeah, I did a radio interview with you just I've got to tell you when said that thing about, you know messing with a woman's trust you mess with their lust she goes I'm you know, fifty-something years old been married for thirty years. I went home told my husband that she said as a woman, I'd never put that two and together in my own head that trust was so essential to open sex is vulnerable for a woman you're getting poked and prodded and penetrated in every way and to enjoy that you've got to let go. Let go you've got to trust and I mean women can bypass that they get drunk enough. They can pray fantasy. They can get into you know, some old trauma-related. You know, I'm with the Jersey And it's saying yeah, but to truly open up an experienced the depth of bliss of and when I say penetration, I don't just mean the guy jack hammer in the woman, you know with this 24/7 hard on. It's about the man bringing all of his Consciousness and presents open heartedness and groundedness and passion bringing all of that yet. Natalie's over there. Yeah. Well, yeah more important because that's the thing is like we were talking about before is the masculine energy. Is that penetrating energy, but as a woman it's all interconnected with how we're feeling and letting go of that guard but also if a man is in that neediness energy needing to validate needing to do this in your intention isn't honest behind why you're even trying to penetrate us a pick up all of your energy you're literally going inside of us. So if I'm sitting there dating a guy and I sleep with him and he's got past trauma. He doesn't love himself. He's you know insecure and he's just trying to log Need to have sex with him validate himself. Now. What was that energy in me? I gotta deal with that kind of pick up your energy now like carry on about my day. So when when you are talking about just that simple thing of like when a woman comes home and you're like they there's a glass of wine for you go change into something comfortable. You've got me for five minutes. It's that and there's no intention behind Old Testament know about that right? There is sexy to a woman and why we would be the ones to initiate sex later because that is sexy to us that right. There is a we get to trust you will just break down anything those break that down even more for men cuz social appears that thing. So yeah again, we'll go back. Let's let's talk about a guy on let's say they got into a third date with woman, you know, and he hears like, you know open he gets laid that night, you know, so he's doing all the stuff to push it and and you know as women you of course know you know why we take out right off. To see you naked that's the whole reason we take you out and you know that, you know, you're not dumb, you know, you know, of course you're not, you know, we're ready. We were that special lingerie off likely, you know, so so and and now that's the point. I really want to make, you know, when you're ready. It's going to happen and I tell guys, okay listen. A woman knows within the first 30 seconds of meeting a guy if there's a possibility she's going to wear that sexy lingerie, right? I can't know for sure if she's going to she just knows if there's not a possibility and you know, then all the guys from there they use the nice guy seduction or the pick up stuff or trying to buy you enough drinks hoping that'll yeah with some wage their insecurities and their alcohol issues. It does happen. But the woman know so I tell the guy so you really don't have to make this happen as Chris Rock Says just don't say anything really stupid. Don't mess up. Right. So the woman knows if it's going to happen right or not. She no she doesn't know when but and and you know, because of all the cultural slut-shaming off and have to Cana like, well I want to do it right now, but I'm going to give it, you know, 15 more minutes before I get, you know, put on the laundry because you know, have to culturally blah blah a bunch of noise, but it off What is so so I tell guys think about it this way if she already in her mind is entertained the idea. She's going to wear that lingerie with you. You don't have to push. All you have to do is show up be you, you know, bring that good vibe cuz you women are so sensitive to energy. Yeah. Yeah, I'll be playful be affectionate took her hand and lead her oldest a way for me to open your door invite her into your great life or she gets to see this guy's got a fucking great life. I'm not talking about a great apartment a great cook. I mean those could be part of it. But that you've got friends. You've got a life. You're you're a social animal you you take care of yourself. Let her see that part of your life. You keep getting the tone and leading what I found when I was dating again. I never pushed a woman for sex put never pushed him to get naked, but I am very affectionate and I will set the tone and I will be Adventures. And I will call a woman up and say I'm at your house in 30 minutes be ready to go. I will do those kinds of things. And what I found is then the women put their foot on the gas and and off, you know, either dropping the innuendo about sex or say come over to dinner in my house Friday night, you know, then, you know, she's going to have the lingerie ready. So I tell them don't push cuz you don't have to you don't have to now that doesn't mean I don't tell I tell guys but that don't mean to be passive, you know be know, assert yourself be bold and when the dog opens by all means walk through that door now you may have to do something like, you know, the woman's, you know been making little innuendo you may just have to do the Bold thing and my kind of was all right, you know take your clothes off and go get in my bed. Oh, I can't believe you're telling me what to do, you know what to do. So I tell men her to do what she already wants to do. Now that again that's not like oh you're going to read her mind off. You guys you you gals send the signals when it's time when you're ready. You're not that hard like me use our mouths. We we think you know those thoughts your hand might end up on his crotch outside of his jeans. There's some signal for the guy to say it happens. It happens and for the guy to say, but I've had to say women this is as far we can go in a public setting somewhere else. So if you do that, Yeah, that's amazing. I definitely oh man, this is so good. I'm like my mind is like

Partner Puerto Vallarta Robert Natalie Esther Perel Jack Hammer Apple Chris Rock Rape Radio Studios
Students return to campus in the UK

The Wonkhe Show - the higher education podcast

05:17 min | 3 weeks ago

Students return to campus in the UK

"Are packing their bags and moving into accommodation returning to campus. The term is getting up and running. The government is nowhere to be seen off on looking from your perspective. Oh, well, I've tried to keep my head down on it. Actually we've had it's been a you know, you as you can imagine an enormously busy time. We've been playing for this moment for four or five months. We have to keep adjusting the plans. We keep having, you know review government policy and advice that's coming in and local advice from northamptonshire. And I I find a lot of the media a distraction actually. I mean I did I did listening to you and yours that you were on earlier in the week marks. I thought would be really interesting to get the the perspective of parents families and students from all over the country and it was interesting but I think I found that the kind of the torrid frenzied pace of the media wasn't really helping a sink clearly through the issues where we had to take responsibility for things and make you know, birth. Decisions with a huge amount of uncertainty and lots of independent variables. So I'm really pleased to see if students come back onto campus. We've had teaching this week. It's been long distance that many students or staff indeed wandering around the campus in between times, but the rooms have been occupied and at that means I think that as far as I can tell all the plan to put in place for our lenders face-to-face and online teaching are going as well as we could hope at this point. We are we are dealing with high Flex that she may want to talk about cuz I know Jim came by Flex earlier, I think a few months ago, but we couldn't work out another way to do that where we had students who had to be off site and students who had to be on site and we didn't have enough rest and resource to teach them separately. So we are at the office trying to teach them synchronously and that's obviously challenging technically and and pedagogically course and you mentioned you and yours the thing that struck me about that and this thing into lots of popular dog. Pictures of the last week or so is that kind of cuz the concern of parents starting to cut through and and they're calling into radio for their writing to their MPS and that they're certainly making making Making Waves and I guess the government is has noticed that input really found a way of responding yet. But I've noticed that and that was that was kind of my take away from that. Are you seeing are you seeing kind of anxious parents as wage dropping effect of their children? Are they kind of talking to the university? I'm not getting it directly actually one of the things I find interesting about that you're you and your Christmas what I thought was actually rather infantilizing a month and the the presenter kept referring to you know, did you let your children do this and she kept correcting herself, but you know, obviously it's a very difficult time because I've got a seventeen-year-old and talk talking to a lot of parents and I do you know, I I fully appreciate what an anxious time is but my, you know, my my daughter says I said to her would you go and she was like, yeah, I'd really want to get started. Want to get stuck in and I I think I think one of the things we've we've done wrong actually in the whole representation of this is to treat it, you know Planet campus if it's different from the rest of the world and I think well, you know students been in they've been coping with all the things that would happen in the last five months six months. They don't expect University, you know to suddenly be this completely different world wear masks don't have to be worn or you know, there is some social distancing and I don't think we should compare this year necessarily to previous years as if we could wind the clock back cuz we can't wind the clock back. All we can do is make this here. It's good as it can be and I really think we're doing that simplifies to the parent who said there's an academic as well. And he said what we're doing is really hard. We're doing the best we can it's really important we do it properly and I totally agree with that. Yeah. Yeah, Joe. How're things on here Thursday. This week so our students were arriving this week. So all the majority of the undergraduate surviving this week. So could have lots of fingers crossed that it goes well, but just to kind of taught to transport with the past six months off. Of preparation that's been I've never seen anything like it in in higher education. We forget six months ago. We were working out how to do assessments online. So we could finish the last that could be Academic Year and then those kind of cheese contingency plans will be putting in place of have been meant that people work incredibly hard both are the teaching side of the learning technology side, but also on the operational side in terms of wage accommodation making sure that the the campuses can be as secure as possible putting testing and and tracing operations in place in short. So I think they're kind of paying for the office hoping for the best approach. Hopefully that that that will get us through I think just for talk to the point in terms of the student experience. I think we just have to do the very best we can for students to get the best education and birth experience that they can get under these circumstances. And as a Shaun said isn't isn't normal circumstances. We can't we can't pretend to teach but I think for these eighteen-year-old starting University now dead. I mean they've had a pretty challenging few months themselves with the with the results Fiasco, but also they've been locked down at home. They haven't been socializing with their the school friends. And in the same way that they would want to in the last year of school. So I think if I were a teen I'd be wanting to get to University irrespective of the of the circumstances.

Government Northamptonshire Starting University Academic Year Shaun JIM JOE
Unpacking Palantirs Public Debut: CEO Alex Karp

Squawk Pod

19:51 min | 3 weeks ago

Unpacking Palantirs Public Debut: CEO Alex Karp

"This is squawk pod I'm CNBC producer Katie Kramer today on our podcast. unpacking Pailin, tear the high profile highly secretive software company has operated quietly for seventeen years and it's finally on the public markets. And -ticipant I I think for maybe the past ten years CEO Elon on why it it took. So long my lawyers will shoot me what I can tell you is we are very very focused on building software a longtime before other people building and how he expects to become profitable with a small, but mighty and mighty controversial of customers. Well, how can you have the Super Valuable Company? They're only a hundred and twenty-five customers to which I respond. Yeah. But one, hundred, twenty, five most. Interesting institutions in the world I would ask people who are watching this to make a list of the institutions they admire in the world, and then roughly figure out if they're using pounder that interview plus the politics behind listing journalist Joanne Lipman fits a company that is very, very closely aligned with the trump administration. There's a huge question here about what happens if trump does not win the presidency it's Thursday October first October twenty twenty the year is still twenty twenty squawk pot begins right now. Good morning and welcome the squawk box right here on CNBC. I'm Andrew Ross Sorkin along with Joe Kernan Becky off today. Today on the PODCAST volunteer goes public analytics company that is usually described as secretive debuted yesterday the direct listening selling new shares on the New York Stock Exchange covered live on CNBC how tears for trading why secretive well here is named after magical orb and Lord of the Rings. But in seventeen year history, it hadn't made much public volunteer received early funding from the venture arm of the CIA and provide software products designed to crunch numbers. One of these programs is called Gotham and it's for government clients. Who Need to organize an understand massive amounts of data. So surveillance predictive policing, possibly rooting out potential terrorism threats, Pailin tear works with US Army Navy Department of Homeland Security and it's working with health and human services to help track the spread of Corona virus case data that we just recorded. We can immediately narrow into emerging hotspot counties, notable backers of talent tear include investor, and Co founder Peter Thiel who has gotten attention for his conservative politics and support of president trump in the two thousand, sixteen campaign. Evening. I'm Peter Thiel I'm not a politician, but neither is donald trump as well as his work technology companies. He was facebook's first big investor other pollen tear backers include wall streeters like Hanlon and Stanley Druckenmiller when talent tear filed paperwork with the SEC to pursue publising listing earlier this year it's called the swan event is finally got a sense of the books turns out pollen tear had never turned a profit and. A, huge chunk of its revenue came from its three biggest clients which are anonymous in the first six months of twenty twenty. It's revenue of nearly half a billion dollars a big jump from the year before this was addressed by pollen tear CEO, Alex Carp investor roadshow, which true to carbs personality, and true to the weirdness of twenty twenty was virtual and started on cross country skis. Welcome to Powell, tears investor day. We're very proud to have you here. Carp is an Orthodox for a CEO. He has amazing curly hair. He uses the modifier super allot super cool and speaking to potential investors. He made the pitch for the importance of Pailin tears purpose. This way of looking at the world war literally savior situation and in many cases Save Your Life Allen to has moved beyond. Just government clients fifty-three percent of its customers are in the private sector big name businesses who use a software program called foundry include Airbus Merck Ferrari and United Airlines but it's work for governments here and others around the world stuck to its reputation allentown faced criticism from privacy groups and for its work with the US Customs and border. Patrol. Tracking immigrants at the border. But Carp in the company not backed off in. That s one filing the leader of this highly valuable tech uniform said, Pailin tears work is different in his view software missions to keep safe may have become controversial but companies built on advertising dollars are commonplace and carp took aim at big tech culture directly writing quote our company was founded in Silicon Valley. But we seem to share fewer and fewer of the technology sectors, values and commitments. Helen tear moved its corporate headquarters to Denver and its shares headed to Wall Street. If you think, we are going to change our internal culture drastically if you think we're going to work with regimes that are not allied with the US enter abusing human rights if you think. that. That the future is going to be a super rosie place where the past ways of supplying software are going to work because enterprises and governments do not need to be reformed you should not invest in pounder. Andrew. Ross Sorkin has interviewed Alex Carpet number of times. This conversation was reported Wednesday yesterday right after the first trade for here on the New York. Stock Exchange. We've had lots of conversations over the years. This has been probably one of the most highly anticipated offerings or listings in a very long time. Almost every year that we would talk in Davos I would invariably ask you are you going to go public? Are you gonNA list and invariably you wouldn't. So let's start with why now? Well, first of all, thank you for having me and I and I really would like to thank all the pound tyrians who stuck with us and built this company and our investors you're stuck with us and you know over the years we've been skeptical about listing and for lots of reasons, we really needed to build our products. With enough protection so that we would be ready to launch them into the public space. And we built we built out PG government and foundry product and and built a way to maintain them so that we wouldn't have to scale the number of people and. You know we've reached a base where where our company's very significant and we believe being in the public space will help us with our clients and help us grow and quite frankly I believe the people apparently who built this company over seventeen years. Deserved a access to liquidity. So we we decided this would be great time for us and so far. It's been a really interesting process and and our clients are embracing it. So it's a really good time for us and I'm very, very grateful. Outlets. The single biggest question that investors ask about this company is seventeen years in while you know may have an operating profit, the company unto itself is still not profitable. So so walk us through what the path to profitability looks like. Well, you know we build these products years before people build them, and that takes money and what you see in the cove it pandemic crisis is we had built this way of going to market with foundry, which would allow us to literally supply an enterprise with a completely new stack of products within six hours and maintain them. And what you saw when we did that is we grew the company forty, nine, percent, forty, nine percent off of a seven, forty, three base and the divergence between expenses and in growth is dramatic. And we're just going to be very very focused on on an invigorating, our software offering. But when you're growing forty-nine percent off of a seven forty base. I think that's a pretty strong indication of what the future could hold and we're super proud of that and I think you're seeing that people are taking a look at our financials and our our company is often been used viewed as complex and. Needing explanation both moral and financial but it turns out our financials are quite simple and you look at this dramatic growth with flat lining expenses and I think that gives investors comfort and it certainly makes me feel as. Co Founder and CEO that we made the right decision to invest heavily over well over a decade in building software, the way other people don't to build it and you see the results do you think the profitability is at twenty twenty, two, proposition twenty, twenty, three proposition can I put you on that? Well, you you can push me but of course, my lawyers will shoot me I can tell you what I can tell you is we are very very focused on building software a time before other people building, supplying it and I think that are year I. First Half of the year growth will be reflective of the future and if I'm right. That will answer all of your interesting questions and we'll be interviewing. You'll be interviewing me again maybe not a Davos but virtually, and we'll see how we do. Confident confident we'll do well. Alex, one of the other questions people ask is how to comp your company meaning what are the comparable should this be considered a technology company as SAS company or should this could be considered a much more traditional consulting company? Can you speak to that? Well I think what the investors are seeing is they're asking the question at this point they used to ask is this is this a company that built software for the government and how do they build it? Of course we always sold this as a license. Then they saw our margins of the first half of the year round eighty percent. So I think the real debate now is. Move significantly away from is this software services because although people think we're very smart, we're not smart enough to get eighty percent margins off of a services company. The question then is, how do you comp it and honestly I think that's something investors will have to figure out. We're not focused on that we're focused on we are going to be the most important software company in the world. And people will figure out what valued over a long period of time and we're very comfortable with investors toying around it could be like this. It could be like that. We are going to deliver the best software. With the morals most efficient way of delivering it investors will decide what's that. What's that were is worth to them and I think you'll find a number of years that will be a consensus. Palette. Here is a truly special software company that is arguably the most important software company in the world. Alex has everybody knows You have contracts with various government agencies, obviously and some of the bluest of the blue chip companies in America today, but it's a concentrated list of about one hundred and twenty-five companies. About Twenty eight percent of the revenue actually comes from three of those clients unto themselves. Two thirds of the revenue comes from the top twenty. How much of a risk does that pose on one side but also when you think about the opportunity on the other, if we're having a conversation like this in in twelve or twenty, four months, how much do you want that list to increase in size or do you just want to keep that group effectively and a effectively raise the margin or cost for those clients? And grow that business. Well, we want to do all the we're going to do all of the above. So interesting about our client list people people ask, well, how can you have the super? Valuable Company they're only one hundred and twenty-five customers to which I respond but one hundred and twenty-five most interesting institutions in the world. These aren't just any institutions. The literally, I would ask people who are watching this to make. A list of the institutions they admire in the world and then roughly figure out if they're using, we don't go out and advertise our product, but I would say the list of our clients is the single most impressive institutions in the world I've ever seen we. So we want to keep these clients. Also investors will of noticing in the one that well over ninety percent of our growth in the first half of the. Year came from our existing clients. What does that mean our existing clients? The most important clients in the world are really happy that's what it means. So of course, we're going to expand those really happy clients who happen to be the coolest people on the planet, and then we've built this product which has gotten very little attention called Apollo Apollo allows us to maintain and deliver software to any number of clients with essentially. Not growing our our force apparent and force at all. So we're planning now that we have Apollo to grow the number of super cool customers all over the world, and we can do it without raising our headcount, and so what you're going to see is we're going to continue building with our clients why they're the most interesting clients in the world and they clearly based on our numbers like us and some of us. We are going to expand our client base. Why? Because now with Apollo, we can deliver the whole stack in six hours. I don't think any other company I've ever seen in the world can do that, and we can do with efficiencies that I don't know any other companies going to do because we can do this with a small number of people sitting in our office that we have maintaining, updating and providing them with new products we built. So they don't have the Frankenstein monster that takes two years to build and has to be maintained with either human hours like in the government contracting case or by purchasing new product or compensating sales people or behind. It people you don't even talking to you can actually buy one stack. So we are going to increase revenue with current customers, get new customers and continue our march. Alex how easier heart is because I know you've talked about trying to keep things in in terms of the platform if you will how he's your heart it for four clients to leave in terms of the churn. Well, as I mentioned, ninety, five percent of our revenue comes from existing customers. So customers, obviously if a customer wants to leave they, can I think the main reason our customers stay besides the fact that the output is very significant as they look at this product, we supply foundry the average customers paying less than six million dollars and they compare it to buying twenty products paying ongoing licensing. Fees. You can't get out of or building something over years, and the last thing they compare it to is we're not delivering a roadmap. Most people are living roadmap of what are you going to get in a year we're delivering a product after six hours so customers can leave. But what you see in the numbers is they by and large don't, and it's not because of my charming personality. Alex well, let me ask you a different question. We've had lots of fascinating geopolitical and philosophical questions about the role of technology and Pailin tear itself as well as the approaches silicon valley has taken. I'm curious in terms of risks how you think about this Amnesty International as you know, criticized, the company recently for its role of working with ice. How much of that does that pose a risk to the larger business? Especially, the corporate business at a time when we have corporations at taking both political positions and also being oftentimes being socially at activist. To Your Business Well, look the fact that we take positions that are sometimes controversial can cost. US clients. But it also gets us. Clients because when we talked to a client and we say look we're going to work with you. We're not gonNA walk away just because the winds change and this is super important especially to our government clients if you're supplying special forces and army and the US, those clients have to know that they will not be left on the battlefield. Because a because Silicon Valley has decided they don't like the warfighter. So of course that costs revenue many of our decisions of cost US revenue we only work in certain countries we've walked away from work because if human rights issues we've said, we disagree with very prominent human rights organizations and we engage in dialogue but also by the way is a reason why I Think people who are watching this may consider investing or not investing. We are not going to stand up here and say we're for everybody we're not going to pretend, and by the way we're going to try avoid jargon. We will actually tell you what we think it's not going to be created by fifty media people it may have to be carried by a couple. Of Lawyers but one of the unique things about power tears, we actually say things and we actually stick to them and that's something not everyone likes but many of our customers do and by the way I think it is a reason why ninety five percent of our revenue comes from customers because when we tell them, we're going to deliver we are going to deliver. Alex. One of the other questions now you all republic company. But as you know, you have three tiers of stock classes of shares that is and to some degree there have been critics who said, this is effectively a private company masquerading as a public company. Can you speak to the decision to structure the shares the way that they are structured and how governance experts and folks should think about that I think it's important for government experts to look and make an deliver opinion but I would also ask them to consider the environment we live in pound tear has been in silicon valley up till recently for seventeen years and in silicon. Valley. Defending the. warfighter providing our troops with technology that allowed them to come home is very controversial. I do not believe a company like ours that makes really consequential decisions for government clients and non-government clients could be run without an F. share structure and I understand there's criticisms investors look and say, well, why should talent you're having F. structure? What is my? What is my what? What can I do if? I don't agree with them. The primary reason why we fought for an structure and we asked investors to buy into it was we need to be able to go to our especially our Intel and defense clients and say, we will not just blow with the wind. And does shares for a company like ours gives us a unique ability to have long-term commitments to the most important clients in the world, both commercial and government, and that's why I believe they're super important, and I also again would encourage people if that's not something you're comfortable with there are many shares to buy. We don't have to buy challenge your shares. You should buy shares knowing that these shares reflect our views. Alex we've often had these conversations in Davos where globalization has ruled the roost but as you know so well, the world seems to be shifting to a globalized world, a splinter net if you will. How do you think long term that will affect the business of here We made this decision, which is actually a secret only because no one believes it's true which is that we didn't solve the problem of fighting terrorism. We solve the problem of doing data protection and fighting terrorism, and the architecture we built both PG and for foundry will allow a super set to work with subsets, which means if the world's splinters and every country has its own jurisdictions, it's GonNa be very hard for normal software companies because they're not built to do that but it's going to be very good for Palette here and finally Alex. Decision five years from now today. How would you measure success? Here, what would be the metrics which measure it? We know they're there obviously financial metrics but I'll tell you Powell cheer has recruited and retained I believe the most interesting most talented most ethical people I've ever met and we work I've interacted with thousands of institutions and in five years when meet I think he'll say to me. Wow, that wasn't just you saying that because it was the right thing to say it's actually true. And the products that will build over that period we'll we'll. We'll be unique and they will tilt the course of history. In favor of things that are good and noble. And will not avoid the complexity that's necessary to do that outlets. Carpool. You lots of luck and we do look forward to having that conversation hopefully in five years. But hopefully sooner than that. Thanks so much Alex.

Alex United States Silicon Valley Davos Twenty Twenty Donald Trump Andrew Ross Sorkin Carp New York Cnbc Powell Joanne Lipman Peter Thiel Gotham Us Army Navy Department Of Hom
A tale of two direct listings

Equity

11:11 min | 3 weeks ago

A tale of two direct listings

"Hello, and welcome to equity shot are quick hit on breaking news I'm Natasha Mascarenas and today joining me to talk about a tale of not one. But two direct listings on the same Damn Day is Danny Creighton. How are you Danny doing? All right this is exciting. You know we went from a world of no direct listings to an occasional direct listening to multiple direct listings in the same day. So it's an exciting exciting morning. We can finally stop breaking up spotify in slack whenever we say the L word and reinvention Asana, and pollen tear, which are the two news heads we got today it's zoo of curiosities. But lots of great stuff to talk about where where do you WanNa start you WANNA. Start with Asana or palate here. What's more interesting to you I think I have to start with pollen tear and my big question is you've been tracking it through every. You know crazy filing, your high level thought was this a successful debut on the Stock Market for? Today I think it's a definitely a success. You know the stock from January two, thousand, nineteen onwards trading at around five to five, fifty, a share, and then in the last two or three months that price jumped to about nine dollars and sixteen cents as of September first, and so you know when when the reference price came out yesterday from the New York Stock. Exchange which was quoted at seven dollars and twenty five cents. A lot of people were like, wow, that's like a significant drop from nine sixteen like what happened particularly also last week we had the Wall Street Journal reporting they were looking for a ten dollar referenced price. You know none of those numbers were really good but look it's trading. Now it's live as we're. Doing the show, it's ten dollars and sixty one cents a share I'm. So it's better than all the numbers we heard before and it's up fifty percent on day one. So so part of me feels like this reference value was actually chosen precisely to give it a pop on day one you know if they were targeting ten bucks on Day One, this is sort of what they got and so a little bit of a lower reference price might have given them a little bit more of A. Psychological boost on on day one. So I, I think overall to success. Do you. Can you talk me a little bit about how we're trying to value the company right now I feel like I'm seeing a bunch of different numbers out there. Do we have an understanding of its fully diluted market value? We do there's still a little bit abate mostly because Peletier gives multiple numbers for the number of care. So it gives us one point six, billion shares outstanding two point one fully diluted two point one billion fully diluted than two point five billion fully fully fully diluted and so. I would say that its current share price, we would call it around twenty, four, billion in evaluation, which is an uptick from its its last rounds. Again at you know for a seventeen year old company to have the sort of strong debut on Wall Street I think it's pretty good. All things considered. Okay. Cool. I'll put a pin in Pailin tear, but I do want to talk about their lock-up period later, run me through Asana numbers I. saw it opened at a five point two billion value. Yes it's on a similar story. So yesterday, The New York Stock Exchange released a reference value of twenty one bucks per share. It zoomed straight out onto the public market. So it debuted, it's currently sitting at twenty eight dollars a share up thirty three percent on day one so far it's up to about I. Think it peaked at five point, two billion, and as of now is more like three point five, three point seven, five, billion market CAP. But again, that's actually significantly higher than his last valuation, which was an inlet late twenty, eighteen around one and A. Half billion dollars so either oke across the board I think both of these issues you know there's always a lot of risk drake listings. As you pointed out Natasha there haven't been that many is this sort of a novel mechanism. They're still a little bit unclear and exactly how they work, and so it's great to see again similar to slack spotify you know these are two enterprise. Companies to again totally different from the more consumer is random companies particularly spotify, which has tens of millions of consumers who might be retail investors buying into the stock. Most people haven't used the Sauna and certainly must people haven't used Pailin tear and so to see the kind of strength on the markets and the first day is is enticing for other companies considering the direct listing model. Right There I feel like pollen tears total customer base was what one? Hundred Fifty, company, hundred, twenty-five customers. That's a lot of customers Doing Gospel distanced. Something it's probably my favorite statistic about the company and I think I saw Dan Prime tweeting the other day that you know it's no longer going to be a secret of company. So we can stop calling it as such. This is the end of that right that confrontation about pollen tear for. So long we've been having well I, I will say. This about an hour ago. So may not be true today. A ASANA has an investor relations page like a standard like every company who publicly trades Peletier does not like it actually does not have as as of an hour ago that I looked up I could not find an investor relations page for here, which which tells you everything you need to know about the company I, feel like that is like in a beautiful one sentence or describes his relationship with investors, but but I think you're absolutely right you. Know despite the fact that only one, hundred, twenty, five customers despite the fact that took seventeen years three hundred grew it's growing from seven hundred, forty, three, million in revenue last year in fiscal year twenty, nineteen, it gave a revenue projection for twenty twenty about one point, five, billion to it's a growth company. It's SAS more and more SAS today than it was in the past where it was more services driven. So again, it's a positive story despite all the kerfuffle around its governance the last couple weeks do you Do you feel like the direct listing method might now take on more popularity. I. Mean. Maybe in some way, but can we even is? Is it enough of a success? You'd think that other companies might follow suit now that it's not just spotify that that did this. I think the more the merrier right I think Palentinian particular raised capital round back in. July right which was sort of what I was told from some insiders essentially the IPO that was the IPO and then direct listings just the actual market exchange. So I think we're GONNA see more companies taking this approach of bifurcating the capital, raise the float that you would normally do a IPO and just the actual just GonNa Start. Trading today and you know I think that that allows you more time to create the right narrative the right story of and also separates what is a a pretty intense kind of crisis driven process the road show getting the company ready the SEC filings separating out at out you don't put all your eggs in one basket. You can do it in stages and I think more and more companies undertake that approach going forward. My question to is and I'm sure our listeners are curious is with all direct listings. There's no shares offered by the company when the when it debuts and so when we see these prices I, guess how much of them are they vanity metrics much of their HABITA- goals, how important are they for us to care about and think about? I wanted to be precise. So there are no new shares offered by the company. So there's no dilutive in an IPO generally have fifteen, maybe twenty percent new shares offered to the public. There are no new shares but many of the insiders have to pay taxes capital gains they actually do have to sell shares. So you know so far this morning already thirty five, million shares of have already been traded and We have on Pailin tear thirty, two, hundred, and thirty million. Shares sold today, right? So already, there's a market, there's clearly tens of millions of shares being sold. So these prices are real or Israel as any other IPO in which people are you know figuring out what's going to happen? You know the next checkpoint for both of these companies is gonNA come in a couple of weeks when they report their next quarterly earnings and I think by then you'll start to see the analysts get comfortable the companies understand the next steps and what's happening after. And you're speaking with Dustin Moskovitz later today the founder of Asana. So any questions on that? You can kind of tease out right now. Well, I was told. The pure folks. About our stock imagery because apparently no longer has sideburns to. Join, the Line of people that complain but it's like you know there's the old line about taking a haircut. Up Thirty, five percents of they actually gained hair on the market today speak. Clearly. sideburns maybe somewhere else. But? No I. THINK WE'RE GONNA be really interested because some unique company in which its founders, Dustin Moskovitz who Justin Rosenstein, who both met each other at facebook actually majority of the company outright right. We just never see or very rarely see tech companies where the founding to CEO's and and COO own like outright majority like not just a majority of the voting because of class, a class B shares but they just outright own about thirty two percent of the company I believe doesn't owns thirty six. Percent of the company outright and just knowns around sixteen point, one percent and so to me like I'm just curious because it's just a different path for a company it was a slower growth company capital much more efficiently grew much more methodically and the founders sort of maintained ownership over time in a way that most other founders do not think the other. The other thing to put out here is Asana has no lockup though the similar to spotify Ed to black as listing all the shares are available for trade to anyone. Who any insider anyone who owns a share of on this morning can put it on the market and sell it Here is the complete opposite pallares pioneering this new kind of fusion of the IPO and the direct listing one would argue maybe the worst of both of those processes but actually a direct listing with a lockup and so only roughly twenty eight to twenty nine percent of pollen. Tear shares are even available for sale at all with the rest in lockup and market standoff agreements that will expire over. The next calendar year. So you know there's a lot more to wait on right. There's not as much liquidity with Pallares could actually harm the stock price. They might be a little bit inflated right now because there's limited number of shares available for trade, we'll have to watch and see but again, it'll be interesting to see if other companies start to do a directing the lockup because clearly Palin tear has not suffered tremendously using this model. So again, another tool in the tool chest and uber do something similar with lock-up period. mean. They did like all IPO's. Underwriter from a bank, they have lockups in place mostly to make sure that there's not a mass rush to the exit. They don't want hundreds of millions of shares at any price willing to be sold. They WANNA, kinda manager coming out because they're putting oftentimes their own money up through the green shoe at stake, and so again, that's what made direct listings unique is that there wasn't this lockup employees are free to do on day one through whatever they don't have to wait six months as is customary. So again, we'll see kind of where the the system lies in the future. As you know, the New York Stock Exchange also got approval to do a direct. Listening with a capital fundraise so we've gone from this world of like there's an IPO and that's the only way to go public to. You can do a direct listing, a direct listening with a lockup, a direct listening without lockup address listening lock-up in a capital fundraise like you can do anything you want. You know it's it's the it's the Netflix of going public. So to speak I, see the headline now airbnb goes public through a through a pollen tear style direct listing. It's just going to happen and it's going to be horrible but we will be back here to talk about it as always every shareholder gets a free party house for one night so. That'll be the new innovation going on there, but but that's a sonnet that is Pelham Tear Ford they an and we'll have more to come in the next week.

Spotify Natasha Mascarenas Pailin Dustin Moskovitz Danny Creighton Founder New York Stock Wall Street Journal Airbnb Peletier SEC Dan Prime New York
HPV vaccine significantly lowers risk of cervical cancer, large study finds

NEJM This Week - Audio Summaries

01:59 min | 3 weeks ago

HPV vaccine significantly lowers risk of cervical cancer, large study finds

"HPV vaccination and the risk of invasive cervical cancer by Giro, lay from the Karolinska Institute Stockholm Sweden. Data to inform the relationship between quadrivalent human papillomavirus, HP V. Vaccination, and the subsequent risk of invasive cervical cancer are lacking using nationwide, Swedish demographic and health registers to follow an open population of one, million, six, hundred, seventy, two, thousand, nine, hundred, eighty, three girls, and women. The investigators assessed the association between HP vaccination and the risk of invasive cervical cancer girls and women were evaluated for cervical cancer. Their thirty. First Birthday. Cervical cancer was diagnosed in nineteen women who had received the quadrivalent HP V. Vaccine, and in five hundred, thirty eight women who had not received the vaccine. The cumulative incidence of cervical cancer was forty seven cases per one hundred thousand persons among women who had been vaccinated and ninety four cases per one hundred, thousand persons among those who had not been vaccinated after adjustment for age follow up the incidence rate ratio for. The comparison of the vaccinated population with the unvaccinated population was zero point five one, the investigators found that the risk of cervical cancer among participants who had initiated vaccination before the age of seventeen years was eighty eight percent lower than among those who had never been vaccinated amongst Swedish girls and women tend to thirty years. Old quadrivalent HPV vaccination was associated with a substantially reduced risk of invasive cervical cancer

Cervical Cancer HP Karolinska Institute Stockholm HPV
LeBron James and the Miami Heat: From Champions to Breakup to NBA Finals Opponents

ESPN Daily

03:13 min | 3 weeks ago

LeBron James and the Miami Heat: From Champions to Breakup to NBA Finals Opponents

"Brian Windhorst you have spent I think the last decade of your life trying to establish successfully establishing by the way that you are a lot more than the Lebron guy after knowing and covering him longer than any other human being in our business dating back to your high school days in Akron and then even through the time you famously up and moved to Miami to cover him there. So I just want to begin by apologising for pulling you back into the orbit of the same son we've been worshiping for now seventeen years well I wouldn't be here but for Lebron I, extraordinarily fortunate to meet him when He. Was Fourteen years old his move to Miami in open the door for me to come to ESPN. So I, Oh, Lebron immensely, and while all of us want to spread our wings as we get older certainly would never shy away from or or tire from looking at this this guy because he's been influential character in my life and thankfully and influential character in the history of the NBA. Yeah. That was incredibly well said but now it's time to get super messy because in this case in this series where there are so many different interesting storylines and angles, it does feel like past might be prologue. I want to go back ten years now. It is July ninth, two, thousand and ten and Lebron James is introduced to heat fans for the first time along with Dwayne Wade and Chris. Bosh introduced to the NBA really for the first time as this big three and Lebron is asked about his plan for winning championships in Miami. Three kings came down here to win championships. Not One championship to Lebron. Tell us about that not too on. Now. Now by. Not. Fix. So at that moment. How did the Miami Heat See Lebron era playing out? Pat Riley thought that that was. The Greatest Dynasty team that he had ever been able to be a part of. Better than magic and Kareem and James Worthy. Better. Than Shack and Dwayne Wade better than the hopeful teams that he had with the next with Patrick Ewing and Allan Houston John starks. He thought this was one of the greatest teams in the history of the NBA. He saw a horizon for a decade where they would be in the finals year after year after year and maybe they wouldn't win it every year and maybe they wouldn't win five six or seven Lebron said, but they would rack up. It was going to be his sunset team. He was going to ride this dynasty out and then go into the sunset and it was an incredible for years. It was one of the most prolific four year runs in the history of the NBA, but it wasn't that dynasty and Pat. Riley, has never one hundred percent ever gotten over.

Lebron James Miami NBA Dwayne Wade Pat Riley Brian Windhorst Patrick Ewing Akron Espn Bosh James Worthy Kareem John Starks Shack Allan Houston Chris
Dosomething.org - Earning Scholarships Through Community Service

The Scholarship Shark Podcast

02:10 min | Last month

Dosomething.org - Earning Scholarships Through Community Service

"Often students struggle with finding unique and creative volunteer opportunities. And today scholarship tip combines two things in that is community service and scholarships end. So I wanNA talk with you about do something dot org. On they offer scholarships but the way students earn scholarships is through community service. So I like to use the page in two ways not just for the scholarships, but it's also a great resource to help soon, think through some service projects that they can be a part of me launch on their own or at least get involved to. Win. One of the do something scholarships. So the way they do something scholarships work for students who are twenty five years old or younger than they live in the US or Canada. They're going to school or planning to go to school. they're able to participate in this community service scholarship. There's no essay, no GPA requirements recommendations no. And the other nizing as you can enter multiple scholarships at the same time So the organization is very generous awarded over one million dollars in scholarships over the past six years with over three hundred winners. And you know if you win and you're not in school yet, they will hang onto that money for you until you graduate and go to college. So I did an episode where I interviewed a do something dot org that's episode Number One, twenty three and I'm going to include that Lincoln the show notes. So definitely check that out because you learn a whole lot more about this scholarship and the organization and how their scholarships work, but they have scholarships all the time and this is really good because often. Younger students will say you know maybe if sixteen or seventeen year old maybe ice will more junior may say you know I wanNA start applying for scholarships want to start. Working towards winning scholarships. What can I do? This is a great one. So definitely, check out do something dot Org and learn how you can earn scholarships through community service.

United States Canada
Ellen DeGeneres Addresses "Toxic" Allegations

Daily Pop

02:59 min | Last month

Ellen DeGeneres Addresses "Toxic" Allegations

"Ellen show returns to day and she is not holding back she is facing all the drama and ugly accusations listen to this. As, you may have heard this summer there were allegations of a toxic work environment at our show. And then there was an investigation I learned that things happened here that never should have happened I take that very seriously and I want to say I am so sorry to the people who were affected. We have made the necessary changes and today we are starting a new chapter. The truth is I. Am that person that you see on TV I am also a lot of other things I sometimes I. Get sad get mad I get anxious I get frustrated I get impatient and I. am working on all of that I am boss of two hundred and seventy people two hundred and seventy people who helped make this show what it is two hundred, seventy people. Still Bracing for. All I want is for every single one of them to be happy and to be proud to work here. I, Still WanNa be the one hour a day the people can go to escape and laugh. Okay. So that's her monologue for the show airing today she kind of touched on everything. So how do you feel about Ellen after watching that I? Mean I watched the whole thing from start to finish and the entire time my recurring thought was just like. Damn killing this right now like she is just such a true professional. This is where she shines right and you know I think she is what she said seventeen seventeen years I believe I don't know how many seasons that is but for her to be on our air for that long to be as highly popular as she has been I'm sure that things were behind the scenes I'm sure there's a Lotta people that no longer work there that are probably like, okay this sounds like a lot of bs but. Like it was set up in a way that Ellen trust fortunately for her was not in a position to take the fall and I really do feel like the way she addressed everything i. smiled halfway through I realized she is just so damn good at this and look I really liked the way she sort of broke it down into categories where she's like I said kind of the I said be kind to one another because of this reason, she reminded everybody the reason for that which I didn't even remember. And I think she was really smart is that she went into all of the different categories of like we're all really complex human beings. Sometimes, I'm happy sometimes I'm mad sometimes I'm sad sometimes a good mood sometimes I'm pissed at the end of the day I'm a woman in this business for twenty plus years I am the boss of to hundred and seventy people. I'm not gonNA perfect interaction with every single person and I hate to pull this car because I like to think that I'm pretty even on this. Front, but if this was a man I, don't think we'd be challenging her as much as we have been and I'm not saying that things were not done an era of not saying that she has been perfect and it clearly shows that she needed to take accountability for a lot of stuff that went down when I think she did a good job for that and I think this is going to go under to go under the bridge and we're going to keep watching Allen and not think twice about it.

Ellen Allen
ON The Frontlines Of The Youth Climate Strikes

PODSHIP EARTH

05:53 min | Last month

ON The Frontlines Of The Youth Climate Strikes

"This week we go to the frontlines of the youth climate strike movement. There are hundreds of protests going on all around the world today as young people, school children from Australia to Iceland come together to protest about what they're calling the crisis of their lifetime climate change. Of course, what they see is politicians inability or unwillingness to do anything about it to the global protests that is underway right now, students and workers all around the world of flooding the streets demanding action on climate change, Maggie, Rulli that a demonstration in London with the latest Michael with thousands of protesters, right underneath parliament, and what's so striking besides just the sheer size of protesters here are. The age of people who are demonstrating almost all of them are students that's hiding just nine years old. We spoke to a group of seventeen year olds who said they're here today to fight for their future. Now, the goal of this strike, really all these strikes around the world it's a send a clear message to world leaders ahead of the UN climate summit happening this week in New York climate change protests happening right now in lower Manhattan this is video from chopper four showing the massive crowd marching from Foley Square the courthouses down to the battery among the people flooding city streets were students who were allowed to skip class today to join this 'cause. I told with Jerome Foster. who had seven sounded watching documentaries about our planet go activated and started climate blogging creating virtual reality platforms social justice. He's now eighteen has been climate striking for eighty one weeks in front of the white. House. He founded one million of us to get youth to vote this November Jerome is one of eleven million people from over one hundred and forty countries the climate striking and skipping school to tell us we need to act now. I stopped by asking Jerome where he is now. I'm visiting New York City I just moved here for college, but I was born and raised in Washington DC. I'm going to college at Peace University and Columbia Columbia basically majoring in computer science specializing artificial intelligence. are distance-learning others are like mixed waken coming class in? Their dorm near the off his classes, some of them, most of my classes right now are digital. Have One. Now. So tell me about growing up in DC and kind of what led you to get into the place where you founded the organization one, million US. So where I grew up in Washington DC right around like places. And forests and those like a huge place for me to explore my neighborhood. So I kinda grew up getting in touch with nature and after years of like understanding what nature wasn't had really appreciate it. I started watching documented by astrophysics and learning about like what are world's about like what a black holes water were imposed all these cool late science things, and after that, I started watching documentaries about my own planet and how our planet fit into. Astrophysics. into the rest of the world that every time they talk about something else beautiful it's like but humans are burning it down and but. Are Continuing to extract coal and an oil and natural gas to power earth than is going to continue to see species go extinct and like that was kind of a wake up call for me understanding that our earth is actually has like trouble going on but still being like six or seven years old was like. This isn't that big of an issue. Adults are GonNa fix this adults definitely going to step up and take action but Learning later on like it didn't happen. That's that's not the story as the navy faded it. kind of grew into another understanding that like if the corruption is the unwillingness to have moral clarity won't stand up to corporations and that they don't have the political leadership to acting say, we need to hold you accountable and like as older I was like, how can I get into? Really. Getting their attention actually taking action when my friends kind of toby lunch table they're like, Hey, you should start into pitch. Okay. Cool. So like for sixth seventh and Eighth Grade I posted every single day. and. Like facts and got to like and I was like I got to convince that climate change because back then like global warming is a hoax and everyone believed that that was the big struggle and like today it's not that same conversation. It's about how do we take action but back then it was all about is it real? And I did that for six eighth grade in ninth grade I trying to transition. To. More technology and building I reality environments. So I mean when you say like it's ten years, it has been view like if he started when you seven that. Yeah. I started virtuality company called Vr, and basically it was the idea that like we can use virtuality. Gaming Place, but actually civic engagement accident building empathy only a few people will be able to see it because it's so expensive to create and it's so hard. Tribute it out. So I, kind of transition into. into journalism and it was because I started watching my documentaries again. It was Leonardo DiCaprio's before the flood and like in the last five minutes he said we need commentators then covered as if it's a lot we need young people we need people to come out here and start talking about time change in a new way. So I was like I can do that. There's like I'm I'm I'm with around blood so like two hours. Later I I email my English teacher in accurate a blog called the climb reporter and one hundred, sixty, five articles like eight months and determine about climate change from east perspective sounds like we need young people in this movement because our future is directly at stake people will say their children's children but we're the Stojan. At this point we waited fifty years to take action. Our Future. Now,

Jerome Foster. Washington Dc Manhattan UN United States Leonardo Dicaprio Australia Michael London Reporter Foley Square Maggie Iceland Rulli Toby Columbia Columbia Peace University
Blending Organizing Styles

A Slob Comes Clean

04:47 min | Last month

Blending Organizing Styles

"Elissa how are you? I'm so excited to be talking to you. I'm so excited to have this chance for us to chat. So tell me a little bit about yourself. Or unique life situation. What makes us unique? I mean, I. Don't have. It's not super exciting. I have four kids. My oldest is super exciting. It might make it a little more chaotic. Yeah it's fun. It's fun. So I have. A seventeen year old son and a fifteen year old daughter and a nine year old daughter and a seven year old daughter. So I have three girls and one boy. And I kind of have I feel like I have two sets of because my two oldest are two years apart in ahead to surprised babies after. So that's so fun. Sometimes. Keeping young and making me feel old at the same time. I have quite a few friends that have similar stories to that, and I, always think about the. Like what is it like when you're taking a baby to like I don't know if they're this far apart but like to junior high football game or but yeah, you know that it's just a whole different world it is and when I got pregnant with my third was I found out like the same month that I had got my second child into all day kindergarten and thought my life was like opening up for me and then I found out I was pregnant. So. It was like, oh Not yet. Yeah, I'm still going to be a mom so and and not that what you mean i. totally know what you mean. Yeah. It's been an adjustment but I'm getting I mean everybody's in school now. And so it's it's helping. Are they actually in school? I said that and I was like, aren't they? We're on day to like on our second day of them actually being gone and it's such a weird thing. I was telling my daughter yesterday I was like. It's so weird that you're going back to school, but it's so weird that it's so weird you know like S. Just anyway, that's that's exactly I have my two youngest are going every day because they go to a charter school. So they catch school decided to do every day. Everyone else is doing hybrid. From my high schooler is an doing hybrid, but she can handle it. I'm not very good at doing the online schooling. So it's been real blessing to have them back in school. yet, and I was telling my kids as the seasons come around. We're used to these patterns of things that just happen and school is like a big pattern. Back to school and going to school after summer. So when it was really up in the air really. Stressed me out a lot I. didn't know what we were GONNA do. Spend one that I like having my kids home and I always enjoy summer and I'm Oh i, always tell them. I'm said you guys are going back to school And then this year. was like, okay but everybody's ready to go because they're ready to get going with things and so then there was like, okay well, then I don't feel that way and then when they actually went, I've been like super depressed about it. You know. So it's just doesn't it? Yeah. Why can't anything be easy this year but whatever We'll get off that topic, but let's talk about. Oh I have a question that I would ask people. So you get to be my first one. Like what was your introduction to Assab comes clean was it but podcasts blog youtube like what was it and then I also WanNa know which thing has been. Like the most ongoingly helpful for you. Okay. So I would always get the audible ads on my facebook or just whatever social media I was using it was facebook though and I saw the cover of your. BLANKIE. But the first book that I read how to manage your home without losing your yes and I saw how the cover and I was like. Oh I think I might like I just like to the cover and plus. I am losing my mind. So that was like I need to. I need to read this book. So I actually downloaded the audiobook and it was like, oh my gosh, this is the first time I've. Read a whole lot of like housekeeping organization books mostly because. and. I think you can really I. Feel like I missed that chapter in my childhood like my mom. I. Hope Does never listen to this. I won't tell. My mom wasn't a great housekeeper. And I'm not a great house feel like I lot I missed like everybody knows what they're doing the normal people that you say they know how to do it and I never liked that and so whenever I read the books I'm like well, yeah. But I can't do

Facebook Assab
"seventeen years" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

02:22 min | 1 year ago

"seventeen years" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

"Seventeen year old wants to these two on NBC for then joined pet loss in use Leon Harris and storm team four chief meteorologist Doug Kammerer for news for it for bringing down the day's biggest stories and giving you a first look at your forecast working for you every afternoon on news Ford for. communication is the key to building any business FM one a one point five and eight AM fourteen hundred the patriot can be your communication key the microphone that voices your business message from the stage of your own radio show defining you as the expert in your line of work the theater that brings your brand to a solid awareness place and position in the vast community of customers listening ears in metro Detroit the broadcast professionals here will help your show develop building you your company and your customer base with and through an affordable on air and online media distribution get to patriot Detroit dot com click contact us at the bottom of the page patriot Detroit dot com contact us do so and then look for a call from sales manager Brad Smith then build your business with your own radio show on FM one oh one point five and eight AM fourteen hundred the patriot he. out in the cold getting lonely getting old can you. okay. call the Larry elder show now at eight eight eight nine seven one sage that's eight eight eight nine seven one seven two four three. that is active in IVF dial that number now eight eight eight nine seven one St you heard the man also follow me on Twitter and on Facebook at France radio F. R. A. N. T. easy is the last name radio as we come to you live from the really factor dot com studios here in Cleveland Ohio before look we got two different culture wars that we're discussing at the moment first hour of the program we discussed at length the L. G. B. T. cues movement toward gender elimination literally.

NBC Leon Harris Doug Kammerer Detroit Brad Smith Twitter Facebook Cleveland Ohio chief meteorologist Ford sales manager Larry France F. R. A. N. L. G. B. T. Seventeen year
"seventeen years" Discussed on KYW Newsradio 1060

KYW Newsradio 1060

03:22 min | 1 year ago

"seventeen years" Discussed on KYW Newsradio 1060

"Youngest seventeen years old the others young adults they were all taken on federal state and local elected officials joined mayor Kenny in a call for gun control governor was cities going to sign an executive order to get the General Assembly to pass gun control legislation and senator Casey called on the Senate to vote on a background check bill and the ban on military style assault weapons this third thing with the support of president trump Israel band to muscle in Congress woman from entering the country this week now Israel's reversing that band for one of those times when I thought more about that we check in live with Margaret Brennan the host of the CBS program face the nation Margaret it would follow the story so really what's going on well this morning we learned that Israel has once again reversed its position and will now allow in Congress woman review to to leave she says she wants to go visit her nine year old grandmother who lives in the west bank the original itinerary for her and congresswoman Omar was to go visit Palestinian areas and see the humanitarian conditions there they've been harshly critical of Israeli policies towards the Palestinians what's really at at the heart of this though it is largely a political dispute the presence been of feuding publically for months with these two members of the so called small squad they are a freshman members are typically they wouldn't have a lot of influence but they're being painted as the new face of the Democratic Party so having this very public dispute provide some political benefit here at home and it's an extraordinary thing to use diplomatic leverage against political opponents Margaret who's on the show this week right now we will be speaking with senator Joe Manchin of West Virginia he has been pushing to tighten background checks on fire arms we will also be speaking to twenty twenty presidential candidate Andrew Yang who burst into tears last week when he was spoken to publicly by a woman who lost a small child to gun violence Yang that moment got in a lot of attention will talk to him about his bid in a crowded field for the presidency yes Margaret Brennan host the face the nation you'll feel first Sunday at twelve thirty right here on K. Y. W. program sponsored by have a foot the president may be interested in a major international real estate deal for the U. S. reports from the Wall Street journal in the Associated Press a president from past talk to aides and allies about buying green land for the US border source described as a trump ally told the AP the president had discussed the purchase but was not really serious about it still it would not be the first time an American leader did try to buy the world's largest island here is an autonomous territory of Denmark which has not indicated any interest in selling it Tom forty CBS news Washington a thirty year old Chester County man has pleaded guilty to third degree murder killing a woman while he was drunk and high back in February the Y. W. stomach Kevin spoke with the victim's family at the media courthouse wearing a dark prison jumpsuit David star how or of Newtown square pleaded guilty to third degree murder and related charges for the D. Y. head on crash in upper chai Chester back in February that killed forty five year old dina Ekman attachments husband Chris was seriously injured the defendant had five prior.

forty five year seventeen years thirty year nine year
"seventeen years" Discussed on Short Story Long

Short Story Long

02:20 min | 1 year ago

"seventeen years" Discussed on Short Story Long

"Caucases, and we've enjoyed writing in his mom's car what where about fourteen or fifteen the seventeen years old to drive. So you've got to be seventeen to get your license. Most people get their driving licence by eighteen we were fourteen or fifteen at the time got so definitely underway. He steals. His mom's car keys, we jump in the call with driving around his parents, and my parents out this wedding. So we are they're going to be gone for a while by the Indian weddings last like seven days. So we were like, okay, they're going to be gone for hours and hours and hours. So we thought let's grab a call. Let's be cool. It's drive around because we're like pumping like still drill or whatever it was feeling like the coolest people. And I think I did a call was like it wasn't even a good car. You know, what I mean, it was it was going to be proud of that called. But for us. It was like fourteen fifteen just being in any Republican still dry. The call was a Vauxhall Astra, which is a British brand. I don't even know if what the equivalent in the US would be, but it's not considered. Like a premium brand. And so we're driving this car, but we're playing still dry really really out. He's getting foster and foster and foster like, we're all having a great time and actually my heart at that point. I was like I don't want to be doing this. This is wrong 'cause nervous. But I was trying to prove that I was cool in that. I was like hit than that. Like, I knew what was going on. And I didn't want to be the odd one out. So I start joining in and feeling confident and my friends gonna fostering foster and foster, and then we see one guy that he used to bully walking past us. And he shouts out some light. Shouts out. Some costs words this guy, and we're like laughing at this guy, and I'm feeling terrible again, but I'm laughing in any way. And then we literally go straight into his. We. I don't plan. We literally go straight into another car that was parked. Thankfully, we go straight into this. Call I'll caused completely written off the car in front of us company. Ran off, you know, I I don't even know if a call had airbags then like, I don't think it was anything. Luckily, none of us were. Wow. Like, none of us had anything on us in both the 'cause completely destroyed in the sense that you'd never go to drums it's caused again. Yeah. None of us had blood on us. None of us had. I mean, obviously had whiplash extreme and the worst thing that happened next was we crashed. And obviously people heard the sound because it was so hot. There was an event whole next to us and outside of that event. Whole that was the event with the wedding was happening. No,.

Vauxhall Astra US Caucases seventeen years seven days
"seventeen years" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

01:42 min | 2 years ago

"seventeen years" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"Time. Okay. Guess what? The real estate realtors have reduced in numbers. Okay. There's ninety five thousand three hundred active agents in October twenty eighteen could you imagine them in January twenty ten of peak to one hundred and nine thousand five hundred realtors. Okay. I've been in the business since two thousand two you know, there was a brief decline. Beginning of this year. And now, it's increased to its current level. We have two hundred and four thousand nine hundred centers in the state of California. And if you asked me, that's too many their mother their brother uncle their father their their their cousin Brucie. And they're everybody. So the point is experienced as matter, and it's not to disparage anybody because this is a wonderful industry can change your life in a heartbeat or in an escrow. But you know, I think it's good to make sure that you're working with a licensed realtor were held to a higher standard a plus rating from the Better Business Bureau. That's an accreditation that shows I've been operating into higher standard for seventeen years and also that they're well versed in what they're doing. And obviously our company provides all your needs across the board. So they wear a one stop shopping. We're here for you. So you can give you call four one five eight ten one eight again, four one five eight ten one eight eight eight so trivia contest question time, and it's movie related. You know, San Francisco has been the backdrop to so many movies. And you know, why because the city's beautiful on my gosh, there is no other city. Out there like this. And I left my heart in San Francisco, and I came back to reclaim the heart that are left.

San Francisco Better Business Bureau California seventeen years
"seventeen years" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

MyTalk 107.1

02:59 min | 2 years ago

"seventeen years" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

"Right. And now the final their current tally is up to what for Bradley Eighty-three foot, Bradley and seventy eight. Okay. Good. Well, now, look who's here. Give it up for Johnny. Donny pretty good. I'm trying to have a conversation with you Donnie interrogate. Johnny. I'm here for a taste test. So here's the upshot. Donnie, here's how this works. All right. Here's what happened. I make the pies every year for thanksgiving. I that's one of the things that I feel passionate about in my life. And this year after you know, sixteen seventeen years of pie making I decided I'm not making the dumb pumpkin pie anymore because they make it every year, and nobody eats it. So same people come to my thanksgiving every single year we have a small family. Same people make the pumpkin pie one piece goes in. That's it. I thought I'm not going to do this. I'm not going to go through the trouble. Nobody eats my pie. Now that occurred to me Donny what if I make crappy pumpkin pie, and nobody knows how to tell me. So I thought well, I'm just gonna make the pumpkin pie. I'm going to bring it to work. I'm going to have the people there try it, and I'll have them try it up against the store store-bought pie. Okay. And then we'll see you know, blind taste has style. Maybe maybe it's terrible. Maybe it's good. We'll find out. All right. And that's why you're here. Okay. So we've gathered some other tastes Ryan tried it. Laurie has tried it. Okay. Both Bradley and Holly of tried it. We have verdicts from some not all and now it's your turn a blind taste test. Close your eyes. We're going to do it relatively quickly while Bradley gonna feed you, I actually should take video of this because we have video of everybody else's fantasies being just a dream. Come true. I know I can tell. Okay. So Donny is eating the first and these are Bradley sized bites. They're large, and it might take a little while to get through working. Okay. So he's got his eyes. What do you think? Okay. Danny likes it. No. Johnny. We're not a restaurant mouth noises. Holly standard this. Okay. Let us know when you're ready for the next one halls. Okay. Just got awkward. Okay. The second piece. Oh my gosh. Bradley. Okay. You're gonna have pie. Enjoy it cooking. This difficult is it really no one is your I'm going to say. I'm going to say the first one was the store bought. Okay. But that's not your job. Your job is identified. Oh, I'm sorry. I don't actually know which one was which because I didn't see what twenty in which order so. I'm going to say the.

Bradley Donny Johnny Donnie Laurie Ryan Danny Holly sixteen seventeen years Eighty-three foot
"seventeen years" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

Newsradio 1200 WOAI

06:36 min | 2 years ago

"seventeen years" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

"Seventy th anniversary and seventeen years on the air together. Kevin McCarthy, and I and. Gosh, I wish I wish we kept candle ham. Any people we've helped to get a great car buying experience. Good great deal found out. There is a different way to buy a car. There's a better way to buy a car and over the years because I have no idea what the number is guessing it's six digits somewhere over seventeen years. I was just thinking it. I think we could fill up a few of those hundred thousand seat mega stadiums. That some of the NFL teams are playing these days. Seventeen years. So many so many customers so many happy listeners so many dealers in so many cities it's got to be in the in the mid six figures could be, you know, so many people go directly to our website factor supposed to car pro USA dot com under certified dealers and read what to do which is simply to Email through our site. So that the person at the dealership knows that we sent you and I opened the door. And then of course, you get the car pro VIP certificate that you take with you. Which is also a really nice thing. Because it's kind of like. Shield if somebody gives you anything or you feel funny about anything that's time to whip that certificate out say, hey, I'm a car pro VIP, do this shouldn't be happening and get things back on track. And they will do that. And on that VIP sticker or is a certificate. Pardon me is the name of our car pro contact at that dealership, usually the general manager of the sales manager sometimes it's the owner and their pitcher. So that there's no imposters. Oh, yeah. Well, you don't look like pitcher. Oh, I had a wreck. Bad wreck. So we take you for listening. We thank you for supporting our dealers. It's their advertising on our show that keeps the show on the air. And has I seventeen years we got over way to pick the very best dealers that will back up everything I say, otherwise, it wouldn't work and guess what? If they don't do that. They're off the show area over seventeen years. We've kicked a good number of them off kind of like flag its engines on airplanes, but by. Let's talk to Randy in Rosenberg, Texas. Randy, welcome. Hey, how are you guys doing? We're doing good, sir. What can I do for you? Well, looking interested in a twenty fourteen fifteen era tapped into a Ford Chevy dodge. I've got a a large. Dealer here. Lease least least company and they're offering off lease vehicles. What are the pros and cons of leasing an awfully vehicle? There is no pros at all. I'll be honest with you. Vehicle comes from does it really make any difference? I mean, some people would say, well, if somebody's leasing a vehicle the no they're going to turn it in. They don't take care of it. And I don't find that to be the case. I will tell you where I'm at or AB located in Dallas. There was a company it's one of these big. They got a huge indoor warehouse, and they got all these vehicles in here. And it's called something least returns. Right. So I was curious about it because they were they were doing a lot of advertising. So I started pulling up on their website, their inventory, and I started looking at the history. I couldn't find a single least return in the whole place. It was just a gimmick. Because people felt like they're getting a better deal because it was the least return I don't give that any credence whatsoever. I don't care if it was at least are bought or the person paid cash, I'm looking at just the truck. It's condition how it drives its history, and what's it worse? And so, you know, I wouldn't get too wrapped up in the in the latest thing also would tell you the typically leases for used vehicles don't work very well. The payments are too high. Typically, you can get a brand new truck for the same pain. As a used truck because the residual values are so low. I mean, it's it's it's a twenty fourteen you're talking about a five year old truck. Now, it's going to have a low residual value. And that means you're going to have a high payment. So. So. I wouldn't tell you don't do it. I would just tell you to do the homework and with the rebates incentives on new trucks right now. I'm you know, you might look at again, a brand new and if you're going to lease for less money. Gotcha. The company I'm talking about is a legitimate there in Dallas as well as Houston. Okay. Yep. And they they offer these vehicles for thirty days or sixty days wholesale. And I I know the used truck market right now. So high. That if I was buying. I would buy a new truck a used truck. I just didn't know if I'd save any money by seeing a thirty thousand mile thirty six thousand mile off lease type vehicle, I doubt that you will. But check it and see talk to talk to her how you Tombaugh Ford about leasing new one talk to them about Lacey used when I wouldn't lease a used truck more than another thirty six months, and and be mindful of your warranty because you know, it used vehicle there's risk. And so if they include if they lay show us and included extend worry with it. That's one thing. If not you got a leash truck that you may be out repairs on and watch your mouth, obviously, that's one of the biggest things people do and frankly trucks, don't typically lease all that. Well, I seldom recommended the one exception is tundra tundra. Lisa. So well because Toyota resale value is so good that often recommend it. But as. As with all trucks. You gotta watch your mouth. You gotta watch that wear and tear and that goes right down to scratches in the bed. You know, I've seen so many people that leaves trucks have to put a bad line around before they turn the truck in the hat, all the scratches on the inside where tear could kill you. If you use the truck now fits a daily driver. You're just driving car. That's a different deal brandy. Appreciate your call very much..

Dallas Randy NFL Kevin McCarthy Toyota Ford Texas Rosenberg Tombaugh Ford Lisa general manager sales manager Chevy Lacey dodge Houston seventeen years thirty six months Seventeen years thirty days
"seventeen years" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

03:17 min | 2 years ago

"seventeen years" Discussed on KTRH

"Seventeen years on the air together. Kevin McCarthy and. Gosh, I wish I wish we'd kept count of ham. Any people we've helped to get a great car. Buying exp- have great car Bank experience. Great deal found out. There is a different way to buy a car. There's a better way to buy a car and over the years because I have no idea what the number is guessing it's six digits somewhere over seventeen years hours, just thinking it's I think we could fill up a few of those hundred thousand seat mega stadiums. The some of the NFL teams are playing in these days seventeen years. Yeah. So many so many customers so many happy listeners so many dealers in so many cities it's got to be in the in the mid six figures. Could be you know, so many people go directly through our website, Dr supposed to a car pro USA dot com under certified dealers and read what to do which is simply to Email through our sites. So that the person at the dealership knows that we sent you and I opened the door. And then of course, you get the car pro VIP certificate that you take with you. Which is also a really nice thing. Because it's kind of like. A shield if somebody gives you anything or you feel funny about anything that's time to whip that certificate outside. Hey, I'm a car pro VIP. This shouldn't be happening and get things back on track. We'll do that and on that VIP sticker or certificate. Pardon me is the name of our car pro contact at that dealership, usually the general manager of the sales manager sometimes it's the owner and their pitcher. So that there's no impostures. Oh, yeah. I'm the German. Well, you don't look like pitcher. What happened? Oh, I had a wreck. Really bad wreck. Yeah. So we thank you for listening. We thank you for supporting our dealers. It's their advertising on our show that keeps the show on the air. And has I seventeen years we got her away to pick the very best dealers that will back up everything out say, otherwise, it wouldn't work. And guess what? If they don't do that. They're off the show over seventeen years we've kicked good number of them off kind of like flag contingents on airplanes. But bye bye. Bye. Let's talk to Randy in Rosenberg, Texas. Randy, welcome. How are you guys doing? We're doing good, sir. What can I do for you? Well, looking interested in a twenty fourteen sixteen era capstone tick Chevy dodge. I've got a large. Dealer here at least lease company and they're offering off leash vehicles. What are the pros and cons of releasing an awfully vehicle there?.

Randy Kevin McCarthy NFL general manager Rosenberg Texas sales manager seventeen years Seventeen years six digits
"seventeen years" Discussed on KSFO-AM

KSFO-AM

06:02 min | 2 years ago

"seventeen years" Discussed on KSFO-AM

"Braces, you were normal. Unfortunately. Yeah. So how long have you been married? Seventeen years. Very good. Good for you. Yes, sir. So what happened two years ago, they put you on this journey because you've man you guys got after it. Congratulations. Yeah. Yeah. Well, for me, I think what it was Dave. Your name kept coming up in conversation. I was trying to make some changes professionally and thought that I could make those changes and realized that we had a mountain of debt that wouldn't allow me to do. So so my former boss shout out to Gil page. He had a copy of your book giving it away to me the Christmas before and after hearing your name a few times, I realized the book was at home, and I drove right into it. And it let me on fire. And so I went and told my husband this is the plan and he easily just jumped on board and from there. We just got started. All right. Very cool. Why do you go? So you were you were that easy. Terrence she just told you. She's the book says this. I didn't get. I didn't have a problem with it. Dave I actually trying to implement at fifteen years ago. Well, when she heard it from you. I'll see how she does. It is. If I have any other problems of things I need to get started. I call you. So you can call. Fifteen years that way, man. Actually, he told me the seventeen years ago when we before we got married. He's a country. Boy, you know, very simple never had a credit card, no car payments, and he wanted us to live on one income. And I thought he had bumped his head because I was a city girl that we need a good credit, and we needed a new car, and all of these great things that I thought we need it. And he ended up coming on board with me. And then fifteen years later, you see it and nowhere else. So. Where you were ready though. That's good. Good for you. What do you tell me? What do you tell people the key to getting out of debt is? Oh, I think they've I coming to an agreement with each other. We have to get on the same page. I we can't be put in two different directions. And the you do that to me to me. That's the main key and getting on at one. A I I definitely agree for me. I handled most of our finances the first fifteen years of marriage and did make all the best decisions. Be because I guess I've made a lot of emotional decisions being a woman, but once we got on the same page, and we knew exactly what we had coming in and going out. It was such a relief for me to to share that information with him on a monthly basis. So definitely coming together. Being on the same page was huge for us. Yeah. That's everything. It changes people. I mean, people say this all the time when we're doing debt-free screams. But I don't know if the typical listener who's not working on it together understands how important that data point is on out of the millions of people that we've done. That we know they've gotten out of debt, and the I guess thousands now that we've had their debt free screams, the data point comes up over and over and over and over again being on a budget working together communicating being unified on it. It's just almost impossible to drag a semi dead spouse through this, isn't it? Oh, yeah. Possible. Well, Dave, I tell you what we have the privilege if we have a marriage ministry team marriage, and we talked a lot of different couples. And we have the wife who's on board in the husband who isn't in the husband's on board, and the wife, isn't that is the most challenging thing that they pay. You know, you have one style who so eager and ready to go, and they all fire, but then the other has been bought into the plan. So we were just so blessed and fortunate that we decided to to work this thing together, we we saw what living check to check look like and having more month than money. And I think we were just tired. We were sick and tired of being sick and tired. If you would. Changes everything when you do that. So how's it feel? Got a truck I wanted and I had a year. I gave it all with no problem. Wow. Sold a Trump crop song. How much that bring? Oh, what twenty three thousand four the Trump? Yeah. We owe twenty three thousand and we sold it for what about seventeen thousand dollars. We took a little hit on it. But can't should pay the difference. Because of course, like everyone we were upside down in it. And we were looking real nice, but we were riding upside down and got rid of it intervene. Immediately. Those were the big items. We immediately got rid of. Yeah. Forty two thousand and then the vehicle we pay cash for we the we drive now only cost us nice sixty five hundred dollars together. Yes. Yeah. Wow. That's awesome. Well, and now you can say about now that you don't have any payments. You can save up and drive. Whatever you want, right. That's right. That's right. We driving like no one else. So later, we can drive like no one else. Yeah. Got it dialed in. I'm proud of you very very well. Thank you. Dave. What if I could this is real for us? I listen to free screams has been any most no experience for me. My kids have listened to you my husband. And I when I exercise at work, I've just been motivated by channel and to be on with you today is just I mean, it's just the cherry on this process. I it's surreal. I can't believe this is even happening. Yes, we have. It's it's those four now house and Dave. Well, I'm honored to be part of the family. Well done. All right. We got a copy of Chris Hogan's retire inspired book for you. You know, that's the next chapter in your story to be millionaires. You are well on your way to doing that. Congratulations and burglary. All.

Dave Terrence Chris Hogan Trump Gil burglary fifteen years seventeen thousand dollars sixty five hundred dollars Seventeen years seventeen years Fifteen years two years
"seventeen years" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

06:03 min | 2 years ago

"seventeen years" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"Some braces, you were normal. Unfortunately. Yeah. So how long have you been married? Seventeen years. Very good. Good for you. Yes, sir. So what happened two years ago, they put you on this journey because you man, you guys got after it. Congratulations. Yeah. Yeah. Well, for me, I think what it was Dave. Your name kept coming up in conversation. I was trying to make some changes professionally and that I could make those changes and realized that we had a mountain of debt that wouldn't allow me to do. So so my former boss shout out to Gil page, he had a copy of your book at giving it away to me the Christmas before and after hearing your name a few times, I realized the book was at home, and I drove right into it. And it let me on fire. And so I went and told my husband this is the plan and he easily just jumped on board and from there. We just got started. All right, very cool way to go. So you were you were that easy. Terrence she just told you she's the book says this get little problem. I didn't have a problem with it. Dave I actually tried to implement fifteen years ago. Well, when she heard it from you. I'll see how she does. It is. If I have any other problems and things I need to get started. I call you. So you can call. Fifteen years that way, man. Actually, he told me the seventeen years ago when we before we got married. He's a country. Boy, you know, very simple never had a credit card, no car payments, and he wanted us to live on one income. And I thought he had bumped his head because I was a city girl, and we need a good credit, and we needed a new car, and all of these great things that I thought we need it. And he ended up coming on board with me. And then fifteen years later, you said Rodman world, so. You were ready though. That's good. Good for you. What are you? What are you? Tell people the key to getting out of debt is. I think Dave I coming to agreement with each other. We have to get on the same page. I we can't be put in two different directions. And then once you do that to me to me, that's the main key and getting on wanna call. I I definitely agree for me. I handled most of our finances the first fifteen years of marriage and did make all the best decisions. Be because I guess I've made a lot of emotional decisions being a woman, but once we got on the same page, and we knew exactly what we had coming in and going out. It was such a relief for me to to share that information with him on a monthly basis. So definitely coming together being on the same page with Hugh trust. Yeah. That's everything. It changes people. I mean, people say this all the time when we're doing debt-free screams. But I don't know if the typical listener who's not working on it together understands how important that data point is on out of the millions of people that we've done. That that we know they've gotten out of debt, and the the I guess thousands now that we've had their debt free screams, the data point comes up over and over and over and over again being on a budget working together communicating being unified on it. It's just almost impossible to drag a dead spouse through this, isn't it? Oh, yeah. Impossible. Well, Dave, I tell you what we have the privilege if we have a marriage ministry team marriage, and we talked to a lot of different couples. And we have the wife who's on board in the husband who isn't in the husband's on board and the wife isn't. And that is the most challenging thing that they face this. You know, you have one south who so eager and ready to go and they're fire. But then the other has bought into the plan. So we were just so blessed and fortunate that we decided to to work this thing together, we saw what living check to check look like and having more money than money. And I think we were just tired. We were sick and tired of being sick and tired. If you would. Yeah. Changes everything when you do that. So how's it feeling? Finally, got a truck I wanted and I had a year lead wind. I gave it all with no problem. Sold a truck crop. How much did that bring? Oh, what twenty three thousand four the truck? Yeah. We owe twenty three thousand and we sold it for what baby about seventeen thousand dollars. So we took a little hit on it. But catch it paid the difference. Because of course, like everyone we were upside down in it. And we were looking real nice, but we were riding upside down and got rid of it intervene. Immediately. Those were the big items that we immediately got rid of. Yeah. Forty two thousand and then the vehicle we pay cash for we the two we drive now only cost us nice sixty five hundred dollars together. Yes. Yeah. Wow. That's awesome. Well, and now you can say about now that you don't have any payments. You can save up and drive. Whatever you want, right. That's right. Like, no one else. So later, we can drive like no one else. Got it dialed in. I'm proud of you very very well. We thank you day. Right. If I could this is the real for us. I listen to debt free screams has been any most no experience for me. My kids have listened to you my husband. I when I exercise at work. I've just been motivated by channel and to be on with you today is just I mean, it's just the cherry this process. I it's the real I can't believe this is even happening as we have. I it's it's those four now house and Dave. Well, I'm honored to be part of the family. Stuff, man. Well done. All right. We got a copy of Chris Hogan's retire inspired book for you. You know, that's the next chapter in your story to be millionaires. You are well on your way to doing that. Congratulations and very. Terrance and.

Dave Terrence Chris Hogan Gil Rodman Terrance Hugh fifteen years seventeen thousand dollars sixty five hundred dollars Seventeen years seventeen years Fifteen years two years
"seventeen years" Discussed on Six Pixels of Separation - Marketing and Communications Insights - By Mitch Joel at Mirum

Six Pixels of Separation - Marketing and Communications Insights - By Mitch Joel at Mirum

02:10 min | 2 years ago

"seventeen years" Discussed on Six Pixels of Separation - Marketing and Communications Insights - By Mitch Joel at Mirum

"Well hey there and welcome to episode number six hundred twenty six of six pixels of separation is mitch joel it sunday july eighth two thousand eighteen let's get on with the show so who are you in what do you do i am daniel pink and i write books the latest of which is called when the scientific secrets perfect great connect how you been i'm good mitch how you've been i'm really really good yeah happy to chat with you i mean you know him huge fanny work from all the way back and free agent nations it's for remembering not one it's it does seem to be a book that that doesn't that i don't i don't i don't know if you attach yourself to his to it as much or it's not attached you term is very much still part of his guys yeah maybe a long time ago at booking about seventeen years ago so but i'm proud to be i'm proud to be attached i'm proud to be attached to it i think that always as you know the first book is hardest book rights on proud of it and that dimension and i think i got some things right in the book yet it seems like it actually became the way most people would like to make a living ultimately i was really fascinated with the new book when i think when i first heard about it the book wasn't even out yet and i was thinking about the title and i'd seen the subtitle and it seems some sort of tweeting out about stuff and things like that and i guess my first thing when i saw it was well is it like how much of this is timing versus how much of this is luck was my first thought and then reading the book i realized you weren't really going in that direction but look still has a lot to do with when also doesn't it oh sure absolutely i mean it's a great point there two different ways of thinking about the two different ways of thinking about timing one of them is timing as as fate as circumstance as as luck and luck and randomness play a huge partner lives more than we're willing to acknowledge because it's so disturbing but what i'm talking about tom talking about different said which is basically decisions about when to do things so you know how to beginnings affect us how to mid points endings affect us wins the right time today to do this kind of work that kind of went to dave do exercise so i'm talking about timing in that specific sense of our all of our win decisions did that idea come to you because you were trying to optimize your life or did it come to because you figured that there there might be some connective tissue for all of us four because i think when we think about the concept and what makes the book so interesting is the fact that we want to think we're so unique but it turns out we're really all similar well you're totally right about that i mean that's basically said some ways the story of human existence that second part that you said but but for me the impetus was the was your first ipod uscis which is that i wasn't so much trying to optimize my life i was trying to make it less crappy in that there's different things then optimization is too high goal for me i'm just trying to minimize the idiocy and truly that's part of what it was i was making these decisions in my life and i was making them in a really haphazard half ass way and frustrated and so i started looking around for guidance thing okay someone's gotta give me some type here in i was shocked that didn't exist and then as you know the last several books ever have looked at social scientists may there's some science on this and i started poking around and i was just blown away by how much there was what it said in the fact that it was that there would be common questions being asked across multiple multiple disciplines.

mitch joel seventeen years
"seventeen years" Discussed on Sports Radio 610

Sports Radio 610

01:33 min | 2 years ago

"seventeen years" Discussed on Sports Radio 610

"Last seventeen years in the nfl fifteen times in the last seventeen years there have been not one not two not three see where this is going not four but five new playoff teams in the national football league five the last seventeen years fifteen of those years there's been five new playoff teams will only twelve teams make the playoffs every year so that means forty two percent of the playoff teams turnover every single year right so if you do this exercise what here's what's going to happen you're going to get to like four teams three teams and you're gonna say now this is the year that they don't have five camps and then every year they have five new playoff teams every single stink in year so you've gotta make yourself find new teams not to make the playoffs last year you had green bay in the playoffs right oops right so i mean some of these things sometimes fluky things happen and it's tough to it's tough to get a handle on so this year in the nfl what at five teams that made it that didn't make it last year we'll make it this year to the post season who ultimately gets in and here's what i have for you folks so last year in the afc the patriots the bills the steelers the jaguars the titans and the.

nfl steelers jaguars titans football seventeen years forty two percent
"seventeen years" Discussed on WFAN Sports Radio_FM

WFAN Sports Radio_FM

03:36 min | 2 years ago

"seventeen years" Discussed on WFAN Sports Radio_FM

"And that's the fun part about it is exciting because i feel like i actually it is professional basketball right but at the same time the first game last played in brooklyn when i walked out into the arena was sold out for half basketball game i started getting chills almost as i was back in like as a rookie because from that type of crowd for a year and a half on that how to play in front of that type of crowd in as the year went on i mean there is a lot of fun i obviously i play league five on five but i played four i'm like you know pick up games in happy court and then five in the nba court what's it like for you to change your world and obiang's three on three for a guy like play seventeen years in the nba still have that fire burning to go and cook at a high level but maybe not at an mba level where i'm running up down forty eight tonight but the is perfect for a guy like myself get through other five feel like i feel like i can play at a high level have court on three once a week not allowed to wear and tear on you body you get somebody like myself thank god that want to continue to play if they feel like they still complain with iraq i was a kid so so how cool has it been for you to be around guys like ice cube and the fact that he loves ball so much that he started his league i mean it's a lot of guts man that's important because all this work and so we buy virtual you get to see this guy worked behind the scenes guy his hands on with everything he's not a guy that just creates on the couch and watch and watch it grow now he's behind the fees that he's there every game every trip and he's making a move and and you know we were doing the draft is tomorrow is that correct i love it your boy.

basketball brooklyn obiang nba iraq seventeen years
"seventeen years" Discussed on The How-To Heretic

The How-To Heretic

01:33 min | 2 years ago

"seventeen years" Discussed on The How-To Heretic

"Of course dollar figures are attached to these these are only initial damage filings these are not the actual settlement prices because settlements are locked behind nondisclosure agreements we don't know what the church paid out in settlements but just the past seventeen years on two days of very cursory searching what i could find was the church has been sued for two point four billion dollars in sexual assault coverups in seventeen years the church has been hetz whole mall that's like an entire mall the church's been happy to champion in the past seventeen years that they've given seven hundred million dollars to humanitarian aid that's barely more than a quarter of what people have sued them for over sexual assault allegations in them covering it up now those are initial damages initial lawsuit filings those are not the actual settlement prices and that was only a tiny handful of headlines that i could find that had dollar amounts tach to them which is not representative how many there are it's not representative of how much has actually been paid out in settlements but there i mean i don't think that it's unfair to estimate that the church has paid out hundreds of millions possibly billions of dollars in covering up sexual sexual assault in the past let's say twenty years and that is what i have been able to conclude based on what i found though that is my opinion i'm saying that to protect you guys podcast myself personally that is my opinion but that is my opinion based on what i've been able to find.

assault representative seventeen years seven hundred million dollars four billion dollars twenty years two days
"seventeen years" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

02:07 min | 2 years ago

"seventeen years" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"In your seventeen years at rj what are you most proud of well i i'm i'm proud of creating an organizing principle around creativity that was there's inclusive but also respected what i think of as the two hemispheres of a creative brain you know i talk about stories in systems and basically it's creativity through time which is storytelling and creativity in space which is designed systematic thinking and those two things need to work together in a way i think that burn back wanted out and copy to work together but he did that in the service of narrative craft i think this is a large organizing principle and we didn't just talk about it as a philosophy we we were very practical about it when we structured creative teams around that so how did you do that well so the the people that run the groups and the offices they tend to be two people a systematic thinker and a narrative think so in the case of new york khloe got leave his background is experiences i and she's a systematic thinker she's a creative designer systematic thinker and tara wayne is a copy writer so he's a he's a narrative thinker when they worked together and this is not about dividing conquering son about chloe looking after in efface designing and tosh looking after tv it's about them working together because what happens is something similar to what i think ben back wanted to happen between copy is that they work with each other symbolic if i'm khloe and i'm used designing in efface as what tires can add that is as a narrative think he's he's a subtractive thinker because it comes down to these reveal moments and so he understands how to present a brand in a really simple coherent way and often interface designers safa from feature creep and they create this sprawling interfaces that don't let her up to brand feeling they just add more right because they tend to be additive and on the other in the other direction thing taras learns that the function.

khloe tara wayne writer chloe taras york creative designer tosh ben seventeen years
"seventeen years" Discussed on 1410 WDOV

1410 WDOV

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"seventeen years" Discussed on 1410 WDOV

"Issue certainly had a wide range of disagreements let's talk about just generic sense since the government shutdown is the big news but nonetheless the populous movement that brought us trump began when because it wasn't just november of 2016 one was their revulsion americans have toward washington when you think that began yeah you know i bet popular movement and the revolt against washington and its impetus was with the tea party there's no doubt about it signed this spontaneous grassroots uprising of folks against the decisions coming out of the obama administration and it continue forward for eight years that got energized both on the left and the right because american style left behind economically i'll on the foreign policy front as well and uh it's on it's home and donald trump and john i think it will remain there because he's being true to the promises he made on the campaign trail at least in modern american history has said the number of successes that trump has had and his first year however there's a disparity between his policies on one hand in his personality on the other in the minds of many americans does his personality get in the way of his policy now not at all on content people have read and could be excited all across the country and those that take issue with his style um you know that's really just irrelevent what what matters are the solutions that we see across the country both on the economy front twenty thousand jobs apples creating lowest unemployment and seventeen years uh lowest africanamerican and hispanic employment and history um and that's just on the economic front and that's only half of the economy story so folks are excited about what he's doing an n style really is largely irrelevant friday of course noon to three i'm on 700 wlw in cincinnati and during the campaign i had many of the trump family on including cluding the president to be and.

washington obama administration cincinnati president foreign policy donald trump seventeen years eight years one hand
"seventeen years" Discussed on WRKO AM680

WRKO AM680

02:18 min | 3 years ago

"seventeen years" Discussed on WRKO AM680

"Around in her senior year she was driving around town in a m g which is for those of you know don't know it it's a british sports car you'll those without the tops on she was driving around in a white mg sports car that's what she was doing at seventeen years of age she talks about the to beat up cars they had she doesn't mentioned a third which was her little sports car that she would drive around i guess her daddy bought her the car so everything are bowed her is ally she's not an indian she's not a cherokee her ancestors on the census even said they were white she never enrolled the native american tribe she everything about her is bs every think everything by the the way you now she got into college not because she was you know up paying four hundred and fifty dollars is semester commuter college she gonna scholarship chana scholarship in other words america was incredibly good and generous to her and she lied and conned her way to millions and millions and millions of dollars and now that the kunar man has exposed her and called her out she thinks she is going to silence me chief i got news for you i've taken on people all law tougher than you you don't scare me chief we're going to make you teach again w rko voice old boss boss a words continues between trump and khenjan own i'm bill trevorrow w rko news trump tweeted this morning calling kim a madman who starves his own people the president's response came after kim called trump a mentally just range deranged oto hard the escalating tensions come following trump's promise in front of the un to destroy north korea if it instigates an attack on the united states or any of its allies foxborough police are investigating suspected murder suicide involving a forty nine yearold father and his sixyearold son authorities say that william efsa caccia junior shot his son anthony and then turned.

sports car america kim president trump north korea united states anthony foxborough murder william efsa caccia seventeen years fifty dollars
"seventeen years" Discussed on WIMS AM 1420

WIMS AM 1420

02:10 min | 3 years ago

"seventeen years" Discussed on WIMS AM 1420

"373 three and i hope um one of the things that i i really hope is that i can stand as a a a goal as an example for those that have felony convictions out there for those that are dealing with the difficulties that you know people want to define them by that difficulty like i am not going to be able to ever live without being called a convicted felon i am defined by a mistake but i made at seventeen years old and it was a deadly mistake it was terrible night i don't believe that my presence there would have changed the you know the the outcome but nonetheless on there i'm responsible right for everything that i did and but i hope that for every everybody makes mistakes i hope that people realize that you can make a mistake and you can still have a great life so they go let's continue with your calls and thoughts rick in columbia south carolina rick you're on free talk live good afternoon gurria hey you're you're listening to bq excelled go with your thoughts you have more car our our our work are required we're your federal law repair up twenty five year and had convicted felons come me if you wanna attorney and it will cost mirny money to write a letter hurting your partner curve get your gun rights restored us pardon attorney ardent turn your it is not a part here there were reported to good golfers out of washington with your orbit as as a team of pre ever people who work hard you you can get a perfect report on transitional pardons are only for federal crimes um so i knew i wasn't convicted for of a federal crime i did go before charlie chris when he was the sitting governor of the state of florida and he refused at that time to give me a pardon in restore my gun rights the news a it was a patent refusal he could have downgraded it from a you know my application for a pardon could have been a conditional pardon he could have offered he could have offered restoration of rights without uh you know uh i can't remember forgiveness or whatever the terminology was for the crime.

convicted felon attorney partner washington charlie chris florida rick columbia carolina federal law pardon attorney twenty five year seventeen years