26 Burst results for "Seventeen Eighty Seven"

A Comprehensive Defense of America's Embattled Constitution

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:34 min | Last month

A Comprehensive Defense of America's Embattled Constitution

"We are blessed everybody. We are very very blessed to live in. A country still has some semblance of a divinely. Inspired form of government of the independent jewish judiciary rule of law consent to the govern- checks and balances and that started today. Not actually today. But on this day i should say many many years ago in seventeen eighty seven the united states constitution after it was the seven articles were at least conditionally approved by the constitution convention. They had to go state by state so they had to go. Delaware was the first state rhode island was the last state to ratify and to approve it and there are seven articles of the united states constitution. It wasn't until seventeen. Ninety one that the bill of rights was passed and ratified by all the states. And that's actually what most people know is their constitutional rights first amendment second amendment amendment fourth amendment first amendment right to speech not to be infringed upon by government. Secondment the right to bear arms third amendment. That soldiers don't come into your home fourth amendment. The government can spy on you fifth amendment. You're right against self-incrimination. Six seven and eight all about process speed and a speedy speedy and quick jury of your peers against long imprisonment unfairly ninth amendment which actually one of my favorite amendments to the constitution which says that anything that is not in the constitution does not mean that it's not protected tenth amendment. Things that are not in here are protect are then given to the states and to the people that the for. That's the first ten amendments to the united states constitution. But that actually wasn't part of what we're celebrating today. If i remember correctly december seventeen ninety one that the bill of rights was was ratified. James madison wrote. It is our reason alone that must be placed in control of the government. Our passions must be controlled by it. The constitution spreads power over time and over land makes it hard to change. Things makes it hard to conduct. Quick revolutions you see the founding fathers in this constitution. And this is the best way to defend. Somebody asked me say charlie what conservatives actually believe said. It's very simple. We believe in natural law. We believe in a natural law. Giver founders knew this they wrote it in the declaration which is why the declaration is a partner of the constitution. They go right into each other. As dr larry arnn from hillsdale college would say it's the founders key. They are meant for one

United States Rhode Island Delaware James Madison Charlie Dr Larry Arnn Hillsdale College
We Will Never Know What Was Said During the Constitutional Convention

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:16 min | Last month

We Will Never Know What Was Said During the Constitutional Convention

"In today's time it's easy to feel disconnected to the brilliant so the clairvoyance or the wisdom of our founding fathers or the framers september seventeenth. Seventeen eighty seven was the last day of a heated constitutional convention that lasted almost the entire summer and went from may twenty fifth to september seventeenth. Hundred eighty seven. It was held in private and and secret. George washington presided over the chair as the chair of the constitutional convention. Now we have some notes from the constitutional convention but most of the back and forth debate and the commentary. We will never know exactly what was set alexander hamilton john. Jay james madison. They were going at it. You see the articles in confederation at articles of confederation which were written after the successful revolution or separation from the british. Were posing problems there. Shays rebellion inability to commerce between states to mint currency. It became more and more clear that some form of a federal government was necessary. The question is what kind of government do we want to form

Alexander Hamilton John Jay James Madison George Washington Shays
"seventeen eighty seven" Discussed on The Charlie Kirk Show

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:57 min | Last month

"seventeen eighty seven" Discussed on The Charlie Kirk Show

"Today is a day that every single child in school should take pause and be leads through and told the great american story of how we got here. Today is a beautiful day. There's a lot wrong with our country right now and i wanna take a pause to remember what happened on this day in seventeen. Eighty seven september seventeenth. Seventeen eighty seven was one of the most significant days in human history. It was definitely one of the most significant days in political history. Almost never before had this idea of self government been tried. The romans tried it in some capacity and failed and eventually became an empire. The greek strident and city states. But never before. Did a people attempt to embark on a form of government. We're the people were the sovereign. The idea of self government independent judiciary the ideas of freedom and equality in the rule of law that are the ultimate principles to build that society. In today's time it's easy to feel disconnected to the brilliant so the clairvoyance or the wisdom of our founding fathers or the framers september seventeenth. Seventeen eighty seven was the last day of a heated constitutional convention that lasted almost the entire summer and went from may twenty fifth to september seventeenth. Hundred eighty seven. It was held in private and and secret. George washington presided over the chair as the chair of the constitutional convention. Now we have some notes from the constitutional convention but most of the back and forth debate and the commentary. We will never know exactly what was set alexander hamilton john. Jay james madison. They were going at it. You see the articles in confederation at articles of confederation which were written after the successful revolution or separation from the british. Were posing problems there. Shays rebellion inability to commerce between states to mint currency. It became more and more clear that some form of a federal government was necessary. The question is what kind of government do we want to form now. A sloppy way to talk about the american stories say we had two founders one in seventeen seventy six and one in seventeen eighty seven that is not true there is an a divine connection between the truths of the declaration of independence and the laws of the constitution of the united states

john maynard keynes edmund Blm incorporated organization Burke airbnb united states of america nike
September 17, 1787: The History Behind This Significant Day

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:57 min | Last month

September 17, 1787: The History Behind This Significant Day

"Today is a day that every single child in school should take pause and be leads through and told the great american story of how we got here. Today is a beautiful day. There's a lot wrong with our country right now and i wanna take a pause to remember what happened on this day in seventeen. Eighty seven september seventeenth. Seventeen eighty seven was one of the most significant days in human history. It was definitely one of the most significant days in political history. Almost never before had this idea of self government been tried. The romans tried it in some capacity and failed and eventually became an empire. The greek strident and city states. But never before. Did a people attempt to embark on a form of government. We're the people were the sovereign. The idea of self government independent judiciary the ideas of freedom and equality in the rule of law that are the ultimate principles to build that society. In today's time it's easy to feel disconnected to the brilliant so the clairvoyance or the wisdom of our founding fathers or the framers september seventeenth. Seventeen eighty seven was the last day of a heated constitutional convention that lasted almost the entire summer and went from may twenty fifth to september seventeenth. Hundred eighty seven. It was held in private and and secret. George washington presided over the chair as the chair of the constitutional convention. Now we have some notes from the constitutional convention but most of the back and forth debate and the commentary. We will never know exactly what was set alexander hamilton john. Jay james madison. They were going at it. You see the articles in confederation at articles of confederation which were written after the successful revolution or separation from the british. Were posing problems there. Shays rebellion inability to commerce between states to mint currency. It became more and more clear that some form of a federal government was necessary. The question is what kind of government do we want to form now. A sloppy way to talk about the american stories say we had two founders one in seventeen seventy six and one in seventeen eighty seven that is not true there is an a divine connection between the truths of the declaration of independence and the laws of the constitution of the united states

Alexander Hamilton John Jay James Madison George Washington Shays United States
"seventeen eighty seven" Discussed on The Rush Limbaugh Show

The Rush Limbaugh Show

03:33 min | 4 months ago

"seventeen eighty seven" Discussed on The Rush Limbaugh Show

"He's in branson missouri and you are on. Eib just had some comments related to slavery the not meant to defend slightly. There simply meant to put history in its historical perspective. Which is important anytime we talk about histories to consider the perspectives of the time. America was not the first country to have slaving nor did it have the largest number of slaves that in fact it was the red slave slave trade that was the oldest and the largest. But you never hear anything about that. Slave trade and slavery existed in america. It existed world lad. it wasn't just. In america and west african countries were more involved slavery than any other country. They had internal slightly before the european Sleep tigers even came there. Well why didn't we just abolish it. Then in seventeen eighty seven when the constitution went into effect. I'm sorry what was that. I missed it. Why did we not just abolish it. Why didn't founding fathers just abolish it in seventeen eighty seven when the constitution went into effect. Great that's that's my point perspective. Why did they have it in england. Why did they have in portugal. Why they haven't in france but ours is supposed to be different right right but we. The seeds were planted in the constitution. So we could develop a more perfect union didn't we. That's what we did and we did. You know you're making a really good point here. The framers the framers declaring that humans have in alienable rights. We get from god and not kings and queens or by virtue of a caste system put in motion all the liberties we have today. The civil rights the abolition of slavery. Women's suffragette that was put in motion by the founding fathers. Even though it didn't happen instantly without them that wouldn't have happened. And it would have been the slavery you talk about would have existed instead. What are we focused on in. Michael thank you instead. What are we focused on today. How people talk because they talked the wrong way. Y oh my goodness what's going to happen. Tucker carlson on the carlson show the other night. Basically found an internal memo from the federal reserve that is imposing a speech code. Listen to this. Shows obtained a document from the federal reserve. The internal website at the fed that its employees. Read it's a memo on bias free language but of course it's very biased in instruct staffers not to use words and phrases that may be considered offensive. What's offensive founding fathers manmade and singular pronouns. Like he or her now. The fed is controlling monetary also totally destroying the economy. in case. You haven't noticed but right or wrong. It's supposed to be a political. Why are they trying to control her language because they want control minds but the fed we know. I think it's characteristic of all bureaucracies that when they can't solve an existential problem they always go to the triviality is done something right because look at the federal reserve. And what are they doing. They're looking to pronouns. The fed is destroying the purchasing power of the dollar while they are lecturing you to say birth theme people and pick the pronoun of your choice. We lost our minds. This this is nuts folks and it's liberal self. Loathing has rushed described not long ago on the last word lawrence or donald head. Tom brokaw on broncos got a book called the time of our lives. A conversation about american and donald..

Michael portugal america england france Tom brokaw Tucker carlson lawrence donald west african european carlson first country today donald head Eib american seventeen eighty seven America
"seventeen eighty seven" Discussed on Tales of American History

Tales of American History

04:00 min | 6 months ago

"seventeen eighty seven" Discussed on Tales of American History

"He's he's buried there but then we've also found the remnants of his gun shop there we really and so his gun shop was there. We know where he's gun shop was that Then conrad moved in later. He wasn't here until probably again. I'm thinking seventeen eighty seven Having trouble recall dates today for some reason but they but he had a son named noah and noah actually apprenticed with his uncle. Michael there was even after after conrad died. He actually sat in seventeen ninety. And there's only one rifle known that signed by him in the book. And there's i guess now. We have three rifles. That are signed. Michael one that belonged to to Gosh captain james floyd that still in the family. And then there's the and you mentioned. Joe candidate The the the my colombo rifle come from the kindred collection i been able to purchase the conrad unbel- rifle and i started Pouring through the books and this thoughts on the kentucky rifle and its golden age that can dig wrote in nineteen sixty is considered the bobble if you will in the long in the long rifle the kentucky rifle world and among go back to this quick to even in pennsylvania. We've got documents now for a long time. People kept saying this kentucky rifle. Come from the song the battle of new orleans that was done. You know after the battle of new orleans but it was really common. This term was really common bay tino three and new york baltimore. London newspapers to describe it interest. Grab this gun. But we now have documented. That's dated seventeen ninety eight At a pennsylvania gun shop listing what he made and one of the top of firearms that he made were kentucky rifles even in pennsylvania. This this term was was being used. But but going back to michael. Michael and joe kennedy had started studying and i had went to kindergarten. And we're talking about six hundred rifles just kind of leaned up against the wall and and i started going through these rifles and i didn't see anything and he told me nothing was for sale and and But anyway and so. I went through. All of these guns and my friend are landing. I dedicated the book to. That's kinda my mentor. And my daddy and best friend who's now eighty eight years old and still going strong But he was talking to joe and they were having a conversation and and you know. I thought man i better go through these again and half halfway around the room now not once all day you know. These are so many you know we're talking to an excess of six hundred so so so many rifles you kind of have to have a rhyme or reason and it's real overwhelming so i was kind of going from my left to the right the same way that i would read now not once during the day had ever reached back at always pulled out what was in front of me and get it went on to the next one and i was halfway around the room and for some reason i reached back maybe three feet i mean a long reach and picked up a gun picked up a rifle in one of the things as collector and as a student of these rifles for years and looking at a rival of made the exercise to not look for a signature but rather to look at the artwork and to test myself to teach myself how to locate where this rifle was made by architecture and.

pennsylvania Michael joe noah joe kennedy james floyd three feet Joe today one rifle battle of new orleans three rifles conrad new york baltimore seventeen ninety six hundred rifles seventeen eighty seven michael eighty eight years old London
"seventeen eighty seven" Discussed on Unreserved Wine Talk

Unreserved Wine Talk

07:37 min | 7 months ago

"seventeen eighty seven" Discussed on Unreserved Wine Talk

"List of every wine that he served while he was president. And you can see you provided on this date. The specific date what was served. How much of it was served ranging from madera to the ryan's of roan. I mean all the different wines if he served the volume that was served each occasion. It's a phenomenal historic record to show you how much attention a president of the united states would stand on the winds it. He was serving to his guests at the white house. I so meticulous i. I'm surprised at time for writing policy in that well and drafted the constitution. So i guess it was a man of many talents. So let's look at this. Oh this is next related to jefferson alluded to it in my intro. Tell us what's engraved on this bottle. Yes it's a very old state bottle from that period and it has the date seventeen eighty seven feet all in grave on the side. There's no paper level of course and then at the bottom. It has t j and that bottle had a very interesting history in the mid eighties as you may recall this collection of undiscovered rare wines was made by a fellow over in paris and he indicated that he was doing some construction work on his house and knocked out a wall behind the wall. Where these bottles of lafitte. And other top wines from the eighteenth century and this one particularly had tj on the side defeat and it turned out that was the same year that thomas jefferson was there and it was known that he enjoyed the feet and he would use the initials tj so. This wine was reviewed by all the experts at went to auction and malcolm forbes great american publisher and his son kip forbes. Also tremendous wine enthusiasts a great business person decided. They wanted to buy the bottle of wine and it had been certified. As original christie's auction was taking place in london so the forbes had a museum in new york that they wanted to put it on display so kip forbes flew to london he bet on this the bidding went back and forth and back and forth got out of hand in the end he paid a hundred and fifty five thousand dollars for the single bottle of wine. Now put it on his private plane. He flew back to new york. Put it on display in the museum and unfortunately the curatorial staff in the museum had really not considered the delicacy of the item. They were displaying. And after it had been on display for a while the court loosened and sunk inside the bottle and the contents were destroyed. So is a very expensive investment that was lost and then to compound things. Another wine collector purchased some bottles that were believed to have been from thomas jefferson and he wasn't sure so he hired a team including former fbi forensic agents track the bottle in to find out what was happening in turned out. They discovered that the graving was not done by hand. It was done by a power tool and no power goals existed of course in history and the bottles were fake and the are that the other bottles as well. we're fake and that word got back to mocking forbes so he had a great line he just dismissed the whole thing and he said i just wish thomas jefferson had drank the damn bottle. I hope. Gosh that's a great story. Oh my gosh one of those bottles. Is that the basis for the book. Billionaire's vinegar exactly greener vinegar talks about this bottle and other ones that. A fellow named coke from florida. Who is an incredible line collector who would purchase number of these bottles and he was determined to get to the truth and he's the one who hired the experts to trace this. Get to a final decision on. Well if you have the means to buy the mine. I'm sure you have the means to investigate it so on him all right. Well let's keep going to the seventh president of the united states. Andrew jackson tell us about the inauguration and his love for wine. Well jackson was considered a kind of a frontier common man. That was kind of a term used to describe him. He decided that he wanted to have an open inauguration so they basically get to open. The gates of the white house opened the doors. The white house in that anybody who wanted to and it turned into a drunken brawl. People were jammed in the place. They were pulling drawers out to see what was in there. They were crawling in and out of the windows. It was a absolute masks. It was out of control end smartly. The path in the white house decided the only way to end. It was to take the alcohol out of the white house was being served and put it in the front lawn and that would move the crowd outside because they wanted to drink more so they finally were able to get things under control by moving the alcohol outside so the crowd could drink it there but despite his reputation as a common frontier man jackson was ranked pretty high when it came to the president and the amount of wine they served in the quality of line they served. He made sure his guest for after the inaugural were well entertained. Well as he himself was did he. Die of gout steph over the president's Died of doubt into roasted the liver so there may have been indulging a little bit too much alcohol time very dedicated to making sure everyone had a good time at the way gus. Now we get the opposite. Extreme with rutherford b hayes. The nineteenth president eighteen seventy seven to eighteen eighty one. His wife had a nickname. Well i think a lot of us know that prohibitions took place. The united states and that was nineteen twenty and eighteen thirty three where the constitution lod alcohol. But before that there was a movement called the temperance movement and it was kind of somewhat religious driven and woven and out of politics and different regions of the country but the temperance movement gained strength the different periods and rutherford b. Hayes was president during a time when the temperance movement was strong and his wife. Lucy hayes was one of the temperance leaders and they had a dilemma. Because at the beginning of his administration in eighteen seventy seven there was a very important state visit. There was coming to the white house it was. The son of the russians are who at that time that was very important relationship. The united states and the diplomats were saying. Of course you must serve alcohol. This is a visiting head of state. It will be full pau if we did not and she was hesitant but the haze is finally relented and allowed the alcohol to be served. It was the only time during the entire presence for four years at alcohol is allowed in the white house. And this hayes. Lucy hayes took this beautiful glassware that we're talking about earlier these decanters and beautiful glasses and she used them only for their service to fruit juice so she was given the nickname lemonade. Lucy differ fruit juice. That served at the white house. Well that would be no fun there you go. You have all types. This whole range is just amazing in terms of presidents in their relationships to wine. now president. Woodrow wilson what did he do. The vol stock act was the one that enacted prohibition but what did he do on the first. I guess reading if you call it of the bolstered at what was his approach. That's as far as we're talking about a moment ago. That's when prohibition officially began which was constitutional amendment was passed and then the allston act.

Andrew jackson london Woodrow wilson new york Lucy hayes jackson thomas jefferson eighteenth century florida mid eighties rutherford b. Hayes jefferson seventeen eighty seven feet rutherford b hayes a hundred and fifty five thous four years one paris each occasion first
Isolation and Freudian Paranormal Slips

The Ladies of Strange

04:11 min | 1 year ago

Isolation and Freudian Paranormal Slips

"When eastern state penitentiary or Cherry Hill as it was known at the time was erected in eighteen, twenty nine and Francis Ville it was the largest and most expensive public structure in the country which country. I've never heard of the eastern state penitentiary. It's Bainian okay was. nope Cherry Point. Just Kidding Cherry Point with Carolina's where my brother was born Cherry Hill. It's still the same country. Back to it. So about that map. Okay, starting off the strong today. Did you mean which state? Even when I, you align. Oh, happy. Belated birthday by the way tiffany was going to mention it but I didn't want us to be all of them. You let that slide since it's your birthday week. All right. So from eighteen, twenty and From eighteen twenty, nine to nineteen seventy-one, the eastern state penitentiary in Pennsylvania United States of America north. America. Earth Opera Milky Way Galaxy. Belief operated as one of the most famous and most expensive prisons in history at its completion. The building was the largest emo-. I can keep saying that the largest and most expensive public structure ever record in the United States and quickly became a model for more than three hundred prisons. Worldwide Eastern state emerged from concerns of prison reformers in Philadelphia in the late eighteenth century when prisons held accused criminals only until their trials if convicted prisoners face public in corporal punishment in seventeen, Eighty, seven, a group of well known and powerful Philadelphians known as the Philadelphia Society for alleviating the miseries of public prisons. Oh. What is the please? Give me a what's it called acronym Yup Thank you the Fist Sim. Map. The FISA Abba Papa they met in the home of Benjamin Franklin. The members expressed growing concern with the conditions in American European prisons conditions at the Walnut Street jail, which is located directly behind independence hall were appalling open in Seventeen, seventy, seven, the Walnut Street Jail House accused men, women, adults, children's thieves. Murderers were all jailed together disease ridden dirty pins were rape and robbery were common occurrences. Okay. I know that this is an other movies and TV shows and everything. 'cause you know this is something that was prevalent in history but this reminds me of outlander haven't seen IT A. Girl Uni Watch it but there's a scene where Jason are like a season where he's in prison in its continue. Okay I think lots lots of prisons are bad. The jailers made little effort to protect the prisoners from each other. Instead, they sold prisoners alcohol up to nearly twenty gallons a day Jeez. Food Heat including clothing came at a price and it wasn't unusual prisoners to die from the cold or starvation and keep in mind. They were only cap until their trials because if they are found innocent, they were like, Oh, if they were found guilty day, we're usually guilt Dr Benjamin rush spoke on the society's goal to see the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania set the international standard in prison design. He was convinced that crime was a quote moral disease and suggested a house of repentance were prisoners could meditate on their crimes experienced spiritual Ra- Morrison undergo rehabilitation good for him. What's his name again? Dr Benjamin Rush Okay you rush rush come down on the Cocoa Award Good Just hear me out for pages. The concept grew from enlightenment thinking but no government had successfully carried out such a program. It took the society more than thirty years to convince the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania to build this kind of prison. But in eighteen twenty, one, Pennsylvania legislature appropriated two hundred and fifty thousand dollars for eastern state and thus began a revolutionary new building on the farmland outside of Philadelphia at twenty twenty, seven Fairmont Avenue all

Dr Benjamin Rush Pennsylvania Cherry Hill Benjamin Franklin Twenty Twenty Philadelphia United States Philadelphia Society Walnut Street Jail House America Carolina Francis Ville Tiffany Jason Fisa Rape Robbery
"seventeen eighty seven" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

02:02 min | 1 year ago

"seventeen eighty seven" Discussed on WTVN

"Tonight just cold and damp out there the low down to forty degrees on Wednesday showers in the morning but once we get into the afternoon some of those clouds will break up and you see some sunshine fifty five for the high but the breeze will make it feel chillier then on Thursday some sunshine little breezy and slightly warmer highs sixty three degrees I'm A. B. C. six first morning chief meteorologist Marshall my peak on your severe weather station newsradio six ten WTVN no broadcasting from the underground command post from the files of the heaven somewhere under the brick and steel over nondescript building we once again make contact without a leader the end mark Livin our number eight seven seven three eight one three eight one one eight seven seven three eight one three eight one one before we jump in and we're gonna jump in old man both feeder ready when the title story that's something that happened on this date how may fifth seventeen eighty seven is written by Joseph Ellis at the American heritage great historian how may five seventeen eighty seven James Madison arrived in Philadelphia it's important remember this because your liberties are being destroyed particularly by iron fisted blue state megalomania X. he was a diminutive young Virginian about five feet three inches tall hundred thirty pounds in thirty six years old it so happened had thought more deeply about the political problems posed by the current government under the orders of confederation than any other American Madison.

chief meteorologist Joseph Ellis James Madison Philadelphia Madison Marshall
A Very Long Word

5 Minutes in Church History

04:17 min | 1 year ago

A Very Long Word

"What is the longest word in the English language? Well I think it's disputed at least if you consult youtube videos out there and people reading what is claimed to be the longest word so I don't know but I have a word for you. I'm not saying it's the longest but I'm saying it's very long or you ready. Its disestablishment ISM by my count. That's ten syllables. What is disestablishment terrorism? Well first we need to know what is establishmentarian ISM and for that. Let's go back all the way. Back to. Constantine in three hundred and their constantine not only legalized Christianity but he enacted laws that made it preferential to be a Christian and we have the beginnings of an established state church. This rolls on through the Middle Ages. By the time we get to Christmas Day. Eight hundred we see a zenith of this establishmentarian. Ism Pope Leo. The third is Crowning Charlemagne Holy Roman emperor and so through the Middle Ages. We have an established church. This was also true. The reformers we sometimes use the designation magisterial reformers. That's not to say that the reformers were grand or authoritative magisterial as a reference to the magistrate. And so whether was Calvin and Calvin S or Lutheran the Lutheran or the Anglicans or the presbyterians there was a view of an interdependence of church and state the group that was opposed to that where the Anna Baptists the during the reformation period. But it's really in the modern age that we begin to see establishmentarian as key piece of this is William Penn. The quaker in sixteen eighty one King Charles. The second deeded land to William Penn and the next year he settled his province later colony leader State of. Penn's woods and you put woods into the Latin and you have. Pennsylvania was established as a colony of religious freedom but for the most part the colonies had an established a tax supported church even after the revolutionary wars these colonies became states. We see them carry on in this establishmentarian practice in fact it's up until eighteen thirty five. That Massachusetts has a state supported. Church the Congregational Church well back. In seventeen eighty six. There was a key piece of legislation. It was entitled the Virginia Statute of Religious Freedom It was written by Thomas Jefferson and promoted this idea of religious freedom. Then we go into the constitution of the United States which was written in seventeen eighty seven was enacted in seventeen eighty nine and in seventeen ninety one. The first ten amendments were ratified and famously. The First Amendment says Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion prohibiting the free exercise thereof or abridging the freedom of speech or of the press or of the right of the people peaceably to assemble and to petition the government for redress of grievances. So in those first two clauses we have what are known as the establishment clause. That is there will be no establishment of religion and the free exercise clause which is the positive side of that of promoting the freedom of religious expression we sometimes hear the expression of separation of church and state. That's actually not in. The constitution came in a letter in Eighteen. O To a letter from Thomas Jefferson. Who was president at the time to the Danbury Baptist Association and he interpreted the First Amendment as thus building the wall of separation between Church and state in many ways has been interpreted since then but it is not language that is in the constitution. But we do have is a disestablishment terrorism as the First Amendment of the bill of rights. Well there you have it along history for a long word and there are many opinions about this word. This word of many syllables. This establishmentarian.

William Penn Thomas Jefferson Middle Ages ISM Constantine Congregational Church Youtube Crowning Charlemagne Holy Roma Calvin S King Charles United States Pennsylvania Massachusetts Virginia President Trump Danbury Baptist Association Congress Government
Garrett's career-high 24 points lead No. 3 KU past Oklahoma

AP News Radio

00:36 sec | 1 year ago

Garrett's career-high 24 points lead No. 3 KU past Oklahoma

"Kansas OB topping guard Marcus had nineteen Garrett points scored and a career seven rebounds high twenty and jailing four points Crutcher scored in an seventeen eighty seven the to lead seventy number six win Dayton for to the its third fourteen ranked straight Jayhawks win over seventy Oklahoma one to sixty three over Massachusetts Garrett was effective Crutcher from scored three fifteen point range of his seventeen with in six the second made half to and help nine the flyers attempts hold on only after the care minute about men cut a double defense digit deficit plan I know to we're four trying in to the do final office minutes on my and team I just took this needed us to so he I also just had had to go out seven there assists you know so and I do four was steals best for the team at the time the lead changed when eleven I my first times site in the this first when I was half with me before so the Jayhawks it was on closed from there out Dayton the first hasn't half lost since with the seventy an eleven eight to seventy three six run overtime defeat then K. against you opened Colorado up on its December lead further twenty first to open Trey the second Mitchell half had twenty six Greg and Eklund ten Lawrence rebounds Kansas for you mass Geffen toolbar Amherst Massachusetts

Marcus Crutcher Dayton Oklahoma Jayhawks Colorado Trey Kansas Amherst Massachusetts Garrett Massachusetts Mitchell Greg Eklund
What Happens When A President Is Impeached?

But Why: A Podcast for Curious Kids

06:43 min | 1 year ago

What Happens When A President Is Impeached?

"My name is evey. Im seven years. Old I live in Downers Grove Illinois. I my question is what happens when presidents get impeached. Have you been hearing about impeachment. It's been in the news because the US President Donald Trump trump has been impeached. And there's been a lot of news and conversation about whether he did something so bad that he should no longer be the US president as we're putting this this podcast episode out the trial to decide that is still going on. We thought you might appreciate having a little bit. More of an understanding of what impeachment actually is is how it works and when it has happened before in. US history so we called up. Jessica Levinson to help us with this. She's a professor or a teacher. Sure of law at Loyola Law School in California so she teaches people how to become lawyers. She also focuses on politics and government in her work so she looks at the rules around elections and she looks at government ethics. How people should behave in government so she really knows what's going on when it comes to impeachment? Here's Eve these question again. What happens when presidents get impeached? So impeachment is basically a way of removing one of our leaders in government. We have a couple of ways to remove people from their jobs so they don't get to keep doing what they already do and one of them is through elections and we can choose to vote somebody out of their current position. We can choose to say you. Don't get to keep your job. Somebody else's going to do your job now and we could also also decide to use a process called impeachment which means that people will basically decide. You did something. That is really bad in really problematic attic and that it's so bad that we might have to remove you from your job Before the next vote before the next election and so so. That's that's basically. What impeachment is a way so that people don't get to keep doing their job because they did something pretty? Bad impeachment is a process that was written into into our Constitution. The constitution is the document that was created to lay out the fundamental rules of what the United States was going to be. Here's our other guests to help explain lane the history. I am candidacy Davis. The author of don't know much about history. Impeachment is simply a term that was adopted by the men who drafted and wrote the United States constitution in seventeen eighty seven and the word comes from an old English term for how to remove an official if he somehow did something that was wrong. Corrupt criminal unethical ethical or some other form of needing to be removed. And so this was an idea that was important to the founders of with the country because they were getting a great deal of power to one man in particular the president does they finally decided on it as well as other federal officials and is important to remember. That impeachment isn't only for president. It's also for other high-ranking federal officials officials who might have to be removed from office including federal judges because our presidential elections only happen every four years the men who wrote the US Constitution thought there needed to be away to remove the president in between elections. If he had done something so wrong that he shouldn't be president anymore even before for an election happened. And I'm saying he here instead of he and she or her because back in the seventeen hundreds the founders couldn't imagine that a president or a judge judge or a person in that kind of power would be a woman one of the most important things about a democracy where the people choose their leaders is just that that the people choose so it needs to be a really big deal for a president to be removed from office by other elected officials instead of by the voters in an the election so the writers of the Constitution created rules around win and how a president can be impeached. The House of Representatives can bring bring charges against the president when they think he has done something wrong if a majority more than half of the members of the house votes to bring those charges to trial then a president has been impeached. That has happened three times so far in. US history and that's what happened to the current president. Donald Trump Andrew through Johnson in eighteen sixty eight was the first president to be impeached. The second one was Bill Clinton in nineteen ninety eight so it was more than a hundred thirty years between the first two impeachments Bill Clinton Andrew. Johnson were not removed from office now. There was one other career impeachment in that time. Richard M Nixon who was the president elected in nineteen sixty eight resigned from the office in Nineteen eighteen seventy four because he was going to be impeached and it was quite certain that he was going to be removed from office because of what he had done. In what we now know as Watergate so impeachment is pretty rare but it also might be a little confusing because being impeached. Doesn't doesn't mean that you're no longer. The president. Being impeached is kind of like being accused of doing something wrong. Here's how Jessica Levinson describes it just because because that first group of people the House of Representatives decides to impeach you nothing actually happens to president it might be that it's really embarrassing Maybe the people who don't like what happened. Use this against you. Think about something that happens at school where somebody does something. Like take a marker that wasn't theirs if the teacher tells the whole class look at this person they took the marker that's really bad that's kind of like impeachment if nothing thing happens other than the teacher just saying that's really bad but it's really what happens next which is called a trial in the Senate where you might be able to lose your job. The trial in the Senate is kind of like if the teacher says. That's so bad that you don't get to use markers for the rest of the day and so there's this consequences to that so it's up to the Senate to hold a trial and if enough of them. Two thirds agree that the president should be removed only then then what a president have to step down and that has so far never happened in. US history

President Trump United States Jessica Levinson Donald Trump House Of Representatives Senate Downers Grove Illinois Loyola Law School Bill Clinton California Donald Trump Andrew Richard M Nixon Professor Bill Clinton Andrew Davis Johnson Official
Anthony Davis goes down hard, but Lakers still roll Knicks

First Light

00:20 sec | 1 year ago

Anthony Davis goes down hard, but Lakers still roll Knicks

"To you Tuesday night in the NBA the Lakers pulverize the next one seventeen eighty seven lebron James had thirty one points Anthony Davis had to leave the game in the third quarter here is back after a fall and he could miss some time that won't help them but then again LA can console themselves with that was their sixth straight win and the second team to get the thirty wins this season in the

NBA Lakers Anthony Davis LA Lebron James
"seventeen eighty seven" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

02:08 min | 1 year ago

"seventeen eighty seven" Discussed on 710 WOR

"Be pen stated hoops action seventy two to sixty one with the nets lost Oklahoma City one eleven a one oh three in overtime the Knicks lost an old west to the Lakers one seventeen eighty seven on the ice the islanders beat the devils four to three in overtime and the Rangers beat Colorado five to three here's a W. O. R. weather channel forecast snow showers ending overnight clearing skies towards morning temperatures drop down to near thirty degrees will be in and out of the clouds as we head to that a Wednesday it'll be windy with a few snow showers possible high near forty wind advisory from noon Wednesday to midnight Wednesday night I'm a urologist Ken boon next news at four o'clock breaking news at once there today with one Berman and Michael Riegel of the morning coming up from six to ten I'm Steve greenfield at seven ten W. O. R. N. A. B. C. news radio station.

nets Oklahoma City Knicks Lakers islanders devils Rangers Colorado Ken boon Berman Michael Riegel Steve greenfield W. O. R. N. A. B. C.
"seventeen eighty seven" Discussed on 600 WREC

600 WREC

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"seventeen eighty seven" Discussed on 600 WREC

"How far your support can go at unbound dot for leave got some rain now scattered showers and a high temperature it's going to be in the mid sixties in for tonight hello in the low fifties with more rain rain on Friday with a high near fifty then clearing skies low to mid fifties for Saturday and Sunday right now we've got a temperature of fifty four degrees you met this morning news time seven thirty two am seven one six hundred W. R. E. C. ninety two point one FM the I heart radio abit Lou we've got yeah scattered showers moving in real quickly we got a couple things on this date in history on this date in sixteen twenty the Mayflower compact was signed by the pilgrims at Cape Cod also on this day seventeen eighty seven Andrew Jackson is admitted to the bar wait with their standard to get in to have a drink that must be for legal okay never mind okay anyway all right as seventeen eighty seven all right couple other items for you on this date in history was it in eighteen seventy one the first human cannonball Emilio Honora is fired we don't know how that went we just know that Emilio was the first we don't know if Amelio was the first to survive all right although the deck at night I mean I guess if somebody has to be the first right and then on this date forty eight nineteen forty six another brave soul Harry Truman becomes first US president to travel in a submerged submarine and then also on this date in nineteen seventy six rocky premieres in New York with Sylvester Stallone got Best Picture in the nineteen seventy seven there you have it on this date in history November the twenty first at seven thirty four we turn our attention now to what's happening in the area and across the country and with this were always pleased to have congressman David cast off Jonas congressman thank you for joining us how are you good good morning Kim how are you.

Lou Cape Cod Andrew Jackson Emilio Honora Amelio Harry Truman US president New York Sylvester Stallone congressman Kim W. R. E. C. congressman David cast Jonas seven one six hundred W fifty four degrees
"seventeen eighty seven" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:46 min | 2 years ago

"seventeen eighty seven" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The record it's got to be a record loss for any administration five rulings in one day hopefully they don't recognize that because he this is what this is there just to tell you the moment but here's the thing this is not anything to be gleeful about for our country it's a very sad time when there is the thought that the president of the United States and the Jews and the data and the facts show that the president of the United States has violated his oath of office and why is that important you will call on September seventeenth seventeen eighty seven the constitution was adopted that day when Benjamin Franklin came out of independence hall on to the steps they said not freckled offering to we have a monarchy or Republic he's a Republic if we can keep that Republic is based on operation of power co with will branches of government a check and balance on each other so we have a president who says I can do what ever I want an axe accordingly and tries to undermine hours of the legislative branch so this isn't about any disregard for him that's for the election this is our democracy at risk if we do not have a system of checks and balances separation of power we have a monarchy a person who believes he can do whatever he wants unaccountable a Republic if we can say that we can keep it what okay.

"seventeen eighty seven" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

14:18 min | 2 years ago

"seventeen eighty seven" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"In seventeen eighty seven the year of the constitution was drafted Thomas Jefferson published in English his most famous and influential book the notes in the state of Virginia there was a chapter called long from one of the long arms he proposed was the law of colonization Matt enslaved blacks should be free several lines and ultimately sent back to Africa because the idea of a free black person in for him in this country spell on again because because I guess he could not conceive of us creating anti racist policies are of equal opportunity and attacks and ideas back and forth between whites and blacks would ultimately lead to this race war for him the solution was let's just get rid of the black people who of course we brought against their will and let's get rid of them against their will and the repatriation that was proposed wasn't back to the place of the family's origin when black people are told go back to Africa because people will be like exactly where would I go I mean I traveled to West Africa travel to Ghana in I don't feel as if I'm home west Africans don't see me as one of them just as Americans don't see me as one of them and that's why I talked in that piece about this sort of envy after Americans on some level have long been sort of searching for nationality because we have not been made to feel as if we are American Indian there's nowhere else in the world that of course we could consider home in a certain segment of African Americans have said we are American and because we're an American we deserve to be free we deserve equal rights while another segment of African Americans have said we are not Americans because if we were American we would have freedom we would have equal rights where do you fall both ring true to me this go back where you came from trope you say it was right there in Jefferson's book later the American colonization society in eighteen sixteen can colonization society was founded in in Washington DC and a who's who of American power keen to witness its founding the idea that the way to solve this Negro problem was to get rid of black people there was widespread in this organization would become the most powerful race relations organization of the nineteenth century before the civil war Abraham Lincoln even during the civil war was urging African Americans to return to Africa you mention Lincoln he said that colonization had to happen because the black race could never quote be placed on an equality with the white race and he was swiftly corrected by the abolitionist William Lloyd garrison that really got to me he he said back in eighteen sixty two it is not their color but they're being free that makes their presence here intolerable and that's what caused me to ask and my only an American when I act like a slave because what we're really speaking about here in the events of the last week is not just for Congress woman of color these are people who are demanding an equal seat at the table but when we have been willing to submit to white power when we have looked away from racial inequality in rhesus policies people don't tell us to go back to Africa we have a quote from kellyanne Conway forget these for a day represents a dark underbelly in this country of people who are not respecting our troops are not giving them the resources and the respect that they deserve so therefore because they're not giving the respect that they deserve apparently they're supposed to leave I think one of the ways we should understand this is if I was for instance to to go to your house and start belittling everything or many things that I saw you would look at me and say how did you come into my house and the little what you see you might as well leave but what if it was my house to don't you want to make your house better isn't it your responsibility to do so but for people who do not conceive of it as your house too because they conceive of the house is white they're going to say you love it or leave it you lay out in your piece very carefully how we've been here before your colleague in the Atlantic Adam Serwer wrote that he wanted to be very clear that that America has not been here before I mean he stands squarely with the idea that white nationalism has been a governing doctrine for most of our existence as a country that racist demagogues have occupied the White House before but he said we have never seen an American president to make a U. S. representative a refugee an American citizen a woman of color and a religious minority an object of hate for the political masses in a deliberate attempt to turn the country against his fellow Americans who share any of those traits we do think it's something new but I think we should also understand that the wi racism presents itself the way race this present themselves they are centrally changing with the times were trump is doing is as Adam stated unprecedented you know you can simultaneously have a history of white nationalism governing in this country in each generation of white nationalist governing differently or the way in which night nationalism is showing itself can be unprecedented where do you think we are in the continuum of American racism I trying not to actually think of a single continuum but I actually think of a dueling continue on and so one is to continue on a racial progress our for certain people things have progressed but I'm long side racial progress has been researched progress in which ideas and policies have become more sophisticated over time if Obama came to represent for many people racial progress for many people they're seeing trump as the embodiment of racist progress when the press run after Republican lawmakers this week wondering whether what happened would finally be enough to peel some of them away most of them declined to do so or even to call it racism they were trying to **** the blatant remark out of the air and feed it backwards through the dog whistle when here are wraps Liz Cheney and house minority leader Kevin McCarthy recasting trump's racism as something else I want to make absolutely clear that our opposition to our socialist colleagues has absolutely nothing to do with their gender with their religion or with their race it has to do with the content of their policy I believe that I believe this is about ideology this is about socialism versus freedom saying that it was about socialism that felt familiar to me read any biographies of Martin Luther king who of course now is widely east by Republicans let alone Democrats this with someone who was constantly classified by A. B. ideological ancestors of current Republicans as communist for his anti racist activism they are doing the very same thing as the people who they look up to in the sixties at the very moment that they're trying to embrace king but at the same thing happened to abolitionist right you know abolitionist advocating for immediate emancipation were denigrated in view it as if they were attacking the American way of life in attacking what was essential to America and of course that is what also happened during during black lives matter that these people weren't saying you know what we should value life equally we should value block like no they are going after people they're attacking people this is a classic defense that the very people who are engaging in the assaults presenting themselves as the victims in the way police officers normally do it strikes me that the storm comes the same week as the justice department's announcement that it wouldn't be bringing federal civil rights charges against one of the officers involved in Eric garner's death in New York City in Staten Island Ernie general bar made the decision the day before the fifth anniversary of his death I am very angry asking the gate but my father no there will be no peace no justice no peace you've talked about how focusing on ignorance ignores the root of what racism really is about have we been focusing on the wrong news all week we should record mines in and focus on the actual policies that are being justified by these ideas up and go back to your country mass deportations of people I'm talking about people who are being mass incarcerated people were being killed by the police and then police officer never facing justice I'm talking about people who are being disenfranchised and demoralized these are many different forms of policies that are effectively removing people from the body politic of America I see a very clear line between go back to your country and a police officer choking to death an unarmed black man so that young man is essentially gone back into the soil in that is deemed okay obviously because the police officers storm force is a very clear line I see and so it's not surprising that the scene trump administration has decided to not pursue civil rights charges for ever garments killer and he's also telling for Congress women of color to go back to the country you have a book coming out next month called how to be an anti racist and you wrote we know how to be racist you know how to pretend to be not racist now let's know how to be anti racist you think it's possible what our question I think it's possible because of how I define and how we define racist and anti racist again if it's not who a person is there's no tattoo on a person's head world well people but people are not born reflex this is not their identity it is what they are doing it is what they are saying and people can say and do things differently one last question when all of this happened this past week in your article in the Atlantic you talked a little bit about the sort of inner screaming that was going on and I wondered if you could just describe how you felt as the week went on as the week went on which of course was the week that in many ways was representative of a lifetime those constant shower to go back to your country causes some people to ask the question will is this my country and in many ways it's a screen because of course you don't even want to hear that you don't even want to be asking that question because you don't know anywhere else right these types of chance you know affect people cars this internal screen what am I an American am I an American and of course people end up probably say yes I'm an American I'm just as American as anyone else but other people never even have to question whether they are an American I'm sorry you have to keep explaining that it's okay and and I think that's one of the reasons why I wrote that piece because I wanted to give for a window you know wait to get into people's minds how they're taking in the last week specifically looking at America's history so we have to be willing to step into other people's shoes and and to be empathetic that's essential to being anti race thank you very much thank you for having me on the show doctor eve from X. candy is director of American university's anti racist research and policy center and author of the book how to be an anti racist out next month coming up Porter Rico often services Americans laugh can a crisis in leadership on.

Thomas Jefferson Virginia Matt
"seventeen eighty seven" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

04:51 min | 2 years ago

"seventeen eighty seven" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

"The flag personally but we do know she came from a devout Quaker family and Quakers led the anti slavery activism in America what's more but she's home colony of Pennsylvania was the first to abolish slavery in seventeen eighty seven years before the constitution slurs against our founders and their banner or not only foolish but ignore I'm Michael made that sponsored by a D. F. alliance defending freedom the patriot FM one a one point five AM fourteen hundred Hey Troy the Salem media group on the nasdaq as SA L. M. it's one of the Riley update message of the day taking a left some Americans are surprised by the far left turn the Democratic Party is taken in its quest to win back the White House just a few years ago it would have been political suicide to advocate open borders health benefits for foreign nationals in the country illegally taxpayer reparations for slavery an abortion for any reason up until birth those are all radical positions but now most Democrats running for president embrace them along with amnesty for illegal aliens already here so what exactly is going on well first of all the national media is supporting many far left policies trying to push the country away from president trump whom they despise also the far left presence on social media is much louder and more threatening than moderate positions so if you oppose the radical agenda you may be attacked sometimes viciously this intimidates opposition to the far left as some are afraid to go up against it a good example of that is the boycotts strategy used by radical groups which threaten corporations if they support conservatives that brutal hammer has been extremely effective as many businesses cave into the pressure that might hurt their bottom line the radical lives goal is the Harmons smear traditional Americans making it easier to recast the USA as a quiet sigh socialist country that imposes so call the quality through income redistribution and social justice the far left has succeeded at least somewhat with great help from the media in convincing millions of people that traditional America is an unjust nation full of white privilege and male dominance and this is not a subtle campaign mark for the July the uber left New York times announced that America has never been a great country the Democrats have largely adopted the radical agenda as the nation saw in the debates a traditional Democrat like Joe Biden is attacked by radical senator Kamala Harris and there's great celebration in the liberal precincts it is absolutely fascinating to watch this but a bit frightening as well if ms Harris Bernie Sanders Elizabeth Warren or most of the other dams every cheap power America as we know it we disappear so what would take its place well last week I visited Germany and that system is what the far left really wants I followed a column about it on bill o'reilly dot com I hope you'll check it out but here's the headline the government in Berlin controls pretty much everything the German worker does if you want health care it's not free you have to pay a tax for but then after the payment you can get served by any hospital at any time in any doctor but you don't get to select the doctor also you have to pay local taxes and a nineteen percent value added tax on everything you buy that means if you want a refrigerator a car even clothing you have to pay nineteen percent on top of the price the result is that most German workers cannot save much money they cannot improve their economic circumstance the money goes to Berlin which then goals that out to people who don't want to work etcetera if that's the system you want that's what the Democrats are offering the Riley update will return with something you might not know well you've been hearing about gold all over the news and prices keep going up experts warning a recession may be coming and it's time to prepare a recent Annalise's week says he sees goal going up hundreds of dollars per house to hit seventeen.

Quakers nineteen percent seventeen eighty seven years
"seventeen eighty seven" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

01:49 min | 2 years ago

"seventeen eighty seven" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"For town hall former quarterback Colin Kaepernick best known for his protest during the national anthem is launching a new attacks against the Betsy Ross flag used by patriots during the revolution under pressure from happening Nike cancel plans for special edition sneakers decorated with a flag featuring a circle of thirteen stars representing the thirteen rebellious colonies all of them allowed slavery so Cabernet connects them to white supremacy this ignores impassioned anti slavery patriots like Adams Franklin in Hamilton as well as Betsy Ross herself historians debate whether she designed the flag personally but we do know she came from a devout Quaker family and Quakers led anti slavery activism in America what's more Betty's home colony of Pennsylvania was the first to abolish slavery in seventeen eighty seven years before the constitution slurs against our founders and their banner or not only foolish but ignore I'm Michael made that sponsored by a D. F. alliance defending freedom Oakland I'm back bill o'reilly here and I will bring you the o'reilly update later this morning at ten eleven and twelve noon on eight sixty eight AM the answer thank you we when my hair's all but gone and welcome back American it's ed Sheeran thinking out loud listen carefully to the base we're just saying he is in yesterday same way with a big role in yesterday the.

Colin Kaepernick Nike Adams Franklin Hamilton Betsy Ross America Betty Pennsylvania Michael Oakland bill o'reilly o'reilly ed Sheeran seventeen eighty seven years
"seventeen eighty seven" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

05:36 min | 2 years ago

"seventeen eighty seven" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"With a flag featuring a circle of thirteen stars representing the thirteen rebellious colonies all of them allowed slavery so Cabernet connects them to white supremacy this ignores impassioned anti slavery patriots like Adams Franklin in Hamilton as well as Betsy Ross herself historians debate whether she designed the flag personally but we do know she came from a devout Quaker family and Quakers led anti slavery activism in America what's more veggies home colony of Pennsylvania was the first to abolish slavery in seventeen eighty seven years before the constitution slurs against our founders and their banner or not only foolish but ignorant I'm Michael made that sponsored by a D. F. alliance defending freedom in nineteen fifty six his father escaped from prison and hungry when he was facing life in jail for fighting against communism in the Soviet invasion his mother escape at the same time they fled to the UK you learn from an early age how to fight the war against fascist communist and not the world expert in fighting terrorists why we fight joined the trump on the White House staff in twenty seventeen to twenty ninety six this battle to a national radio this is America first with some bastion gore welcome to the new age me an individual of a committee of one pledge dedicate all of my worldly goods to give without self pity allegiance my love and my devotion to the flag our standard old glory a symbol of freedom wherever she waves there's respect because your loyalty has given her a dignity that shouts freedom is everybody's job United that means that we have all come together states individual communities that have United into forty eight great state forty eight individual communities with pride dignity and purpose all divided with imaginary boundaries yet United to a common purpose and that's love for country and to the Republic Republic a state in which sovereign power is invested in representatives chosen by the people to govern and government is the people and it's from the people to the leaders not from the leaders to the V. or for which it stands one nation one nation meaning so blast lying on if this is incapable of being divided with liberty which is freedom no right of power to live one's own life without threat fear or some sort of retaliation and just as the principal are qualities of dealing fairly with other for all for all which means boys and girls it is much your country as it is mine I now boys and girls let me hear you recite the pledge of allegiance I pledge allegiance to the flag of the United States of America and to the Republic for which it stands one nation indivisible with liberty and justice for all since I was a small boy two states have been added to our country and two words have been added to the pledge of allegiance under god wouldn't it be a pity if someone said that is a prayer and that would be eliminated from schools to.

seventeen eighty seven years
"seventeen eighty seven" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

Newsradio 700 WLW

11:36 min | 2 years ago

"seventeen eighty seven" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

"Cunningham, the great American, as you may know as a Trump supporter to somewhat difficult to get up checked of media coverage from ABC NBC CBS, especially CNN MSNBC, which we're entitled to see the only business in America in seventeen eighty seven when the US constitution was drafted. That's protected by the first amendment is the news gathering business now the founding fathers could not have envisioned talk radio or television or radio or Facebook, but they knew something down the road that to have an informed. Electorate, they had to have a means in a method to get them information. I don't get up in the morning and say you know what? I'm gonna go talk to newsmakers all over the country to find out what's going on. I rely upon largely large huge media opperations to determine for me to go talk to the president, talk to Senator talk to congressman go talk to governor. Go talk to mayor city council member. I rely upon these other organizations to do this for me. And then objectively, can we underline the word Tony bender objectively, tell me what's going on? Then I can based my vote with an informed ballot. I can decide based upon objective information given to me by CNN as to whether or not to reelect, the president, re elected governor Amarah, whatever it might be. There's one or two media organisations in America, that kind of keep an eye on big time, media, and one of them is the media research center, run by my good friend, Brent Brazelle. And the other one is newsbusters. Want him announced Societa tour of newsbusters, Scott Whitlock, and Scott Woodlock. Welcome to the Bill Cunningham show, Scott, how are you doing? Great. Did I adequately objectively state that as a citizen? We kind of rely on the news media to give us objective information upon which we later cast, an informed ballot. And if they don't give us that information garbage in garbage out. It really affects the democracy. Yeah. Well, we've been doing this long-term study on the president and the media's coverage of him. And it's just been unrelentingly negative. We've kind of been doing it month by month and what we found in may. Was that, that ninety two percent of the coverage was negative and they've kind of basically been barreling past the Ican -clusive nature of the Muller report and still pushing for impeachment. It happened, of course. Muller reports about two months ago about two weeks ago, Robert Miller held a ten minute news conference that essentially said nothing he sensually said, I'm not going to testify to the congress. If you want to know what I think, read the four hundred forty eight page report, but that's served as launching pad for the media to attack the president. If a democrat was in office, what we have not heard that the molar report clears, President Clinton clears, President Obama, because he spent two years, there was five hundred witnesses three thousand subpoenas. There was eighteen US attorneys, all of whom are Democrats. They had thirty six FBI agents. It was the most extensive investigation of a presidential campaign ever, and the most extensive investigation of president ever in American history. So when the results came out that there was no Russian collusion, and there is no provable crime of obstruction of Justice that should have been the media stopping and saying the president's been cleared. Let's move on to the to the Mexican tariff issue or let's move on to China. Let's move onto public education. Let's move onto the opioid crisis. But the media didn't do that. Did they know they did it? And you're absolutely right. This is a complete double standard and it's not like we don't know how they've done this in the past, because we certainly look back at the coverage of Bill Clinton and impeachment. And they're they demonize Ken Starr, the demonize the investigation, so. Yeah. I think you're absolutely right. Had the situations been reversed and Donald Trump. Again, that's all we would have. Heard which was, you know. Coup no collusion. Don't have obstruction of Justice, and that's the end of it, and certainly they would have pounced all over Muller at that press conference thing. Well, if I could have proven that he didn't do anything, and that he was innocent. Well, that's obviously not, that's not a prosecutor job, but we didn't hear any of that what we actually heard at the press conference the day of and the day after with a lot of talk of implicitly what Muller is saying and what he's implying. We let me interpret, we, we did a video montage. And there was a lot of that, where they were just molar mind reading and the other issue is to cheerleading for impeachment because media wants fresh meat every day to have clicks into have eyeballs and ears on them. It's amazing to me that CNN and MSNBC in the national media, is routing and pushing the Democrats toward impeachment. Even though we have an election next year I was up and running the first betas about a week away the. Right now, the media's completely invested in the destruction of this president. But the media is urging these Democrats, they have them on every hour of every day, pushing them to impeach the president. Why is that? Well. Symbol answer is that Donald Trump has unhinged journalists in a way that if you Republican presidents have in the past they've always been liberal, they were against Reagan. They were against George W Bush, but I think partly because Trump is as been fighting so aggressively against the liberal media. They they've really gone over the deep and they've gone into the resistance CNN used to be the network that was the most known for that. You would see them in the airport while you're waiting for your flight. Now. They are the hard core resistance. I think part of it is, they want to take on MSNBC for that spot is the premier left wing media outlet, but they have the they had just taken such an aggressive stance. And one of the things we have a Bank of televisions in our lobby, you don't even really have to have CNN the had the volume on the Chiron graphics that they have of every day, just calling Trump ally doing this and doing. That and doing things to Donald Trump that they never did to Barack Obama and they never had any interest in doing the look like. But Brock Obama didn't tell a number of lies. Remember, if you like your insurance, you can keep it politic called that the lie of the year, and they, they had no such reaction to him that they had had to Donald Trump when Obama was in the White House, if there was a Chiron on CNN that said President Obama, Kat lying. I would have had a cardiac seizure because there were numerous examples of the live year. Whether it's all the Obama stuff that he lied constantly about her. The IRS are fast and furious. Obama had numerous scandals at the media ignored. And so now you have Joe Biden running around, Iowa, saying, you know, what we were scandal-free administration and Democrats, heads are going up and down. Yes, it was scandal free. It was scandal free because the news media refused to cover it in the end, Loretta Lynch and covering him on one side because he. He had two attorney generals who made sure there was no special counsel, who made sure there was no investigation was held in contempt of congress. And the other one was Aligarh Loretta Lynch, but the media never covered it that way. So this is my concern. Scott Whitlock of newsbusters, and that is this, the great bulk of the American people are not involved in the news gathering business, nor do most of them, ever watched CNN or read a big city, newspaper or watch watch any other TV show. They basically live their lives. Get up raise their kids go to work handle their own difficulties. But in the ether off to the side, the distant thunder, whether it's the Tony awards, or the Oscars, and the Grammys, who they might watch might be watching a TV show might be watching the view might be watching something else. They're relentless ninety two percent negative coverage of the president seeps into the ground water of American politics. And I have a fear that come November third twenty twenty just the average slept who lives in Wisconsin. Ohio, Pennsylvania, Michigan Iowa Arizona. Nevada, Texas, Florida, the states that matter are going to say you know what? I don't know a lot about what's going on in the country, but I don't like the poisonous venomous atmosphere. We have today because of Trump being in the White House. Do you have the same concern that the thirty to forty percent of the American people that just live their lives and really can't name the vice president, there's something in the country? There's too much anger, according to the media, and it must be stopped. Are you concerned about a backlash against the president despite all success because of the architecture of that of that groundwater by the mainstream media? I sir it's always a concern. I mean, that is the danger of the liberal media, eat Ed, people will sometimes it will, what does it really matter? They'll they said, well, I tune it out. Well, a lot of people don't do, and it does have an impact on elections, and how people voted has four decades. I think part of the reason that journalists, they pretend that the reason they don't like it. They complain about. Donald Trump tweeting is because he. He could be crass on Twitter or he can say things that are weird or objectionable, and I don't think anyone would be this. Sometimes he does do that. But the reason they, they really hate him tweeting, if because it is the modern form of him going around the media and going around the filter. And I think that's that's where we are. That's where this battle for the future really lies because a lot of it is going to play out on social media, and that's where you get into all these concerns about Google Twitter, Facebook, that they have a liberal agenda, just, like the, the sort of establishment dinosaur, whatever you wanna call it media, did, we're back in the day, ABC, NBC, and CBS work controlled the narrative, and it was Walter Cronkite. We don't have anymore, but you have some of these new media outlets trying to, to reclaim that. So it is a battle, where you had Trump and you have conservatives and other. Other right. Reading outlets that are trying to make sure that we continue to have a free speech on these new outlets and that there are ways around the classic liberal media. So that messages for conservatives can get out this year and in the twenty twenty election and going forward after that. Why now I'm watching Jim Mukasa a left-wing attack dog for CNN now. By the way on the point you made about the president's Twitter account. I asked him that a few months ago. I said, you know, you're catching some flack for that is that let me tell you something. Really? He said, I have fifty million Twitter followers, fifty million on a good night. CNN might have seven hundred thousand the reason they want me to stop tweeting as much as I do because I'm the new AP. I'm CBS. He said, if you would take CBS NBC, ABC, MSNBC FOX, and take CNN. I have about six times, more Twitter, followers than all those all those broadcasts Antlers. Put together. He said, that's why do it. I said, you know every now and then I told him I think ten percent of the time when you punch down your off base. But the other ninety percent of the time you're right on now before I let you go, Jim Mukasa is the worst of the worst. I'm watching one of the morning talk shows and he was asked the questions. Do you have any regrets about your coverage?.

president Donald Trump CNN President Obama President Clinton Muller Twitter ABC Trump NBC US Bill Cunningham MSNBC CBS Scott Whitlock Facebook
"seventeen eighty seven" Discussed on Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

01:31 min | 2 years ago

"seventeen eighty seven" Discussed on Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

"Good. Sports dot com. Froze? No getting it done. Right. Means getting more bang for your buck because putting more towards your bottom lines for business. Lows is here to help with savings during Memorial Day sale like sixty dollars off at dewalt twenty volt max cordless drill now just ninety nine dollars and fifteen dollars off gallon cans and forty five dollars off five gallon pails via lows gift card rebate when you buy interior and exterior painting stain do it right for less. Start with Lowe's. Offers valid you five twenty nine. See store for details. US only. You're all set with free. Checking thanks for choosing Union Bank. And trust. Wait. What everything? Okay. Yeah. No. It's just my last Bank. There was always a catch a catch, you know, hidden fees hijinks shenanigans, well, free. Checking at union is actually free. Get free checking with no monthly fees. No minimum balance and. No Tom foolery just one. More way, union makes thanking nice and easy. I'll play online at Bank. It union dot com. That's Bank at union dot com. Member FDIC. Before sunrise, the morning of Monday, December third seventeen eighty seven. A band of pioneers had gathered in front of the rectory where they were to take an early breakfast at dawn. They paraded in front of the house. And after a short address delivered by the Reverend Cutler full of good advice and hearty wishes the men fired a three volley salute and marched off down the road, young Jervis.

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"seventeen eighty seven" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

Radio Free Nashville

03:26 min | 2 years ago

"seventeen eighty seven" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

"Tc dates back to eighteen. Seventeen eighty seven when we adapted. Our we wrote a constitute flavors constitution, which. Enfranchise his the American people in favor of small stake in it. Then we try to civil war. We passed the thirteenth amendment, which permitted slavery. If you are in prison and right now, we are trending everyone of color as well as we can the fourteenth amendment which. Let's see you may have to remind which made preparations eight Bill and corporations now ruled the country just as they did in moose Lang useful. He needs Italy in the nineteen thirties. Yeah. This is the. This is my argument of the of the big arguments happening, and it's an argument that's been going back before the civil war and before the revolution. And back the Magna Carta at least, which is do we get to decide stuff together or do ownership interest? Just by virtue of ownership get to make decisions and that let's not be distracted from that. Drumbeat lettuce connects things to that drumbeat. That all of us got to play a role democracy is one of the first principles is key argument. It might be a lousy system. But it's way better than most of the others. I can think of. James Spokane Washington. Hey, J D not the wall. A lot of people think like, it's an empty symbol not representing anything. I gotta tell you these billionaires day. No global warming is real they they didn't get their money, and they don't maintain their money by denying science. Yeah. The new global warming is real they want the wall because that global warming along with the policies are starting to institute and central South America and hope institute. Yeah, there's going to be hordes of people coming to our border, and they know that. Climate refugees, a real thing. It's happening in Europe. It's happening here. It's gonna be happening more. I live in Oregon to be more people moving to Oregon because we got water and is not burning up all the time. But even here we've had climate fires and a bunch of by the way, Nancy Nancy if you could call back in I really wanted to take your call. And I clicked it too many times and that made you go away, and if you could call back in if you can make it in would really love to take your call forgive that pretend that happened off the air. But Nancy, I didn't mean to hang up on you. Rick from Lexington Kentucky. You're on free speech. Tv you got just a couple of seconds. All right. Thanks for taking my call. I understand that. It's really hard for the white community to talk about race. But I find it amazing that white people find it so hard to talk to white people. Yeah. It's amazing to me. We can talk about we split this up any kind of way you're going to split it up taxes healthcare whenever you want to talk about. But the bottom line is is that you raise your hand and said I'm gonna follow a leader that the biggest racist. Then you go on the floor of the Senate like notching your sentence. Senator did in Kentucky say we're going to do everything we can do to stop people from voting. That has to be examined..

Nancy Nancy Lexington Kentucky Magna Carta Oregon moose Lang Italy James Spokane Washington Senate Senator Europe South America Rick
"seventeen eighty seven" Discussed on Timesuck with Dan Cummins

Timesuck with Dan Cummins

02:47 min | 3 years ago

"seventeen eighty seven" Discussed on Timesuck with Dan Cummins

"Now back to seventeen thousand four seventy ninety four seventeen year old. Andrew leaves for walk sauce or leaves walks out for salads, very North Carolina, just over forty miles northeast of Charlotte around thirty five thousand people. Now founded in seventeen fifty three. It was the county seat for Roane county. It was the economic and legal epicenter of the area, Jackson studies law under attorney spruce Maceio spruce. That's a hillbilly redneck attorney name right there. You need some lawyer. You get yourself whole spruce fruits, Sprungli. He's a trouble more times than I can count. And I can count to six carries what say six. Various other local lawyers help young, and you learn the ins and outs of the law and twenty year old. Andrew eventually qualified for the bar examination in September of seventeen eighty-seven education. So different back then, no college degree needed for lawyer in an apprentice type system worked just fine. I do like how for certain trades was more straightforward back then? No jump through financial hoops, you know? No, no job with a bunch of financial aid bullshit. Spend x. amount of years studying something, you know, paying to the nose just to to study that thing for that amount of time. Just can you pass the test to do this job? Yes. Within you get the job, I'll let spruce. No, there's a new law dog in town. You can do the job, get the job, sadly the insane cost of higher education. If like destroys that opportunity for a lot of people. Now for passing the bar, a friend helps get Andrew appointed to a prosecutor position in the western district, North Carolina, an area that would later become part of the state of Tennessee shortly after arriving in little Appalachian town of Jonesboro, in seventeen eighty eight, Andrew fight in his first duel with the federal lawyer named wage. Steal, Avery, wait, still not a hillbilly named. That's a that's an old money name. If ever ever was one Jackson and actually been arguing against Avery in civil court. During the trial, Avery more experienced lawyer and also a revolutionary war veteran who outmatch Jackson considerably in the courtroom, took one of Jackson's arguments, turn it around on him. So forcefully, the Jackson felt he had been intellectually insulted, seeking revenge against Avery, who would often proclaim our referred to bacon. Meaning Francis Bacon noted text the elements of the common laws of England when making the point Jackson, replaced a copy of the text with an actual slab of bacon. And one of every saddlebags guessing he smiled himself silly after doing that when every criticized Jackson for Poland, such a childish prank. The next day in court young Jackson leapt whose feet and yelled may not know as much laws, there isn't bacon to bridge, but I know enough not to take legal fees than Avery shot back. It's false as hell, which I guess is fancy rich man, rich. Commands speak for. That's bullshit. Jackson issued a challenge to duel by immediately writing in writing in a page of an old law book, tearing out the page Hannity, Avery, the senior lawyer..

outmatch Jackson Avery Andrew Francis Bacon North Carolina Roane county Charlotte attorney Jonesboro Tennessee Hannity prosecutor Poland England seventeen thousand four sevent twenty year
President Trump, US and Trump discussed on Morning Edition

Morning Edition

05:16 min | 3 years ago

President Trump, US and Trump discussed on Morning Edition

"Rod Rosenstein the man overseeing the Muller investigation. They have filed articles of impeachment. They say, he's denying their requests for documents in the Russia investigation. Can they get it done? It is Thursday, July twenty six actress and Dame Helen. Mirren is seventy three years old today. And the news is next. Live from NPR news in Washington I'm korva Coleman President Trump is headed to, the midwest today there's continued concern among American firmers about the effect of his trade policies on US agriculture he's going to places affected by them a steel plant in granite city Illinois and eastern Iowa NPR Sierra mccamman has more Trump steel and aluminum tariffs have been popular with the metals industry but farmers in places. Like Iowa and parts of. Illinois have taken a hit because of retaliatory. Measures taken by US trading partners. Trump is, heading to the midwest on the heels of an announcement. That he's reached an agreement? With European leaders, to work toward removing tariffs on multiple. Goods and to buy more US beans. Soybeans is a big deal The European, Union is going to start almost immediately to, buy a lot of soybeans air tremendous market by a, lot of soybeans from our farmers that news came the day after Trump announced a twelve billion dollar bailout plan for. US farmers affected. By his tariffs Sarah mccamman NPR news Washington. Secretary of state Mike Pompeo testified before a Senate committee yesterday and many lawmakers were skeptical. They were asking Pompeo for more information about President Trump's private meeting with, Russian President Putin the US. Has released scanned information about it from peo- said that Trump sees the meeting as a, chance to improve u s and Russian relations President Trump believes the two great nuclear power should not have they contentious relationship this is not just in our interest but in the interest of the whole world he strongly believes that now's the time for direct communication our relationship in order to make clear to President Putin. That there is the possibility However remote it might, be to reverse the negative course of our relationship however Pompeo refused to answer senators, questions about whether Trump and Putin discussed any of Trump's real. Estate projects around the world a federal judge says an anti-corruption law suit against President Trump can proceed NPR's Peter Overby. Reports the, plaintiffs claimed, Trump is benefiting from. Foreign and state governments doing business with his Washington hotel the attorneys general. Of Maryland and the district of Columbia brought the case they cite the constitution's clauses against. Foreign and domestic emoluments which essentially say it's not okayed use public office for private gain the suit alleges that foreign governments do business at the. Trump hotel in Washington to get in the president's good graces also Trump personally. Benefits from the hotel sweetheart least with, the federal government the Justice department sought to, dismiss the case saying the emoluments clause is don't apply, but federal judge Peter miss city adopted abroad meaning of emolument and said the league Claims. Are plausible Mississippi's definition of me is the first, in a federal court since seventeen, eighty seven when the constitution was drafted Peter, Overby NPR news Washington this is NPR A group of House Republicans has introduced. Legislation to impeach deputy attorney general rod Rosenstein the lawmakers are. Demanding the Justice department turnover more documents related to special. Counsel Robert Muller's investigation into Russian interference in US elections the, Justice department says it has. Already turned over many documents initial results have been coming in from Pakistan's. National elections the former sports star Imran, Khan is leading the vote tally but NPR's, Diaa Hadid reports. The ballot count has been filled. With charges of incompetence and vote. Rigging Hans followers were already celebrating across Pakistan but, his main challenger, alleged they'd be massive rigging and Pakistan's. Third largest potty complained voting, irregularities the. Complaints began on voting day when. Unofficial observers said the voting process was sluggish which they said discouraged voters from waiting. In the heat then in, an early morning press, conference, Pakistan's election commission Announce this system for transmitting votes. Had broken down and results were delayed the post-election drama. Follows a campaign marred by allegations of interference now Pakistanis awaiting, for fish election results and. To learn whether they'll be accepted by all parties Hadeed NPR news Islamabad. The US embassy in China says a, man sent off a homemade explosive outside the, embassy in Beijing. Today the embassy says the only. Person who was hurt was the. Man with the device in a statement US officials, say no embassy, property was damaged and local police responded. To the scene I'm korva, Coleman NPR. News in Washington Support for NPR comes, from tirerack offering a tire decision guide to help customers find tires that fit their. Car and driving conditions with a network of more than seven thousand independent installers tirerack. Dot com helping..

President Trump United States Donald Trump Washington NPR President Putin Pakistan Mike Pompeo Justice Department Rod Rosenstein Robert Muller Russia Dame Helen Mirren Iowa Illinois Peter Overby
"seventeen eighty seven" Discussed on Part-Time Genius

Part-Time Genius

01:43 min | 3 years ago

"seventeen eighty seven" Discussed on Part-Time Genius

"Rodenstock he just wasn't content with selling one bottle that he discovered behind a wall he also found four more bottles which he sold for half a million dollars to william coke and you probably recognize that name he's the lesser known but still superwealthy coke brother who isn't as tangled up in politics and for longtime coke also believed as bottles were legitimate but that changed in two thousand five when the museum of fine arts in boston was preparing to exhibit his wine collection to the public and basically the museum contacted the thomas jefferson foundation at monticello but none of the historians could actually verify that the bottles belong to jefferson in fact all the evidence that they had on hand pointed to the contrary so what what kind of evidence are we talking about well jefferson actually kept meticulous records on everything you know jefferson being jefferson and this included all the ones he'd ever bought while in france and according to one of monticello senior historians and here i'm just going to quote the note he wrote in his vast records of over sixty thousand documents there was nothing that suggested jefferson had ever ordered any of these wines into socalled jefferson bottles there are about a dozen bottles including seventeen eighty four and a seventeen eighty seven chateau to kim a seventeen eighty seven lafitte are margot most of them were seventeen eightyseven of vintage jefferson never ordered in his life wow so i i mean that is pretty compelling evidence but meticulous or not i mean there's always the chance to jefferson made a mistake in his records right yeah that's true which is why bill coke actually leaned on a private investigator and former fbi agent this guy named jim elroy to get to the bottom of things art i definitely want to hear all this panda but before you clueless in let's take a quick break.

coke boston thomas jefferson foundation monticello jefferson france lafitte investigator jim elroy william coke museum of fine arts bill coke fbi million dollars