35 Burst results for "Seventeen Eighteen"

What is the Atvidaberg Sun Cannon?

The Atlas Obscura Podcast

02:25 min | 9 months ago

What is the Atvidaberg Sun Cannon?

"Some cannons have been around since the sixteen hundreds some of them were used on ships. The position of the sun triggered them to fire at almost exactly twelve. Pm so everyone on board would know what time it was in the seventeen hundreds. You might also have heard a son cannon in fancy park in england or france or even on a large estate where they were used to signal lunchtime in fact when son cannons were in style throughout the seventeen eighteen hundreds most of them were owned by european nobility and that how a son canon ended up in a small town in rural sweden the sun cannon in all to the body has its own tower. It's up on top of a hill and it looks like a fifteen foot tall version of a rook. That chess piece. that looks like a little castle. it's round made out of brick and there's a long narrow slot carved into the south facing side. It's been here since eighteen fifty three and it was built by the local barron and his family. The all those fats. These days it's cared for by a team of volunteers who call themselves the sun cannon club there a delightful gang of retired people who've taken responsibility for preserving the town's history but the whole organization is totally unpretentious and they're a little loosey-goosey when it comes to the foggy lor surrounding basan cannon but at least three different people including my grandmother told me this story back in the mid eighteen hundreds the barron and his wife took a trip to paris. Supposedly the baroness who was born. A commoner was terrified of boats so instead of making the relatively short trip across the baltic to mainland europe. They'd spent somewhere between two and three years. Travelling to france in a horse and carriage by finland latvia with wayne lia poland. You get the idea. I was able to verify almost none of the story. But i'm told somewhere between one and two kids were born on the way from sweden to france and when the family finally made it there and saw the sun cannon in a garden they thought would be kind of fun to have one of those to fire off parties back at home.

Fancy Park Sun Cannon Club Barron Basan Cannon France Sweden Chess England Wayne Lia Baltic Paris Latvia Finland Europe Poland
How Carlos Welch First Got in the Game

The Chip Race

02:11 min | 10 months ago

How Carlos Welch First Got in the Game

"I grew up like i said in the atlanta georgia area Grew up pretty. Poor am was a pretty good student in school. So i kinda like work my way up in Started you know. Having some moderate financial success for myself Eventually graduated college became a math teacher. And somewhere along the line along the way i found poker and i found poker because like i said grown up poor i was always looking for ways out of poverty and i used to mess around with these get rich quick schemes that you see the late night. Infomercials lost a lot of money. Going on certain days when i was probably seventeen eighteen years old and then one night i was watching and they said this guy named moneymaker won a bunch of money. And i'm thinking like who writes this shit like this is like. Obviously this one's a scam. I'm not falling for that. But i gave it. You know. I did a little research and i was like wait. This is real and sounds okay. This is going to be my quote unquote get risky scheme. That Starting me down that rabbit hole and so started playing a line around two thousand four and then singles primarily up until black friday Obviously that was like a disaster for a lot of us in the us. So i i was out for like a year and then these rogue. Us site started the pup. You can play on as so. I kinda got back in and at that time the sitting does are kinda dead so that started me on the tournaments and So this is around two thousand twelve and in two thousand thirteen I was a member of tournament. Poker edge and andrew brokers is one of the pros on that site. And so that's how i met andrew and Met him for the first time in person in vegas in twenty thirteen to get on the pie. And i think you pretty much. The rest is history from

Atlanta Moneymaker Georgia Andrew Brokers United States Andrew Vegas
test-debug

The Crossover NBA Show with Chris Mannix

51:23 min | 10 months ago

test-debug

"When the olympics start will be the most talented team in tokyo. Hands down no question. Most talented team in tokyo with the roster that they have but this is like a five alarm fire right now howard. This loss to nigeria. I don't care if they win the rest of these pre olympic games which will take place through next sunday. This has to make you nervous if you're a fan of the team because not only is it this. The loss to nigeria. But you go back two years ago at the world championships where you had a us team. That was good. Didn't have probably better team now than they were back in two thousand nineteen but all nba players. They finished seventh. They've been seventh at the world championships. You have the seventh-place finish the loss of nigeria. How concerned are you howard beck about. Usa basketball. It's just an exhibition game. Chris oh no no. It's not just an exhibition game. Stop this team was thrown together over the last however many weeks they had what like three practices. I think i'll ever. Us team is thrown together. What are you talking about. There's no team. There's no no mid season practices for usa basketball. No but the nigerian team has been practicing. What i'm saying is some of the play in the nba though wants win the nba nba. A few of them play in the nba but that team has had time together more so than the team. Sorry brown coaching. that team. That i missed was that a facsimile of mike brown on the bench all season long. What what are we talking about. The warriors have been out for like two months kris k. Okay so two months. that's what matters. That's that's the number three three practices. Also they're still missing. I believe at least three guys because they're playing in the finals right now. Booker middleton chris paul get it. Yes not chris. Ball's not playing a holiday with the the what holland is your holiday. Those those guys will matter especially given that middleton and holiday are to the better perimeter defenders that that team. Usa has and if you look at the rest of team usa's roster. I don't see a ton of great defenders. There there are a few. I think those three guys by the way are going to be exhausted by the time they get to. They may well be. They may will be so. We're going to judge them. Judging when their whole judge when the games matter to strange to me like we don't judge nba teams based on the preseason but we judge team usa based on these exhibition games. That they do going into international competition. I feel like it's thirty. One point favorites. Why why is there betting line on a freaking exhibition better training but a little league baseball. Now country degenerates damn right. I didn't mean chris i'm with. Let's go monday. Nigeria money line. I just. I can't get too excited about this. If they lose the rest of the exhibitions does that mean something. Yeah that might be alarming if they're if they're still struggling to find some cohesion. That could be alarming. But i mean the talent is obviously their talent alone doesn't win on the international stage in style of game is different team ball matters. Shooting matters like yeah. There's a bunch of budget stuff that comes into play. But i i find the panic over this loss or at least the outcry to be a little bit much. So you don't take into account the seventh-place finish in two thousand nineteen. I mean that to me. It's the it's not just as game. The totality of it right. Like and i don't know howard like so in the early two thousands the world kind of caught up to the us ninety to ninety six thousand us. Gold maps then comes the two thousand two world championships in indianapolis and that's seven. The place finish was one of the worst worst outcomes in at least recent usa history. They got it together after that. They hired jerry colangelo. They bringing mike chef ski. They get their act together. Two thousand six two thousand eight then. They run off. Three consecutive years are three consecutive cycles of gold. Medals is argon. Made that like the world's caught up again that somewhere along the way and the last four or five years. The rest of the world has once again caught up usa basketball. I'm trying to understand this. I mean that's close games in those olympics cycles. No question about it. But i can't imagine the oh eight. Twelve or sixteen team losing nigeria. I can't exhibition or otherwise. I can't see it happening. No team and the and the one that followed it were built around like lebron koby. Carmelo enjoying wait. I mean that that groups at another level like as good as this group is that we're seeing right now as talented as they are after k. D. tatum's really good damian. Lillard is great. I mean come arbit- tatum. Bill lillard auto bio levin. Draymond dream ends up there in years but one has won some things. Jeremy grant jeremy grant zach living out of like. These are guys who have done anything in the nba yet. But they're all stars most they're they're also but are they to level of lebron kobe now but do you think is that what you're saying then is that what you're saying to be at the level you need to have like i'm saying the crop to win. I'm saying that if we're going to start comparing the twenty twenty one team to the twenty eight a two thousand eight two thousand twelve teams there is. There is not an equivalent right now. Lebron kobe laurent cobaine weight. And plus what we what. We called olympic. Mellow like carmelo. Didn't have the success in the nba. That some of his teammates did but carmelo in terms of talent level and certainly has resume like that group was at a whole other level. That group is a different level than jason. Tatum bam outta bios. Zach levine. Okay so not saying that you necessarily should have to have that level of time firepower to win an exhibition game against nigeria. Or anybody else. But i am saying comparing usa to itself different iterations of team usa. This one is not that one. This is not as dominant group as the ones we saw in eight and two thousand twelve. It just isn't what do you do like. What's the solution here. Like i mean i jerry. Colangelo deserves an enormous amount of credit for rebuilding that program when it was at. Its nadir mitra chefs. He comes in enormous amount of credit for what they did. But as we sit here in twenty twenty one like it's almost to me howard like the usa basketball rebuilding. The program became cool. Like lebron wanted to do it. Chris paul like dwayne wade. These guys wanted to do it and then they did it. And i think playing for usa basketball didn't become quite as cool as it was fifteen years ago. Like is that what has to happen like does not need to have like a fifth place finish in tokyo for all of a sudden the next generation of a-list stars wherever that may be in two thousand twenty four to come back into the mix and is that the only way this team can win. I mean i think we need to pay attention to the overall context like obviously one. These olympics were supposed to happen a year ago. They're delayed a year because of covid got durant out of it though like that right. It's questionable whether these the olympic should be happening at all still but along the way because of these back to back brutal seasons and everything else like team. Usa doesn't have james harden right now. Doesn't have anthony davis because of the injury doesn't have steph curry doesn't have kyrie irving doesn't have lebron kawai again. If your argument is that the second or third tier it sounds like sounds like insulting. Somehow but if you're saying that the next wave believe after those guys should still be good enough to dominate on the world stage. Maybe but if the point is that the team as best are they still. Are they still able to win. Gold fairly easily. Your probably but a bunch of them aren't on this team right now because of injuries and just the stress of the last year or two so this this is not necessarily representative of the best of the best right now. It just isn't and yes. They should still be good enough to win. Yes the world has caught up to some extent. No the the group that at nigeria's put it put out there last week. Does not leap off the page improbably. Us should've still want it. But again i exhibition game after like three practices. Let's see what happens with the rest of this. This schedule out brought mellow back. I mean he's not what he was four years ago. Eight years ago twelve years ago but the guy knows how to play international basketball. He might have sat. maybe. I guess. I didn't really. I assume that he just want to keep. He didn't kind of like four formerly re retire from the olympics. But it'd be pretty much says like i'm done like lebron kinda did to get talked into it. I feel like. I don't know if i was if i was the usa team would try really hard to get carmelo blake because his style. Whatever it is to the nba is perfect for the national basketball. He's a really good or national basketball player. On this subject damian lillard. He spoke for the first time. Since the hiring of chauncey billips. Only listen to what little had to say about his future in portland. I'm prepared to go in and do my job every year. Like hopefully we make strides over direction and could become a better team a new coach notice. That's where i am. What soured it sounds like. Lillard is at least nominally on board with going back to the blazers. But if i'm a team out there with assets. I don't listen to that response and say well it's over damian. Lillard is back on the same page with the portland trailblazers. If i'm a team with assets i hold onto those assets because it feels to me like the blazers might be one like sixteen to start from blowing that whole thing up with louis mccollum on the way out the door so get the sense now. That seems more likely than not that damian lillard at blazers training camp. He's in ablaze uniform. He starts the season with the portland trailblazers. But if it doesn't work with chauncey billips early and you get close that trade deadline. It wouldn't surprise me at all to see portland decide. Look we've got a. We've got to do something here and opened the door for damian lillard trade. What do you think. I think that nothing has changed. I think that his remarks last week because he sounded a little bit lukewarm. Or just you know you hear one of two things. Well you want to hear one thing if you're a portland trail blazers fan or if you're just looking for any indication that lillard is all in your you want to hear him say listen. I know things are rough right now. But i'm all in you know this is. This is where. I want to be you to repeat all the usual talking points that you hear from players in his position and that we've heard from bradley beal that we used to hear from james harden houston. Which is a win in phil in city fill in the blank with the city. I want to win here. I don't wanna go somewhere else. You know we're going to get this right blah blah. He didn't go down the usual list. And so i think it left open. Some interpretation but getting has changed like the disappointment was clear when the season ended. Some of the things have happened since including obviously the the the train wreck away they went about the the coaching search and lillard. Being caught in the crossfire. There at feeling heat from fans about chauncey billips being selected and so. I don't think we should expect he's going to be rah. Rah right now The trailblazers have a lot of work to do. But we also have not even hit the summer yet. Like there's the draft hasn't happened yet. Free agency hasn't happened yet. There's there's a lot of work to be done. And i think if you're damian lillard which you're probably doing is internally saying here's what i need to see happen externally saying you know what let's let's wait and see i mean you see. He can't he can't say publicly the same things that he's telling say neal o'shea right about what the the state of the roster i i would think that there are some very impassioned debates or discussions being held behind closed doors about what they need to get this thing right and if they can't get it right the he might shift is his stance about staying there long term. But that hasn't happened yet that we know of. What do you think the most interesting potential conversation is amongst players over these next four weeks like i'm kind of curious what jason tatum bradley beal talk about. Tatum and beal close friends dating back to their highschool days both went to the same high school bill with something of a mentor to jason. Tatum actually got him involved with his trainer. Drew hanlin which helped. Tatum elevate his his personal skills and they've talked about how happy they are to be playing together. Played the all star game together for the first time beal last year of his contract. Like you know we've seen these conversations yield real tangible conversation. You'd like to be a fly on the wall on for any of these guys in the next couple of weeks. Yeah i mean look we. We have a history now going back over a decade. If we're to believe that the that the heels were formed in part through team usa activities. You know which is true which is true. That's that's yielded an extra things guy. You know guys who you mentioned. Tatum and bill because they were already friends but guys also become friends through this experience right and then they start getting the ideas about playing together. Like oh hey. This is a lot of fun. Let's do this again in the nba. So there's i'm i'm sure some of that is is happening. It always does. Who else in that group. I mean man. If any of these guys that'd be trying to recruit bam out a bio but he's too early in his in his contract with miami to pry him loose from there And you know the heater still a pretty potent team but you know jimmy butler is up there in miles and outta bios future won't necessarily be there forever. That's the way it goes in the nba. I think tatum has the potential to be like the biggest recruiter. They're like he's about to start the first year of his max level extension. He can recruit bill. But like you can also does damian lillard like. It's great to play in boston. I love it here. Answer some questions of my have a playing on the east coast for the first time. Like i think data might be boston's best asset at this point. Yeah again some of this comes down to bradley. Beal's coming up to that point where he has the leverage to task out because of his contract lillard under contract for several more years and so he's not in that position. So what if it says. Like i need to go like. I don't foresee the blazers being no finish your contract. Just don't see it. i think right. And they would work with him on a deal to sure but directing it is harder so beal can use the leverage of his free agency to say well if you send me to team x. I'm not gonna resign there. Which then blows up that deal and he can direct himself to the team he really wants to be at lillard would have a harder time to doing that. Because he doesn't have free agency looming two to play that card. Yeah well i encourage any reporter. That's in tokyo tatum. Beal and lillard talking to each other. Just take a picture and then let the internet go wild crazy because it will unquestionably last thing for you. Howard the breaking news. This week in the coaching ranks. Is that jamal moseley is headed to orlando moseley of course last with dallas. A really well respected assistant coach there. Who was a candidate for that. Maverick job before. It went to jason kidd my immediate reaction to that higher howard beyond i think being an excellent choice for orlando is that we're gonna look at at moseley and jason kidd on parallel tracks. The next couple of years moseley. There was a strong case to be made that he should have been elevated to that head. Coaching job he'd been considered for other head coaching jobs. Before most recently in new york he had by all accounts a great relationship with luka doncic i understand bringing kit in he's got a history with dallas and as riccar lau said publicly having a player that played the game like kid and having a player that plays the game like don-shik make some sense to pair those two guys together. But there's always going to be as i watched these two situations unfold. I'm gonna wonder you know. Did the mavericks make the right choice. Leading jamaa moseley go and bringing jason kidd in and there's so many variables in this the first being at orlando's in step one or maybe even steps zero of a massive rebuild right there in the negatives right now. I think there's still maybe more fat to trim on that roster before they really bottom out. Yeah and you know you talk about trying to build around. You know markelle foltz. And and jonathan isaac jonathan isaac for so long. They're getting hurt and he's a great player but they've loved writing in a weird way john stays healthy. He's still more of a complementary store right like he's he's a potentially defensive player of the year at some point. He's not a guy who you're building an offense around though and marquel foltz okay. He he got himself back on track in orlando. He has a career now where he didn't have one but he's not a foundational building block. Come on like that's crazy so the roster doesn't have much talent jamal. Moseley's is coming into a situation. Which a lot of first time head coach is committed to which is all right. There's a lot of work to do so You're gonna have to do a lot of development. You're going to have to take a lotta lumps in the win loss column. It's gonna be rough going for the first year or two or maybe three. Let's see how they can get things going. But you know as it has been a certain other like kenny. Atkinson came to look a completely hopeless situation in brooklyn but was known as development coach in atlanta. And sure enough. Everybody who went there. Joe harris spencer. Dinwiddie jared allen versus lower. First round picks. Guys who were you know whether they were reclamation projects whether they were low picks everybody seems to get better the second they went to brooklyn and play kenny atkinson and his staff congenial. Moseley have the kind of effect in orlando can the front office. Get him to kind of guys. That will thrive in that in that kind of environment and carve out careers from cells and carbon identities. Jamal moseley has a lot going for him. And we've heard like many great things about it but we often hear great things about assistant coaches who don't end up panning out so i always. We have to caution ourselves on these things. Because i thought. Brian shaw was gonna be a great head coach and he was. Everybody loved him all the players sung as praises when he was associate head coach under frank. Vogel indiana he goes to denver probably just the wrong guy at the wrong time but he hasn't had another shot since then but that went really badly. Brett brown was really great in in some respects for the for the early years of the process and then suddenly. It seemed like they'd hit some sort of ceiling. Eager kokoschka of had been talked about for years is a great assistant. Coach didn't work out. Swells head coach in phoenix. David dale bumpy ride in memphis and then disastrous in new york. We just don't know like luke walton. Another example like there are plenty of coaches who as their when their assistance. We hear and see the best of them and then you know some of them be go on it and have great success coaches. I mean tyler has been fantastic. Mike malone has been fantastic money williams. Nick nurse dwayne casey a lotta longtime assistance. Get their shot and then you know it. It works out in a dozen. It's all contextual. It's all just the opportunity you have the thing for dallas is. They went with a guy who has experienced jason kit. That experience was not necessarily good experience. Like i think most people around the would look at what he did in milwaukee in brooklyn and say. I'm going to steer clear. Maybe you'd rather have the the unproven. Jamal moseley versus the somewhat proven jason kidd but. I don't think we'll know what the right choice was there for a while yet. Because it's it's gonna take some time before we can evaluate moseley as head coach. I maybe jason kidd learned something in two years as an assistant. I mean that happens. You know working with lebron for entire for two entire seasons working under frank vogel maybe picked up some things that'll be useful to him as a head coach. Moseley to me. The key is giving him time. Like you've got to be committed to moseley for a minimum. I think of three years and more likely five years. And then you see what you have in head coach. You mentioned gore. I mean it's worked out for phoenix. Absolutely but i do think he got hosed out there i mean he only had one year on the job and that year was without deandra aiden chris. Paul had devon booker of course but that was not a good team that he was coaching. There i gotta get moses the because you want to see what the guy can do when you put that team in a position to win a great example to me is james breglio in charlotte. I mean berea. Was one of those guys assistant coach elevated to head coaching position in charlotte. Not great first couple of years there but when he was given players and chance to win he did pretty well. I mean up until lamelo ball went out the horns were really good team and i think they will be a good team. Going forward in part because of the borrego is a pretty good coach. I want to see this magic team. Invest heavily in jamal. The you're the guy developed these guys and we'll keep you around no matter what the won loss record says until you get a chance to win then you judge like brett brown six or seven days since brett brown left but i can see the for letting go of brett brown. I mean they had a talented team and to a degree the underachieved. But you've got to let the coach get a roster on that level before you really make any decisions about whether they can coach. Yeah well and that's the thing about. This is what set up says apart. I think the good organizations from the bad ones is that you you decide when you choose a guy. Especially if he's a longtime assistant not a guy with head coaching experience. And you've said we believe in this guy. This is somebody who's got a great trekker record as an assistant. We're going to first opportunity. It's your obligation to when you say investment. Yeah it's time investment. It's a give them all the tools to succeed. Give him the time to succeed. You've decided you believe in him. So stand behind that have the conviction to stand behind that and take some bumps along the way you know maybe maybe memphis and or the knicks should have stuck with david physed longer. You know we had heard nothing but great things about fiscal coming out of miami. Initially we may yet you know. Find out that he. He can be great head coach in the right situation. Maybe those worth rights situations. He might be one of those guys though. I love physios and assist one of those guys. Though the just the temperament is always important. Like the government like memphis yet. Some battles with market assault didn't work out your plus new york. You just might be one of those guys that doesn't have the right temperament to be is based on what we've seen a memphis in new york might be better suited for these ranks but if he succeeds in l. a. I think he'll get another chance right. Maybe i think the point being though that if you as an organization have identified a guy instead he we believe in him then. Okay then believe in him. Stick with them and make sure you've given them enough tools to succeed Is it a pulling the plug at the first sign of of struggle and that's what happens in the nba. too often. is that seems panic. You know the fans turn. There's some minor flare up. Oh the coach and player got into it. Whatever it may good teams that can happen on as well. And it's it's just. It's the way franchises. React so you have to know whether or not the guy is is is right and then stick with them. And so yeah. Let's jomo's should get a nice long here. She got a ton of latitude in orlando given where they are as an organization given the state of that roster. Yeah i agree. Howard enjoy milwaukee looking forward to hearing the conversation with the lazarus on friday. You can check podcast. Right here on the crossover feet again. Make sure you listen to howard's interview. Spencer dinwiddie from last week. It was really really strong. Enjoy -joy the mid west our. We'll talk when you're back on the northeast always a pleasure. My friend the newest player in the pre nba basketball landscape is overtime. Elite elite will begin playing sometime in the fall. And we'll be headlined by some of the top now. Former high school players in the country players would be paid minimum one hundred thousand dollars with some making north of that and have access to high level facilities training as well as educational programs to help. Get a better grasp on that. I'm joined by brandon williams the head of basketball operations for overtime. Elite and kevin ollie the former. Nba guard uconn. Coach was the head coach and director of player development bread. And i want to start here with you. Just kind of give me the ten thousand foot view overtime elite. What are the objectives. What what what was behind the formation of this league. I think any of us. Chris who've been around for a long time i've actually seen Sort of the downside of young players who entered into professional ranks to this point. It's been the nba Who are not ready. And so what does that mean you know not not ready to form and be stars or is it just not ready to be great teammates or is it not ready to be good partners. is sort of all that you know the idea that the work day is much longer than they know. And that there's more responsibility to be in a professional athlete The responsibilities to families and communities we just have to do a better job preparing them and here was an opportunity to be part of a program that wanted to address all that. It's not just about being a good player. It's like we wanna address the whole athlete. Hope so on. Three levels were hitting basketball. Easiest thing understand. I think businesses in our world is education And then there's brand you know. These young people now are moving at a speed that we aren't as older folks and they want to build things An earlier age particularly off the court so building a brand is important something that can last well beyond their tread on tire so we're hitting it in basketball business brand. That's that's that's really thirty thousand foot view. Kevin what attracted you to this job. Just like his dad is the whole person being able coach them from a mind body and soul Experience and understanding the mindfulness athlete I've seen it from a pro level. Got up tune into play thirteen years with twelve different teams so i understand like the different trials and tribulations you go through with a player not saying that these players are gonna go through that but is getting them more prepared if they do come into some certain situations where it's not typically going the right way. How can they manage that situation. So what they do today can echo into tomorrow and having the ability to kana paint on a black blank. Canvas is what a really attracted to me to to this you know. Ot league program we can take the player really shape the curriculum you not with teaching them about subjects. But we're really teaching them about themselves as well from media training From mental health issues. All the different things that come involved because we all know chris is stress. You know from success is a lot of pressures is a lot of people pulling at you. It's a lot of people won't certain things. But how do you deal with that from a player's standpoint where you can play when you get on the basketball court and half clear and not be caught up in the distractions of off the court issues. Um as desks desks were really kind of vocal. Spirit to give back in it and how these kids you know. Have these players be available at the moment of truth to make the right decisions and that was very important to me. Kevin as you mentioned you played in the nba brand. You played in the nba. As well i wanna ask both of you guys and kevin. I'll start with you like if this was available to you as sixteen. seventeen year. Old looking back. Would you have founded attractive with a definitely founded attractive You know i kind of thought the box anyway. I was from chris. Shaw from from from south central and i chose connecticut. So you places that. I didn't even know nothing about growing up. You always thought out the box and never wanted to go down a path that everybody was going down So i was always curious. And i think that's how my mom especially my mom. My dad raised me. So i definitely been curious of this situation. No no speaking now without you know took it. I'm not sure. But i think it really gave me another option to look at it and this is what we're trying to do not saying that the ncaa is wrong overtime. Leaders wrong or right. It's not about that. It's about if you really care about the student. Athletes you give them as much options as possible. And i think this gives the lee student athlete. Another option and i think you know it's a very Great option for them to have and if they choose overtime league we're going to give our whole heart to make sure they're developed on and off the basketball court chris i- jumping after coach It would have been interesting. Chris but i certainly would not have been a candidate i would. Let's just get that right. What what things that's important. We sit down going through just grassroots community and we spent months just talking to people educating about. You know what we're about who we are. Each of us has a reputation in some other space. Not here The this program isn't for everybody is not the right fit for everybody. We are cherry picking and a lot of ways. These are players that feel like they are destined for professional basketball. There are a lot of sixteen year olds. That don't know that yet and their parents aren't convinced that yet in people that support them. Don't don't feel that confidence yet. They may be another year away or two years away but this is not. This is not the right path for everyone. Twenty four athletes roughly twelve per class. We're looking at juniors and seniors and the truth is at this age. What was really funny about scouting them is everybody's skinny and like a lanky and underdeveloped and still has like a mountain of upside to you know to to get through before you can really see who they're going to be but you know if you have a young player like brand williams who's just dreaming of being an nba player but does not much certainty. That's even realistic We gotta be very careful about this approach In taking because there there are risks but for those that that have already established in this deke. They've established a day of separated from their class. You know jaylen. Lewis has an example the most recent example. He's he's he's elevated in separate. The draft isn't tomorrow though so there's still a lot of work to do but he's already in front running physician and it gives everyone low confidence that this is the kind of investment and the kind of pet that would make a ton of sense for players like that. Let me follow up on that brandon. Because you're you're entering. What suddenly become a fairly crowded space in terms of leagues like this. You know the g. league ignite is one season in but they've had a measure of success. We've seen jalen green probably a top pick. Jonathan kamenga top five or six. Then you have the ncw with this. Recent ruling allowing top players to make money off their name image and likeness. How does how does the elite separate itself from that group. Why think i is. We start a little bit sooner so the g. league zone a great job with what we call it a year the prep year that year. That a recent graduates would be going to college and they've already been hacking the system you know going to italy or china So so there's a market for those players and we want an alternative to college for for for us though. Our players are seeking an alternative to high school so we are a school but we think about the resources that were bringing to the table first of which being an nba like environment You know start coach. Ali coach lehto in a robust set of staff. I mean scouting staff a high performance staff administrative team. Our goal was to simulate an nba organization for for young athletes at sixteen seventeen eighteen. Th there there is no other environment. Like that. And i think the big way that we separate with high school athletes Is that both domestically and internationally. We're able to put twenty four of them together in a building. So what we're selling is the best competition for these guys starts at home. I mean every day in line coaches don't minister drills administer competition aspects of practice and getting ready for games but when you look to the right and left and i noticed as a player. There's no weak link. I mean everywhere you look. There's somebody that's doing what you're doing and possibly doing more. Because they they are not just dreamed about the into the league or to the high level. They're on their way there That's where we've been able to. I think create a little separation from others that have tried or looked at something. Like this kevin. How do you approach this job. Do you do it in a similar mindset and you had at uconn where you have young players you also you know yukon. You had to keep them academically eligible you to follow that pretty closely. I mean is there is it a similar mindset or do you take a different tact. I think you just let it be you know. Similar is not. It's just whatever comes you say yes to it and you cultivate hope from it I never coached high school players. They was always you know graduated from high school. And now they're freshman's This situation is a little different in in was recruiting for two to three years. This situation is a little different. But you know from me. Chris i love the unknown about it. And that's the space i live in. Not just wanna make sure that. I have the space incorporate something in these players that they can just think about it can build from a have a foundation so when they make the transition they have every tool in the toolbox to say okay. Oh that's a problem Assess it let me be able to correct it. Let me obsessed. Let me be aware of it and i think that's the difference between you know coaching a high school kid in in the college. Kid i mean you get able to mold them a little bit better and then you have to understand where they at. Now you know back then. I didn't have social media. We didn't have social media now. These kids these players are building their brand a little bit earlier and now you just meet them where they are. And i can't wait to get them up on campus get them up until atlanta just continue to build a great relationship. Welcome spend time with the one on one in. This situation is going to provide us to do a lot more skill development that i didn't have a really good opportunity and it had not one say good opportunity. I didn't have the best opportunity. Because there's so many things we own a row recruiting You own a row fundraising these different things. Brandon's taken care of in. Dan porter is taken care of. I can just really coach the player and work on his skill development on and off the basketball court. So it's really given me my own lane. So i can really perform my job. Mama job is really breaking down and relationships it starts. Relationship is start with trust. Stars will hold is spending time with the the young student athletes on and off the basketball court and pushed them to greatness and the competition is not on. our side of competition is with him. You know can you beat your previous best bestself. Can you be better than today you know. Can you be better tomorrow than you were date. And that's what i'm coaching. And that's what i love to do. And i think we're going to have some great young man as open as biden has going to be vulnerable going to try to reach for the sky. In the sky is going to be ob- you is not going to be limits. I can't wait to get up to atlanta. We've been having some many camps. Chris has been wonderful to get back on the court with the guys. And i'm looking forward to the next mini camp and dan looking forward to getting them up to atlanta. So we really can go to work. You know when. I was was talking to brian. shaw a couple of months ago. Kevin about how he was coaching. The ignite you know it was a lot of pro stop. He was trying to bring to that team. Are you taking that same. Approach you trying to coach them like their nba players or something different. No it's nothing different is just. I'm building pro. Habits in every situation is going to be different. Chris this is going to be some guys. Come in you know. Say for instance like a. John montero will we got him and he you know is a little bit more advanced than some other players because he's been a pro- already and then it's going to be another situation where we gotta talented guy might not be able to get quick but these opportunities we can go at our own pace we can sit down and talk to them but we're really teaching and building pro habits and those habits is going to translate over to them being great pros when that opportunity come invest in the nba are the euro league so every day you know we are building like a practice plan like more of a college practice plan nba practice bandwidth doing drills. That i got from my numerous stops in the nba. You know we're doing sets in the nba. Then we gotta understand that sixteen years old as well you know and maybe sometimes you gotta you know kinda doubt it down a little bit. But i'm gonna let com. I'm going to let that go. i'm not going to focus on one of it. I'm not gonna say oh. We're doing this process. Each and every day every day is different. And that's what i love about the unknown. And i'm gonna treat it like that and we just gonna continue to bill because i think we got great mas and organization that really want to coach the whole person. And that's what i'm really excited about. You decided to upgrade your outdoor deck. So you ordered the essentials. Power washer said a patio chairs and a shiny new grill. And you use your bank of america. Customized cash rewards credit card choosing to earn three percent cashback online shopping and up to five point. Two five percent preferred rewards member which you put toward your most essential deck addition a bird feeder of yours at bank of america dot com slash more rewarding copyright two thousand twenty one bank of america corporation support for this podcast comes from invent together according to studies less than thirteen percent of all inventors who hold a us patent are women black and hispanic college graduates patent at half the rate of their white counterparts. But we can fix that by increasing participation innovation and patenting by underrepresented groups. It would quadruple. The number of american inventors and increase annual gdp by almost one trillion dollars. Invent together is a coalition of organizations companies. Universities and concerned citizens committed to ensuring that everyone has the opportunity to invent and patent because the more diverse. The american patent system gets the stronger and more successful. our nation will become. What can you do to help. Divers inventors patent and unleash economic opportunity. Find out at invent together dot org learn more and take action today brandon not to continue to compare this team to the ignite but when i talked to sharieff abderrahim about that i mean. I had asked him about the sustainability of that team. Given how much. Money was being poured in to pay some of the players. And he bobbed and weaved floyd mayweather trying to answer that question. Because it's it's hard to commit to it without say a television contract more sponsorships and things like that when you can you speak to kind of the sustainability of this because we've seen startups with an influx of cash. Get get in big the first year. But then peter out. I mean what needs to happen. Four overtime elite to become a long term successful program while has got to answers. I think you know a concept. I mean we're we're selling on the ability to develop young players and have a more more pro ready right. So this is. This is the path we are offering basketball development. Call it professional Business development And we are also like leveraging. What is an incredible media platform that again. The things that we like to call a distinguishing factors. That's a huge one. So not to bob and weave one. We gotta be good ass. You know that. That's how have long deputy spurs the spurs. They were good for really long time. And so we've got the that there were good at this note. No pressure on kale right The the the second piece though is you know and this comes from my my time in the nba. It just wasn't that long ago where it out of chicago. Pre-draft combine interview. If i said. I wanna build my brand. Everybody in the room was like smirking and like you know what. What are we talking about like. It's about basketball basketball basketball And you know if you are young team developing and not winning a lot of games truth is you can't sell just basketball because your basketball isn't great you got to sell personalities and stories in that there's something that people can invest in in fall in love with other than like the final score like otherwise. The sixers had no chance right any any development team yet to buy into a story and for us. I think we have a chance to create stories but we get a chance to show those stories because we have a platform. So it's it doesn't take much. I mean i'm not a social media guru. But when i got recruited for this job haven't been around the block a little bit certainly from an nba perspective. I heard a couple of things. I really got my attention. One was fifty million followers That's eyeballs and we all know that that Business follows the eyeballs in whatever in whatever respect. The other was which is unfair. Because i think that number changes month over month but it started at one point four and not set maybe one point eight or one point nine billion with a b. billion views of content a month that overtime in some ways has found a way to the heart. The mind of young people It is being communicated and solid as you know the generation z. sort media and content engine We are doing an amazing thing here which is developing young talent in a pure way that we want to make sure that they are prepared. Top to bottom to do well on the court to do well and communities to do well in business but then there's this other thing which is they want to be known like. No player wants to play in an empty building. Everybody wants to play where it matters. They wanna play. When nick can rock and like the building and just like recognizing their talent. We're just artists. And one thing that is kind of showcase. By one event that that overtime overtime the media company producing s called. You see it on youtube to. Is that over. Hundred million people watched that. I mean that that's not an insignificant number that players that are going to play overtime. Lee will have the opportunity to be known The the opportunity of bring brick big brands to the table and support this platform If not already indicated by the kinds of investors that that have shown interest but the brands that are coming to the table our sustainability is going to be showing value delivering value to not just the athletes but to overtime visibility. I would imagine great for them but can you monetize it. Can you make it so this league is in the black or does it need to be in the black every year. Well my the good news is as a basketball man. No different than a different than the is Get a budget. My job is to be fishing and and spend wisely. I i'm not. I'm not asked to sell tickets or generate revenue that's for a tremendous And in successful a business operations Our job is to make sure that what we are delivering is high is a high level product That you see the growth and development of our young players. What's there recruited. We gotta make them better. They need to be able to perform and probably the best testament of our success is going to be our nba. Gm voting with this pick right but with a coach saying like they did a nice job. This guy was. Well coached testament to takeo and the rest of the coaching staff. That if we're doing that will prove successful. Because guess what the next crop of recruits when we're in the gym like we're not chasing them. There's sort of meeting us at at minimum half way. We need to keep bringing high level taliban and developing talent to prove successful and i have a tremendous set of partners across academics and across content media. That will will do their part to elevate our business. Can you expecting to tap into some of your. nba relationships. I mean as you mentioned thirteen teams in twelve seasons. You've made a lot of friends over the years. We're going to see like san preston sitting in the crowd for your practices as a whole so sam and so many gyms that i know you know Kevin durant and all these guys are destinies in overtime. Just having them be around. We had our first minicamp. Ray allen showed up and not only showed up. He brought his son to work out with guys. Just it was just amazing. does just see how the branches that we can continue to pull up on and they continue to pull on us and be a partnership in. This thing is going to be great. Are you expecting to have kind of drop ins. Durant's involved with the league. You expecting these guys. Just be around. Which i would imagine would be both a resource for you but also an attractive quality to this league definitely. Definitely we going to build a place where it's going to be hopefully a development premier development destination for everybody and you know hopefully katie can come out and work out with guys and russell westbrook and james harden and all these guys that we know and i know i had opportunity to be evolved. Then it's kinda beat a veteran guys We want them to be around. Because it's not. Just me sean. It's also watching tape like these are the different drills and look how k. d. and look how chris paul is using the pick and rolls and now they're showing up that's a that's a big big bang for us with us growing these young talented student athletes To get them inspired to the next level and they're doing a great job done only gonna do. I coached him. Chris a coach me on a day to day basis. I'm open to that and we just really want to have a love affair with guys and and the end of the day chris. We want appease the basketball guys. We wanna play the right way. We want to share a basketball. We wanna run. We wanna have fun. We want how to join the game but it can't just be me me me. It has to be weak. And i'm wanting to teach guys how to be involved in any system they get drafted about. They can be a part of a productive system and be a productive partner in in the community as well no matter what city they when they arrive to the nba brandon. Before let you go. What schedule gonna look like i mean is this team playing. Just walk me through kind of what these kids are getting into. And what kind of schedule you gonna be able to put together so schedule that that is really interesting for everybody. And i wanna try to illuminate. But i've got to be careful we are still contracting with some teams But for the audience the think about it in buckets. We're gonna play independent prep schools. That's going to be a significant part of our schedule. We are a high school so we are looking to schedule. Some of the top independence that you would typically no to have a national schedule can travel that have the ability to be mobile. We're scheduling home and away with with With those folks and it looks like net set as an example It looks like you know. Folks that are playing for a national title Arizona florida california. So it'll be a widespread travel schedule for us. We're also looking at European competition so think about junior euroleague as an example. Some of the best clubs the Insects as an example Where we can get a collection of sixteen to nineteen year old elite talent to compete against us. And then as i mentioned earlier on the show we really feel like the best competition is gonna come internally and that's where our league play Comes into effect so we are looking at our group of twenty four as three teams of eight. There will be standings you'll be able to track will compete against each other. That'll be a significant part of our schedule as well. We don't want to overstep our guys one of the things. We really wanna correct leading science. Guide us here. is is minimized the wear and tear. Nobody's while still developing and preparing for a professional level place so a schedule of maybe thirty five. To forty games is our target. We started september Training camp will will begin Play by mid august. We'll be done by by Late march is how we see our schedule shaping up i'm looking forward to it brennan kevin. It's a really interesting concept and hope you guys have a lot of success with an. I'll certainly be watching a lot of. Nba people will be watching but brandon. Stay out of a set of massachusetts. Kevin has like some basketball. Ptsd from all those bc. Matchups i'm sure would probably were so tough. I don't remember kevin. It's not real like talk about it. But lita past. We'd be six thousand. That's not very nice. That's hovering kevin brand. Thanks for joining me. I appreciate it all right. Thank you chris. Thanks so much.

NBA Basketball Damian Lillard United States Chauncey Billips Brett Brown Nigeria Lillard Tatum Jason Kidd Blazers Olympics Howard Tokyo Moseley Jamal Moseley Beal Orlando Portland
The Influencer Marketing Advantage

Sounds Profitable

02:16 min | 11 months ago

The Influencer Marketing Advantage

"Raya sharma ashra. Thank you so much for joining us. It's my pleasure brian. How're you doing. I'm great i'm great. You know it's funny. This is the first podcast that have recorded in the new space. Since i've moved from austin and san antonio i knowing myself prerecorded so many podcasts. That half the things people are listening to our months old and i feel bad. But we've were starting to catch up and we're starting to do this so this will be you know only month and a half old by the time it goes up but i'm so excited to be talking to you in this new space and so sh- raya i give give people a little bit about your background like i personally love what you do at inside podcasting and that's how we first connected but there's so much more to you than that so i'd love to pass it over to you. Sweden all right. So i am speaking to you from vancouver canada today. Which in my humble opinion is one of the most beautiful places in the world. Hope you can visit someday. I was raised in. Dubai was born in bread. By and then i would not do my engineering. Which recently found out hilarious went on to do. My engineering in india quickly discovered that engineering was not for me and did my mba in sydney. I know this is like me flexing. How much i've traveled and i've earned it and then i worked in event marketing in singapore where i did a lot of cold calling in going to events and selling things that was fun. We got out of my comfort zone really quick with that job and then i moved to vancouver in twenty seventeen eighteen. I think and i have been working as a marketer for awhile. Now my day job as i call it is a marketing director. I mean to start up. So i'm the marketing team At an ultimate frisbee organization my team. When they listen to this. We'll ask me why didn't refer to myself as the marketing overlord. Because that's what they like to call me and then as you mentioned right inside podcasting as well which is I don't know if i should say right. But both right in hewett inside podcasting which is a collection of news that happens in the podcasting world sometimes offer my opinions here and there

Raya Sharma Ashra San Antonio Brian Vancouver Austin Sweden Dubai Canada Sydney India Singapore
"seventeen eighteen" Discussed on ESPN FC

ESPN FC

01:39 min | 1 year ago

"seventeen eighteen" Discussed on ESPN FC

"Else. Who's done mom as my as my dau- shopping yemen asia. Oh no i didn't live in seventeen eighteen and they don't know greece. Man top scorer. Yeah i just Between benjamin and around them he gets he service nothing just a big summer for reasonable guinness struggles at club level. I think he comes in. In in france blue somebody ingredient to be on the receiving end of a lot of okay. We got a frank. Frank funds next predictions overseas successful head. So frankly come for franzen. Let's get the gone act. Nineteen ninety-six ninety-six. When i signed for chelsea remember well you never know. You never thought much hair when you came to jail. No john's well. Yeah you know that was nineteen ninety six. The pitcher is taken from below. So why are you doing. I here from a new copy. Your top scorer frank spaces strike in that. Yeah because you know. It's possible that belgium can win. Also the tournament.

belgium benjamin Frank asia franzen france Nineteen ninety-six seventeen eighteen nineteen ninety six frank chelsea greece john ninety-six
AMD's New CPU Socket Just Leaked

The WAN Show Podcast

02:05 min | 1 year ago

AMD's New CPU Socket Just Leaked

"Man. Do you remember when it was intel. Cpu launches were exciting. Yeah you also remember when. Cps weren't like absolute massive chagas. I was actually expecting you to say no. Because it's been a while why i mean that's true. It's such a weird flip. Remember the twenty six hundred k. Okay like if you if you look back it when you and i started working together which was old longtime over ten years now we we have flipped from all intel news to all. Amd news base basically. It's been such a long time. You think that at least some point in their it would essentially be a time where it was like really notably both and we had a little bit of that. Crossover here there. But it's pretty much just been all intel news or all. Amd news really weird. Yeah we're in the amd era and this is according to a leak from executed fix. Who apparently has a pretty good track record with. Amd leaks that the upcoming amd am five socket will be lga seventeen eighteen. So this'll be similar to most intel and all of amd's threader processors in that instead of using pins on the bottom of the cpu and then little holes in the socket on the motherboard going to use pads on the cpu and then a landlord array of pins in the motherboard itself. So we've actually got a display. Capture this images from at you fix. Cbs's ono now. I've moved other things. That's okay there. We go supposedly this is what. Am five rafael will look like from the bottom. That's right you're seeing it here. I unless you follow at excu exceed exceed q fix on twitter. That's all one thousand seven hundred and eighteen pens

Intel AMD Chagas CBS Rafael Twitter
"seventeen eighteen" Discussed on Capes & Lunatics: Sidekicks

Capes & Lunatics: Sidekicks

04:38 min | 1 year ago

"seventeen eighteen" Discussed on Capes & Lunatics: Sidekicks

"Magic. Are everyone welcome back to the devil. You know lead. They're the-they're podcast. That's right and we promise to be promised then finally here. You've got a friend. Mr de chester back to talk double free. Seventeen eighteen alot. Everybody i'm i'm going to stumble i i would i would. I would advise over that. My wife nicknamed the but then she gave up on that after a while. These did so again like the questions.

de chester Seventeen eighteen double
William Jackson rips the Bengals and fans after signing with Washington

Mo Egger

02:19 min | 1 year ago

William Jackson rips the Bengals and fans after signing with Washington

"William jackson the third Leaves the bengals. After five years he gets a three year forty million dollar contracts from the washington football team and good for man. Fine whatever william was good player. Here that is tantalizingly. Good two thousand seventeen eighteen and nineteen. We're kind of last year. He was good. I don't know that i'm paying him. Forty million bucks. He's mad about something so here he is. Here's william jackson the third. Wj three on one zero six seven. The fan in washington talking about bengals the bengals and bengals fans. I'm not asking you to talk about the bengals or anything but do you feel like the rest of the. Nfl doesn't know how good you are right. Now nobody no good. I you know in Over time they kind of get to you. You know you putting in and you guys these crazy denying saying number one number two corner on the market and i'm like i'm over here but then today man i was on the team. There's not a big market A lot of people around the world or no. What i can do it without have did so. You're looking at it from scratch their point. That doesn't tell you who the player really are. You know like. I was in the guy that was picked on throwing it the whole time. So if you wanna watch the bingo which we would hardly own prime time. Tv wouldn't never know. Lee jackson is surprised by the outpouring on social media. Twitter instagram. whatever it is. Yeah man they they definitely sa- put him in it. You know. cincinnati they got some crew fans man. You know misery loves company going to everybody doing man. I just was happy to embrace their fan base that they came along the cancer the page and man they. They've been put support if they win. You know depending on the other hand shoot them. Do they not winning. Other thing is a blessing to get away in wisdom. The best with washington. Lucy goes from here

Bengals William Jackson Washington William Football NFL Lee Jackson Cincinnati Twitter Cancer Lucy
Goodhart's Law in Reinforcement Learning

Data Skeptic

04:11 min | 1 year ago

Goodhart's Law in Reinforcement Learning

"Student at university. College london minds researches mauka manipulation if you have self trading algorithm does it learn to manipulate markets. And then going from that. How'd you stop it for many players in the market on cutting more generally how do you tell algorithm which runs a policy. How do you tell it. The certain things are illegal. Should be done. So it's kinda taking me on more security journey than i thought it would because of going into the world of experimental psychology lower because not market knows very interested in intent lieutenant and they're also interested in coz -ality my work at the moment is trying to establish will Like for an hour them and the what the beginning to be talking about today is connected to quality so is an area that really came up in my kinda full mold machine learning education and it was only probably just over a year. When i read a book by judy. Appel will the book of why a restarted get interested in the subject to causality and realize that it's something but isn't tool on isn't handled while a machine learning at all. And if you read the book. Paul is very adamant about the importance of alexey. In housing types of analysis simply can't walk without taking into account so it drew a question in my mind is wide or how machines machine learning techniques reinforcement dining. what when there's no explicit treatment of causality. it's all so that led to the dog brought to pipe official quoted by fulminate cool cool combo good health law enforcement butting so a reinforcement learning should be all about causality. You have an agent. He chooses actions that she's actions. That somehow changes the world. They receive some kind of award the world changes and so on so you think that reinforcement learning calls aleksey guy well together and actually if you to believe bill. They can't walk reinforcement. Dining should be able to work if causality isn't explicitly treated. But if you look at sutton a barter which is the canonical text on reinforcement. Learning a search for the wet causality. Causal anything like that pays exactly zero times in the book. So someone's gotta be wrong. Eva wrong in saying that actually k. nikon generate any kind of policy to solve a problem or reinforcement dining extremely lucky so far in the Questions that they've studied have contained any kind of interesting causal structure. I agree that the word causality is suspiciously missing from most of the reinforcement literature. Books and papers. I've encountered but it almost feels like it could be there implicitly. Could this just be a matter of semantics. Well that's the great hope from deep reinforcement dining. I guess that ye somehow by involving date neural network in order this somehow in that your network which is unknowable. Mysterious does the job of analysing causality. It doesn't automatically so you don't need to think about it. And it's done you don't need to worry about to me fulfillment dining works. So let's move on. And i guess there is an element of that because reinforcement dining does work. But it just made me think about if you look in science. In general there's a long history of humans discovery techniques which work with before actually understanding why they work so i was thinking about i on the on age was five hundred bc even saudi arabia and to make land. You need to take on all you. Smelted with coke and the coke burns in the air that produces carbon monoxide to carbon monoxide displaces. The oxide in the side which then lacey with real on so at what point in human silenced. It be realized that was happening. Probably two years lights may be seventeen eighteen. Hundreds ole is time. We still had on tools. Said he didn't really matter that we didn't know why what it did kind of walk on. I like bit to reinforcement learning. Maybe the process. Which does what. It's a bit mysterious. Maybe ego to do things to get it to work. But the actual understanding as to white wax isn't diane. I think without an understanding of sally cardi understand. Why rainbow sledding works. I can pull out a textbook or maybe go

Appel Alexey Aleksey Judy London Sutton Paul EVA Nikon Saudi Arabia Coke Lacey Sally Cardi Diane
DAOs Back In The Spotlight with Professor Aaron Wright

Epicenter

03:33 min | 1 year ago

DAOs Back In The Spotlight with Professor Aaron Wright

"You've been in the ecosystem a very long time so you you were here. When the dow the entire the dow thing went down way interested in dallas. Before that do that kind of kick it off for you. Yeah i mean. I actually was an avid reader of bitcoin magazine. Way back in the day. And i remember Dan larimer writing about decentralized autonomous corporations which was kind of the precursor to douse. I thought that that was a fascinating concept. The thought being that you can use at that time that bitcoin blockchain and an interesting implementation called colored coins to begin to represent the structure of a corporation as using blockchain to kind of record interests in the entity using those interests to to think about how to transfer assets had build controls into a corporation using smart contracts. I thought it was absolutely fascinating and kind of all clicked together as not surprising when when metallic and others began to veto venture towards thirty. Am and dow's became an important part of that story. Right does appear in the white paper. There was lots of conversations around. is that the community. I began to think about. I was equally fascinated and the dow itself was really i expression of that interest right So a theorem Was just recently launched for the most part even though it took some time to get the on tests nats and a whole bunch of other technical hurdles. But you know i really thought it was great that christoph and and team began to really push. Here they wanted to build a was in the white paper. They wanted to explore what these new digital organizations can look like and the dow is really the first grade experiment in that area. I i remember even before the dow launched seeings or demos and other things by the sparkle team dealing with you know a theam slash iot related devices which i thought were incredibly cool and i think to everybody's surprise though. The dow just was much more successful. Than i than. I think anybody would have imagined right. It was supposed to be kind of a a small experiment. It became a massive experiment and then he had a kind of a spectacular. Finish at which i think was Was great in terms of automating people's minds about the possibilities of a theorem at but at the same time highlighting a number of the challenges and but technical and then over subsequent months has lawyers and other folks began to to get some regulatory challenges as well so it you know i think it was the first great use case for theory was dow's and i do think people had a bit of ptsd. How after the dow and they were kind of free to play around and divan and start. Start to see what this ecosystem look like. There was obviously developer teams like the arrogant team and the dow stocks team. That were that were pushing forward. But i think people put to to the side as we saw token sales and other other kind of crypto economic systems began to be exported in twenty sixteen seventeen eighteen. But they're back great houser coming back to focus. There's a lot of activity in the dow space that i think as you know folks are beginning to pay attention to and if you are a developer or somebody that's interested in boxing technology. I imagine that it's probably worth your time to start to dig in here and think about what may be coming over the next couple of months and years.

Bitcoin Magazine Dan Larimer Bitcoin Blockchain Blockchain Dallas DOW Christoph Houser Boxing
Are Probiotics Ready for Practice?

The Carlat Psychiatry Podcast

04:35 min | 1 year ago

Are Probiotics Ready for Practice?

"My first faculty position was a minority turkeys was introduced a college in dublin and was a gastroenterologist. They're not keeling was a very good friend of mine. He persuaded me that. The brain got access was relevant in relation to psychiatric illness at that time. Dopey really considered microbes within the got to be relevant in relation to the brain got access. And when i came back to cork seventeen or eighty years ago. A group of micro biologist and gastrologist decided that they're going to set up a new at brain got institute which we set up so i was involved in setting it up and at that stage. People thought michael might be important in relation to the brand. It wasn't at all clear so we begun researching the area. And i've been working in that area now for the past seventeen eighteen years. I'm a psychiatrist. And i decided at the very beginning that if we were going to engage in this research that we are going to publish the best journals out there because it's an emerging discipline. There's a certain degree of skepticism. About self our initial publications would have been been john peony s to the nineteen nineties. The general sense i got was that the brain is protected from the rest of the body by a tight web called the blood brain barrier other than stroke and a crane disorders and a few infections. There wasn't much that got in their back then. Psychopharmacology was all about synoptic festivals and neurotransmitters. But things have changed one landmark that stands out to me was two thousand thirteen. That was when dr trolls raisins group at emory published. The first randomized controlled trial of a medication that treats depression without even crossing the blood brain barrier. How did it work with saudi getting into the brain. The thought was that it treated depression. By reducing inflammation in the body. The medication was to the crisis factor antagonised inflexible and worked for treatment resistant depression but only in those who had elevated markers of inflammation like crp. You're probably not going to be using inflexible matt in everyday practice because it has to be given. Iv among other things but in this journal we featured a few articles lately on how to treat depression by reducing inflammation and dr dina's work on probiotics and the mind gut connection is one of them. But first let's hear from dr dean about what the gut microbiome is. The god microbiome is essentially the collection of micro organisms within the intestine. Now the majority of them are in the large in stein and the beat assed volume is carried bacteria. Now there are obviously viruses and fungi. There there are a variety of microbes. But we've largely focused on bacteria the golden microbial over navarine adult like you are. I is at least a kilo gram and weight. So it's it's quite a large wage. It's it's pretty much the same way. As the human brain really traditionally. We've always taken the view that their commencement. They don't do anything any harm there. There we feed them because we feed these bacteria as well but it really is only one in the last fifteen years that people have begun to realize that in fact there really is a synergistic relationship between these microbes and dos and was we might feed them that they in turn produce chemicals that our brain and other organs in our body absolutely choir how these gut bacteria influence the brain when i think they influence the brand in a variety of ways that be one of our database of boll is big areas of research over. The years is trying to anything. There are lots of unknown questions but the narva security very important majority. It's a long meandering nerve. It sends signals from brain. To got it sends signals from the brain we showed in taper in peony s their own twelve years ago. That sir microbes could only communicate with the brain. Is the vegas nerve was intact. So we did a gossipy in an animal. The microbe couldn't communicate with the brain. So the vegas nerve has very important author important.

Brain Got Institute Depression John Peony Dr Trolls Keeling Dr Dina Dr Dean Dublin Emory Stroke Michael Saudi Stein Matt Vegas
Zconomy: How Gen Z Will Change the Future of Business with Jason Dorsey

Entrepreneur on FIRE

29:22 min | 1 year ago

Zconomy: How Gen Z Will Change the Future of Business with Jason Dorsey

"Jason. Save up to fire nation and share. Something interesting about yourself that most people don't know sure what's up. Fire nation thrilled to be here with you. Huge fan fire nation. Everything about something that most people don't know about me is. I wrote my first book when i was eighteen years old and it was so successful. I ended up sleeping on the floor of a garage apartment with five thousand books that i had printed thinking somebody was going to buy them instead. They were furniture. So a bed of books means you're not selling as many books as you want to fire nation but guess what jason's grown he's matured and right. Now he's rocking z. Konami which is all about generation z. And how gen z is going to change the future of business. So i kind of want to start a few steps back jason. Because i'm just curious like how does one get into studying generations wide. Did that interest you. And why did you get into it. Yeah share well that. I book that i wrote when i was eighteen at ended up not selling it first and then becoming a real big bestseller and i started speaking all around the world and i ended up on sixty minutes and i was on. That show is all about millennials. And i'd written a bunch of books and started a company and everything was going great but after that show i started speaking all these corporate executives who are now our primary clients but i was speaking all these exact and he would say such terrible things about millennials and i am a millennial pretty fended lazier titled your pants or fall off. You live with your mom and all this stuff. And i'm like well. No actually. I have my own house in our own office building in my parents worked for me and my pants are on very snugly. Thank you very much. And so so after that i remembered Clear as day. I was in this boardroom. Big public company and the ceo had said Some things about millennial employees. That i just i didn't fully believe and i'd spoken about half a million millennials at that time and so i asked him because i didn't know any better. Now i serve on lots of corporate boards. You know one of the couples on sold for eleven billion dollars. I live in this world now. But back then i didn't i didn't i didn't know and it was really a set up for success so i asked him i said is there any way i can see your data about millennials because you say the turnovers hiring. They're not as engaged and on and on i. I love to understand better. So i can conceptualize it and maybe help also for so. There are a lecture or whatever so they sent the data to me. And the data didn't match with the ceo had just said in the boardroom which basically never happened. Ceo's don't go off the cuff in front of their boards prickly a private publicly-held company like that. So i asked my wife who has a phd. I said denise you know this is. The strangest thing was just in this room with this pretty famous. Ceo they said all these things with great conviction then. I looked at the data and the data doesn't match what they just said. I said what do you think we should do. And she looked at me and she says we start a research for. She's up because if they don't even know their own data if we can help them to understand their data make better decisions and we can really great copy and help lots of peoplesoft. Lots of challenges and so. That's how we got into this thirteen years ago. We founded the center for generational kinetics. We lead research all around the world for many of the biggest brands in the world. And all about separating generational myth from truth through data so leaders can make great decisions whether you're a startup or venture capital or your bootstrapping yet or you're in a big public company getting accurate data and being able to make decisions based on that increases the likelihood of success de risk strategies. That you're looking at drives innovation and so forth and we found that generations in particular or one area where there was just so much myth and so much misinformation and if we gave people great information that it could take action and that was incredibly exciting. We've had seven hundred clients since then which is pretty wild and done studies all around the world and just love it absolutely it now. Your ceo is just flat out wrong when it came to millennials and you had the data to back it up. Did you ever go back to him. And just be like joe burrow. Check us out. you're wrong in also my pants. They're pretty snug. Check them out. I know that was a quiet. But i really do credit him and i if it wasn't such a negative story i would say what company is because it's really big famous company but But no but. I do believe that he something that we saw frequently. Which is the idea that generations older generations. Think of millennials through the lens of their kids or their grandkids and so that that becomes a proxy for the whole generation. And in fact when we wrote the economy book new book. What we found is the same thing was happening again and there was all this misinformation and it just wasn't true and that's why we spent less two years right in the book is because we've got to clear this up because when people have the wrong impression about an entire generation it leads to so many problems for everybody. Everybody loses so no. I never never corrected him on it. But i do give him credit for sparking the idea. I'm glad that you do give them credit for sparking that idea because sometimes fire nation. Is those things you just like you know. I'm not just quite sure about that. Let me look into it. They can really uncover some great opportunities in one thing. That i think is a huge problem in this world in general and especially when you're talking about generations is just regurgitation. You'll hear one person on one talk. Show say one thing. And then you'll regurgitate it. And then somebody else regurgitates regurgitation and like seven layers down. You're like how'd you hear that. They're like oh. I don't really know like somebody just mentioned it and like now you're speaking it like it's the truth and it's just regurgitation of what you know is something that has no data to back it up. So what most people get wrong jason when it comes to generations break that down for us shared. There's a few things that jump out. The first is this belief. Generations are a box or stereotype and that is absolutely not true. We're generational researchers. This is what we do more than sixty five generational studies and what we see is generations are not a box but what they really are powerful clues and as long as we used them as clues and only clues to dry faster connection trust and influence in create all kinds of positive outcomes. We don't wanna put people in boxes. We wanna use this as clues. So we can figure out how to better lead market sell collaborate innovate and so forth. And when you sort of at that level people seem to really embrace it because it just gives them another lens to better connect. So i think the first is people think. Generations are boxes or stereotypes. And they're not in fact. Our clues are driven by math. We look for what's called predictability by scenario so that's the first thing that people i think it wrong. The second is this idea that generations are the same around the world. Now one of the things that we've uncovered repeatedly in our work. We publish all this on our website. Is that generations vary by geography so for example in the us will see differences between urban and rural within the same generation. And that i work a lot outside the us and we'll see differences. Has we travel around the world and that's important because if you're a global company or frankly a global brand fire nation is you want to make sure that you really representing each of the different geographies. And what makes them different now. One cool thing that we've uncovered and we talk a lot about this bunches. Economy is the most consistent generation the world. now that doesn't mean exactly the same but the most similar generation the world is now gen z. Gnc's about twenty three twenty four years old. The oldest and the reason the most similar is because of cheap mobile technology so if you live in different countries around the world you might even get your phone for free as long as you use it for payment. Think about it started using a text. Payer sort of like a mobile credit card in different parts of the world and because we've driven the cost of a mobile down solo basically two zero in many places now. All the sudden young people around the world are having access to entertainment news information dating banking on and on and on and as a result of that. We're seeing a lot more similarities. As i travel all around the world the younger you get but interestingly the older you get even to gen xer baby boomers from a different planet as you travel around the world. So that's something people get wrong. And then the last thing that i think people get wrong. And is they have to deal with a bunch. Is people confuse life. Stage or age with generation. So for example jen's is now twenty four but when we do studies and ask people how do you think the average millennial is they'll say twenty five as if we didn't keep getting older you never talking about millennials for fifteen years. Say there they're now forty. I think that's a board it because you stay in the saying generation but you pass through different life stages and frequently people confuse the two and it's very important to understand the difference because if you're trying to market or employer build a business that targets different groups generations gives you all these clues but we got to distinguish between the generation which travels up right at ages up baby boomers for teenagers versus life. Stage for example high school or college which are still pretty similar ages as they have been for the last four years and so knowing. The difference helps you to understand that. Yes really interesting. How people always confuse age with generations. And how that all goes. I mean you know. I was just talking to a friend the other day literally. He's in his late thirties. I'm in my late thirties. And he's just going off and riffing about jenner. How millennials or just entitled and all this stuff and it looks like you know where millennials. He's like oh no. I'm definitely not a millennial mike. Well we're we're like the oldest millennials millennials. And he's like well. I need to look at that. And so it was funny. He came back. We know there's actually a lot of great things about millennials and he's now like listing off all the good things because he now is identifying himself as a millennial so it's really interesting fire nation and yes. We do get older. That is what happens to all generations and all human beings foreshore. And we're gonna die something. I'm pretty excited about as soon as we get back from our break which is about how generational work is actually going to solve challenges for both entrepreneurs that's you fire nation and companies as well as soon as we get back think is the best platform to create market and sell your own online courses in. We speak from personal experience. We've been hosting our online courses within kick since two thousand seventeen with dinkic we can deliver content to our students in a simple user friendly way that allows them to learn and take action fast plus our students are always raving about how easy it is to follow the flow of the contents. Thanks to think theme and templates. So if you're ready to create an online course to help you reach a wider audience build revenue in make a bigger impact than think. If is the perfect partner to have by your side to prove it. Think if it has an exclusive for you fire nation. Their five day course challenge. Here's what one of their recent students had to say about. This challenge helped me gain the confidence and clarity. I needed as well as a perspective required to compile my specialized knowledge into marketable contents that others will be willing to pay for sign up for this free challenge today at think dot com slash fire. That's t h. I n k. I f i. C dot com slash buyer looking for business. Coach was helped thousands of entrepreneurs just like you to increase profitability by an average of one hundred percent per year all for less money than would cost a higher a fulltime at minimum wage employee fire nation meets clay. Clark klay has been coaching businesses. Like yours since two thousand six yep even through the great recession and he does it for less money than would cost a hire a full time minimum wage employees at a time when inc magazine reports that by default ninety six percent of businesses will fail within ten years claes helping businesses like yours to grow on average by one hundred and four percent annually. Houses even possible clayton only takes on one hundred and sixty clients so he personally designed your business plan. Plus cleese team helps you execute that plan with access to graphic designers. Google certified search engine optimize web developers online added managers videography workflow masters in accounting coaches visits thrive time show dot com slash fire to see thousands of video testimonials from real people. Just like you. Who plays helped over the years. That's right do your research view. Thousands not hundreds of proven documented in archives videos. Testimonies from real people just like you. At thrive time show dot com slash. Fire thrive time show dot com slash. Fire then schedule your free consultation with klay himself to see how he and his team can help. You thrive so jason. We are back. And as i kind of teased before the break. I wanna get into. How generational work console challenges for fire nation. That's for us entrepreneurs but companies as well. Sure that with us. Sure one of the things. That also is not obvious as i'm venture partner at a venture capital firm and serve on lots of start up boards. It's an extremely passionate about and what we're seeing much of the opportunity being created today has a generational trend or thesis. It's the adoption of new technology new solutions or bringing a different way to look at old problems and when that happens that's where both change and frustration and challenge and frankly companies go out of business but it's also wear new opportunities are created so i'm speaking with entrepreneurs and working with entrepreneurs were trying to look at what are millennials and particularly gen z. Doing right now that you might want to be able to build a business around or leverage as their pine power influence increases so for the first time what we're seeing is technology trends are rippling from the youngest to the oldest and that's a huge shift. It used to be from the oldest more affluent down to the youngest. But now we're seeing younger. People are actually driving tech adoption up to the older but the key as an entrepreneur mississippi that we coach entrepreneurs about is being able to sort of step out of your generation and look at it through the lens of another generation. it's what we call generational contexts. One of the best ways to do that is actually bring members of that generation into the conversation. I can't tell you how many times i'm speaking at places. And they're asking me all these questions about millennials or gen z and. I'm like well. Why don't we invite some of them to the conversation. Let's talk to them. Uh let's actually talk with them. See what they say. Say get and so. I think when you look at bringing generational diversity into the workplace into innovation. You can solve all kinds of interesting challenges. I'll give example right now. What we're seeing is the gen z and even younger millennials. I talk about both of these in this economy book. They want a different on boarding experience. Obviously we're in this time of covert and all these changes but even before that what we saw is that the youngest generation wants to be on once on boarding to be by text message. Which sounds i know a little bit wild but there are companies. Do all of their on boarding through text message so you get semes- before you Short for your first day in alaska you just give you a simple example. This is in the book from coming called on border. When you they'll send a text message and it'll say what's your favorite snack three o'clock when your energy starts to go down. Do you have a favorite sports team are causing all this sort of stuff and the is when you show up for your first day. Or they'll even now senator gift baskets to your house. They'll have all your favorite snacks ready for you on your show up because they already know because you put in your text message or the. Have your favorite sports team. Or they'll find the best place that you wanna go eat or have that food delivered so they're engaging you by text message in a process that generally used to be in person and frankly pretty terrible at most companies. There's another company that worked in with again. This is generational trend. They figured out how to pay all employees fifty percent of their wages every day at no cost. They're called instant and what they did. Is they basically said you get a text message or message on your phone after your shift. And it says hey. Would you like half your money today. Yes or no. If you click s you get your money. Will all the sudden now you have. An entire generation is growing so fast that thinks they should always be able to get half their paycheck. Every day will imagine how that changes so many other things and all the sudden other generations. What do they say well. This text messaging on boarding thing is pretty cool. You mean i can get paid every day. That's pretty awesome. I think i want that. To and all the sudden the generational trends creates huge businesses. And those are the types of things were seeing you know so much. Innovation is driven by other generations. This is the key they don't even think it's new or different when we interview them. They think you've always been able to do on boarding by text message because they never got on onboard before there was text messaging or if they've only worked at a place that gave them the ability to get paid every day. That's how they think everybody gets paid. And you know older generations. So i work with the frequently. Get defensive and they're like you know. The young generations are trying to change everything. And i'm like no. They're not this is just all they've ever known they don't know any differently. Change to them is actually doing what you're proposing and it's not about one being right or wrong. It's going we can. We can leverage us. We can adopt this and all the sudden on boardings better retention is higher engagement is higher in these types of things and you see it on the marketing side for those fire nation members who are really growing their businesses and they're more than sales marketing. Same exact deal and the idea is just recognizing this you're creating so much opportunity. We see this particularly with social media. We see this with podcast such as yours that this is a great way to engage younger generations who then index for talking about these things and driving awareness in referrals and excitement fire nation. So many things to take away here. One of my favorite things jayson broke down was specifically tech trends are rippling from the youngest. To the oldest. Like think about that shift. Think about that change. How the ripples actually going from the youngest to the oldest now which is a complete flip from how it used to be back in the day and one thing. I wanna really dial in on just because i'm personally curious and i think fire nation is to is this the up and coming generation now. Let's talk about generation z. Like who is generation z. And what do we need to know about them. Yeah absolutely so gen z. The key thing is that they're already twenty three or twenty four years old. So that's a good starting point and what we uncovered in our research and we publish. This is economy. Book is at gen. Z is the key thing we got all these research firms around the world to change their birth years. Gen z does not remember nine eleven and that is a huge deal because it's the biggest event for the millennial generation we call generation defining moment. But jesse doesn't remember it at all. They learned about it in school or heard about it from a parent or they watched the video on youtube. But it's not something they experienced and they're now twenty three twenty four years old so a huge event of the generation before they don't remember in fact they're they're covid nineteen is essentially their defining moment. This pandemic is the generation defining moment that they're gonna take with them and we talk about this a lot. So one thing is they. Don't remember kievan of a previous generation and the other is there. Cuban is happening right now. But what i think you're entrepreneurs will find super interesting is that we've been doing this. Study for the last five years called state of gen z and. It's our big study released every year. And what we've uncovered and we've seen it for five years in a row now is gen. Z is more practical or frugal with their money than previous generations. And this is shocking and when we dig into it what we find out is that gen z came of age around the great recession. And what do i mean by that. Their speakers are experts. Like you talked about earlier. This regurgitation people running around saying oh gen z struggled during the great recession in the workforce they were twelve and were not working right but instead what they did is. They saw their parents struggle. They heard their parents struggle. They know people lost their houses. They saw millennials drowning in student loan. Debt having back home a mom and dad and you put all that together and what you see is. They're very conservative or practical with their money. As a result they're driving double digit growth at stores. They like couponing they wanna know. They got a good deal. They want things to be a bargain. They want them to last a long time really have utility and what we see. The example. i'd like to give is a gen zero sixteen years old. We'll have a birthday party. They'll get fifty dollars. They're all excited it away. And then they'll go to their mom or their dad and say hey. Can i have fifty dollars. Wanna go buy something. Mom or dad will say but you just got fifty dollars. And they'll say oh. No that's my money your money. It's overseeing that so if you're trying to market to them you've got to understand their practicality with money we also see the gen z when we do values based research. What we find is for the last four years Their top concern was climate change. Or would they would call climate crisis in their own words. And so that's been the top that they've been looking for brand alignment and for entrepreneurs to get behind and so forth however in the last six months we are new study. Social justice has leapfrog. Climate changes their top issue. And it's significantly more now so all the sudden as you see the generation respond to events around them. You can sort of see how they're shaped so if you wanna make sure in line with their values you gotta know what their values are going. Even deeper on the employment side is people look to hire them. Gen z no is looking for stability. This one's this one's tougher for entrepreneurs. So i want to explain it. They're looking for stability in an employer. What do i mean by that. Gen z saw these layoffs. I heard the layoff. Seen millennials struggle and as a result they're looking for an employer that they view as stable. So it's interesting because they tend to automatically defined stability by being a big company. So they'll say. I want to work for a big company will say why and they well because they're stable and the truth is you and i both know that. Just because you're big company does not at all mean that you're stable and just because you're a small business doesn't mean that you're not stable so it's important that you message to them. We also found in our research is gen. Z is very much interested in benefits which is shocking given their age in fact two years ago. Twelve percent of gen z was already saving for retirement. Wow and yeah. That's crazy right and many of them already have an emergency savings account. These are eighteen year olds. That are taking up their phones showing us emergency savings accounts and it. Just it's such a different generation. I think the key here. Mrs so important for all the marketers who are listening our nation is at gen. Z is not millennials. Two point oh they are not millennials. Just more extreme. That's total bunk. People say that it is not true. Jesse is a completely different generation raised by different set of parents who has come of age only knowing social media it has always existed for them. That's why they trusted so much at the same time. They're more diverse than any previous generation. Different set of values different purchasing pathways. And now the key is they over index on influence because of how they use digital media and already twenty four years old fastest growing generation in the workforce today on a percentage basis. And they're gonna be the most important consumers to get right over the next ten to fifteen years. One thing that i assume and please correct me if i'm wrong. Because it's just an assumption but generation x. And millennials like this is like. I'm speaking of my generation's here that i cut kind of overlap. Both pretty closely. It's we came to like being seventeen eighteen years old and it came to money in debt. Just kind of close our eyes and kind of believed the rhetoric of. Hey you just have to go to college and it's going to be expensive and you're going to get college dad and that's okay and you're just going to be a paid off at some point in the future and now like millennials and gen xers just hammered with this dead. They can't payoff ten twenty even sometimes thirty years later because it was just brutal with the mountains of debt that people kind of blindly get into it. Seems from what you're saying. Generations not gonna kind of take that same approach in just blindly. Sign away their lives to this debt of secondary education in colleges and universities in the such. Is that true. Wow that is such an insightful. I mean you you are super pro do so yes. That is actually true What's interesting is when we studied student. Loan debt with millennials in particular. That's what we call an economic anchor. So what it's causing. It's actually causing millennials. Now this is wild to delay marriage kids and buying a home because of student loan debt and that has massive ramifications on all parts of the economy to everything from financial services whether or not. You're buying life insurance. You know the the homebuilding recovery like on and on we could keep going to income households. There's just there's so many things that are impact even ultimately the ability to take care of your parents later on so what we saw. Was that large student loans at delayed major life commitments which we which is what's happened as a result And by the way gen z will tell you they're not sure that if spending a whole bunch of money and college actually pays off his it remains to be seen right now for millennials. We were told. I'm a millennial. We were told getting the best college at an. Just get debt. And will all be worth it and then for a lot of it wasn't on the flipside. Gen z in our new. Study in this in this economy book because it's important to understand how thing about education gen z is trying to graduate from college with as little as possible ice which is super cold. They're also saying that they're looking. They're very interested in the employability of their career. So so if they go and they pursue a certain path. Am i going to be able to get a job in that path. Now by the way kobe. Nineteen has been a massive massive. You know challenge for that because there are people that were three or four years into college university you know. Maybe they're going to study retail merchandising. Well aren't hiring never hired for that role again or they studied. You know oil and gas and those aren't hiring whatever it is so all the sudden people who already had you know pretty heavy commitment are now realizing that that path isn't there for them but we are single. Gen z particularly during this experience. Right now is they're saying. Hey i want to make sure. I'm getting value for my education and raven seeing well if it's going to be online only i'd rather go to a community college or state school or somewhere else. Get some credits. And then i'll figure out. If i want to go back into the future maybe take a year off and then come back and so forth so there definitely much more conservative with debt when it comes to college university and by the way the other people who are more conservative are their parents boomers had to cosign on all those millennial loans just. That's my mom about it right. And that as a result for many millennials it was tough for them to pay it off on the flipside. Gen-x is going well. I don't know if it's worth it gen x. Gen z kids. You will not end up. Like those millennials so the that's also being weighed into the conversation now is college university worth it and then you add the layer of kobe. Nineteen is it worth it if it's nontraditional experience and you know i don't know the answer to that but it is something we're observing and now this is where it gets really interesting. So the oldest members of gen z. Those that are about eighteen to twenty four. They're bearing the brunt of this. Pandemic what i mean by that is in our latest study. That group was most likely more than any other generation to lose their job. Have a decrease in pay or have a shift in responsibilities meaning. They had to assume a job that they didn't sign up for where it gets interesting though is younger so my daughter is nine years old. Her name is russia Sushi is in fourth grade right now. She heard this is in the book in third grade. Her last end of the year project. Which i didn't know anything about Was she went and built a presentation. She built all and google sides. She built it all in spanish. She had animation. She presented it. She recorded it and then she uploaded to classroom and she thought that was completely normal. She's nine and then of course. You saw one of my powerpoint slides. He's not very good. So i say that because the younger members of gen z. This is the real twist here. They might end up turning this pandemic into a positive. Because they're going to learn a whole different way to learn to collaborate they're going to get the benefit of the older part of the generation struggling. So they can learn from them. All of this stuff largely will be resolved in terms. Of least what normal looks like in the future and so they're gonna get the benefit of all of that the closer you are to those transition years of eighteen to twenty four the worse is but the further away the more benefit could end up being you so it's pretty interesting that within the same generation you can have two very different experiences and by the way this is what happened. To millennials millennials like me who crashed into the great recession and then the millennials who came afterwards who benefited from a very robust economy. So even within the same generation you can see pretty significant differences. I mean fire nation. I really hope you're enjoying this contest. Much as i am. Because i'm seeing the application to the real world and that's so important because we're entrepreneurs in the real world. We own businesses and companies in the real world in this stuff makes a massive impact so jason of everything that you shared today. What's the one key takeaway that you really wanna make. Sure fire nation gets from all of this awesome stuff above generational impact and the generational studies. That you've done and then share how we can even learn more about it through you and any call to action. You might have for fire. Nation is time to share. Yeah absolutely so the number. One thing that i would share. You know as an entrepreneur myself now for twenty four years is i would do. It's called a generational snapshot and what that means is you create essentially a pie chart representing the different generations. Either of your customers or of your employees or team members or ideally of both. Because what you'll often find is that there's more generations and you suspect it and it will help you to shape your messaging your leadership in your marketing to better fit them and going a bit further if you don't see enough of the next generation coming in particular on the customer side that's definitely a yellow flag that you need to pay attention and make sure that your dappling for the next generation because they will be the ones that drive growth. So that's the best easiest how to that will cost you zero dollars that a promise will make you money. Which are the type of things i'm all about. And if you want a whole bunch more in terms of how to actually recruit and retain motivate and so forth across generations or market and sell. You can definitely check out the new book. It's called economy. How gen z will change the future business and what to do about it. We do talk about all four generations and just packed with how to in case studies and all kinds of cool stuff and we'll put together a special promo for fire nation. New it be on my website. Which is jason dorsey. Dot com slash. Fire you'll be able to get all of that. They're including three free video courses. Because i am a passionate entrepreneur. Have been for a long time. And anything i can do to help them. Nation will fire nation. You are the average of the five people you spend the most time with and you've been hanging out with j. d. n. j. l. d. So keep up the heat and head over to your fire dot com type jason in the search bar. The page will pop up with everything that we've been talking about today. But of course jason. Dorsey dot com slash. Fire is gonna get you to that gray page with all that awesome content. And i just wanna jason. Thank you for sharing your truth. Knowledge value with fire nation. Today

Jason Joe Burrow Clark Klay Inc Magazine Lazier Peoplesoft GNC Denise
The Secret to Selling from Instagram with Elise Darma

The DigitalMarketer Podcast

04:24 min | 1 year ago

The Secret to Selling from Instagram with Elise Darma

"Hello elise welcome to the digital marketer. Podcast thanks so much janet. I'm excited to be here. Yeah i'm really excited to have you. There's so much that we have to talk about. And before we get into the nitty gritty. I just want want you to introduce yourself and in your own words. Tell everyone who you are and what you do and why you do it. Sure i always find the question funny because like how far back do you want me to go. Troy by eight. My teens my twenties. Because i do see where i'm at today was a full circle moment in terms of who i've been my whole life. I grew up in a very conservative upbringing very conservative religion that taught me to live life. According to a set of rules and as a teenager especially a seventeen eighteen year old. I discovered i really did not like rules like as much as i was a goody two shoes straight a student top of class my whole life. I really discovered that. When i was eighteen and i went traveling with a group of people around europe for a month and i was free to be whoever i wanted to be like. No one knew my upbringing. It was addicting that feeling of total and utter freedom. So i really think that moment put me on this path of. Ooh i want more of that in my life and i got back home and i did the regular thing that you're supposed to do which is go to school. I went to three different universities before. I graduated with a degree in radio and television arts. It's called and i got a job. And i thought i was doing what i was supposed to do. Even though is a couple of years behind already. Because i delayed my studies and honestly within a year or two of working a regular day job i just was bored like the only way i could describe it was. I felt dead inside. I would sit at my desk. And i loved my co workers. I love the social aspect but the work the bureaucracy of the organization. The fact that i didn't want my boss's job like it all just killed me a little bit inside and my desktop at that time was of a co working space in called who booed and it literally is like a tree house. It looks like a tree house for adults that you work from mike. God this was in two thousand twelve. I think i discovered it and it was my screen saver. It was the goal and so that year someone in my network said haley's social media right. Can you grow my instagram for my new fashion brand. And that's when a light bulb went off. Because i i'd already read the four hour workweek. I wasn't sure if i should do like an e com business or like video services business and this person said. Can you grow my instagram in. This was in twenty thirteen by the time we got started so back then. Instagram was like a hangout for teenagers. My first post was of me with the movember moustache followed knee right. I just didn't care. And so that's when i was able to learn kind of undercover because i did have a personal brand. I didn't tell anyone about what i was doing. But i was able to learn how to grow this account specifically for teens to attract teens to grow their brand and we were able to hit a hundred thousand followers in less than six months when god's unheard of now back then we really dove into influencer marketing and that was my job sending free sweatshirts to teens around the world and making them post to post about it and so with that client. That really gave me the confidence to say yes to a few more clients on the side of my day job and nine months later i was able to quit when one of my clients wanted to hire me for two days a week. That was my fork in the road decision and it was harder than expected. You know. I thought. I wanted to be my own boss for so long. And then when the opportunity was there to leave benefits to leave my friends to leave that. Normalcy it was scary especially as someone who loves their routine in their creature comforts. I quit my job. And then that was in twenty fourteen. And that put me on the path to grow agency and have a fulltime roster of clients. Not too many just enough to satisfy my travel habit and then in two thousand sixteen. I thought okay. This has been fun. You know but my income has been the same every year

Hello Elise Janet Europe Haley Instagram Mike
WASP Documentarian Erin Miller

Ready For Takeoff - Turn Your Aviation Passion Into A Career

06:36 min | 1 year ago

WASP Documentarian Erin Miller

"I'm talking today to Aaron Miller. Now, Erin is not a pilot, but she is the granddaughter of a wasp that's women's airforce service pilots, and she has a fascinating story to tell. So Aaron, thank you so much for being with us today. Thank you for having me your welcome so What I'd like is for you to to share with us what what your grandmother has shared with you about her flying story, and then we'll get to your story of how you how you made things right for your grandmother. But can you tell us how she got her starting aviation? So. My Grandmother. Elaine. Dan. For harmon was born in Baltimore Maryland in Nineteen nineteen and she grew up in the city and was born at home in her house. And had two siblings and was very independent. sporty did a lot of rotor bike and very athletic growing up and she attended the University of Maryland in College Park. Maryland for college. and. She did lots of activities there as well. She was a cheerleader she was on the rifle team swim team. She was in a sorority in all kinds of things very active and her senior year of college. She saw an advertisement in the school newspaper for the civilian. Pilot Training. program. Which I'm sure your listeners are familiar with but it was a program in the nineteen thirties to have more people in the United States prepare to get a pilot's license and Senate was I guess subsidized by the US government and it was offered through a lot of universities and university. Of Maryland was one of them. And Anyway. So they had an advertisement for this program where you could learn how to fly and it costs thirty five dollars. Or forty dollars and you got thirty five hours of flight training and ground school and whatever. So my grandma thought that would be cool. So she applied and at the time which doesn't sound like a big deal you're signing up for a class nowadays. But back, then if you were a woman, they only accepted one woman for every ten men in the class. So you kind of had to I don't I never asked her if there were comp competition about this or she just happened to be the only woman that applied I don't really know but anyway. So, she asked her dad for the money and she also had to get a permission slip signed because she was female and under the age of twenty one and not married. So her dad had to sign a permission slip and that's how she initially took pilot training lessons West, through this program at the University of Maryland. Very. Cool. So after she got her thirty five hours, did she continue to fly on her own? Not Really she I think she did a little bit but she basically that was in nineteen, hundred forty, sue her last year of college. She got her pilot's license and then not too long after that, she got married in the summer of nineteen forty one. To my grandfather, and then as your listeners I'm sure. Well, aware six months later Pearl Harbor happened. So I don't think you flying around was generally something that happened. A Lot. So at that point, my grandmother and grandfather were moving around a lot to support the war effort they lived in Ohio at one point for a while and we're kind of working at different places. And and so how did she get back into? So in nineteen, forty, three, I believe there was an big. The Women Airforce Service pilots kind of became newsworthy and there was a little bit of news about them. Newsreel. The old newsreels are in life magazine, and so my grandmother heard about this program called the WAAS. And thought she could apply and she asked my grandfather. If he thought it would be a good idea and he thought it would be a great idea for her. So she applied and she kind of didn't really think she would get in because she really the most she had done was that civilian pilot training program she didn't have a lot of hours. And she kind of applied and thought oh well, we'll see what happens but they accepted her. So that's how she ended up becoming one of the Watson. Then she started training in April of Nineteen, forty four where did she go for Carini? She was in sweetwater Texas Avenger field, which is in western Texas. About an hour west of Abilene Texas. Now. Did your grandfather go there with her when she went there No. So my grandfather was an engineer and he later became a patent attorney, but he was not in the service because he had a physical defect so he was So, he couldn't serve in the army. But he was I think recruited I would say by a company to actually manufactured airplane parts called Jack and Heintz which some people may not because I've seen their parts in the in the warbirds He got sent to Asia to work on a plan to repair aircraft for the US military in theater in the Pacific. So the planes didn't have to be sent back to the continental United States to be repaired to save time. So he got sent over there to work on that program as a civilian, and so he was gone during this time when she was trainy. tweet water. Aircraft was she trained in? So she was trained on I think they were all trained on basic plane. So things like the the steersman PT, seventeen, eighteen, nineteen, eighty, sixes, bt, Thirteen's neither all planes that she was training on. And what did she eventually flawed she I assume she was multi current and flew a lot of different airplanes as wasp. Yes. So all the WAAS flu lots of different planes and there were groups of wasps that were trained to fly every plane that was produced during World War Two from little trainer planes all the way up to be twenty nine bomber. So not every wasp was trained to fly every plane obviously but they're little groups trained to fly like you know pursuit crafter bombers or whatever. So. She was trained to fly bt thirteen's to train men in instrument training. So that was her job after she graduated. So she was transferred to Nellis Air. Base. In Las Vegas. And with her best friend from the WAAS Maggie Gee and Magnesia was to- target pilot in Las Vegas. So they were transferred there and my grandma trained men on instrument training in the thirteen. And she was also has some time as a co-pilot on the B seventeen.

Maryland University Of Maryland United States Aaron Miller Las Vegas Erin Elaine College Park Women Airforce Service Carini Life Magazine Us Government Sweetwater Texas Avenger Field Baltimore Ohio Senate DAN Nellis Air Harmon Maggie Gee
Martha MacCallum Discusses the "Unknown Valor" of Iwo Jima

Dose of Leadership

05:40 min | 1 year ago

Martha MacCallum Discusses the "Unknown Valor" of Iwo Jima

"Martha McCallum. Here you are on dose of leadership I can't believe it welcome to the show it's great to be here Richard Thank you for having me big fan of you obviously in in your work that you've done and obviously a big fan of of the book being a primary ince unknown valor, and what prompted you to write this I think I know the answer this I see say but I just I'm curious about why you got so passionate about World War Two about that generation and specifically you would Jima. It was a personal connection when I was growing up my mom used to occasionally take out letters that were written to her and to her father by her beloved cousin Harry Gray who had been killed at Iwo Jima when he was only eighteen years old and the grease from his death just sort of was there never went away it wasn't something we talked about. All the time obviously but it was very real and when I read the letters, they're so beautiful and he was such an eloquent eighteen year old and wrote great informative letters that had a lot of information them about what was going on and they would often when I did pull out, dust him off and read them I couldn't really get through them without. Being brought to tears. So, and of course, I never knew him but his mother, my aunt, an was someone I was very close to and his sister my aunt Nancy also somewhat I was very close to end became got to know on such a deeper level through the writing of this book which grateful for. So when I started to think about writing a book I. Sort of couldn't get around the subject it was it felt as if it was calling me and it was a story that I needed to tell and I also knew, I wanted if I was going to spend the time and effort writing I wanted it to be a real book of history a book where I would learn a lot. So if I was going to take time away from my work and my personal life to dedicate myself to this, I wanted it to be a inexperienced. That would pay off for me. You know that would be a lot. So it did that in spades and honestly by the time I was done I thought if this book doesn't sell more than ten copies, it will still have been worth it to me. You know I I it resonates with me because I became friends obviously in the marine. Corps and we look at Iwo, Jima with sacrosanct and I've never visited the island. You're fortunate if actually put your feet on the ground there and I've flown over a few times when I was in the rink was a pilot in the Marine Corps and we'd fly over. You would Jima going back and forth from Okinawa and stuff. And it was weird when every time we'd fly over it in, we'd all be talking and joking that. But when you fly over it, they're just be the stunned silence every time we fly over you a German and to give you these chills just because if anybody studies at knows the stories in particular that how many people sacrificed their lives and were injured, it's just phenomenal thing about the numbers in the short amount of days where on such a three square mile or piece of dirt you know it's just. It really is it's almost as if it's a piece of the moon race loading in the middle of the Pacific and I completely connect with what you're saying. Of course I have never served but I was on this flight that only to a once a year it's A. It's to you know a memorial slight to honor those who were lost there, and it is a memorial that has Japanese dignitaries that attend and American. Veterans that attend and their families in a few reporters and people who are interested get to go on his flight. So I was really fortunate to be on it and there was this amazing commodity on the flight and we had all traveled a lot I flew from Newark to Tokyo. And then Tokyo to Guam and then Guam alternate late to gene on the day of our trip there, and it's a day trip. You go in the morning couple of hours on the plane fly back that evening and the Japanese government has complete control over Gina. They have since the sixties. So they dictate the amount of time that Americans are allowed to be on the island, right which in and of itself is sort of an interesting situation. But So it's all very regimented when you land, they take your passports away. They put them in a bag when you're ready to go they give them back to you. And you can leave. But when we were flying from Guam to Jima and the plane was obviously only people who were all on this sing of our mission and we had first class about five, I believe. A woman veterans who were on a couple of from Tarawa but there were five I believe you Jim Veterans a couple of who had never been back. So we're saying sort of camaraderie everyone's joking around a little bit talking to each other with all get to know each other over the last few days on Guam and some of the things that we did together before that. But as soon as the pilot said, okay, you're going to see what Jim now coming up on your left as soon as we dip under these clouds. And as soon as we dipped under those clouds, there was silence across the plane and I looked over at some of these veterans looking down on the island through the window hadn't been there since they were seventeen eighteen, nineteen years old and you could feel that flood of emotion come over them. They saw it and I will never forget the dramatic approach to that island landing on it. It's still steaming as a volcano in different parts of the island. So it's it's smokes while you're looking at it it's kind of a surreal place.

Guam Iwo Jima Jima Tokyo Martha Mccallum Jim Veterans Harry Gray Ince Richard Marine Corps Japanese Government Nancy Okinawa Tarawa Gina Newark
Max Has NO FEAR FOR THE DEER + Nick Nurse ‘Coaching Clinic’

The Cedric Maxwell Podcast

06:33 min | 1 year ago

Max Has NO FEAR FOR THE DEER + Nick Nurse ‘Coaching Clinic’

"That's not a bad shot wasn't a bad shopping to see not it was a bad shot. But how did they beat Philly? Was that a good shot? Just tell me that was was that a Nick nerve-wracking. This is the best coach you can do we need to Coalinga. Is that the best player you go? Okay. So this is what is what I wanted to hear from you mind me getting that. I mean running off the corner going all the way following the way from the three-point line that that was the way you designed. This is where I'm getting that thing. Okay. So then let's talk about that. Then ignorant didn't have a play lined up in that situation or at least we maybe didn't have the the player. Maybe maybe that's it. In my opinion. He said, you know what they figure things out up to this point. I'm going to let them just keep going cuz I have nothing and that's a problem that's off. Can't be that kind of Coach into play. I believe in this situation that Brad Stevens to me and although Nick nurse is the coach of the year. I like Brad Stevens home is a knows better now like next Nur Nick nurses X's and O's I think he is. I think he gets guys in places. They need to be and it has really worked out well for so so I don't I don't necessarily think that yeah, you want some people that call timeout. Okay, you can call timeout but now you give the other team opportunity to self esteem. So if I promise up until you come down to your file before guy gets into the act of shooting Mean there are a bunch of things. You can talk about that. You can't talk about on the flyer. So that's a good point because you if you're Brad Stevens, I'm telling my guys to foul. They needed three follow. Yeah, but they they going to do that. They did not going to do that because they didn't have that opportunity to think about it. They just play what time on the situation you have more time to think about. Absolutely so that maybe it's why Nick nurse doesn't call a time-out init work off. All you were trying to do is get a decent. Look at it three point shot got a decent Loop. Don't miss don't miss out on this one. It's your chance. You know, Cedric Maxwell says go down absolutely had to betonline.ag today and take advantage of all the great signup bonuses betonline.ag your online sportsbooks experts and it now I don't know man. just feel like when it comes down like you say like when it comes out and accessing those late-game situations, I'm taking Brad Stevens over over Nick nurse all day them, but when Nick nurse but some guy told me later on or off. Yeah, some guy told me the other day on the radio from Toronto said Nick nurses by the arrestee was a give him a clinic in coaching. Okay. Oh, I thought that goes but this is my thing with him. This beef with Nick you you played out that situation, right? It didn't pan out obviously depend on welfare. But you know, you played that card whatever it is what it is right off of 20 minutes later. So it was a microphone in your face and you're gonna complain about oh Jason Tatum got their free throw line too many times all the favors. I mean, excuse me, all the referees gave him that one come on and while you're trying to put up there and you're trying to put something in somebody's you're trying to put some because if it's not working you're down to well, you're trying to put your grabbing it whatever you can grab that actually the course of the year. You're trying that your job. Well, you're grabbing it what you can grab it. See I can really hasn't been that guy you know that said, oh my God, there's no way to stop. I'll come David Jaylen Brown has done a nice job. I'm just I sewing being one off. Woman with G acha you gotta yeah, and they haven't really had to double-team. That's true. So, you know what Jaylen brown hair but his defense has been underrated. How about the time that Jaylen Brown? I mean you're talking about quickness thought he ripped off calorie calories was dribbling and it was like stripping. Well, yeah look like look like brown was in The Matrix the way he went across and grabbed the basketball game. Carolina was sent he was going back the other way know when the ball on the floor you you ain't got it no more. I looked at him. Where did it go with so long? I mean, it's been it's been eye-opening to see some of the some of the situations and even now down that bubble people talk about or you know, what's going on with Milwaukee Milwaukee is trademark what they do. They give up three's what does what does Miami like to do? Oh you take the reason you're walking Milwaukee is given that more FAQ. To anybody else. So Miami's Forte there strip is shoot the three. Yeah. So if you ever team does knocking down threes in a regular area off and you you're struggling right now with, you know, Yiannis and Middleton and you know, they play great against the Celtics but they've had a you know, Jonas has been if they use the series honest is going to be exposed again time to time MVP. I agree with that. Well, the biggest reason why I agree with that is because you you got a 27-point performance out of Chris Middleton office and you couldn't make that a win like that's a big. Well somebody else involved in this. Well, that's what I'm saying. You know his Lopez involved. Where is Lopez build out. 1 game? Okay lower game loading again if off on your scores Seventeen eighteen, you're in trouble. Well, we're we're and that's the thing about picking up your teammates like somebody who's like Kimba. Okay. Kimball didn't was barely scored and Marcus fairly score. Yep. You had somebody else that kind of shoulder the load until those guys got it together and you look at blood. So what's blessed done during the series always been a little banged up. So I don't I don't trust them this man. This is obviously I've never been like like that's always in my thing Milwaukee. Yiannis is going to be honest, but I don't trust your boys like your squad is shaky Milton will give you those 30.93 here and there but need to make sure those are wins you can give those up Jerry has travels big man. I really like Miami and new series. I just like their Focus right now, too. Yeah. I totally agree. I think again to see to me, it's Jimmy Butler Factor. Yeah, because they those dudes right now bam alabado guys, like they're they're taking on that same Persona is Jimmy Butler like, you know jumping off. Yeah. I mean Jimmy brother man. I mean he said about when you asked about guests and family come into the bubble was you said he I'm not bringing anybody man. This is a business trip. Wow. While I said liked that I've always been among. I

Nick Nurse Brad Stevens Miami Milwaukee Jimmy Butler Coalinga David Jaylen Brown Yiannis Milwaukee Milwaukee Philly Jaylen Brown Cedric Maxwell Toronto Jason Tatum Basketball Brown Chris Middleton Carolina Lopez Kimball
Arian Moayed On How Fear Never Leaves, And Why You Should  Just Keep Going

Good Life Project

06:47 min | 1 year ago

Arian Moayed On How Fear Never Leaves, And Why You Should Just Keep Going

"I believe in curiosity I just I. Just think that we can't do anything without it early and just asking people obey the is basically a version of empathy. Enemy. Empathizing with WHO people are and what they do over were you the curious kid like is this something that's been part of your life or somebody who cultivated? Yeah. I mean. I think the circumstances of my life you know being born in Iran and then moving here as young immigrants in the eighties where Iran was like enemy enemy number one if you recall. And like Iran Russia which kind of back there again I kind of felt that like you know I was so curious about this world is culture and I think that's kind of where it started also you know It's crazy. It was crazy. My parents don't speak any the my spirit's English is not great. The they came here when they were forty and fifty. The I mean it's not like they. You know I'm thirty seven. So like imagining myself in three years time taking all of an IV and Chrissy and saying, Hey, well, going to move to China and we're GONNA make this. We're going to make life better in China as a show I mean that's All you can be as curious I. Guess. Yeah. I guess. So how so how old were you when you actually let on? Well, we laughed Iran you know it's hard to tell because at time here was crazy there was a war happening and I think a lot of you especially you a bit younger don't don't really remember that whole window of of our history and our relationship with Sir Yeah, the Middle East Yeah. Yeah it's complicated. It's long and it's GonNa either bore fascinate all of you guys. But the the the the the truth is we you know it's it's. It's it's hard to talk about because there's so many levels to like how crazy it is. One is my mom was married to my dad at the age of thirteen. My mom was thirteen Wendo arranged marriage. My mom is pretty standard. You know it was on the outs in that time period. Yeah. But my parent, my mom's mom was a single mom she was the youngest you know she couldn't make she couldn't make it happen, and so she had to like you know she had to like give I, guess her her daughter La youngest daughter away and so then my dad, my dad's they were more religious than my mom's side was and so. They got arranged. My mom had her first kid at fifteen years old her second kid at sixteen and Arthur kid eighteen, and then had me when she was thirty five. So my siblings are seventeen eighteen in. I'm sorry. Yes. Some teen eighteen basically twenty years than me. So, and then and then the revolution hit seventy nine. And then a war hit right after that because Saddam invaded with you know and then got the support of the United States. You know because we of the Iranian situation and then we were in a war. And so everyone was closed inside as is bombings happening all over Tehran all over the border, and so we were indoors and and you know when when people get doors and there's a lot of fear in the air of uncertainty, you procreate you know and so the baby boom in Iran happened at that moment in seventy nine to eighty five, where like sixty percent of Iranian. Population right now in Iran is under the age of forty. Fascinating you walk down the street and everyone's young. So anyway and then and then. CRAZILY my brother. My oldest brother was sixteen. When he graduated high school in Iran, his name is Amir And then he went to A. He got accepted to a school in. CHICAGO. Right. When he was sixteen. So sixteen twentyish he's in Chicago, ish issue like something like that, and then the revolution hit. And then my brother was like should I come back and. My parents were like you're never coming back here will come to you. And then in that time period. My. Youngest my brother that's closest to me who seventeen his name is. Oh, mead omen was drafted in the Iran Iraq war. And fought three years in that war. With a couple of my cousins who are who are who have passed away who died in that war one of them, which data that were, and then my brother was in war my sister was in the middle there. I was just born. We got the F out of town and we went we went as far as my dad's connections and money and. You know and you know connections could could could take you in that was Dubai. We've got to Dubai who lived in the Arab Emirates and we were there for off and on for about five years and then and then we and then you know a long period of time you know no one heard it from my brother was fight in the war. And trying to and trying to try to like move three pieces ahead while also like making sure the pieces back here it's a chess game you know and and dangerous one. And then my dad then. We had were that Amigos live. We went back to Iran. Might he got back? He was no nine, hundred twenty you know fought three years in a war in a city called Oh mead his name is omitted, which means hope and wherever like was slaughtered murdered and died because it was a brutal war brutal war and he he's a twenty year old brainwashed you know. PTSD. Kid. And in that time period as we're figuring out to go back to Dubai and come back, my sister falls in love. Falls in love with the guy and and then that made things tricky and then, and then we all laughed and my sister stay. So I- sister got the states in two thousand and three we left in eighty five. So An and then we came to the states and again you know the analogy that the Chinese like us like you and me and you taking your family and your son going to China or whatever language that you don't know our culture, the No, and you're like, this is the best news for us. Now you know you're GonNa, you're not going to be easy and so in all of that, you just get you know a a sense of like the world in a very kind of complicated way. A very young age and and not only do they not speak the language they don't know what? Christmases. They don't know what Hanukkah is. They don't have any idea why people are going to church all the time. They have no clue why the cars are this way they don't know why the food is patching. There's nothing that is familiar. There's nothing that you can empathize with as as an Iranian living in the states and being like I know this thing and so in all that you are learning rapidly. You know a very drastic way and so that curiosity might have had something to do with it. I'm not really sure

Iran Dubai China Amir And Sir Yeah Chicago Wendo Middle East Ptsd Chrissy United States Arab Emirates Saddam Arthur Tehran Russia Iraq
Why the pandemic is getting worse, and how to think about the future

Short Wave

10:28 min | 1 year ago

Why the pandemic is getting worse, and how to think about the future

"Okay Richard, so there are about forty seven different things we could talk about to unpack the story of how we got here in where we're going, but we chose a few of the big ones to focus on in this episode, so testing was a mess at the beginning. It seemed to get better for a little bit, and now it seems like it's a mess again, so what happened? Well it is complicated. Let's take you back to the beginning of the epidemic when the decided to develop its own test for the corona virus, which is standard practice for them, but honestly they bungled it, and instead of reaching for tests developed in Germany and distributed widely by the World Health Organization the CDC fix this quickly, and they kept trying, but really that turned out to be a big mistake, and it cost us a lot of time. I think the CDC didn't really realize the scope of this epidemic early on federal health officials should have done what South Korea did for instance what they did overseas immediately spur commercial companies to produce large quantities of tests. The US eventually got to that point, but you know it was really late, and now, of course we are in better shape. The US is averaging something like six hundred thousand tests a day or sometimes even more than that, but. It's still far short of the amount of tests that experts say we should be doing. Yeah, and let me ask you about that. Because I've seen estimates that we need to be doing like double or triple, the amount of tests to really control the virus right and you know the number of tests you need to do is really relative to the number of infected people, so we have so many infected people, and that number is growing. We really need to be doing a lot more testing. For example scientists at the World Health Organization uses a rule of thumb that you should have enough tests that your when you get the results back only about five percent or coming back positive. That, means that most of the people are negative, which is what you'd hope what you'd expect right now. Unfortunately, we have states like Texas and Florida in Arizona where the number of percent positive is like seventeen, eighteen or even twenty five percent, and you know the percent positive rates keep going up, which means it's definitely not true as the president has frequently claimed at the cases are only writing, because we're testing more. No seeing more positive cases as we see more tests so okay. Let's talk about the case numbers of it back in April we were at about you know thirty thousand cases per day and now we're. Sixty thousand new cases a day, which is objectively worse and to put that in perspective, sixty thousand people wouldn't even fit in dodger stadium, which is the biggest baseball stadium in this country, so we're talking about you know. Give you a visual image of what we're talking about it right right and you know. Some of that is driven by big outbreaks in places like California, Texas and Florida. Let's talk a little. Little bit more about why cases are up in those places. Yeah, it's complicated series of reasons, but some of it is that we're what we were talking about a little bit earlier. Some of these were in states like Texas and Arizona that were determined to open really early, and we're a lot of people including politicians thought you know starting. Their economies was more important than being really cautious about the virus. Could also be other stuff at play here because you know it is summer, and those are places that very hot, so more people are spending more time in air conditioning that is to say indoors and one thing we know about this virus is spread more likely indoors among people who are stuck together for at least fifteen minutes or longer in an indoor space. Yeah, honestly like this idea of being indoors is something I've been thinking about. Because I'm looking ahead right and we're looking at the fall in the winter when you're going to have the exact same thing happening all over the country like more people forced indoors. That correlates with of course, the beginning of seasonal flu, circulating some people in the hospital. That kind of stuff right it's going to. We're going GONNA have both epidemics happening at once. It's going to be a real mess. Okay, let's talk a little bit about mortality or people dying from the disease, so the president and others have pointed out in the last few weeks that the numbers of people dying per day are down from early on in the pandemic, and that is true back in mid April. There were days where we had well over two thousand people dying each day, and in the last week or so the US is seeing more like hundred people dying every day on average, although that number seems to be rising again. Let's talk about a few reasons why that could be why we're seeing fewer deaths now than earlier right well, certainly, one of the biggest reasons is not the biggest reason that the death rates are so low now compared to the spring when New York City got clobbered as you recall is nowadays the viruses infecting mainly younger people, and they just frankly less likely to die in Arizona for instance of these days, half the cases are in people aged twenty to forty four years old and only. Only eleven percent of cases and people over sixty five, and of course people over sixty five, or really at the highest risk of death, and you know that that shift younger age groups is both good and bad. The good part diseases hitting a population that can more easily survive, though we should say some people do die should bad part is that the spread is accelerating and putting vulnerable people at higher risk, because now the virus is traveling far and wide and putting more older people and. And people with underlying health conditions in harm's way right and you know one thing to note though is that especially in the younger demographic? This is where we see a lot of the huge racial disparities up, basically which young people are surviving and dying a paper out of Harvard June showed that in this twenty five to thirty four age group, the mortality rate for black people was seven times more than for white people really matters. Who are the those young people are right? It absolutely does. Does the overall risk of death is very very low in this age group, but it does absolutely hit some people harder than others, particularly because more people of color are at risk for contracting the disease because of their jobs, they have to be out and about and also underlying health conditions may also be playing a role here. Yeah, so it appears more young people are getting sick. Fewer of them ultimately die, but to be clear. Young people do get very sick and die from the virus. So that's one reason we're seeing fewer deaths right now. Compared to the beginning of the pandemic as far as why the numbers of deaths don't seem to be matching up with the increase, in cases, yet is partially due to the fact that deaths are what we call a lagging indicator Derek Thompson at the Atlantic wrote a really nice piece on. This will make sure to put in. The episode notes for Richard Let's talk about that a little bit right. Yeah, it's a very plainly put. There's a gap in time between the day someone test positive until the day the either recover or unfortunately die, and then of course. Course there's another lag in which that death is reported health officials. So what you're seeing now. It really in-depth really reflects people who got sick. You know two or three weeks ago or even longer than that, so that's one reason why deaths have not followed in lockstep with a big spike in cases. Yeah, and then there's also this thing called lead time bias right right, and that's basically a phenomenon where data can make it seem like something new is happening, but actually just about how you're collecting. The data with the increases in testing. We've seen in these past few months. We may simply be detecting more this. This virus earlier in people than we did before, people may have been really sick and not get tested to the hospital now people are driving up in their cars right and doing okay, and so there earlier on in the course of disease, but that doesn't really change the percentage of cases that wind up being fatal. It will just take longer than it did early on in the epidemic for those fatalities to show up and of course Richard there a ton of complications that we didn't have time to get into more hospital capacity ventilators, so what sheep the hospitals in actually plays a role in who survives and who? Who doesn't and then you know even though there isn't a cure, of course, doctors have had more time to learn how to treat this disease, so we don't have a lot of data on this yet. In the United States, but it seems like perhaps more people are surviving this disease than right in the beginning right, I think that is clearly the case and you know as long as hospitals aren't totally overwhelmed with patients. They can make use of what they've learned so far to improve treatments. I'll give you just one example steroids which are used to reduce inflammation. Turn out to be quite useful in many instances. So Richard I'm curious like overall how you're feeling looking at where we are compared to. Let's say April, there are ways in which I feel like are a lot more prepared like we understand the virus. A little better were obviously farther along on a vaccine and some potential treatments, but we still don't have adequate testing. Cases are at an all time high. We're heading into the fall, which means we're GONNA, have this consolidation of cold and flu and corona season, plus the schools potentially opening up your really cheering me up here. But maybe the most concerning fig just to keep you just to keep you down. Richard is that I? Just don't feel like we are a country with like one central goal to fight this thing together. Yeah well I think. I would agree with that first off a corona virus vaccine is not going to help much at least not in this coming flu season. Even if one is amazingly enough approved by the end of the year, we'll take really a long time to vaccinate enough people to make a big difference. What really could help would be a good flu vaccine. I think only about half of Americans typically get the flu shot every year and public health officials say if they can dramatically increase that it would really help a lot against this sort of one two punch that we're going to have to be confronting. But you're right about the country, not working well together on this starting with leadership both at the federal level, and also tim states, but also including people who are ignoring all the guidance that's going all the good advice from scientists and people are hesitant to get vaccines because of misinformation. As for testing you know by the fall. There will be some help. I expect doctors offices should have a supply of Rapid Kobe tests. They're like rapid strep test, or whatever the aren't super accurate, but they can help relieve some of the testing bottleneck and sort of looking down the line a little bit farther. Scientists are also working on next generation of tests that you might even be able to do. Do at home and you know those might be ready sometime. Next year next year seems pretty discouraging, doesn't it? It's pretty far off, but you know I'm pretty well resigned to the fact that we're going to be in this for the long haul. covid nineteen is going to be with us for years so even technology that seems far off right now. We'll still be needed

Richard Let United States Arizona FLU World Health Organization President Trump CDC Texas Dodger Stadium Florida South Korea Flu Vaccine Germany New York City Younger Age California TIM Derek Thompson
Looking Ahead After Kentucky Speedway

NASCAR America

02:35 min | 1 year ago

Looking Ahead After Kentucky Speedway

"Beli go to the all-star racist of course midweek. We're excited for that, but then on the next points race Texas in points. Were there a premium now? Kyle because Cole custer winning this race taking a playoff position only nine races to go before the cut-off yet you know we talked about it a couple years ago when Chris Butcher won at Pocono when you're outside the top twenty five or back in points far enough, and then all of a sudden you leapfrog into that top. Top Sixteen, and you don't just leapfrog into that top sixteen you leapfrog into the playoffs. You leapfrog all the way that's how simple it is with that win, so I think when we look at that that puts a lot of pressure on sixteen, Seventeen, eighteen, also on fifteenth fourteenth. Thirteenth twelve these guys. It tightens up it again I'm back to the musical chairs, analogy, the music just stop for somebody and that top fifteen and they got bumped out. They went into this race thinking. They were only a few points in or a few points now and now they're out completely. They've to figure out how to find their way back into it, so that is the amazing part, and that is the exciting part for me about watching these next eight or ten races leading up to that bump leading up to that playoff situation, because there's so many things so many strategies that go into it and you've always got to be looking behind you at a team that can jump. Jump in and win a race. Yeah, so yet. Pressure is mounting now so when this season started. What feels like two and a half years ago? It's hard to imagine that we're talking about just non-racist until we get to the play offs, so I think that because of everything that's been happening. I'm not sure how many people have even been paying attention to those playoff standings that much, but with coal customers win. That is open. Everyone's ass is open. The eyes of those people that are. Back to sixteenth Jimmy Johnson sitting in that sixteenth spa is the eyes of some rookies and some other teams that haven't won yet, but see that. Coq Gun win a race. That says that this is open to anybody and everybody could possibly do that, so the the pressure's GonNa. GonNa, amount here and we've. We've got racist coming up as some very difficult tracks, a coupla double header weekends that Never GonNa come along so many things happening that we can see a lot of shakeup in display off standings as we look at, it might not look anything like what we see right now, but cold customers proved to the world that is out there for the.

Texas Chris Butcher Cole Custer Pocono Jimmy Johnson Kyle
"seventeen eighteen" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

02:41 min | 2 years ago

"seventeen eighteen" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Down to like seventeen eighteen seats see so the uncle owns a van a in Greenwich Village where did this mostly for the neighborhood I'm not sure if this is going to be financially viable in the long run but you have to get out of the house the city allowed restaurants to take over sidewalk and parking spots space patrons can go inside to use the bathroom Erin cutters he ABC news New York president trump continues to take shots at former national security adviser John Bolton course he claims he fired Bolton Bolton claims he quit well in any case the do the book is due out tomorrow there was a court battle over blocking this book will the White House lost both in windows so it's going to be on the bookshelves tomorrow if you were hoping to buy this book so today this morning the president started tweeting again a call Bolton grossly incompetent he called him a liar NEO also was interviewed by Axios and the president addressed another topic of the Bolton book relations with Venezuela let's get more from Sarah cook with CVS in his new book former national security adviser John Bolton says that in twenty nineteen the president privately said he thought quite a was a week as opposed to Maduro who he considered strong a former senior White House official confirmed these comments to CBS news a former administration official confirmed to CBS news that in twenty seventeen the Venezuelan government reached out to the White House and state department at least twice to express interest willingness to meet with president trump in two thousand eighteen the president had voiced an openness to meeting with Maduro but had also signaled military action against Venezuela was a possibility according to a former official the president began to voice a desire to meet with Maduro again last year Sarah cook CBS news Washington presidential candidate Joe Biden is responding on Twitter writing trump talks tough on Venezuela but admires thugs and dictators like Nicolas Maduro and he says as president he meaning bite and will stand with the Venezuelan people and for democracy one nineteen on this Monday a vigil will be held tonight outside of Braintree town hall remembering Laurie Mel Chanda the school nurse and mother was shot and killed at her home in Braintree last week a former neighbor has been charged with her murder the candlelight vigil begins this evening at eight thirty organizer at organizers are asking people to wear purple that was Laurie's favorite color you're also asked to please wear a mask and a sad day in Brockton after a young boy falls to his death WBZ TV's Jim Smith with the story.

Nicolas Maduro Washington CBS Bolton New York ABC Erin Jim Smith Brockton murder Braintree Laurie Mel Chanda Braintree town hall Greenwich Village Twitter Joe Biden Venezuela official John Bolton Sarah cook
The Big Easy (with Father Brad Doyle)

Miss Information: A Trivia Podcast

08:08 min | 2 years ago

The Big Easy (with Father Brad Doyle)

"I'm so excited for this because I. Admittedly have never been to New Orleans. Although many Louisianans. Oh, Lord, what's the Deborah and we're going to get into that I got. Using Indians Louisianans have told me like. Oh, you gotta get down there and have some shrimp to fe. experienced the joy of New Orleans, so. Yeah, yeah, I just allow me to bathe in the knowledge of the south. I was you in crab? Boil right now. Sounds a little painful. Be Baptized and Gumbo. Is that service you provide in your church Father Brad. I cook. I Cook like the other day. I went over in at a social distance, sat and and prisoners, driveway and boiled to Sachse, crawfish and like just gave it to him and sat at. It's socially distant. Right off, but so I I do do that, but they usually eat it. They don't pour it on their head or it on themselves. I mean that's the waste, so that's understandable. Who Hey please. The floor is yours Sir Nice okay, so we're gonNA start with pronunciation. Very while the city derives its name from the city of early-on, France. It's not pronounced that way or else people think you are conceded. I'm in New Orleans. So, it's some other mistaken. Situations are new, Orleans or even worse knowledge wins okay. That's very touristy. Okay, One's going around. Saying Nolan's in New Orleans like when we kept referring to Chicago is Chinatown. From What he says, so the best way to say New Orleans is just a smash two words together and just say New Orleans. Let's try like Toronto. Toronto Yeah Yeah. New Orleans okay, and if you live in new, Orleans you're a newer Linian. Okay important, okay, so history! I think it's historically interesting because it's. It's kind of very different from a lot of the country, our country. As is the case with most of the Americas the human history of South Louisiana begins with native Americans right. There were there. And the major tribes inhabiting the area, or the president. Of President of the Chitter Maka and the choctaw tribes, and what's cool is the chicken Maka are the only native tribe of Louisiana. He's still inhabit part of their ancestral land, so we still have people who are a part of the tribe that still inhabit where their ancestors lift our. And many of the rivers streets still bear their the language of the choctaw. For instance there's a street called Chop Tulips, which is just really hard to pronounce even harder to spell. But it is right there on the river, and a lot of stuff is on top of tulips now it's. Exploding section of the city and that's actually a choctaw word. It's not French anish or Haitian or anything. okay. New Orleans. As we know it now is the result of a French colony. Probably know that is founded in seventeen eighteen by Montreal Frenchman and this is you know. French people have these long names a John. Baptiste Lemond be in Ville. But we just call him. Be in Ville feels like a the founder of New Orleans. Chose New Orleans because of the high elevation like where it's at. It's actually has a natural levee where it's located like the French quarter now is where the original spotless, and it didn't flood during Katrina so the French quarter didn't flood. who was all the surrounding areas that flooded? Okay so the land itself is a natural. Levian protected it from the floodwaters exactly. Of Us. WHO. Are probably thinking well. It's at the mouth of the Mississippi right like exactly. something. It's it's not exactly right there. Most of the city. We'll get to that the geography of it. Or geology of it, but it's that section. He chose wisely I mean he chose it for a reason right, so it's a little higher than all the other areas, but it's near strategic waterways. Help it with its. It was considered a port at the beginning I. It's still is, but it was. It was supposed to be the gateway to. Louisiana territory. Okay, so in seventeen twenty two. It was made the capital of French Louisiana though it struggled at first we think of new. Orleans a super touristy, like a great place to go experience, culture and music, but that wasn't the case at the beginning. It was on the outskirts. It was very rustic There's a one of my favorite quotes from missionary priest. Who is there in seventeen twenty one? And this is his quote about New Orleans. He says it's a place of one hundred wretched hovels in malaria, sweat, thicket of willows and Dwarf Palmettos, infested by serpents and alligators. That sounds disgusting. Florida. Things are. A minus the malaria pretty much pretty much accurate even. Mosquitoes. So yeah, that was it wasn't. It wasn't always the tourist destination so and it was French colony until seventeen, sixty three, when very confusing land trades from treaties from the French and Indian war, which not going to explain it I don't quite frankly because I don't understand but that resulted in Spain so seventeen, sixty three Spain, the kingdom of Spain like the monarchy took over. and. They got the territory west of the Mississippi, so Spain got all the territory in the Louisiana territory west of the Mississippi. Plus, New Orleans in Britain got east of the Mississippi minus northern New Orleans this little bitty section. That Spain was like now we want that. which is kind of important because Britain? Never controlled New Orleans. They never controlled it, which is kind of like a point of pride for us. I mean with the French and British kind of beef, but but also because later, and we'll get to the battle in Orleans. We. We fought back the British. In the battle of eighteen twelve at the battle, yeah, that way you can twelve okay, so all in all New Orleans has been under the control of the following. People's the Chitty Maka the monarchy of France. The monarchy of Spain. And then it went back to the Republika France this is post, French Revolution Right Oh early eighteen hundreds and then. U. S. A.. And in eighteen O, three right with the signing the Louisiana purchase the first major event in US new, Orleans, history was in eighteen, fifteen at the end of the war of eighteen twelve, so US forces the militias of New Orleans so just regular new Orleanians like picking up arms, and even a pirate, so there's a famous pirate named John Lafitte. Have you ever heard of John Lafitte Yes, and the BARATARIA. There were basically I mean we were taking every body. And just throwing them at the British we're like we are not letting them. Take the French quarter. Okay, and so they they set up in this place called Shell met, which is really really marshy it's south of New Orleans. and. We fought them back in and actually they were led by Andrew Jackson so old hickory himself.

New Orleans Orleans Louisiana Spain Malaria French Louisiana Toronto Mississippi France Deborah Father Brad New Orleans. Republika France Chitter Maka Andrew Jackson Montreal South Louisiana John Lafitte Sachse Americas
"seventeen eighteen" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

06:46 min | 2 years ago

"seventeen eighteen" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"On seventeen eighteen West Texas intermediate crude up two point six percent thirty three sixty six a barrel hi Charlie palette that is a Bloomberg business slash art Charlie thanks so much well let's continue our conversation without Khan he's the founder of course of Khan academy journeys on the phone from California and some just before we took a break we were talking about sort of the inequalities that the SAT and other standardized tests were meant to combat and and obviously that is a debate that will rage on for however long those tests exist one of the other inequalities it feels like this pandemic has laid bare is around technology and I wonder what you make of that and what you've learned and what we all should be taking away from this in terms of what sort of access students of all shapes and sizes and socioeconomic status need in order to really learn yeah and I don't think I'm telling anything it's surprising to folks but as you get this call record is not just to keep learning on apart from what I can do that frankly this is it connected with right the attack of the friends and family the lifeline for for most of us and in many parts of the country there's twenty thirty percent of the population that does not have devices at home or reasonable internet access at home and so that frankly has always been a problem people talk about do you provide and now with this whole thing the whole mortar and school having to close physically it's become that much worse the silver lining if there is one is that because it's become so urgent you're seeing government school districts corporations take action like they've never taken before a New York City public schools the distributed almost three hundred thousand laptops in a matter of weeks they got the local telecom carriers to get free internet access Miami Dade did something similar a Las Vegas Los Angeles so one silver lining is because it's such an urgent need a lot of the digital divide hopefully will get closed because there's a lot more motivation to it but obviously you need that access if you're able to tap into everything else like Khan academy or anything else yeah that's a good point because that's the thing we're trying to sell as you know how much stays with us so I love to hear the stories you know about free wifi and equipment being you know distributed to those who didn't have it how much of it do you think stays with us on the other side of it I think it's gonna say I can't imagine a world where they died and then they have to take it back you know the the heavy lifting frankly has already been done and every school district that we've always talked about you know we've always talked about the value of personalized learning about students being able learn in a way that's not bound by time or space and and teachers will be able to understand data off when kids are doing homework and things like that and everyone intellectually agrees with that but then there's a bot is ten percent of kids who don't have an active also we can't do that the vision for the entire classroom so now that there's been a will and a desire and and and action taken to close the digital divide I can't imagine that we'll go back on so so is you think about a world in which we are a kind you know remain concerned about the health and safety in worth rethinking what school looks like we know that there is some amount of online learning we can do we think about hi Bridget situations where you know maybe have some kids in the classroom some kids remote learning what's feasible I mean knowing this world as well as you do what is a feasible way that we can really integrate technology into some sort of you know for lack of better term sort of hybrid solution yeah it's pretty clear that this coming back to schools going to have to be hybrid in some way shape or form there's going to be kids whose families don't feel comfortable sending them they might have health issues or family member might that might have a junior in a grandparent lives with them and so I think school districts are and and colleges are really trying to figure out how do you do that in a world where some kids might be there but then there's half the kids were watching from home so the reality is that going they will have to lean more on what you call asynchronous tools like Khan academy where kids can learn at their own time and pace and then teachers can monitor and then leverage video conferencing whether numer global needs or whatever more even when they are live with the students because they're gonna have some of most of the kids who are there and when you when you lean more on these types of tools you haven't I'm talking a lot of teachers about this it's always been the case that a lecture can be a little bit not engaging for a lot of students that even more so if you're doing a video conference with your lecturing the whole time that might as well be a video right and so this is really pushing teachers in schools I think how do we make it much more interactive how do we pull those kids were watching from home into the conversation and and have them interact sell what role do you think online learning virtual learning will have ultimately and higher education I know people already get degrees but I'm thinking about those institutions where you know part of the experience a big part of it is being on campus somewhere among other students and I do wonder especially as higher education's got so expensive you know whether or not there might be some kind of mix going on in the future that's what I think too I think this crisis has been a force on bundling of what higher education offers at offers essentially three things it offers an education like you will learn the set of skills it offers socialization being able to hang out in the closet and throw the frisbee or going to parties on weekends or hang out in the dorm and talk about your your life dreams with with folks that you you've met and then it does credentialing and I think we talked about in the past that this is the direction that we might go in anyway regardless but you're seeing record numbers of kids are deferring you know even to very prestigious universities because they're like well I really wanted to pay that tuition because I wanted to hang out with kids in the choir and and they're realizing that they can get some of the learning just fine virtually on your virtual community college or on the move or some other type of platform so I think it's going to be really interesting my gut sense is education as a whole you might feel a little bit of an on bundling where there will always be certain pieces that are happening on video conferencing virtually especially for older students colleges students are adult learners and then for those who want that in person experience there's ways for them to get it yeah all right well we always enjoy catching up with you always so thoughtful and very much on the front lines of a true revolution in how we learn and I think so many of our listeners out there among the hundred million folks who have used Khan academy yeah absolutely tell his been in our household first time or you're listening to Bloomberg business.

Khan founder West Texas Bloomberg Charlie
"seventeen eighteen" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

04:08 min | 2 years ago

"seventeen eighteen" Discussed on WTOP

"You know we had a a very warm January across the country and that may have distorted hiring in areas like construction so we may not see as many jobs created or maybe some of those jobs come back that or or you know reverse in the subsequent months if it gets colder okay that said there was also this big revision to the numbers the labor department releases a report then it then releases to subsequent revisions month two months later and then once a year they go through all the data and they say okay let's see what's really there and interestingly from the spring of twenty eighteen to the spring of twenty nineteen the labor department says that there are more than half a million fewer jobs than they had originally reported this is not a death knell we still had strong job creation is just wasn't quite as good and in fact when I was looking at the numbers creating beautiful charts and graphs which I love to do I said wow it's so interesting it's actually very consistent job growth from twenty eleven right through twenty nineteen so essentially had very steady and consistent growth over those years now the unemployment rate for January grew to three point six percent it was at a fifty year low of three point five percent what did we learn from the broader measure of unemployment well you know when that times are tough we used to talk at that about this thing called you six meaning that's the labor department's classification this okay who's unemployed but then who's discourage whose marginally attach I have a job I hate my job who's working part time but once full time and what we now know is that that number you sixty ballooned up to seventeen eighteen percent during the recession and now it's at six point nine percent that it's near a nineteen year low and frankly that I think there's a lot of progress in this particular number especially because a year ago this rate was eight eight point eight percent now it's six point nine percent that is a lot of progress in one year what is the effect of all of this on consumer confidence in financial security well according to Gallup they do these polls and they find they ask Americans Hey are you feeling about your financial life right and in the most recent poll released last week Gallup said fifty nine percent of Americans say they are currently better off financially than they were a year ago now fifty nine percent that's a pretty big number it's the best result the Gallup is seen since January of nineteen ninety nine so this is a big number here's your other side of the aisle cautionary tales often when we feel really good it's when the economy turns so think about this in nineteen ninety nine that number was really high and then we had a dot com bust in two thousand six in two thousand seven that number was high and then we had a housing crash so just because we feel good doesn't necessarily mean that we are going to feel good in the future my best bit of advice my certified financial planner in me coming out that if you really do feel good and financially secure be sure to pay off that credit card debt get that emergency reserve fund and kick up your contributions to your retirement plan CBS business analyst Jill Schlesinger talking there deb and more you're listening to World War morning news at twenty five and fifty five on WTOP this is the Bloomberg money minute stocks begin the day with the S. and P. and nasdaq at all time highs worries about the corona virus continue to lurk in the background federal reserve chairman Jay Powell heads to Capitol Hill today for the first of two days of testimony testers are hoping to hear his take on the economic impact of the corona virus with city group strategist bias Leftwich says Powell may not have much to offer I don't think his neck out too far because he just doesn't know none of us really know the extent of the problems companies are struggling to restart their operations in China apple supplier Foxconn resumed some production your how many workers return there's certain Ford have reopened.

"seventeen eighteen" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

01:44 min | 2 years ago

"seventeen eighteen" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"Going for seventeen eighteen years serving all right yeah thank you very much we appreciate the time ABC Jim Ryan Ryan nobles is back from a well deserved break in glad to have him back in the traffic farmhouse Luther who went on a Monday looking pretty good getting around Sacramento gotta slow down I got a problem your super commuter headed out to the bay area via westbound I. eighty this reports right by all state things look good right now all the way across the causeway into Davis and Dixon want to broach highway one thirteen in Dixon you're going to get the slowdown that's due to an accident at midway road now we understand everything is over on the shoulder out of the roadway the traffic slows to a crawl from one thirteen to the accident site at midway road after that you look good all the way to the six eighty connector six eighty getting a little mild slowing now is make your way across to me to the beach a bridge and some heavy traffic now in Concord Pleasant Hill into Walnut Creek he be staying on I eighty headed into San Francisco looking pretty good through Vallejo double heavy traffic report joins up at Hercules a process through Pinole after that you're actually down doesn't happen until you get to Albany then you've got it off and on from there to the bay bridge with an Allstate agent you get a local expert and help finding the best coverage for you and because they live in your community you can always count on them to be there when you need the most plus when you bundle home and auto so you can save so call your local agent today you're in good hands traffic on the tens every ten minutes mornings and afternoons Brian nobles news ninety three point one K. F. B. K. times of clouds and sunshine today with a high of fifty five to fifty nine then mostly cloudy tonight there maybe a shower later on with a little forty one to forty five tomorrow clouds will give way to some sunshine with a high of fifty six to sixty I'm accu weather meteorologist Joe Lundberg news ninety three point one K. F. B. K. this weather report brought to you by Tom Dave's dot com it is currently forty four degrees in.

"seventeen eighteen" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

04:20 min | 2 years ago

"seventeen eighteen" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"Retirement for seventeen eighteen years now your self what was it like in September of two thousand and eight what were you hearing from people you know people don't know what to do people were panicked and I even was there during the tech bubble with our clients as well and you know similar story where you know they were companies here on the toll road just right around the corner that were built in a day and and a second gone now same type of thing with the tech bubble but a lot of worry a lot of people had to go back to work and a lot of concern but because of the type of plan that we do Kristin where you know our retirement income plan is not only focused on just growth or growth potential but also protection and preservation of principle and keeping what money we have saved our clients for nearly as worried as I think a lot of other people were out there yeah it doesn't mean that they didn't have any concern at all but you're saying that they had are less concerned that maybe some of their neighbors and coworkers let me give you a really good example mime one of my good friends actually designed the AOL logo or help in designing that logo which is a big deal back then and he was around thirty years old at the time four six million dollars now company stock and he walked away with just a few hundred thousand dollars after the crash II now a few hundred thousand dollars for somebody in their thirties still you know decent chunk of change right but six million in your thirties could have changed his life his family's lives are generations to come and I tell you what Kristin we hear that story all the time when it comes to to people telling us their stories in the tech bubble crashed in two thousand a crash we need to get ahead of that we need to get ahead of that be proactive imprudent and smart you know I just looked at the S. and P. five hundred the other day I mean having a fantastic year that's not sustainable it's not going to continue to go up every single year so we need to start taking some chips off the table if for about to retire or in retirement and planning for you know an inevitable recession and downturn and getting ahead of that you're not one of those doomsday people I think we need to get ahead of that you're telling all the facts in real life and around the office you're one of the most positive I know absolutely and we can't ignore what will likely happen right and the markets will continue to go up and down for the rest of our lives I think the big difference for our clients is that for the first time in their lives they could be faced with a time where they're taking money out of their investments they're pulling money out and the markets also down at the same time but right now wall street's doing pretty well Avon there's a lot of people that feel they don't want to miss out on all the games that are going on and they also feel like it's done so well for so long yeah that's true you know in fact one of the most recent couples that we just helped they live out in Lake Frederick Virginia on the Winchester and Stephen city area Virginia about about an hour from our office and he's seventy one and she's sixty eight and he's retired government work for the government matter fact his former military to has a pension from the military but he's seventy one and before coming into their office are actually in there our initial meetings with them he was a hundred percent one hundred percent in stocks as a seventy one year old all in the stock funds of the T. S. P. sounds pretty risky very risky and he said you know what a for coming in to meet with you guys I knew I needed to do something I just didn't know what to do I was considering doing this and that and moving my money here and there and I'm so glad we came in to meet because now we actually have an income plan we actually have suggestions that we can follow implement and basically what we implemented or recommended implementing was segregating and separating the monies to serve different purposes of some for growth potential some for income a seventy one and he's in his first year of our Andy's iris arm days and yes the market's up depending on the index that you're looking at and he's taking out around four percent for his arm dis but if and when the market turns around here in the near future he could be faced with that double or triple negative which we talked about wanting to eliminate or avoid and they love that the law of implementing those two strategies together making sure that you know where you.

hundred thousand dollars four six million dollars seventeen eighteen years one hundred percent seventy one year hundred percent four percent thirty years
"seventeen eighteen" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

02:22 min | 2 years ago

"seventeen eighteen" Discussed on KGO 810

"Even know how many years we've been telling people about where foundation freedom station how many years now we've been doing it for quite a while we've raised a lot of money for them over the years and we're gonna do it again this week are we go we are I was so waiting for Hanson to answer he's shaking his head he does now he just doesn't know what good is a it it's been years ever since we became aware of the incredible work for your foundation freedom station does we have been in Susie asked exporters of theirs and as we've communicated it to you all through the years you have joined us in that as it is you know if you care about this country you care about our troops it's sincere resistible yeah and we'll be telling you more about it throughout the morning morning talk to well the person that runs the whole thing and then that somebody that's benefited from it throughout the week you'll hear more and more but here's one of the keys to the whole thing it's one of the most efficient charities in America it is one of the best of charities for your money actually doing good at that you can find anywhere and well if you listen to the show you know were really big on that lot of people he up for money if you dig into a little bit a lot of times those charities say they really spend the money that well this one really really really does and that's one of the reasons we like and how to people donate your Armstrong and get it out com yeah there's a big old banner you can't possibly miss it but to worry or foundation freedom station very short version of things excuse me is that when the warriors come back into this country from being overseas serving fighting what have you sometimes with the psychic wounds of battle sometimes with terrible physical injuries and years of surgeries and rehab ahead where your foundation freedom station is there with transitional housing support services quality of life items guidance counseling just everything they need to not end up on the streets and and to have successful and happy American lives as opposed to what often happens which is disaster because a lot of these kids when I come home and their kids they listed at seventeen eighteen twenty years old whatever and they've never been out on their own then they come home with terrible wounds or what have you and are expected to to make it well it's it's time for us is their fellow Americans to step up and give my hand and that's what were your foundation freedom station is all about we're going to figure out the goal last year our goal is three hundred thousand we blew by that's we got to figure out what our goals gonna be but more on that later yeah mailbag.

seventeen eighteen twenty year
"seventeen eighteen" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

06:02 min | 2 years ago

"seventeen eighteen" Discussed on KGO 810

"That that it was real that we have now lost not only been visited by extraterrestrials but they were already here among us and they kind of intelligence that they possess he felt it was a different question because he said that them where they came from and what their purpose for coming here words the lingering question but when asked if he thought they were real he said absolutely yes that was my conversation with him let's go to the phones let's pick it up by going to bury in rock hill South Carolina to get things going on a bear go ahead hello George water wells you too happy thanksgiving to you as a matter of fact happy Turkey day two year and Cheryl and older problem mage's George of lecture or does is going to make a terrific addition to the coast to coast name absolutely no kidding and Cheryl of what you'll see an air of of your child and ran George that far but I'm really enjoying you'll coast to coast and you shouldn't be worker for a better group of characters how how sweet of you to say that and you're absolutely correct it's about time to finally be able to get into a situation where you can have the freedom to report on stories that really are beyond the mainstream news I am a product of mainstream news I make no bones about that however I have graduated from the twelve step recovery program I designed my own program so that so there's there's life beyond mainstream and sometimes guys you know I just wish that there were term limits on people working in mainstream news I think it does does you good as some would say to get out of that line get out of that bubble and take in the world from a nother vantage point because it is a bubble and it's very frustrating when you know that there are things beyond the headlines that are not being reported that people need to know about and basically are very key to the ultimate serious life and death decisions we all have to make all the time what you're you're exactly right Cheryl and the thing is you're with a group they are right on the cutting edge of a coast to coast team is absolutely the best in the business and one more compliments of yours thank you for adding my buddy Ian Punnett you're the credit check here and then the show he if they're nicely right behind your snaps he sure does and of course as you know when I started filling in on coast to coast back in April of two thousand one my very first part time show I was filling in for Ian on a Sunday night gosh seventeen eighteen years ago that's crazy time really clicks why doesn't it these days Cheryl it sure does I don't know where it goes they say that the older you get the faster it flies and I really do believe that I'm I'm not anxiously awaiting the try time travel machine so we could go back in time a little bit you were born where what state I was actually born in Middlesboro Kentucky although my home at the time was in East Tennessee so I grew up in a pretty rural area there wasn't jazz in the hospitals weren't all that handy and so I was born across the state line we're taking phone calls with Cheryl Jones our investigative reporter she appears monthly on the program and you will be with us all right before let's see right before Christmas a couple days before that won't you a couple of days or a day after I don't know we we will check the daytime Emmys got your schedule I know Christmas is what Thursday this year or answer for Wednesday let me see here I have only got the calendar with her yes Christmas is on Wednesday okay so I would guess if Christmas is on Wednesday why don't we have you on Thursday the twenty six th that will work fine okay perfect that'll be the date that that we make sure somebody knows about it let's go to Gina Marie and the state of Washington hygiene a go ahead hi fusion loving god bless everyone and everything thank you yeah so I had an experience when I was a child probably four or five years old I've told it before where voice woke me up on my feet and for me to go to the window and I went to the window and I saw a complete lack yeah colors and shapes in the scaffold and at the same time I heard a sound that I described as a child as a near near near with beat beat beat and this person between that she believes that but that would basically when it is like shift in my power and that well those sounds are everywhere Cheryl albeit says it's a messy contagious people are also hearing Lole hallmark roaming the rumbling sounds have you heard about that absolutely that's another one for you to go after yes the strange sounds possibly coming from underneath the the route Blake something's being built or who knows who's excavating or something it's very scary have you seen a lot of reports or seemingly more than before George just a sinkhole starting to develop yeah cars are getting sucked in and everything else exactly.

seventeen eighteen years five years two year
"seventeen eighteen" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

KTLK 1130 AM

06:08 min | 2 years ago

"seventeen eighteen" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

"That that that it was real that we have now lost not only been visited by extraterrestrials but they were already here among us and they kind of intelligence that they possess he felt was a different question he because he says that them where they came from and what their purpose for coming here words the lingering question but when asked if he thought they were real he said absolutely yes that was my conversation with him let's go to the phones let's pick it up by going to bury in rock hill South Carolina to get things going Hey bear go ahead hello your orders water wells you too happy thanksgiving to you as a matter of fact happy Turkey day to you and Cheryl and old Dick problem mage's George of lecture or does is going to make a terrific addition to the coast to coast he came absolutely no kidding and Cheryl of what you'll see an air of of your child and ran George that far but I'm really enjoying you'll coast to coast and you will be working for a better group of characters how how sweet of you to say that and you're absolutely correct it's about time to finally be able to get into a situation where you can have the freedom to report on stories that really are beyond the mainstream news I am a product of mainstream news I make no bones about that however I have graduated from the twelve step recovery program I designed my own program so that that there's there's life beyond mainstream and sometimes guys you know I just wish that there were term limits on people working in mainstream news really think it does does your good as some would say to get out of that line get out of that bubble and take in the world from a nother vantage point because it is a bubble and it's very frustrating when you know that there are things beyond the headlines that are not being reported that people need to know about and basically are very key to the ultimate yes life and death decisions we all have to make all the time well you're you're exactly right Cheryl and the thing is you're with a group there are right on the cutting edge of a coast to coast team is absolutely the best in the business and one more compliments of yours thank you for adding my buddy Ian Punnett you're the credit check the end of the show he it's their lives we right behind your nap he sure does in the course as you know when I started filling in on coast to coast back in April of two thousand one my very first part time show I was filling in for Ian on a Sunday night gosh seventeen eighteen years ago that's crazy time really clicks by doesn't it these days Cheryl it sure does I don't know where it goes they say that the older you get the faster it flies and I really do believe that I'm I'm not anxiously awaiting the trying time travel machine so we could go back in time a little bit you were born where what state I was actually born in Middlesboro Kentucky although my home at the time was in East Tennessee so I grew up in a pretty rural area there wasn't judge it as the hospital's work all that handy and so I was born across the state line we're taking phone calls with Cheryl Jones our investigative reporter she appears monthly on the program and you will be with us all right before let's see right before Christmas a couple days before that won't you a couple of days or a day after I don't know we're going to double check the date time Tom he's got your schedule I know Christmas is what Thursday this year or answer for Wednesday let me see here I have you got the calendar with their yes Christmas is on Wednesday okay so I would guess if Christmas is on Wednesday why don't we have you on Thursday the twenty six that will work fine okay perfect that'll be the date that that we make sure that he knows about it let's go to Gina Marie and the state of Washington hi Gina go ahead hi peace and love in god bless everyone and everything thank you yeah here so I had an experience when I was a child probably four or five years old I've told it before where voice woke me up on my feet and for me to go to the window and I went to the window and I thought complete blackness colors and shapes not valid and at the same time I heard a sound that I described as a child as a near near near with beat beat beat respecting the plane that she believes that but that would basically when it's like chicken my talent at well those sounds are everywhere Cheryl albeit said as they must be contagious people are also hearing Lole hallmark roaming the rumbling sounds have you heard about that only absolutely that's another one for you to go after yes the strange sounds possibly coming from underneath saying they're out like something's being built or who knows who's excavating or something it's very scary and if you've seen a lot of reports are seemingly more than before George just the same cold starting to develop yeah cars are getting sucked in and everything else exactly it's crazy houses exactly actually in an area not that far.

seventeen eighteen years five years
"seventeen eighteen" Discussed on 790 KABC

790 KABC

01:51 min | 2 years ago

"seventeen eighteen" Discussed on 790 KABC

"Two thousand seventeen eighteen fiscal year and five of eight last fiscal year the operating knowledge of the outreach work LA HSA does is difficult any committed their efforts but he said the agency has fallen far short of its goals a group of citizens are fighting mad over the government's failure to solve homicides justice for homicide victims just put up a Billboard along the six so five freeway in Baldwin park to bring attention to their cause member lawanda Hawkins nineteen year old son was slain in nineteen ninety five in what is still an unsolved murder case and once law enforcement to step it up we would like your unsolved qualified database created immediately with all these law enforcement agencies we have a right to know about murderers living right next door to us we want to know that how they got it set up now we don't have a way of knowing anything we don't see not public service announcement regarding this crap called murder lawanda Hawkins was a guest on the morning drive I'm Jeff Whittle K. A. B. C. news struggling at twenty twenty democratic presidential candidates braced for bad news today with the window to qualify for the next debate set to close at midnight near impossible deadline for many to make that could doom their campaigns correspondent Ryan nobles has the new poll numbers essentially we're gonna cut the field in half for this debate that's coming up on September twelfth in Texas you've got the the front runners biting Sanders Warren Harrison booty judge then the second tier candidates a Booker clover shar Yang metalworking fully in Castro they've all qualified reading the higher standard the higher price of entry for this particular debate talk radio seven ninety K. A. B. C. success in Anaheim Patrick sent about climbs the hill tonight for the halos that's sports on the new home of the U. S. C. Trojans am seven ninety nine ABC dependable driving right now fourteen freeway.

LA HSA Baldwin park Ryan nobles Texas Castro Patrick lawanda Hawkins murder Jeff Whittle K. A. B. C. Warren Harrison K. A. B. C. Anaheim ABC seven ninety K nineteen year
"seventeen eighteen" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

11:33 min | 2 years ago

"seventeen eighteen" Discussed on WGN Radio

"By the band gong gong you know I saw gong at the house of blues but the eighteen years seventeen eighteen years ago well with my buddy GM who is a big prog rock guy like a major prog rock act and pretty crazy band gong ad but the best story about gong who is very they're very popular among the prog rock I can't remember who their leader what the leader the name of the leader lead singer and the guy who basically formed gong as they've been around for a long time and they're proud as hell like their their songs are eighteen ninety minutes long very strange way out there and actually they were they were they were pretty great in concert there it was it was weird but it was great was this same Favio golf ready you know I don't know I'm not really sure he's the he was a guy and it is really from occurring Healy Smith now he had like a beard and like he was like tali a long beard he was tall and skinny in war really weird clothes by the time I saw them you know they were popular like in the sixties and seventies there that was like their heyday I saw like I saw in the early two thousands I some like two thousand one two thousand two yeah at house of blues so they were up in there you know like they probably weren't the original members it was probably the guy the founder was still there and he was like seventy by the time I saw I thought I saw but my favorite story about gong you can look this up and I and I would I would suggest that people have some fun and what this story up because there is an increase red double story that in the biggest gong fan if you can believe this was Sherman Hemsley who played George Jefferson on the Jeffersons he was like the biggest gong fan at the height of the popularity of the Jeffersons he would have these insane parties booze drugs women gong eight he was the biggest gong fan of all time George Jefferson was the biggest gong fan of all time he blow we'd take drugs and listen the gong he had gone over at his house he was obsessed with them in every time anybody came over his house all he would play would be gone so if you were gonna go over Sherman Hemsley house during the height of the popularity the Jefferson when he was George Jefferson in the seventies and there's a great story I I can't get it into the details but there is this great story that I read years ago our E. tailing just some of the weirdness that that Sherman Hemsley would do and hit like his obsession with gong thank you would never expect George Jefferson favorite band and the band that he would be obsessed with is this insane prog rock band called gong so I'm trying to put myself in this time it's the seventies yeah you're going over to Mister Jefferson George Jefferson so you're probably completely faced can you show up and you've just got white book to got to got to got insane you've got gong which is somebody else and say musical over here and I'm assuming that if you're going over to Sherman Hemsley house at the height of his popularity George Jefferson knowing that one of the popular things that George Jefferson has is the way he dances because that was the thing on the show like Sherman Hemsley had a very distinctive walking a very distinctive dance and it was always some sort of funky music that they would play on the Jeffersons if George would dance funky is about as far as you can get from gong and that's the stuff that he loved most and I am I wish I could remember what publication support it but like a a music publication did any extended story about Sherman Hemsley speak absolute you know obsession with the the the progress gone it was one of the funniest and craziest and weirdest music slash entertainment stories I I'd ever read yeah so anyway if you just I think if you just Google Sherman Hemsley and gong something will pop up yeah ID it's definitely popped up yeah oh my gosh yeah it's a real thing the good very last band that you would expect George Jefferson to like would be this weird you know prog rock band called gong the story is all areas to like I mean there's an ace there are extended there's an extended story that goes into all of the report that they did that goes into all of the stories that involved a Sherman Hemsley and his obsession with gong absolute madness yeah it's pretty funny all right now we're raw wrapping this up here we got to some weather coming up in just a few minutes and then we're gonna wrap it up with the body horror movies and we're gonna jump into what happened on this date and it's it would be with that was one now Hawaii became a state on the state will talk a little bit about a why in the talk a little bit about friendly a state's we're still talking body or if you want to jump in next hearing I mentioned is eraser head David Lynch's surrealist body horror film is as disturbing as it is indecipherable but for I get I don't think it's indecipherable no I think that some big misconception it's pretty obvious about what it's about yeah it features copious amounts of gruesome imagery surrounding the quote unquote child in the film I personally think that the kids adorable what the little like larva fan I think he's adorable I think he's adorable you are sick it's the Austrian protagonist Henry Spencer and again girlfriend Mary acts to bizarre individuals who have somehow spawned a limitless monstrosity that swaddled in thick bandage like material looks vaguely like a baby alien cab for some sort of reptile but it's nothing of this world this scene in the movie with the with the I'm with the chickens at me at dinner Cornish and if what whatever it is that's the scene where I go what then you got the girl behind the radiator I I don't I love that movie I love a razor it's so much fun why is fantastic you can tell it was made during a pretty dark period in his life because he was living in I was a Pittsburgh who's living in a in like in a city center and all the imagery is just of all yeah like factory and well anyways yeah really very impressive it's up right that was the first of David Lynch movie ever saw was a researcher at the first one I ever saw and I immediately loved it I was like thirteen when I saw the first time it's weird how certain certain movies if you saw him at a very young age but they had a delivery for up like a raisin in a profound effect on me as it would any thirteen year old you know you're not used to this kind of movie either you know I mean and I was like wow this is fantastic I don't know what the hell's happening that I'm in and out and I saw I saw a clockwork orange wavy way too young it would very well I was a a Levin maybe when I saw clockwork orange and that's another one that like you know as you get older you know okay his clockwork orange but you know like when you're like eleven or maybe barely twelve when I saw clockwork orange it's going to have a pre eighty profound effect on you yeah that's a that's a bitter pill to swallow I was just like no I loved it I don't always carry some but but so at some of the imagery is just in the same or a fine of the imagery it's the violence it's the sax it's the language and I'm not talking about profanity I'm talking about Burgess is words that that yeah and that will and was called like mad Saturday yeah yeah a mixture of Anglican ized Russian it was just an item no you know like that was one of those movies one is mind boggling movies at a twelve year old a fresh twelve year old should probably not see without some sort of explanation and I saw I followed it up with a razor head so I I this is the kid who saw the exorcist eight is now watching you know barely twelve in watching clockwork orange following it up with Eraserhead so I decide this maybe be you know you guys might be it getting insight as to you know how you might want to raise your kids considering how I turned out I feel like you're probably in a room with a bunch of doctors like observing you all at some point yeah yeah yeah yeah yeah they had me they actually had my eyelids stretched open they were dropping there were two drops in my eyes three days I still I still don't believe the ending of that movie the I I just yeah I was cured alright what completely excise in the last chapter of the book is clearly he really was like actually you know what get that exactly I love that movie the man is yeah movies if you use a topic that we should do sometime what movies it'll scramble your rain yeah well no movies that you see at a young age that that really made it had a profound effect on you you know I mean yeah like like for instance in this is that this is a okay had a profound effect on me the whole god that's one of the scariest movies the the whale the way I mean I don't even know what to say and and Bambi same thing Bambi do you mean those are kids movies but I'm talking like movies that might not be appropriate for kids you know I can't imagine what like a a nine year old you know but would think of the for the first ten minutes of up I don't even know what how do you pronounce how do you process backed Hey kids you will learn about grief right we can't have children and then she dies that's the first ten minutes of up it's official the love of this man's life who is barren then they can't reproduce you see that there and he's all alone some idiot boy scout shows up in bugs him I love that movie though so he learns the value of friendship he does but it takes a lot but I don't need the first ten minutes I didn't need that in my life I don't need to be sobbing ten minutes into a Pixar movie my god all right.

GM gong ten minutes twelve year seventeen eighteen years eighteen ninety minutes eighteen years thirteen year three days nine year
"seventeen eighteen" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

KNBR The Sports Leader

05:03 min | 3 years ago

"seventeen eighteen" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

"He's far that stretch twenty fourteen fifteen sixteen seventeen eighteen five years they have made the playoffs how many teams in the NFL have a five year streak in not making the playoffs not many like the Cleveland Browns round in top management lean it's been a lien for the Niners cut if I might be we want to look it up because it me most teams fall Bassac words into a wild card spot right it is really wild card to Louisiana C. championship with more that was against the Panthers a the twenty M. I. B. C. to see what other teams have five year NFL playoff drought because you know armor in Arizona the loss to Caroline when when can nude when thanks so twenty sixteen when given the symbol fifty had a twenty fifteen but the season one of these errors are to get to that in order to accept that sounds right I might be meeting in fact Brian the New York Jets have made the playoffs since the twenty ten AFC championship he suggests twenty ten obviously the Browns are no grounds have to be and then the other one it was brown's haven't made it since two AFC wild card the other one is the Tampa Bay Buccaneers oh seven wild card that's the last in the box made if I'm surprised to hear that too wow and then Joe bills bunny jailbreak brings up yeah Buffalo Bills hills made if they want to play they played near the planetary nine to three in Jacksonville the bills are respect the bills I know respect bills mafia well you see that Josh Allen thing on though that went viral usually with the KDL Josh you look awesome in shorts and then in just one of the key was trembling and crying all so there's also by the way this morning in about age I know you love the stuff but man you get hard to keep it together Carson Wentz is signing an autograph for severely disabled kid at Philly camp and the kid begins bawling he's a little keys press seven or eight he's he's in a wheelchair is overwhelmed there's over one crying and then the cars and gives enough it's an engine it's so I like people are like eagles and we only ever passed out the prediction sheet which by the way I nailed last year we almost we have with the Niners in the Superbowl last year which is all yours out yet I did would you have you'll have to wait and see how come on yeah the suspense is killing I feel mine out I did put the Niners in as a wild card team I did come on Gerry all had passed rams yeah but I was going to pick yeah grants yeah shadow to mean Gerry picking it up so this year I got to my civil champ is that Kansas city I am too Joe hi fi yeah yeah choice you got another thing comin perhaps you have seen the offseason Derek because that have it I call Erro head the house that al Davis bill totally yeah so the only reason we're moving to Vegas is the get father away from the cheap you get close to the city yeah right because I already own it I might as well get close yeah a sudden Erro head is an ancient Indian relic buried under the ground like you season it's always so interesting about Kansas city in the Scorsese film and is one of the odd ones I don't buy even be impact privacy it's not my favorite but it's good is casino but interestingly all the mob boss is that we're controlling Vegas apparently back then were all centered like it was in Kansas city that was the hub they would all have their meetings in Kansas city some of you have come from as far away as Kansas city yeah what does is like strike me as like a mafia town but I guess it has been who's your champ Paulie would you take what who I test here what do you think I took it you took under the pats you know what I'm looking for something right now because I don't even know if members ever heard this let me let me see if I can find somebody I can't fight yet to to Pat the combat until they lose why should why would you pick up I took Seattle or the path no no no I see you know I used to as a wild card we to let me know he picked an honest on it was a wild individual I have the diesels this all came about that because when I have the eagles when the FC watch out for big make down there with the Jacksonville Jaguars I know I promised to you I didn't want jobs and I've colds winning costume calls as well AFC west I went chiefs again yet which color in in the act because Steelers gonna cry brown's right the Browns this is a wild card from me same here and have them and I took the Browns winning division steel is a wild card I took Jacksonville winning their division that's a good pick and I took up the whole Jacksonville's in the same division as the cold Tracy what happens I got it I got I got versus the Frank Reich incident poly I got to go with the cold who is this guy no regrets what's up with the Vikings on a bounce back year too I like her cousins in the Vikings doing their thing that a lot of talent so we win anything if we pride bunny's bridal so you are you don't get anything Lee hammer brings you a box and I don't that's good from experience you get nothing I just another one by the way yesterday I said that on there yeah Henry showman telecast giants baseball next.

NFL five year twenty fourteen fifteen sixtee twenty M
"seventeen eighteen" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

MyTalk 107.1

03:04 min | 3 years ago

"seventeen eighteen" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

"Cooking power seventeen eighteen hundred dollars. Okay. Okay. Thank you. Stacey. It sounds like you watch a lot which we appreciate that. We have just one more tough question for you. Which is the fact that you're going against four other finalists who were all lovely in their own, right? Why should it be you? Why do you deserve to go to New York City to watch live with Kelly and Ryan with me in studio. Well, so as I stated I had a baby in December and he came two and a half weeks early. And actually we delivered him in the car. I'm lee. The hospital and because of that and being home on leave. I was watching Kellyanne Ryan Marceau from one Steve was doing his morning segments there. So I started watching the bar, and I watched one of their segments with may grow with you true trivia or something and found out that Kelly's really into birth stories, and she was interested in those that somebody made a joke about be having a baby in a car. And so I found out that she's interested in that. And again being a new mom or second time off. Having a little getaway. I think it'd be a great experience. I've never been to New York. It's the city that doesn't sleep. And so I don't really sleep anyways. But with the baby. Thanks. Yeah. But if I did, hey, maybe it'd be a great time to get a couple of nights rest without being away from the little one. And I just think it's great. You know, Steve is represented the state so well and so being able to be with him when he gets his recognition. I think it'd be a great experience, and he just seems like a wonderful guy to hang out with. So oh, man station saying. Yeah. All right. We have. A panel of experts who will make a decision that we will share with the world on Friday at nine AM. Stacey congratulations on the birth of your being congratulations one of our finalists. Good luck. Yes. Appreciate it. Thank you guys for giving me a shot. Oh, man. This is going to be tough. Everybody's been silliness to right after the interview. They just keep saying thank you for this opportunity. I'm like, oh, man. They're just so polite. So who's real unpalatable? I like if there would've just like like four super unpoliced people. Then one really nice person would have been great. But it really didn't work out that way. Unfortunately, anyway, so we have one more interview coming up in the eleven o'clock hour. Meanwhile, we've got a real quick time to get a little tips. Cops show pin tip sake. Shout. Era body helps you pin tips. You can get a free slider at like castle. Today was what I mean what's.

New York City Steve Ryan Marceau Stacey Kelly seventeen eighteen hundred dol
"seventeen eighteen" Discussed on ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

12:29 min | 3 years ago

"seventeen eighteen" Discussed on ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

"Be a precursor to what we may see depending on the favorable roles that LeBron gift certain points favourable role. John Calipari is going to get as a payday for as long as he's breathing. A university of Kentucky he's going to be getting paid as long as he wants to get paid by the university lifetime contract after retires. He'll become an ambassador for Kentucky. He was given permission to talk to you sail. The report out there that offer was six years for forty eight million which comes out to eight million a year. They'll all in Kentucky's making a little over nine million a year every July. I think it is. He gets the retention bonus. As long as he stays in Kentucky. He gets two point six million dollars because he didn't leave. So all is good for a guy who has made a ton of final fours. One himself a national championship and has had two final fours. Vacated the more. I think about it now with this lifetime deal. So you're going into whatever the wilderness. College basketball is going to offer you and one of the things we keep hearing about is changing this one and done rule that has been John Calipari is recruiting star strategy. It worked a lot early on in his tenure there. We know he's on a bit of a final four drought right now. All this talk about can freshman lead teams working consistently. When you games, we're gonna find out what he does in a world where maybe that's no longer the option either with the kind of guys he's been used to recruit it just so people understand how successful he's been Kentucky's last. Final four appearance was twenty fifteen. So the drought is sixteen seventeen eighteen nineteen at one, holy if someone actually stayed for. It'd be one class. So John Calipari is set for life. All right, Golic and wingo here with you. Ron darling is now joining us on the shell Pennzoil performance line. Who has written a book called one hundred and eight stitches about his life and times in baseball. But there's one specific passage that has garnered a lot of attention that is of course, his recollection of what happened before game three of the World Series at Fenway park. Where in his book, he says his teammate Lenny Dykstra, went on a vile vicious racial tirade against Dennis oil can Boyd before the start of game three and Ron darling joins us now. Rob thanks for being with us this morning. I'm sure you're caught up to date on what Lenny Dykstra had to say about that passage in the book and what Kevin Mitchell white Gooden had to say about that book. What is your reaction to their reaction saying this never happened? Well, one thanks for having me on here guys. I appreciate it. Well, it's interesting. I've also got a lot of texts and phone calls from other eighty six members that. They got my back. I I don't know. I don't want to get a tip for tip would everyone. This was the nineteen eighties of the bench Chaki and stuff that went along in those days of was sometimes obscene in nature. And I heard what I heard, and I put it in the book of four reason. And you know, that's that's a where mad. I mean. I I don't know how else to respond to it. And and I guess that's even forward. You know? We'll we'll see we'll figure out how to do that. So there's no chance you're because Dwight goodness. I live with Lenny now, he said he doesn't remember this. But he never heard from Lenny Kevin Mitchell said if he had heard it he would have he would have gotten his chest. There's no chance you you misremembered this in your mind. I don't no chance that I missed remembered it Trey. And I, and I do I do say that if you read the entire chapter it's really a shame about Michael in these kind of things that happened in those times where that seems like the right way to compete the right way to get on the opposition defence job. You could be anything that you want us to be. So that really was the gist of the paragraph. Certainly that is not how it's coming out. And I'm going to have to deal with it accordingly. Yeah. Yeah. We rhyme. We have reached out to rich Gannon who was a catcher for the Red Sox and Bill Buckner playing first base, Wally Backman was the next you know, I'm from that. So we're we're trying to effort all these players as well to see what what they heard. What do you do you foresee players coming out from those two teams are maybe some fans, and and having your side of this saying, yes, they did here is because the way you make it sound as he was screaming at so many people should have heard this. Yeah. I mean, you know, that will be up to them. I'm just trying to in the book, and the reason I chose the paragraph is because of my memory of those times, you know, I do not feel that I miss remember anything. I certainly wouldn't put this in a book just to a sensationalize that I think my reputation as who I am. It's not that kind of person. So I'm gonna stick behind my story. And I don't know where else I can take that other than I wrote something on a stand behind it. And as things come in. I'll have to. Reacting in whatever way that people react. But that's you know, my memory of the situation of guys. And and that's where I'm at talking to Ron darling. Mets analysts for S N Y World Series champion and author of one hundred eight stitches loose threads, ripping yarns and the darndest characters from my time in the game with us on the shell Pennzoil performance line. One of the other things that Lenny just mentioned yesterday when he joined the Michael Kay show. Was that you've never been a fan of his what was your guys relationship? Like when you were players. What's it been like since then for this kind of thing to come up behind it? Yeah. That that's a complete falsehood. Fact one he was trying to to the players magazine. Which was okay is I don't know how many years ago, I was one of the first people that he reached out to try to help them with adventure. So I don't know, you know, what he thinks relationship was I had absolutely no problem with Lenny ever in his career. You know, one of the greatest players ever played for the Mets. But you know, that's what I remember from that night. And you know, that's that's what I'm sticking with Ron darling. Joining us now the book is one hundred and eight stitches his memories of the game. And of course, there's one memory one passage specifically that has garnered a lot of attention. You said a lot of players have texted you and had your back or any of them willing to come forward and say, yeah, we heard that too. Yeah. I haven't talked to them since I was up at five o'clock and saw the tax. I certainly to call anyone. Back. I don't know that I don't know that I think moving forward that would certainly. Helped my cars. But I certainly don't wanna get chapter Lenny foods that situation. He's very prolific. And and speaking and defending himself. I just you know, he's there's been a lot of things he said regarding me, and I'll just have to react as they come. I don't you know. I don't know. What else I can say other than to say what I wrote is what I remember. And and as things come in. Hopefully that'll be backed up talking to Ron darling again World Series champ, author of one hundred and eight stitches, and certainly that's this is what happens round as you all know when you write a book when there are alligators are accusations against a person or a team or something. Now are gonna come back on it as well as far. So this is what specific to game three of the World Series. You are teammate though with Dykstra, obviously more than just that game. Had you heard him at other times using this kind of language directed toward other minorities. Certainly Lenny had his own way of speaking out his own way of. A being that cutting edge kind of person. I heard many things from Lenny I think with regard to this. You know, what I was trying to emphasize new paragraph that despite kind of ashamed now, a fifty seven year old person at that time is probably no one showing harder when he gets home run against all boy. So you know, that that was I was I was hoping would be the just a paragraph, but certainly it has not become that Ron darling with us on the shell Pennzoil performance line taking synthetic motor oil performance to a whole new level. Make the switch to Pennzoil synthetics today. You mentioned that you weren't proud of your complicit nece in that moment. And being a part of that. I mean the rest of the Eighty-six met season that year we've heard a lot about in the past. Is there anything else along the way, and that you bring up in the book or just in general that you look back, and sort of cringe in the same manner with I I? I don't cringe at the way the team played certainly, but I I do Clinton trip. Some of of you know, inaction guys couldn't be as bad as action in in in retrospect now that I look back on it. So plenty of my inaction in writing this book in the last couple of years, but certainly a lot of things that have happened in the landscape sports were a lot of people have put themselves on the line and taking action. I certainly wasn't brave enough or strong enough to to do that myself. So that's probably all this kind of came from when I wrote this one of the one hundred stories Ron darling with us does work for the Mets and has also written a book with that has gone and a lot of attention over a controversial passage leading into game. Three Lenny Dykstra went on the Michael Kay show yesterday. I know you heard it and said like he plans to sue. And he was very specific of what he would do if he saw you in public. So what would you say to Lenny Dykstra? If you had a chance if you had a chance to sit. It down to Lenny. What would you say to him? Well, I I know I did not see the Michael Kay show. But I know about the threat and those uncomfortable one wants to be threatened, and I don't think that this point. I would say anything somebody not a thing after sets. Well, Ron obviously a lot of people are going to zero in on this. This is really started a bit of a firestorm. But as you mentioned one hundred eight stitches, so you got you got a lot of stories in there. What else are people are going to get out of this book? Well, I'm hoping thanks for the question. Mike, I think, you know, my intention was I thought about this book, many moons ago about twelve years ago, and I saw that the hundred stitches are what make up a baseball. I tried to have each story. Kind of stitch to the other connected to the stories and personalities. And that at the end of my thirty years now, or whether any of former they'll be stories that the people enjoy a about people that I've met in my life that have inspired me. And and and maybe a better player, and hopefully a better person, Ron we appreciate you being with us. This morning understand. Arguably are obviously why we have to ask what we had to ask about their on. All listen, you have to do your job. And I totally understand that I'm on your side, occasionally, doing your stuff, and and thank you for trading in an obsessional way. Now, it's it's just it's gotten a lot of attention. So we appreciate you coming on. And and short sharing your side of how you remember what had happened, and we'll see what happens in that specific situation going forward. But the book is one hundred and eight stitches Ron Eighty-six Mets one of the most interesting teams I ever saw in my entire life in terms of major league baseball. And this book goes into great deal about some of the things that went on behind the scenes, they're wrong. We appreciate you being with us. Morning. Thanks. Thank you very much. So again, we have we have feelers out for rich Cadman the catcher for the Red Sox. Bill Buckner played first base, Wally Backman was in the on deck circle there or was next up. So anybody that may have been around to possibly here or not here. What what was said? And again, he said people and and teammates are calling and texting in the backing him up. And if that's the case. Some of those welcome publicans say it, and we'll see what happens going forward. So there's a lot to react to what we just heard from Ron darling. We'll get to that. Plus, we'll have your chance to join.

Ron darling Lenny Lenny Dykstra Michael Kay Kentucky shell Pennzoil Mets John Calipari baseball Lenny Kevin Mitchell Bill Buckner Wally Backman university of Kentucky Red Sox basketball LeBron Pennzoil Fenway park
"seventeen eighteen" Discussed on The Bone 102.5

The Bone 102.5

06:18 min | 3 years ago

"seventeen eighteen" Discussed on The Bone 102.5

"Now at winn-dixie that should blow your mind more than anything. I've told you in the hour and seventeen eighteen minutes. We've been on the air today they opened up an alternate checkout lanes. So that they could get people checked out more efficiently and quickly at winn-dixie. You might have still been meditating. I don't think that really probably vision. I wanted to to snap it to live it to show people that really happened. But I was afraid if I pulled out a mobile device that it might all disappear in front of me. Dixie is like if they're so busy, and you have to go over to where they sell the lottery tickets, go get Mattie for trying to go over there. Not this lady the lady right there. She's the one who called free enforcement. She's the one who opened up more lanes, and she was calling out the employee by name. Tyrel time to get off. Breaking get on the catch. Lydia, lydia. Please report to the front. We got a code want to check out. She got all of her fellow workers out of the back and opening up lanes for people to be checked out quickly. I bet you that winn-dixie doesn't make a pass twenty nineteen seventy seven five seven nine one zero two five eight hundred seven one one or two five to rather live who are you? Hey, what's up, man? All right. Hey, real quick. It's actually not as far as you think to start started church. I think has become ordained which you can do online. You have to have one like the treasurer or some other. Somebody like that. Any Faye Bakker if you will? Yeah. She's still alive. Please tell me she passed that sucks. Us on my favorite regulars at TGI Fridays diet coke with lemon every Sunday. At a place where you congregate would be your church or temple and now would become tactics. Who wouldn't wanna come to watch NFL football every single game NFL ticket on giant screens in a building that you don't have to pay anything for, you know, communion you drink the blood of Christ. Well, all respect to the Christians. We don't happen to believe in the Jesus myth, so whatever liquor you want to believe the blood of your maker. If you believe that Yeager Meister is God's saliva and you want to drink that down. If you believe that Bud Light, whatever snacks you want feast upon a communion wafer because that's the embodiment of Christ. No. It's not chicken wings are lasagna is tacos are bond, me, whatever you got. Hey, man, I'm in it. I would give twenty dollars a week. Mike hiding offers your all your offer is very much appreciated. We'll reserve a plaque for you and a place in the afterlife. Thank you. I went to this church. Once they had these big huge giant piping hot fresh baked loaves of bread for the body of Christ. You just rip off a piece and dip it in the wind. It was so good to listen. Like. Good power of Christ compels you. I think that's what you're supposed to say an extra system and instead of exercising. We'll exercise everybody gets a free gym membership. Our church has a gym as well and everybody gets a free gym membership with training sauna. Yep. Room sauna cold plunge. Yeah. I've been hearing about a Turkish sauna, you know, anything about that. No me. Neither. Thanks. I've just been hearing about it. There's one at safety harbor. I want to go check it. What a Turkish. There's a Turkish on that. I think it's just a giant sauna. Like, we're a bunch of people are in it together. Like a lot. That's your dream. Yeah. Tammy Faye died. No seven by the way. Oh, seven seven. Yeah. Already dead for twelve years sixty five third break, the news, dude. She got so comfortable with me that she would come in without her wig and makeup. I I consider that such a huge step. She ever cried for any. Oh, yeah. She was she would I would wait on Jim was in jail. Well, she's very vulnerable. There's no she passed. You guys were so close we were back in ninety ninety one. Her son was very Email and any later, I think had some sort of reality show. Yeah. She's a nice lady. There were kids in the nineties. Oh, yeah. We just know to call me more kids yet. Disturb back then. Yeah, I think it was. I think we said future school shooters do not alive. Hello. Hello, drew. Hi. Are you doing today, sir? I'm great, buddy. Thank you very much enlightened. How about you? I'm doing very well. I actually wanted to comment on what you said, you're entirely, right. You couldn't be more. Right. As a matter of fact, if you're not living to be happy, you're wasting your life. Well, yeah. And I never understood the fear of God thing because like, okay, I get it. Like, you got to do something to get people to believe. But why would you think that from birth to death? We're supposed to suffer. So that God knows that we love him. We have to obstain from things to show some higher power that we have restraint, and we will put nothing else before him. I don't get that mentality at all. And I don't think that's why we're hearing if I'm wrong may I burn in a fiery pit of hell for all eternity. But I think that we're supposed to be happy while we're here. Just try not to screw other people over in the interest of your own happiness. Exactly. And I did kinda wanna bring in another perspective. So what you're thinking the creator, maybe instead of aliens, maybe like a higher dimensional being. I never said aliens, by the way, I don't I think what we term as aliens is anything outside we know as earth, but we're both right. It's an alien. It's another we can't fathom what created us. It's the reason. Religion exists. We need it to be God, we need to call it God. But what you call God. Or that guy calls inter dimensional beings. Are you call aliens? It's it's all something that gave us life. And we owe it nothing more than gratitude to say thank you for creating our life. But you're supposed to live yours and be happy. I think seven two seven five seven nine one zero two five and eight hundred seven seven one one zero two five to live who are you? Zac, what's up, Zac? Yeah. Weird that while you guys were talking about aliens, all of a sudden my phone gave me a an update that there was a history channel show called the blue book project coming on tonight, by Robertson. Look up John. The book project. Okay. Thank you. Was because.

winn-dixie NFL Zac Lydia Tammy Faye Faye Bakker Dixie Bud Light Mattie treasurer Yeager Meister Mike John Jim Robertson seventeen eighteen minutes twenty dollars
"seventeen eighteen" Discussed on The Working Experience

The Working Experience

03:42 min | 3 years ago

"seventeen eighteen" Discussed on The Working Experience

"They're just they're just they just been they've been beaten by a stick and vote is depress. It's a press event getting put out to pasture when you're like fifty five now, we don't need anymore. Stan thanks, though. And here's a gold plated watch. Well level. O'briens for you. And well, you know, I was just gonna say it was kind of funny. I you know, we're reading into the wild. And he was really into transcendental Azam throw and all that Chris mccandless. So I it's a little project is said to the kids. All right. You know, here these tenants transcendental ISM create your own little community get into groups and give me a rule that everybody has to do once a day once a week once a month once a year in your transcendental community like something specific, and I had in mind like you have to meditate for an hour a day or once a week, you have to give up two hours to work at a charity, or whatever is in this. The these are juniors and seniors seventeen eighteen years old and they're walking around like, okay. What did you guys come up with for like once a week as kid goes grocery shopping? No. I mean, another group put take a shower of like, look, look, look, look let let's take certain things as Rhett that we're gonna shower go grocery shopping. That's not what I mean like more elevated, and then I thought well, they are like seventeen eighteen years old. I guess this is part of the exercise is trying to get them to think a little on a little higher plan. They are. But. Yeah. I mean, even that which sorry go ahead. I was gonna say they come out with interesting responses that sometimes I think all right. Don't get aggravated. Like, this is part of the learning process. I I hope so. Well, yeah, it's it's it's about, you know, learning than ages learning trying stuff failing repeating succeeding repeating in. It's it's good even asked that question at that age, you know, to to figure out like what you you know, what you want out of out of life. Like, what do you? What do you wanna do? What do you wanna be will? You know? I play the clip that Denzel Washington starts off with talking about technology in these like, you know, is is your he's a really smart guy on his. He's afford him grad other. That's right. That's right. He he's he was like, you know, is your technology. Are you using your technology or technology using you and he's? Like, what does it really four? Like, what is it? What's really the purpose? Or what are we using it for and then they actually Joe Rogan talking about a lot of what we've talked about ad nauseam. You know, people working these jobs that they don't really like for the stuff. They don't really want, and blah, blah, blah. I played it for them as six minutes and this kid looks at me he goes. Yeah. Mr Kerr, we've we've heard all of this. But like how are you supposed to avoid that? And I was like, oh, I, you know, I don't really know what to tell you. I realized you know, this kid's seventeen eighteen years old. And I'm like, you don't really have to map your whole life right now. But you know, something food for thought. So it's I mean, it's it's a very valid question because you know, you're being bombarded with messages advertising messages, you know, hundreds thousands.

Denzel Washington Chris mccandless Stan Joe Rogan Azam Mr Kerr Rhett seventeen eighteen years six minutes two hours