24 Burst results for "Seven Thousand Years"

Plant of The Week: Bristlecone Pine

Plant Of The Week

04:07 min | 5 months ago

Plant of The Week: Bristlecone Pine

"With a plan of the week mark is one that is of structure it is a good nature. And it's very specially grown here at my house. It is one of the oldest plants on earth as far as anybody knows they're they're assuming that between four and seven thousand years old. They won't even tell the public where the tree is out on the west coast and then there are others in the two thousand to four thousand year range. I don't know who can tell anybody's been living. That long probably is not able to write much but at the same time they can do borings they can do various tests bristlecone pine is normally in the eight to twenty foot. Now that makes it a small tree for for your consideration also on rare occasion given extreme age they'll hit up into the fifty foot plus range but very very very slowly. I happen to have one that It was ready unique. It fell off the truck when it was delivered to the nursery but forty years ago. and it's Got badly broken onside matter of fact or one side off so all of a sudden now. There's a plant this just The one eighty part. I thought well. Now here's the chance. I took it home brought it home. I finished proper pruning of it. And i planted on a west facing brick wall between my porch and garage door. It is presently now mrs about a forty year period. It's presently standing. Maybe six and a half to seven feet tall. It is leaning against the brick wall. The west afternoon sun gives it the brilliant son that it needs. Then it's the hang which. I was delighted with the way. It took a hold It's it's pretty dry. Under most overhangs and with sufficient inadequate initially it took a whole and it grew like crazy about four inches a year. and that that's one of the beauties of it it's a rather Sculptured tree now you. You could look at that as a well. Let you say any of several words for recommendations. But it's irregular it's decorative and in my case. I've trimmed it to stay along the wall now. It isn't much to trim probably every other year. I have to be sure nothing on the side. Branches are sticking out beyond about ten inches from the wall. I don't want it to be able to pull itself away from the wall. Should we get snow or ice. Or whatever on it I have only anchored in two places over the long haul and rest of. It is handled with pruning and i won. One landscape showed up at my house a long time ago and was lamenting the fact that he needed to plant exactly like that and i said well you can have mine at the right price. Yeah he said. What's the right price. And i told him and he said okay. I'll have a truck here monday morning. Whoa whoa not serious. Not certain beauty now you can grow it. let's just say you're regularly It does require son and then the beauty of it is you. Don't handle darn near any soil now not not excessively wet by any means it prefers out west growing it well. The big one is untold is a very rocky gravelly soil. Sandy When it rains which is not too often it will soak up enough water down deep enough that the roots can stay alive until the next rain which may be a whole year or some portion thereof so anyhow a very tolerant plant very very interesting and I highly recommend it. But don't don't don't plan where you need to get screening from the neighbor in short order because it isn't going to happen that way.

West Coast
Humans Have Caused the Most Dramatic Climate Change in 3 Million Years

The Science Show

11:14 min | 9 months ago

Humans Have Caused the Most Dramatic Climate Change in 3 Million Years

"Recently Assad with some research colleagues at the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research, a look at a brand new science article in which are climate model for the first time had recreated the climate on earth over the last three million years, which covers the entire geological pleistocene epoch. The Pleistocene is so important as it constitutes a point of reference for life on. Earth. Because although sure our planet has existed for four point, five, billion years it's only in the last million years. That earth has looked at least roughly in the way as we know it, the continents were roughly where they are today. The North and South Poles were covered with ice. The atmosphere had a similar chemical composition to what we have today. Planet, Earth. Our earth has only existed for three million years. All, comparisons further back in time are quite meaningless. And the manuscript I hold in my hand is not just reaching. My brain is also striking straight into my heart. A deep humility settles in when look at the graph showing the variations in mean global temperature on earth over the past three, million years it shows that we have never throughout the whole plasticine exceeded two degrees global warming compared to our pre industrial average temperature of approximately fourteen degrees. Never. This means that Earth despite all the stresses and natural shocks from fluctuations and Solar Radiation Volcanic eruptions, asteroid impacts and earthquakes has regulated itself within an incredibly narrow range minus four degrees. Celsius were in deep ice age plus two degree Celsius. We're in a warm interglacial period lasting three million years. It's absolutely incredible. Especially since we know why. It's earth's ability to self regulate the ability of the oceans to absorb and store heat the ability of the ice sheets to reflect solar radiation the ability of the forests to absorb carbon dioxide and the ability to be a safe and store greenhouse gases. The planet is a biophysical self playing piano whose music sheet stays. Within the minus four plus to scale. If that is not caused for humidity than I do not know what humidity is. And a deep concern in hundred and fifty years. In the geological blink of an eye, we risk now tearing this Planetary Symphony to shreds. Let that sink in. The global average temperature is now changing hundred and seventy times faster than over the last seven thousand years and it's doing. So in the wrong direction upwards when the current orbital forcing meaning are distance to the sun and the current low level of solar activity means that the temperature should in fact, be slowing down. You don't have to be a physicist to understand that we have a problem. Climate skeptics like to argue that historically the climate has fluctuated so much. So why shouldn't it be fluctuating now? Obviously. It fluctuates. But we are now racing towards plus three to plus four degrees warming. Sceptics like to bring up the little ice age the time when Swedish King Call The tenth Gustav Marched His army across the deep frozen great belt and the little belt in sixteen fifty eight to beat the Danes or that the vikings grew grapes in Greenland during the medieval warm period. Yes. Of course, this is true but it all occurred within the natural boundaries of minus four and plus two degrees. And it's here within this sweet spot that we must remain for our own sakes and our future? In August two, thousand, eighteen at the peak of that year's drought and fires in Sweden and Europe. We published a scientific paper where we tried to establish whether we are at risk of pushing the entire planet away from its current state of equilibrium, the Holocene epoch where we have been since the last ice age. This is fundamental. Our Planet Earth can be in three different states. It can be in a deep ice age as it was twenty thousand years ago with large is. Extending over the northern and Southern Hemisphere with over two kilometers of ice above our heads here in Sweden an ice extending as far south as Berlin. This is an equilibrium state as it is not only lower solar radiation that keeps earth in an ice age. It is also the feedbacks caused by ice. As the ice sheets grow earth gets whiter, which means that more more incoming heat from the sun is reflected back to space more ice means it gets colder which means even more is and suddenly you have a self reinforcing mechanism. This is what makes an ice age and equilibrium earth remains. They're not only because of the external forces from the sun but also thanks to these inbuilt biophysical processes in this case, the color of ice. Earth can also be in an interglacial an intermediate state, which is what we have today where was still have permanent is sites at the polls and we have glaciers on land and the biosphere with forests, grasslands, and lakes roughly as Earth as we know it. It is these two equilibrium states and only these two states that the planet has been over the last three million years that is during the entire Pleistocene. But then there is a third state when earth tips over from self cooling feedback loops to self heating feedback loops, which leads to an inevitable journey to becoming a hot tropical planet that is four, five, six, potentially seven, eight degrees warmer than today where in principle, all the ice has gone and the surface of the ocean is more than fifty meters higher than it is today and where the conditions for live is fundamentally different all over the entire planet. This is what we call hothouse earth. Or Highs Zaid hot time in German where the article when we published it drew so much attention doing this burning heat wave in the summer of twenty eighteen that highs Zaid was chosen as the word of the year in Germany. In this research, we tried for the first time to identify the global mean temperature at which we are in danger of tipping over from our current state, the Holocene interglacial, and embarking on a journey that would inevitably take us to highlight our conclusion is that we cannot exclude that the planetary threshold. The tipping point where we kickoff unstoppable processes of self amplified warming is at two degrees. Bear in mind we are today at one point one very mind were moving fast along a path that reaches one point five in potentially only twenty, thirty years and two degrees in forty fifty years. This is one I would argue of the biggest. Challenges of all to test whether we are right. Can the planet cope with or Canet not cope with higher temperatures than two degrees? But. My conclusion based on the knowledge we have today is that the planetary threshold to avoid triggering high Zaid is most likely at two degrees. Of course, it's not so that Earth will fall off a cliff at two degrees. The risk is rather that we would then pass a threshold where the shift towards hindsight would become unstoppable. In other words, we face an urgency at the timeframe whether we pushed the on button on not triggering stoppable warming is within the next few decades meaning essentially. Now, if we pressed the UNBUTTON and kick off the great planetary machinery with feedback loops causing self warming, then the full impacts may play out over three four, five, hundred years before we reach a new equilibrium state hothouse. A planet with over ten meters, sea level rise temperatures, and extreme droughts, floods, and heatwaves making large parts of earth uninhabitable a planet we do not want a planet that cannot support US humans. This requires from us that we understand two different time horizons. The short term time of commitment. When do we push the unbutton but then also the long term time horizon when we have the full impact hitting on people these are different but ethically, I would argue only the trigger moment counts, we cannot leave a damaged planet beyond repair to future generations. So to summarize the decisive moment when we press don't press the button lies within the next ten to twenty years. With consequences for all future generations a moral, bum. Are High site article concluded that degree Celsius is our ultimate planetary threshold that we need to stay away from. This article actually came out six months before our climate modeling showed that we've never exceeded two degrees throughout the whole pleistocene, the last three million years. In Two thousand nine, our planetary boundaries size showed that one point five degrees is a boundary we should not transgress because then we enter a danger zone of uncertainty. So perhaps you do understand my feeling a deep concern of humility in the face of our latest scientific findings, which really only says, one thing tipping points are real and if they're crossed, they lead to unstoppable changes, which requires a new relationship between us and our planet, and that we realize that we are facing a new ethics. What we do today will determine the future on earth for all our children and their children.

Zaid Sweden Potsdam Institute For Climate Assad Physicist Holocene Europe Gustav Vikings United States Canet Southern Hemisphere Germany Berlin
"seven thousand years" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

Newsradio 1200 WOAI

01:32 min | 1 year ago

"seven thousand years" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

"Queen seven thousand years ago you think listeners say improvements are being incredibly anything criminally you know are happening up until this point but then on the next big changes sixteen sixty three when John grant I think that's how you correctly spell a ground of very British Orton examined information about mortality rates because there you move on a plague was just ravaging the just the entire area at the time and he decided he wanna know more information about like how what is happening here exactly how many people are getting affected why are they getting infected let's get information and we can start solving this yeah that sounds that sounds sensible is the least you could do right now we I don't know have we ever talked on the show about just how profoundly the plague the series of things known as the plague change the world no I've listened to a little too much stuff you missed in history class about it so the information sometimes gets model between what we've talked about and what I've just heard these plays have played such a profile and role in the global evolution of the human species this is crazy is the kind of stuff you want to keep track on so this guy John Groth becomes the father of statistics reconsider that because he does the first statistical data analysis that we have recordings of any has a book about it called natural and political observations made upon the bills of mortality Canada.

Orton plague John Groth
Bored?  Games!

Your Brain on Facts

09:20 min | 1 year ago

Bored? Games!

"A lot of playing board games these days and that's pretty fitting human making board games for a long time like a long longtime seven thousand years or more for a bit of historical context. We stopped hunter-gathering and settled down to be farmers about ten thousand years ago rather than try to cram seven thousand years in six occupied continents worth of history into a half hour podcast. I'll hit some of the high points. Especially the less well-known once the earliest gaming pieces ever found are forty nine. Small carved painted stones found a five thousand year old burial mound in southeast Turkey. Similar pieces have been found in Syria and Iraq and seemed to point devoid games originating in the Fertile Crescent. You remember the Fertile Crescent from the first week of world history class. It's the same region discovered alcohol invented papyrus and made calendars all of which you need. If you're hosting game night other early dice games were created by painting a single side of a flat. Stick these sticks would be tossed at once and that would be your role Mesopotamia. Dice were made from a variety of materials including carved knuckle bones would painted stones and turtle shells. No wonder folks used to say roll them bones dice from the Roman era. Looks like the six sided die. We use today though. Some of them had their corners. Cut off to be able to reach a higher number not unlike dungeons and dragons dice. Imagine excavating a distant Roman out host and finding a D twenty serious cricket board games became popular among the Pharaohs of Ancient Egypt. And that shouldn't surprise. That board games were a bigger part of life for upper class people since they have both money for entertainment and time to play. Even before the first dynasty Egypt loved a game called Senate. It's even seen on. The walls of tombs and copies of the game are buried with noble people. Ancient Egyptians were strong believers in the concept of fate. And that your luck in the game of Senate meant that you were under the protection of the major gods of the Pantheon raw toe to toe Cyrus. The significance of the game is clear. The game play not as clear. Historians have made educated guesses as to the rules more on that later and Board Game. Companies have used those guesses as a jumping off place to make modern versions. Four Games also became tied into religious beliefs. One such game was Mahan played around three thousand. B C e Mahan was a protective God depicted as a snake with coils around the Sun God raw during his journey through the night the game and the God became intertwined. Tim Kendall and ancient Egyptian historian believes that it's not possible to know for sure with the information we have available whether the game was inspired by an existing deity or the Deity was inspired by the game. Many people think backgammon is the longest plate of all the board games with evidence that it existed around two thousand B C but there is an extant game. That is a little bit older. Relatively speaking the royal game of for the game gets its name from being found in the royal tombs of in Iraq. There was also a set found in Pharaoh. Tutankhamun tune the game. Play is simple but very familiar. You're trying to get all of your pieces around the board first thumping off your opponent's pieces along the way again. Proving there's nothing new under the Sun. The royal game of herb was played with four sided or tetrahedral dice. A D Four for the tabletop games out there. Even though the game's over four thousand years old amazingly we found a copy of the rules Irving Finkel the British museum deciphered cuneiform tablet and discovered. It was the rules for the Royal Game of Earth. He then saw a photograph of a nearly identical board game being played in modern India. That makes the Royal Game of Earth. The longest played game in history and there is a great video of Irving Finkel. Who has ever so pleasantly mad teaching youtuber or Tom Scott how to play Lincoln the show notes and a little clip right here. Because I just couldn't help myself. All sorts of evidence has come to live so that we know how this game was played and we can play it now with a great deal of excitement. Sometimes it brings out violence. Come Times it brings out savagery. I have to say that this so we've decided to bring in a member of the public. I can't remember the name on Tom. Scott I make videos about science technology in the world. Who's never paid this game before? I have never played this game before. I'm Gandhi swift overview of the walls. Hope he masses and I'm getting to play of course play gently at first because I don't say hi to hang I'm to wipe the floor with it wouldn't do it for me even discovered these rules and I'll throw in his mind. Game listing whitlow. Marta is similar to that question of modern. There were some minor differences s today. Each player has fifteen checkers and uses six sided dice to be the first to bear off. All of one's checkers. I confess that I am reading that. From a website verbatim. I know less about that. Yemen do cricket. Backgammon had a renewed surge of popularity in the nineteen sixties which is held longtime for a comeback. Thanks in part to the charisma of Prince Alexis. Obolensky the father of modern backgammon cigarette liquor and car. Companies began to sponsor tournaments and Hugh Hefner held backgammon parties at the Playboy Mansion. At the same time that the Romans were playing Latin backgammon. The Chinese were play. We she or you may have heard of it. Go Que- she may even predate the game of twelve markings and the royal game of Earth. According to legend which has a pesky habit of morphing into history quay g was created by the ancient Chinese. Emperor Yell to teach his son on Ju discipline. Concentration and balance the popularity of wage e grew throughout Eastern Asia especially in Japan. Which is where the name go comes from another ancient game which is still out there and a favourite of nearly every household in my family is the African game of Mangala in our modern parlance. Munkala refers to a specific game. But the name actually belongs to an entire genre of games a genre eight hundred traditional games strong. This family of Board Games is played around. The world is referred to as Sewing Games S. O. W. I N. G. Devotes the way that you pick up and drop the stones playing pieces like you were sowing seeds in the ground. The word Mukalla comes from the Arabic Nicola to move most one college games share a common structure where each player has gained pieces in divots on the board and moves them to capture their opponent's pieces leading them to also be called count and capture games. The boards can be wooden clay even just little holes in the dirt playing pieces of everything from seeds. Stones shells anything near at hand that fits in the holes. The earliest evidence of the game are fragments of pottery. Board found in Eritrea dated to the sixth century CE. Though if the games were played with seeds on wooden boards or pebbles in divots in the dirt the game could be even older. The absence of evidence is not evidence of absence after all that particular logical fallacy is called argument from ignorance at ignorant him. And it's not a good look now. We go to the land of ice and snow of the Midnight Sun. Where the hot springs flow Scandinavians played chess. Like game called. Nevin tough at least as early as four hundred see. I'm sure my clever listeners haven't forgotten that. Viking refers to the raids undertaken by a small portion of the population themselves called Viking US meaning kings table noth- Atoll was a war strategy game. The kings objective was to escape to the edge of the board while the opponents laurel objective was to capture him. The attacking force had the natural advantage at the start of each game. Perhaps mimicking a cultural mindset of a small group being victorious against a larger force like say a few boats full of Viking attacks against the army of an English King Scandinavians spread the game to Ireland Britain and Wales through. Let's call it. Unexpected cultural exchange archaeologists have also discovered that it was popular as far to the east as Ukraine.

Backgammon Tom Scott Iraq Mahan Senate Fertile Crescent Irving Finkel Turkey Pharaohs Of Ancient Egypt Syria Tim Kendall Egypt Prince Alexis India Hugh Hefner Eastern Asia Midnight Sun United States Eritrea
Ancient Artifacts on the Beaches of Northern Europe

Science Magazine Podcast

07:47 min | 1 year ago

Ancient Artifacts on the Beaches of Northern Europe

"Now speak with Andrew Curry a freelance journalist based in Berlin. His new article in science explores hidden treasures that have surfaced on the coast of the Netherlands. They include such things as neanderthal tools. A willy mammoth tooth and human remains from thousands of years ago. These remarkable fines lending significant insight into the ecological and anthropological history of the region. Hi Andrew All right. The story highlights a variety of people from a nurse to university professors who were studying the samples from vastly different perspectives. Generally speaking who were the scientists involved in the research so it's kind of an incredible array of different disciplines that are being brought to bear on the same questioner region there geneticists archaeologists geographers people who specialize in underwater mapping. And then. There's also one of the things that really interested me in a story. There's a big contribution being made by amateurs interested in the fines and spend time just looking for the stuff on each where it washes up right so these things are just washing up on shore. What are some of the most compelling fines that have been dredged up so some of the most compelling fines are stone and bone tools and human remains that date back seven thousand or more years ago some of which goes all the way back to fifty thousand years when the the area was populated by neanderthals? They're also finding animal remains. They found Bama's skulls all kinds of things that date back to a time when the shore off the Netherlands and the UK in the North Sea was actually above water. So how are these finds turning up on the beach in the first place? It used to be that these finds would turn up in fishing nets and sort of at random but in the last few years as the Netherlands has really focused on coastal reclamation and protecting their coast against sea level rise. They've been dredging sand and gravel offshore and bringing it and dumping it on the beach and in those massive hundreds of thousands of tons of sand and gravel that they've brought in from offshore there are bones stone tools human remains that slowly then get uncovered by the waves and they're amateurs who go out to the beach every day almost and just look for the stuff as it as it comes out of the sand. Pick it up. Send pictures of it to archaeologists then identify it and they work together to analysts. Awesome and like you said. These fines are eating found by all these different types of people. Could you outline some of the techniques being used to analyze the fines? There's actually geneticists who are scraping DNA straight off the sea floor and showing what kind of plants and animals live there when it was terrestrial land. The fines are one aspect of the whole effort. Devoted to trying to figure out what the landscape under the North Sea looked like before the last ice age ended and flooded the area so at one point there was an area three or four times bigger than Modern Day Holland. That was all above ground. There were forests there were rivers and it was probably heavily populated. Sounds pretty beautiful actually. Yeah what kind of DNA is being analyzed. So geneticists are using ancient DNA techniques to look at both the soil to get DNA from there and also analyzing human remains. The collectors have found on the beach. That are actually really well preserved because of the cold and wet at the bottom of the sea to get whole human genomes and you can then look at the ancient. Dna from these populations that lived in an area that is now underwater very cool. There's a specific item that surface that holds huge significance. And that's the landscape of the area being studied. What are some of the most important lessons learned about the landscape of this submerged region? I mean part of it is just that it's cool to go is one of the researchers. I talked to said. They're getting maps of a country that you can't visit so there's this massive landscape that was once above water and they're testing out all these different ways to look at it could also be applied to other coastal regions. That were once habitable. That were once passages to new lands like the landscape between Alaska and Asia for example Barron. Jia they call it yeah and look at how you know how these areas worked for human migration how humankind spread around the world. There are these key gaps in our knowledge because the sea levels today are thirty meters higher than they were twenty five thousand years ago right and you mentioned these maps that they're able to make out of information being collected and one of the sources of that information are these energy companies. Could you explain how these energy companies are contributing to the data collection? And what that data help discover sure. It's been a really interesting and sort of inspirational collaboration. Between scientists and industry in the North Sea is a is a tremendously important commercial area for shipping. And then there's a lot of wind farms oil. Well gas well drilling and so companies went out and did these seismic surveys to see what was deep under the ground. And for the archaeologists it was a very top level. That wasn't maybe commercially. Valuable but tremendously valuable. In terms of the knowledge it contains about the landscapes so they worked with the companies to get that data. And then we're able to start. These maps based on seismic survey data. There's also been some interesting collaboration. Between companies that dredged gravel for construction use and then led archaeologists have access to the stones and dirt that are dragged up from the bottom of the sea which was once land these maps and some of this information really revealing what humans were like thousands of years ago what civilization was like before this landscape changed. So what did this region? What does this research teach us about human history? The very end of this landscape was populated by modern humans. Just like you and me who were hunter gatherers. At first they were in a landscape that was probably a lot like the most fertile parts of England were Hollander Belgium today and then slowly over a couple of hundred years. Some of the research has revealed that as the water levels rose it transformed into more of estuary wetland area but people kept living there and they managed to adapt and change their lifestyle to the rising seas which I guess goes to show you. The climate change is an old story of course that that begs the question right. This begs the question of sea level. Rise impacted these civilizations and we can see it. Is that going to tell us? About our present. On the one hand they managed to deal with a certain level of sea level rise and then there came a point about seven thousand years ago when there were a series of nominees and the landscape completely disappeared. It was rendered uninhabitable su-nam as that's That's pretty familiar. Actually yeah I mean for a while. Archaeologists were reluctant to get into this one expert. Told me because they didn't want to be seen as digging after chasing after lost continents or Atlantis or something like that. But as the techniques have gotten more and more advanced it turns out that they can do some really scientific

North Sea The Netherlands Andrew Curry Andrew All Berlin Alaska Modern Day Holland Bama Hollander Belgium Asia UK Barron England
"seven thousand years" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

06:12 min | 2 years ago

"seven thousand years" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"May be one of the most competitive tennis matches we've seen in some time at Wimbledon right now there's a semi final going on between Rafael Nadal and Roger Federer again and setter took the first set the doll white them up in the second one in there betters leads the third but this is just some of these rallies have been twenty twenty one twenty two shots back and forth these guys are gonna be exhausted this is a semi finals whoever wins this obviously is going to go into the and to finally think on Sunday but just fantastic tennis going on not that you should leave the show to watch tennis or anything will watch it what is it with you tennis crickets already all these alternative sports I said this any competitive sport yeah as long as it's played well I will watch and Little League World Series doesn't it does bother me I mean because there's kids know how to play it's exciting soccer cricket but curling is fantastic as well toward of France as they say in France that's on right now and I've been watching that every night they were telling a story side note tell us to one of the guys just whole story was racing in the early eighties and I don't remember I think he was talking about Greg LeMond and how he fell behind one one leg because he was sick and ended up as he said with an explosive balle movement in the middle of the stage now and kept racing and then ended up winning the stage with just okay we can imagine you don't need a word picture there's not a lot of protection back in that area there was earth quake again this morning magnitude four point nine another aftershock with the ice cream challenge everybody what's that the ice cream challenge is a social media sensation where yes people are going into the grocery stores and getting ice cream opening it licking at the top and putting the cover back on and putting ice cream back in the freezer walking away now we've got a woman who has been caught posting on social media her actions inside a doctor's office where she sees a jar full of those tongue depressor is the popsicle stick type things and it's got a sign on it that says please do not touch medical supplies thank you and so she takes she she touches all of them with her hand and she takes one out licks it and puts it back and post this with the caption don't tell me how to live my life well along the along the lines of dumb ideas being spread on social media have you heard of the area fifty one rate that's being planned for September now three hundred thousand people have signed up to physically storm area fifty one in an attempt to get at them aliens so what was it you said yesterday when we were doing Bible talk about god promising never to flood the earth again after Noah you know that's a good I might it might be looking for a good flood that it might be time today in Chicago an indictment was unsealed against your friend Robert R. Kelly facing sex abuse charges brought by the Illinois prosecutors these are far and above anything that we had seen to this point the indictment includes charges of racketeering kidnapping forced labor sexual exploitation of a child and it says that R. Kelly and his managers his bodyguards in some of his other employees were picking out women and girls at concerts we've heard that story before arranging them for to to travel to see our Callie and then they would also set the rules that the women and the girls had to follow things like nobody leaves their room unless our Kelly gives you permission you got all of Daddy as well and you can't look at other men now there is a separate thirteen count indictment that was filed in Chicago federal court the details all of the efforts to cover up sexually explicit videos of R. Kelly with underage girls prosecutors in that case said the defendants were paid hundreds of thousands of dollars the defendants I'm sorry paid hundreds of thousands of dollars to the Vicks of victims in the witnesses to make sure that they would not cooperate with law enforcement and accused are Kelly using threats of physical abuse violence and blackmail to prevent prevent victims from providing evidence to law enforcement they picked him up last night when he was walking his dog and now is celebrating his Friday at the high rise metropolitan correctional center in downtown Chicago how many years is he face off all told seven thousand yeah I don't know something of that if you were to break it down I mean you like the idea of he was arrested in February on ten counts in Illinois sexually abusing three girls in a woman's pleaded not guilty to those charge and then in may there were eleven more sex related counts from cook county and now we've guides the the indictment from the Eastern District of New York and these thirteen and count indictment in Chicago seven thousand sounds about right seven thousand years now a publicist for our Callie which who by the way has one of the toughest jobs in the country right now the publicist for our Kelly says he is planning to deliver a statement about these latest developments at a news conference sometime in Atlanta but was not going to comment at a time so listen couldn't happen to a nicer guy coming up next to Jeffrey up steam that story continues apparently he has a steel safe in a room that no one can get into on that orgy island in the Caribbean any chance any chance we could put our Kelly and Jeffrey I've seen in a cell together and they could just share secrets in a steel safe that no one.

tennis Rafael seven thousand years
Fossils Are Filling Out the Human Family Tree

AP 24 Hour News

00:46 sec | 2 years ago

Fossils Are Filling Out the Human Family Tree

"Archaeologists who discovered fossils of an unknown human species from over fifty thousand years ago plan more diggings in the northern Philippines. Filipino. Archaeologists are Monsalve adore me. Harris said the discovery of the remains in the Cayo cave makes the Philippines and important research ground on human evolution his team found six fragments of bones from the feet hands on by and seven teeth from three people tests show that two of the fossil fragments had minimum ages of fifty thousand years and sixty seven thousand years, according to a study published by the scientific journal nature me Harris says he plans to resume the diggings next year, and he hopes to find larger fossil bones artifacts and possibly stone tools used by people in those

Northern Philippines Harris Cayo Cave Monsalve Fifty Thousand Years Sixty Seven Thousand Years
Bones discovered in an island cave may be an early human species

Science Magazine Podcast

07:41 min | 2 years ago

Bones discovered in an island cave may be an early human species

"Up, we have Lizzy Wade. She's back on the show this week to talk about a previously undescribed type of ancient hominids hominids or things like Denisovans, the Android halls, homo Florencia census. These are close cousins of modern humans that have not survived into modern times, except as bones and small bits of DNA integrated into our genomes highly has there. So I'm really excited about more hominids this find is actually based on bones from the Philippines. What exactly was found? And where were they found? They have been excavating in a cave on the island of loosen in the Philippines for a long time. And Luzon is the biggest island in the Philippines, Manila is the caves called KO k-, and they've found quite a few Fussell's from what looks like a very unique kind of human this. Paper is based on some teeth some finger bones and some toe bones mostly they also have one can broken leg bone from. They can tell that it would kinda growing juvenile. So kind of Atta lessened during the years when you grow to your dole size, the bone isn't complete. So they can't tell how how tall this species was right? And that's a really good segue into what can we tell about them from teeth hands feet and part of a leg Mon on the one hand not as much as antecedent lichen on the other hand kind of a lot. First of all the bones were found in layers that have been dated to sixty seven thousand years ago and fifty thousand years ago, so this may or may not overlap with homo sapiens on that island. They don't have any evidence of homeless cave. But this is around win poem Assyrians were were around southeast at this point. So I teased they have like the upper right jaw of one individual, which is pretty cool. So you can see the ratio between different kinds of teeth. You have molars than the somewhat smaller teeth in right before your molars are called pre molars. And so in this species or population, the pre molars are kind of the same sizes, homo sapiens, pre molars, but the molars are like really really small like they're smaller than home Aflou instances, even which is a really small human. That's sort of the that's why they call it the hobbit. It was like three tilts. These molars particularly are even smaller than the hearts molars. And that's like suggestive that this person. Also may have been quite small, although they can't say for sure. Yeah. I was gonna say the teeth may not be the best marker of general size. Right. Yes. So I mean, it would be much better to have like a full leg bone or a full arm-bone that would they a lot more, but he's do generally correlate to body size but suggestive, but not conclusive as usual. Okay. And Hans hands and feet that might tell you something about what they did. Or what they were good at or those kinds of things. Yes. So that handed feet or also really interesting. So they particularly have fingers and toes like pieces of them. The fingers toes were both quite long and curved. That's something that's quite unusual in the homo genus. It's very similar shoe to us show kiss, which is Lucy who's from Ethiopia three miners, or whatever this is sort of been interpreted as kind of a mid point between chimpanzee feet and hands and human feet and hands on. Unexpected to see so much very very unexpected to see fifty thousand years ago like a lot of this past. So that you know, it whereas a lot of questions about who. They're drek ancestors may have been obviously curve toes and fingers are usually interpreted to be really good for climbing trees. So there doesn't seem to be a lot of freshmen that homo loosen. Insys was by people in some way. But it may have also been very good at climbing trees still or whether that that trait survived or about the gun on this island. There's another really weird thing about one of its toes the third toe where it connects to the foot on all other homo species that part is really strong in. It's quite flat. And it's like what gives you a lot of propulsion when you're walking upright. Everyone has this all the homeless habit, and this when doesn't it's really really different. And nobody knows what that might mean. Nobody knows what it might do. Nobody knows why. But. It's very unusual. That's really interesting. So as you mentioned, this is about these are about fifty thousand is sixty seven thousand years ago, homo sapiens, might have been around and homo Florencia ances- which was founded Indonesia, they were also around at the same time. So how do we know that it's not one of those? How do we know this is a different species? Yes. So the fingers toes look somewhat similar to for instance. They also have kind of these curved fingers toes teeth, really look different. So it doesn't seem to be from Francis. And another possibility if you're finding a known human species in southeast Asia would be Denisa vans for whom we have very few fossils as yell, but we do have teeth for the Denise, Vince. And they have really gigantic. Teas though, this seems and this has really small T. So that seems to be pretty obvious that they're not related, and it's very sad that there is no ancient. Dna in this paper. Does that is there likely to be any ancient DNA from phones from his teeth? They tried to extract intraday, and they couldn't they didn't find any this deposit in the cave. I mean, it's in tropicals of these agents are hot, humid, the particular pen of layers in which these bones were in the dirt was like, really wet. And so like this is really terrible situation for DNA preservation. Yeah. So it's possible. They'll find other fossils in this caver elsewhere that will be slightly better conditions or as possible. You know, our introduced techniques will get a lot better, which they are. They are getting better. You know, I wouldn't rule out ever having into DNA from this disease. But it wasn't particularly surprising that they don't have it. Now, how does this fine fit into this trend of finding more kinds of humans than we knew what we're around before? And how does this fit in with the overall understanding of human migration yet that's sort of? Million dollar question. Of course. But you know, one thing that definitely shows is that the human story. This story of our ancestors is so much more complicated than we ever thought even ten or fifteen years ago like the amount of discoveries in the last literally ten years about. Yeah. All the species of ancient humans that we're all kinda living at the same time in the place seen is like truly wild was. So an expected and it just keeps happening over and over again. This will definitely not be the last new human answer tickets discovered or meter news human species, it also shows that something very interesting going on in southeast Asia, which coma flurries census, also obviously suggested and that's not entirely surprising because there are thousands of islands in this region and win animals of all kinds get isolated on islands some very strange things. Start to happen to them. They can get really big they can get really small. That's what seems to have happened with whom Afri census and possibly with homo, loosen. Insys too. Clearly, something is happening on the islands of southeast Asia for interns human of Lucien, and it looks like we're just scratching the surface of all of that.

Southeast Asia Philippines Luzon Lizzy Wade Manila Denisovans Asia Atta Ko K Fussell Lucy Ethiopia Hans Coma Indonesia Francis Lucien
"seven thousand years" Discussed on 103.5 KISS FM

103.5 KISS FM

01:32 min | 2 years ago

"seven thousand years" Discussed on 103.5 KISS FM

"By using tiny stickers. The hackers created a faked lane by putting three small stickers at an intersection. So the autopilot took the car in the left lane of traffic. Seattle pilot anyway. Yeah. I I don't know if I could I don't know if I'd be into that. I don't know if I had a test life. I would let the thing Dr. It's I feel like I would be driving the car. Yeah. I don't I don't know Mick Jagger training today. He's alive. Every time I see a celebrity trending. I'm always afraid that they're dead. But he's scheduled for heart surgery this week. Putting the Rolling Stones upcoming you're on hold. He's expected to make a full recovery. He is seven thousand years old. Well, that's what happens to your heart. When you smash twenty year olds. God bless he'll be able to do it for another seven thousand years after replaces harder over the valve Burger King is trending today. They're testing a new Walker that includes fake meet the impossible whopper. Just like the regular watt per except that uses a plant based Patty instead of beef. That's made re patties the company impossible foods. It's tested being tested in Saint Louis. Now, if it goes, well, the roll it out across the country. They're saying that they're experts can't tell the difference. Wow. So there you go it's national reconciliation day. Everyone here is gonna be calling their fathers later on today. National. Four and five of us national ferret day. It's Sam day of action sexual assault awareness month. National equa equal pay day national peanut butter and jelly, Dan. Thanks pot belly. I ever peanut butter and jelly sandwich. We'll come back. We'll do. Good news to as quickly. Traffic.

Mick Jagger Seattle Saint Louis Patty assault Walker Dan seven thousand years twenty year
Magnesite

A Moment of Science

02:00 min | 2 years ago

Magnesite

"Hey, Don, have you ever heard of magnesite? That's a rock isn't a yoyo. Right. It's a carbonate mineral, which means it captures CO two in it's formed that got some scientists wondering if they could use it to capture some of the excess CO two in our atmosphere. Researchers have been working on ways to create the mineral in the lab to bring us one step closer to that idea. It's tricky because magnesite usually takes a very long time to form on the earth surface up to eleven thousand years at one site in British Columbia where groundwater moving through rocks becomes enriched with magnesium and carbonate ions and the ions eventually react to format site. You're we're going around for seven thousand years doesn't sewn great. When researchers tried to recreate the process in the lab, we found out why it takes so long. They added magnesium and carbonate ions water and found that the water molecule surround the magnesium ions preventing them from bonding to the carbonate ions to get around this problem. Researchers added Microsft fears coated with a molecule called carb oxo to the mix which successfully pulled the water away and let the magnesium and carbonate ions react after that it took about seventy two days for the magnesite to form. I'm guessing this is new magic solution, though, definitely not scientists have only created a tiny amount of magnesite and it's really expensive to remove co two from the air. Some scientists say the idea isn't viable and either way it needs a lot more research. We've cut down the amount of time research takes this moment of science comes from Indiana University harmed on glass, and I'm ya Cassandra.

DON British Columbia Indiana University Microsft Eleven Thousand Years Seven Thousand Years Seventy Two Days
"seven thousand years" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

01:36 min | 2 years ago

"seven thousand years" Discussed on KTOK

"It said, you know, we're not Jacob was wrestling with the so-called angel. Yes. He said the prince has prevailed over God in men, the prince of darkness. Yeah. Yup. So we lost the war urging the slave planet in the millions of war planet. Now any the Mon is not a moon. If you see a planet. That's not spinning it's just a planet. That's dead. While some people think the moon is artificial. I'm not sure I believe that. But some people say that is you believe that. Of course. And what happened was when they came. I don't know I tried to get a time line. And I think it was twenty seven thousand years ago. And when we lost a war with the do is they put us in the stone ages, and it took everybody that had technology in our spiritual wisdom, and they took him on the moon, or you know, other planets to be slaves to build their spaceships in war interesting. But we gotta we gotta win this war back in the this is the case, we we've got a we've got a beat them at their own game to be sure, hey, Mr Lobo is going to join us in a moment to talk about some incredible strange movies on coast to coast AM. Coast insiders, the new version of the coast to coast AM app is now available for iphone and now Android four dot own above. Listen, live or on-demand, anywhere anytime..

Jacob Mr Lobo twenty seven thousand years
"seven thousand years" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

KLIF 570 AM

01:34 min | 2 years ago

"seven thousand years" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

"It says, you know, when Jacob was wrestling with the so-called angel said, the prince has prevailed over a God in men, the prince of darkness. Yeah. Yup. So we lost the war and urging the slave planet in the moon is a planet. Now any the Mon is not a moon. If you see a planet. That's not spinning it's just a planet. That's dead. While some people think the moon is artificial. I'm not sure I believe that. But some people say that is you believe that. Of course. And what happened was when they came. I don't know I tried to get a time line. And I think it was twenty seven thousand years ago. And when we lost the war with the do is they put us in the stone ages, and they took everybody that had technology in our spiritual wisdom, and they took him on the moon, or you know, other planets to be a slave to build their spaceships and were interesting, but we gotta we got win this war back in the this is the case, we we've got a tweet out a beat them at their own game to be sure, hey, Mr. mobile is going to join us in a moment to talk about some incredible strange movies on coast to coast AM. Coast insiders, the new version of the coast to coast AM app is now available for iphone and now Android four dot own above. Listen, live or.

Jacob Mr. mobile twenty seven thousand years
"seven thousand years" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

760 KFMB Radio

03:03 min | 2 years ago

"seven thousand years" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

"It has been nice. I guess it's coming to an end. All things must come to an end. But we have a good thing about to begin right now at seventeen and a half past the hour. Robert workman is joining us in. What is all this about Tom Brady? You're all excited about this morning. Tom Brady, I think he's got a future in this football thing be working out for him. Okay. You know after seven thousand years in the NFL the Pro Bowl rosters were announced yesterday. The chargers led the pack with seven players chosen with the Steelers right behind them with six Tom Brady made it. That sounds familiar it. Should it's his fourteenth Pro Bowl selection that ties the NFL record shared by only four other people. Peyton manning. Tony Gonzalez Bruce Matthews and the first guy to make fourteen pro bowls Merlin Olsen for the Rams way. Way back before he was on the on the TV and everything. Let's say the buccaneers bills and raiders. Well, they didn't have anybody make the team yesterday. Player moves the Ramstein running back. C J Anderson is insurance for Todd Gurley Houdini in Sunday night's loss to the eagles to make room LA cut receiver. Ferro Cooper this time last year Cooper was named to the Pro Bowl as a kick returner. Well, that's the NFL for you. I guess in the NBA on Tuesday, the nuggets dunk the Mavericks won twenty six hundred eighteen Nikola Yokich with thirty two points and sixteen rebounds is Denver one at home for the seventh straight time. They're the best in the west right now. Head of Golden State that snag the Lakers. One one ten Brooklyn is one six in a row, the ngelo Russell had twenty two points and a career high, thirteen assists. Cavaliers took the Pacers ninety to ninety one in Indiana seven game winning streak. Larry Nance junior had a tip in at the buzzer for the winning points, and the hawks whack the wizards one thousand nine hundred ten seven Atlanta players scored in double digits that offset Bradley Beal's twenty nine point nine for Washington. Tuesday in the NHL. Flyers flip the Red Wings three to to give interim head coach Scott Gordon win in his NHL coaching debut. Philadelphia fired coach Dave Hextall on Monday three weeks after sacking GM, Ron. Hextall? I think their names just sounded too much like them kind of put a Hex on the team. This is the fifth N season coaching change this year, which would be exactly five more than last year. Every coach last year that started the season ended the season with the team this year. We've already changed five and we had six changes over the summer as well. Rangers down the ducks three two one islanders ice the coyotes. Three to one blues cap the Oilers, four one kings, jump the jets by account of Florida one Blackhawks shaded, the predators to one snarls snuffed out the flames tutor, nothing Ben Bishop and Anton khudobin teamed up for the first combined clean sheet franchise history. Bishop started the game was injured late in period, two left. The us could've finished up the period, then return for the third of between twenty four saves and the win shark shut out the wild Ford. I think Martin Jones certified six six Panthers. Bent, the sabers five to lightning struck the connects five to two and the Maple Leafs exercise the devils seven to two college football bowl season last night in Florida, the Boca Raton bowl, you UAB torch northern Illinois thirty seven thirteen blazers freshman quarterback Tyler Johnson. The third only threw seven touchdown passes all season. He started out as the backup last night. He had four including a seventy yard or.

Tom Brady NFL Merlin Olsen football Robert workman Ferro Cooper NHL Peyton manning Steelers Brooklyn Ben Bishop Tony Gonzalez Bruce Matthews Florida Lakers Larry Nance Mavericks Boca Raton Rams buccaneers
"seven thousand years" Discussed on The Young Turks

The Young Turks

03:52 min | 2 years ago

"seven thousand years" Discussed on The Young Turks

"Hundred thirty seven thousand year. In that ballpark. You're gonna say sixty one thousand ninety dollars. Okay. If if and then the the in twenty twenty seven what little or twenty twenty five in realistically what little tax the middle class did get get wiped out. Yup, but for the rich seventy, five percent get to keep their tax cuts forever. So now wait, you say for budgetary reasons, they say we had two sons, they call it sunsetting. We sunset the taxes for the middle class. Well then why didn't you have to suss it? The taxes for the rich? I mean that causes even more money. But no, those are. Donors are friends. Of course, we're not gonna end those. So now they're come back around and say, well, I mean, yeah, sure. We met the middle class too. Right now that it's unpopular about. We're about to lose the election. We also meant the middle class. Okay. So a great analysis to find that k. tax two point. Oh, this already passed by the house. Okay, so send it's not gonna. Come back in pass it. The Republicans in the house, all voted for this almost all of it. If you make under twenty thousand six hundred dollars. So you know, porta middle class, you're going to get about one hundred bucks. So it's in the middle class. Tax cuts would actually get one hundred dollars if you make it onto that amount for the full year, the whole year. A hundred. Okay. All right. And it's actually worse than that because I remember there was a great article in the intercept right after Trump was elected in his first week in office. He got rid of a middle class mortgage deduction which affectively raise taxes on the middle class. So they never meant it about you ever ever ever ever ever. Don't let them get away with the lies. And by the way, this is why the media's the mainstream media. So objectively terrible and why you have to come. New media to get the truth because they won't tell you that they'll say, they'll give you the both sides tap dance, and they'll say, well, you know, the Republicans say they're cutting it for the middle class, but they're not actually doing that. So you know, report do your job and here. Look, I'll give you the the real numbers in the new tax cuts. Luckily again, they have not been passed and we might listen to a little bit on whether I am in favor of a tax cut for the middle class. If you make between fifty thousand and ninety five thousand dollars in in the ones that are proposed, he would actually get nine hundred and eighty dollar tax cuts. Now I'm opposed to that because I think it's basically just bribery of the of real Americans say they're giving away stuff. It's Christmas, right? And this is what the Democrats have all the time all bomb phones and he's giving away stuff to minorities. This is a giveaway in another sort is just too, but it destroys the deficit a center. That's my conservative fiscal side from from back in the day, but nine hundred ninety dollars to be fair. Okay. The top one percent would get. And now they're forty thousand one hundred eighty dollars on top of the sixty one thousand dollars with tax cut one point. So at the end of the day, if your port a middle class, get about one hundred bucks combined from the to get about Faouzi bucks if you're middle class and if you rich, you get a hundred thousand dollars. Okay. And then Trump says the newest for the middle class the why are you giving forty best those? What percent in that proposal? So even that's not true, they can't help themselves. They love redistribution of wealth. They love to take it from you and give it to the top one percent. Okay. We gotta take another break. When we come back. My summary of the different debating styles the substance of the four people have debated in the last four years of politic on an culture events feared initiatives, Sousa, and Tucker Carlson, and then how I responded to them. So interesting conversation will do that. When we return, we hope you're enjoying this free clip from the young Turks..

porta middle class Trump bribery Tucker Carlson Sousa one percent forty thousand one hundred eig twenty thousand six hundred do Hundred thirty seven thousand sixty one thousand ninety doll ninety five thousand dollars nine hundred ninety dollars sixty one thousand dollars hundred thousand dollars one hundred dollars eighty dollar
"seven thousand years" Discussed on The Nightly Rant

The Nightly Rant

01:59 min | 3 years ago

"seven thousand years" Discussed on The Nightly Rant

"I didn't call you liar i asked you to lie to people the difference in those things is pretty large thanks for overreacting this person they overreact even more excited that they no longer wanted to have this conversation public decide stick into private message oh gee what same rules apply i know i didn't appreciate this at all she says if i tell a lie i am a liar if i am a liar i have told a lie i don't agree i feel like a liar somebody who lives continuously and if you've lied once you're not literally say to her i would literally say to her i couldn't possibly call you a liar because by definition a liar someone who lies continuously i don't know you well enough to know whether you like continuously or not so i couldn't possibly have called you a liar in my philosophy we share brain sometimes i said unfortunately i'm not willing to use your definition of those words but that's okay you go ahead and i called you aligarh to be honest i couldn't care less take care and then she sends another private message in another thread asking me how long i've lived in lapoma and if i pay property taxes she's on those little that matters yeah like eat it so so you should be allowed so you should be allowed to lie because you pay property taxes yeah that's what that comes off life but me wanting the truth is not allowed if i don't live in lapoma haven't lived there for nine hundred and eighty seven thousand years and if i don't pay property taxes well eat a dick is my response to that though i did not say that to her i was much nicer eat a little but quite honestly where you live has nothing to do with where you're interested in in events like for instance okay if.

lapoma aligarh eighty seven thousand years
"seven thousand years" Discussed on Pat Gray Unleashed

Pat Gray Unleashed

02:10 min | 3 years ago

"seven thousand years" Discussed on Pat Gray Unleashed

"So you know one hundred million year old piece of amber hundred million year old yeah earth is only seven thousand years listening to you now see this packer story genetic survey conducted yeah okay the bar codes collected from one hundred thousand animal species including humans revealed what came as a shock to the researchers nine out of ten species on earth today included came into being around one hundred two hundred thousand years ago how can that be when the earth is only seven thousand years old so w say anything about that they didn't answer who said this bill no bill science from usf should've picked okay so anyway that's interesting that they're all genetically together they're talking about viruses ice ages they all got together but the simplest interpretation is that life is always evolving and it's more likely that at all times evolution the animals alive at that point arose relatively recently so you know it's a fascinating story though not really not really i mean it proves you wrong seven thousand year old thing wow disapprove you world i don't believe the seven year old thing just giving your heart time so he doesn't believe what he's been lying you sold time yeah what else he's been lying to you study study we order burgers instead of salads because of loud music i would say that i would say that no they just did a study at restaurants in the louder the music the worst we order so if you have burgers salads and they're playing loud music loud rock music you'll order the burger you won't order the salad that's got him i'm not gonna wellness i've ever heard of regardless.

usf seven thousand years one hundred two hundred thousa one hundred million year hundred million year seven thousand year seven year
"seven thousand years" Discussed on Show Me the Meaning!

Show Me the Meaning!

02:03 min | 3 years ago

"seven thousand years" Discussed on Show Me the Meaning!

"A world that has been pulled over your eyes to blind you from the truth like i just kind of feel like we're all nieto's in a sense and people can kind of and because of the matrix when you know anytime that we have a grievance with culture or grievance of authority we interpret it within the lens of the matrix do you guys think that the matrix had a profound effect in the way that we think about disillusioning ourselves from authorities let's think gave it a gave it the picture for it you know i think i think people have been going through oppression in going through like the government is against us rich people poor people that that whole system has been going on forever since the beginning time this movie gave it like the baseball card for it is like hey this is going on this the movie this is explaining everything i don't i don't really have to say anything just watched the matrix and this is my 'cause this is been going on forever though and that's why i'd never thought of it as the essential counterculture movie but even i mean you know because no one on the conservative right in the seventies gave a shit about easy rider which is why i think this is so amazing how this is how this has become more culturally relevant and yeah on both sides i mean i think there's definitely a very robust reading of the film that suggests that it probably was intended to be more of a leftwing film i mean we can get into a little bit more of that later but i just find it so amazing how people on both sides of the spectrum and you know i i do my best here at wise crack to be like as much of a centrist as i can so i mean like i i i just find it so amazing but i think i think the question might be i mean yeah it goes back very far obviously awesome pointed out this is this is plato so at least seven thousand years but but i think maybe another way of framing the question or the way wave to give out the question is is kind of reversing the cause and effect so maybe it's the case that because like the nineties were so filled with a kind of rebellion and so filled with a kind of political.

nieto seven thousand years
"seven thousand years" Discussed on WGTK

WGTK

02:57 min | 3 years ago

"seven thousand years" Discussed on WGTK

"And he said anywhere again he was very polite but he said i agree with you israel took the the land is real does not deserve to exist and anyway you know the palestinians have been there for seven thousand years seven that was the longest i had ever heard seven thousand my wife is a witness she was with me and the name palestine is seven thousand years old given by the greeks that's that was the i also i know the greeks aren't that old either but it doesn't matter the only reason i mentioned that is the impossibility often to dialogue on the middle east because of its passions i mean if somebody believes that then there's not really much you can talk about but as i always point out to these people so what you're saying is of the one hundred and eighty six countries in the un only one has no right to exist that generally stops them it's it's very it's a very powerful little argument because it does seem to isolate what they're saying anyway the media line dot org felice and michael frightens our the founders and directors of the organization so i got a lot of middle east the questions to ask the two of you begin with a domestic one that a lot a lot of americans are are only vaguely aware of through obvious reason people don't tend to follow scandals in other countries but we're reading here that the prime minister of israel benjamin netanyahu might be indicted by the israeli police so two questions is that so and why how could we have is mic on so you he asked how long do we have dennis are that's very funny go ahead michael again we're not hearing michael one minute i'm sorry michael we're having technical problems your mike mike is not try again philosophical statement dentist is my mic truly on or not yes but as for prime minister netanyahu he's been investigated certainly as much probably more than most of his predecessors but then again if he manages to stay in office until a year from july he will be the longest serving prime minister beating out the legendary david ben gurion most israelis believe that regardless of whether he'll be indicted probably will be around long enough to serve joe.

un michael prime minister benjamin netanyahu israeli police dennis mike mike david ben gurion joe israel seven thousand years one minute
"seven thousand years" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

Radio Free Nashville

01:52 min | 3 years ago

"seven thousand years" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

"With few exceptions but this is page one seventy six with few exceptions most native american cultures did not have our notions as part of their collective mythos instead of the story that were separate from creation and born to nominated these older cultures held a different view of the place of humans in the order of creation they believe we are part of the world we are made of the same flesh is other animals we eat the same plants we share the same air water soil and food with every other life form on the planet we are born into life by the same means as other mammals and when we die like them we become part of the soil that will nourish huger generations they also believe it is our destiny to cooperate with the rest of creation every life form has its special purpose in the grand ecosystem in all are to be respected they believed each animal and plant has its own unique intelligence and spirit we are permitted to compete with other plants and animals but we may not want and lead destroy them all life is absolutely as sacred as human life although hunting and killing for food or part of nature's order when we do so it must be done with respect and thankfulness older cultures are most often cooperators not dominators there are human cultures who do not engage in the destruction of the world they demonstrate the destruction and domination are not an inevitable part of human nature prior to the emergence of younger cultures about seven thousand years ago the ants with anthropological record shows that not one culture believed itself to be separate from and superior to nature we find the remnants of these older cultures and tribal people around the world such as the sun the kogi the of uganda the navajo the hopi the cree the jiddah living in harmony with the world around them the people around them and seen all life is sacred assad bushman don't even qualify as stoneage since they've never used stone implements only tools made from wood and yet they were six six six successfully pursuing their way of life.

uganda assad seven thousand years
"seven thousand years" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

Radio Free Nashville

02:27 min | 3 years ago

"seven thousand years" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

"Seven thousand year history of civilization any country anywhere in the world that has successfully done the libertarian experiment sure i can name you several ancient ireland from uh about seven about seven hundred b c hill odd sixteen fifty it would an individualist anarchy and it was governed denied not a chance us all ireland during that era and and frankly most of europe during that area was one of two things either they were communist essentially you had community small towns and small committees where people work together they built each other's homsi they they a fatty other or you had three feudalism and you know is modern version is near feudalism where you had a a chang or or a lord running burning roughshod on people this is jefferson's big love of the wig histories you know paul the rip india or bear here say oh well most of europe with futilely so that means that no i'm saying what i'm saying was that there were two systems at that time this and as i said this is jefferson godless at some length in his in his love of the wig histories the wing histories were the histories of the british isles before the invasion of the romans in two hundred bc and and fired that time you enrage communal europe most of europe communal but ireland was not there with no political authority and there was no state structure what they did it they formed organization known as too where people voluntarily organized and they function they created most as were clans and tribes as so you're talking communism no i am not what i'm saying is that these are voluntary continue identify any any liber tear any successful libertarian experiment since let's say 1800 um yeah i can't i can't think of any sense 1800 but i can't think of any either because it doesn't work at circular logic um terry terrorism works so well you know when i went bhushan painted iraq on bush of invasion iraq the ana anxiously i can hear us so when bush invaded iraq donald rumsfeld he and you can read this in the biographies of the time donald rumsfeld saw iraq as an opportunity for a libertarian experiment rumsfeld's phrase and that's why when when freedom was messy when russ you know when they were looting.

ireland europe jefferson iraq donald rumsfeld russ paul bush Seven thousand year
"seven thousand years" Discussed on KVNT Valley News Talk

KVNT Valley News Talk

02:31 min | 3 years ago

"seven thousand years" Discussed on KVNT Valley News Talk

"Of that one of the ones under the mystery category is this morning 10 northern european mysteries that remain unsolved now i don't know how old you are but back in 1990 in april there was a devastating fire and it broke out on a passenger ferry called the scandinavian star backed i think that's the ferry i was referring to when i mentioned the survivors club that book by sure with it i told danny to read that the star travel the waters between oslo norway and denmark denmark course north of of germany there north went north west and uh fire spread quickly throughout the ferry hundred fifty nine people lost their lives several reasons for the large loss of life included the thick smoke preventing passengers from finding the exits and crew members who could really communicate to the passengers in their native language well it was thought it was an arson move then it was blamed on infrastructure then in two thousand seventeen they opened a new inquest and thinking maybe it was an arsonist and that just that scary stuff when that happens and it was it's an unsolved mystery in northern europe how 'bout this colleague crater mystery more than seven thousand years ago a massive meteorite entered the earth's atmosphere and broke into pieces some of those rocks smacked in the cali on the estonian you know that e l l estonia latvia lithuania those are some of the country's smaller ones in northern europe it broke into pieces some of the rocks smack down on the island of ceremeny are the collision left nine craters in the area which has now call the cali meteorite crater feel the biggest crater on the island has the remains of a stone wall surrounding it the dates back to the bronze age mysterious because the structure well it was believed to have been put up by an each and cold that settled that area and they may have used the crater as a watering place considering that it is filled with water to this day experts have also found many animal bones inside the walls perimeter scientists are unable to turn the theory in the fact however that it might have been a sacrificial placement ancient history northern europe as much as any how about denmark's ancient labyrinth that's right really in two thousand seventeen just last year archaeologists discovered a mass of stone age labyrinth in stebens denmark.

norway cali lithuania europe cali meteorite crater denmark danny oslo germany arson latvia stebens denmark seven thousand years
"seven thousand years" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

Stuff You Missed in History Class

01:39 min | 3 years ago

"seven thousand years" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

"The australia was actually settled before the commonly cited forty seven thousand years ago one team found evidence of human habitation in booty cave on barrow island sixty kilometers off the coast of western australia dating back to about fifty thousand years another team publishing findings in the journal nature concluded that a sandstone rock shelter in northern territory was inhabited sixty five thousand years ago this work with the aboriginal heritage project is basically confirmed away aboriginal australians were already saying which is like our people have been living in this place for tens of thousands of years a genetic study of northwest north america reached incredibly similar conclusions about the indigenous residents of southern alaska and the western coast of british columbia mighty connery all dna al's analysis revealed that indigenous people living in these areas today are descended from the region's first inhabitants about ten thousand years ago and also in british columbia archaeologists have confirmed with the hill took nation oral history has maintained that the hill took nation moved to a small area of land that never froze during the ice age and survived therefore the duration archaeologists carefully xrated the area and found that yes there were artifacts dating back fourteen thousand years at which point glaciers recovering much of the surrounding land mass but not that particular area the hill sick nation is hopeful that the findings will support the nation's claims in any future negotiations about land rights and other legal issues in the area sedan we're moving onto a category of like a subcategory of that one called we probably told use.

australia barrow island alaska connery forty seven thousand years sixty five thousand years fourteen thousand years fifty thousand years ten thousand years sixty kilometers
"seven thousand years" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:35 min | 3 years ago

"seven thousand years" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"In new york and some so it looks like pre human species in africa had a huge range of skin pigmentation and hair color and then you see much in the much more recent s pause asked evasion returned some we took him out eur seven thousand years we see the emergence of light skin which is almost certainly an adaptation to being further north so darkskinned his very protective against the damaging ultraviolet rays of the sun pigmentation protects at effectively protects the dna in the cells of your skin from radiation damage now as we move migrated further north we didn't need that as much but it's uh poudrier and you know the son's noticed bright and so light skin emerges now blond hair and blue eyes which were satiated would light skin and europeans we we can't say that that has been naturally selected we can say that skin color has been eight may well be that blond hair and blue eyes just came along for the ride ginger hair which is a rarest of all red here we call it in this country yes yes redhead you don't call it ginger i didn't know that no oh okay well that that's the rarest type and some again we do not know we cannot for sure say that that has been uh that has undergone natural selection it may just be that it occurred and isn't bad view and maybe some people founded attractive and then claimed together as a result may be that they were isolated in in the north west of europe for a time enough that it becomes a it occurs at a high proportion in scotland i read recently that it it what we always used to say this columns the highest concentration of red heads but it is now in america will a won't didn't do come from the vikings isn't the reason that the bridge kind of disdain ginger is because they associate them with the the viking invaders i know i met most people that i come across who austin questions about ancestry which happens a law as you want to be want to show genealogy with viking sayed says you know they regarded as being someone he wanton you'll heritage uh there is there is some animosity towards changes which i think is is.

new york scotland america vikings africa europe austin viking sayed seven thousand years
"seven thousand years" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Daily

Monocle 24: The Monocle Daily

01:57 min | 4 years ago

"seven thousand years" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Daily

"But these animals they really have seen all the difficulties the city has endured through the seven thousand years of people have been living there so in a way they have a relationship with the city that is older than even what we as individuals field because they've they've evolved there many of them are descendants of cats that were there thousands of years ago so their relationship is different they go in and out of places that we cannot go to in nothing is forbidden to them nothing is truly off limits to them they can access almost anywhere that's what you know excited me about following them around because they also revealed parts of the city that i had forgotten to look at or i had never known there these tiny holes on the staircase is leading into these old buildings in bail lou and goleta areas and i didn't know until i paid attention to those holes and then asked about why they were there that they were actually ventilation holes for the hamas that used to be the communal hormones of everybody in that building a hundred and fifty two hundred years ago when there was no plumbing so it's very interesting the things that get revealed when you follow an animal that his native to a city around i think the cats of sort of become this symbol for the burgeoning use of a online videos that have really helped the concept of watching short videos when you got a few minutes that's sort of become a bit of a bit of a phenomenon in itself but that's all about the short and sweet pot of of consuming cat videos was something that made you look at just the everyday unspoken life of a cat and and made you think i could actually make a fool linked film about this this so much to this was there maybe a particular experience oh can you think of a particular sort of observation that you made that gave you this this the confidence to proceed with this idea while i was lucky enough to have been born and raised in istanbul and had my childhood.

lou goleta hamas istanbul fifty two hundred years seven thousand years