18 Burst results for "Seven Million Years"

The Interior World

Stuff To Blow Your Mind

05:06 min | Last month

The Interior World

"Hey welcome to stuff to blow your mind. My name is Robert Lamb, and I'm Joe. McCormick, and today we're going to be taking a look at interior space. Get Era Two thousand twenty brings to mind the old curse. May You live in interesting times and one of the factors here has, of course, been the corona virus cove in nineteen pandemic and in an effort to fight the spread of the illness, save lives and prevent overwhelming are hospitals. We've made a lot of changes to our lives and these range from the simple such as just wearing a mask when you're out in public and you can't so full. Distance from people to the harder choices about employment, and in life choices, we've all been social distancing and stay at home orders teleworking in quarantine have meant that we've all been spending a lot more time at home. Now depending on your home, this could mean a lot of things, but we want to explore what this means from a biological standpoint for the most part here. Now, make no mistake spending more time at home has absolutely been the right move. But just as it's forced you to focus more on, say that weird stain on your ceiling we wanted to focus on the other often unseen aspects of life in home right much the same way that being say on a Spanish galleon out in the middle of the ocean might have made you pay much more attention to the biology and behavior of of ship rats than you ever would have otherwise I. Think being at home more and more is forcing all of us to Turner is and maybe our microscopes and magnifying glasses to the corners and the cornices and the showerheads and the drain traps and all of the wonderful places in our house where life dwells. we're going to really get into the difference really between the natural world outside of our homes in the unnatural world inside and getting into some ideas about how how we could perhaps enable our interior world to be a little more on the natural side of things. But. Before we get into all that, I wanted to take a moment here to discuss the history of houses in general, you know just to get into the concept of what a house is. Our first and most important interior artificial environment. So you can certainly look at a home as an artificial cave to a certain extent indeed, we have lots of early evidence that early hominids sought out shelter in caves in the same way that many other animals do these can shelter one against the elements and against predators and as recently as one hundred, thirty thousand years ago cave-dwellers were already augmenting these natural interior environments with things like rough stone walls using timbers so So you know, even one, hundred, thirty, thousand years ago we were taking naturally occurring interior spaces and. A little less natural. And of course, on top of just the shelter caves can provide. It also seems that caves had a strong sacred meaning too many of these prehistoric peoples those might be important, but ultimately, proximity to water is far more important thus as Kate Spin Brian fagin point out in. In the section of the seventy grade inventions of the ancient world about homes, most early hominids lived out in the open near streams and lakes built temporary structures, and most of this has been lost a time. But some of the earliest evidence of potential structures for homes goes back a one point seven, two point seven, million years ago with Homo Erectus sites in southern Africa, and these were potentially contemporary with the domestication of fire. The have been temporary tents, but they still would have been artificial interior environments. Now, more secure evidence comes from the Ukraine roughly forty four thousand years ago the the mammoth bone structures from mullet ova with recently see us on the show actually yeah we did talknet these that would have been structures in one of the northernmost habitable regions of the earth the time because this was during a time of glacial. Advance where the polar ice caps from the north were coming deep down into Europe and Asia, and and so this would have been far far north way up among the ice and for some reason, humans were building these structures out of the bones of mammoth and we don't know that there are still things. We don't know about those structures like how how consistently they were inhabited and for how long and so forth. Right? Now beyond this, the history of human homes is is largely dictated by local resources and local climate. Long process of trial and error ends up leading to the development of regional and cultural building forums construction methods. Before nine thousand B C e we see evidence of clay houses and Palestine what is today Palestine and before seven thousand BC we see rectangular dwellings in Anatolia. But but a home is far more than just a shelter. As the authors here point out houses became key to social structure as well.

Robert Lamb Palestine Kate Spin Brian Fagin Mccormick Africa Turner Ukraine Anatolia Europe Asia
"seven million years" Discussed on NewsRadio 1020 KDKA

NewsRadio 1020 KDKA

01:42 min | 1 year ago

"seven million years" Discussed on NewsRadio 1020 KDKA

"Probably would move over. Here's a new store in paleontology named Scotty at forty two feet long. This Ranna source Rex was the size of a city bus weighed nearly twenty thousand pounds and live for thirty years, the largest and oldest T Rex ever found. Scotty is such a giant edged out sue the famous. He wrecks at the field museum of natural history in Chicago. It's just west long help pull Scotty from the ground as our material was being prepared. And I knew it was something big sixty seven million years ago. Scott roam the Frenchman river valley insist on Canada, that sandstone Scotty was found in is so hard, it took. Researchers almost a decade to dig it out of the ground and realize, just what they had usually a dinosaur skeleton consists of Olea few bones or. A section of the skull. He find that you're happy Scott persons was at the original dig site and led the team. Reconstructing Scottie, Scottie lived a hard knock life. It's got evidence of a broken jaw impacted tooth got a section of its tail the vertebrae seem to have been compressed possibly from the bite of another trailer sore scientists found a lot of Scotty almost sixty five percent of the skeleton intact. So this is just one backbone. Yeah, can I hold it? You can. You know, there's a way to Jamie Yuccas. CBS news, Regina, Canada. Finally, this weekend growing effort at colleges, like the university of central Florida to help Hungary students eat from CBS news correspondent Peter King in Orlando. He li-.

Scotty Scott Canada Scottie CBS Rex Frenchman river valley Jamie Yuccas T Rex university of central Florida field museum of natural Peter King Regina Chicago Hungary Orlando sixty seven million years twenty thousand pounds sixty five percent
"seven million years" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

KLBJ 590AM

01:30 min | 1 year ago

"seven million years" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

"Volume so by the way in alpha to omega journey to the end of time Matthew, let's get back to your thoughts of the flood being four to seven million years ago. And what do you think caused it an asteroid hit or something like that? Well, you know, Georgia. I don't think it really matters. This is what I hear. I'm gonna read to you exactly what it says in Columbia history of the world. Okay. It says somewhere in late tertiary time, which is four to seven million years ago the relic, and it made even it could have been seven the relative positions of continent to the position of the earth's poles shifted from sites in eastern Siberia in the southern and in the southern Indian Ocean to their present location with the south pole relocated in the great mountain Antarctic continent series of important events began purse precipitation in the mountains, turn to snow than I snow fields built up in the glaciers and growing larger the glaciers spread out over the lowlands. The freezing of Antarctica began about three or four million years ago and initiated a drop in the world sea level because one of the not returned to the oceans by the normal thing in the summertime now what we get from this is that. This wasn't just a magnetic pole. This was a geographic pole shift.

Matthew Indian Ocean Siberia Antarctica Georgia Columbia seven million years four million years
"seven million years" Discussed on The Jordan B. Peterson Podcast

The Jordan B. Peterson Podcast

04:10 min | 1 year ago

"seven million years" Discussed on The Jordan B. Peterson Podcast

"And so the suggesting it is going to be the woman who says I find that really offend. I'm suggesting is about probably is never mind, but women are also more sensitive today. Give emotion. So there is some slightly higher probability that that might be the case. But then I think women are also associated at least in men's imaginations with nature, which is part of the chaotic domain say as opposed to culture because they're sexually selective. So you think what is nature we have that as a cognitive category. Right. We think of the natural world, we think of nature versus culture, it's a fundamental opposition. What is nature? Well, nature is trees and landscapes and animals and all of that. But that isn't what nature fundamentally is nature fundamentally is that which selects from a genetic perspective, that's nature. That's the fundamental definition of nature. And it is the case that human females are sexually selective, and it's a major component of human behavior. So the. The evolutionary theory. Roughly speaking is that the reason we diverged from chimpanzees eight million years ago seven million years ago is at least in part because of the differences between sexual selectivity between female, humans and female, chimpanzees female chimpanzees are more likely to have offspring from dominant males, but it's not because of their sexual selectivity. So a female chimpanzee has periods of fertility that are marked by physical by observable physiological changes not the case with human females human female automation is is concealed. So that's a very profound biological difference between human females and chimpanzees and the chimpanzee females will mate with any male, but the dominant males chased the subordinate males away but human females are sexually selective. And so, and it's not trivial fact so you have twice as many, female and. Sisters as male ancestors. You think well how can that be? Well, imagine that on average every single human female has had one child throughout the entire course of history, which is approximately correct, by the way, then imagine that half of the man had zero and the other half had to. Okay. And that's roughly the case so half of males. Historically, speaking have been reproductive disasters. And the reason for that is because of female sexual selectivity. So it is actually the case that female, humans are nature. It's not only that they're that. They're associated with nature symbolically as far as reproduction is concerned. They are the force of nature that does the selection and so their nature in the most fundamental way. And there is a chaotic element of that at least in relationship to men and also in relationship to women because a lot of the female on female competition is competition that's chaotic for the right to be sexually selective. Right. Not only with regards to man, which drives a lot of politicking. But also in relationship to each other because part of what human females do is jockey for position in the female dominance hierarchy for the top position. Which is the woman who gets to be most sexually selective. And so that drove. Female female competition, and it's different dynamic. There's there's similarities between female female competition and male male competition, but there are also differences and their pronounced so men, for example, while men are more likely to compute compete for socioeconomic status, and that's partly because that drives female may choice. So the correlation for men between socioeconomic status and sexual success is about point six and for women. It's zero. Zero. In fact, it's actually slightly negative you so and that's a huge difference between men and women. I know that you knew the anthropologists Sarah Hertie, HR D Y, an and she's like my favorite feminist theorist. Although is she would say, I'm a theorist who happens to be a feminist, but she studied primate behavior, and she watched she looked at the women very care.

Sarah Hertie eight million years seven million years
"seven million years" Discussed on Screen Dive

Screen Dive

04:12 min | 2 years ago

"seven million years" Discussed on Screen Dive

"You know, damn dog -ly does being really interested in how how did they how did this all happen and going back and watching it now? All the science and all the social and critiques of planet of the apes. Now make sense so much more. I asked her to give us the basics eight biology one. Oh, one we are living in planet of the apes right now because humans actually are part of the great eight family were part of the family today, and in that great ape family there are humans chimpanzees bonobos gorillas Aranka tans, and then there's the poor lesser ape the gibbon which gets the shaft chimpanzees, which our closest genetic relative about ninety eight point seven percent, similar DNA to us and bonobos are two closest genetic relatives. Okay. But just to be clear apes and humans evolved differently in parallel. Right. They aren't just in line behind us on the highway. We have a common ancestor. So when point with chimpanzees about seven million years ago, we had a common ancestor, and our lineage what one way and there's one another and that the point being what? Chimps were seven million years ago is probably could be very will be very different from what they are today because they've been evolving, and they still are just like humans, but it's not just our genetics that similar our behavior. Overlaps two they used tools so they use dipping sticks when they're eating termites or ants. They're good at solving problems. As you see in the reboot of the series. What are the things that that primates do quite a bit is grooming, grooming, a huge deal? So the whole idea of us going getting our hair done or like, even like, your mom, braiding your hair or just sort of scratching each other's back. They have their own ways of grooming, one another and usually grooming in terms of who is in line in terms of hierarchy plays a role to one thing. That is very important is is primates all of them are social very, social when they are together, they embrace they hug, they, you know, they they roll around they play, and I should also mention plays a huge part of all animals, but specifically primates and chip. Being at war wasn't something invented by the movies. Males will actually have these groups patrolling the actually get together and they'll silently patrol their territory looking for outside males. And if they do find an outside mail. They can be very aggressive in times fight them and kill them in sometimes even eat them. So yeah, it's pretty rough out there sometimes for chip so apes our family, but maybe don't invite them to thanksgiving in our world. At least for now human primates are on top. I asked to tell you what do we have that? They don't communication. I think is really what gave human sort of a leg up language is incredibly important in terms of increasing sociability. I mean when it comes to communication, you can only do so much with your hands. You can only do so much with grunts. And and we and went not the fact that humans could communicate very well with one another meant that they could be able to hopefully survive in an environment. That is pretty forboding. Or warning each other for predators, for instance, to being able to speak basically is kind of it opens up the doors to a lot more possibilities for innovation. So there is a way to communicate. But even further you can explain okay ogg here take this stick. And if you rub it together, you know, you could only demonstrate so much. We often talk about finding our voice being heard speaking our minds as a metaphor for advocating for ourselves or having agency or even claiming our humanity. Natalia was telling me that essentially having a voice is what makes us human. So no wonder it's terrifying. To look at a world where we have lost our voice and another species has found there's but I was curious if apes right now could start talking. What would they say if apes Raval the talk tomorrow, I think they'd be very miffed at our behavior. That's fair. We've talked about what was going on in the nineteen sixties, politically and socially. But there was something crucial going on anthropology to something that dealt a major blow to the way human saw themselves..

Natalia seven million years seven percent
"seven million years" Discussed on Something You Should Know

Something You Should Know

03:26 min | 2 years ago

"seven million years" Discussed on Something You Should Know

"Your spine with genetic tools we don't we don't even know where to start in that process so i don't think those are going anywhere but we don't have to that's the point we can fix it surgically and i think our tools to do that will it continue to advance so like i i it's another story of how our brains have sort of liberated our bodies from having to be perfect when we don't have to fix it genetically we can fix it surgically so what you said just now is interesting because you know i've always thought of human evolution as this continual process of humans changing because that's what humans do but you're pointing out that the changes that happen throughout evolution serve a purpose and that purpose all comes back and always comes back to survive ability and reproduction that's right so if you look at the transition to upright walking our ancestors were in the rainforest and they started to explore a new habitat which was the border of the rainforest and the open grasslands the savannah in africa well you have a big advantage in the savannah if you can stand up because you can see over other things you freed up your hands to do things and you have good social interactions you're looking each other in the face and so forth and so the individuals who could stand up better we're more successful they were more they were more likely to get their food into into feed their children and all of that and so they out competed if you if you think of all the members of the species as competitors with each other even if they're not directly but sense of who leads more offspring those who are able to stand up right did the best but the thing is is that it wasn't overnight right it was a gradual transition living in the border and then eventually living out negara's lands and early which is what we know our ancestors eventually did but there's a loss there too because once you start transitioning to a striding gate walking the way we do now you can't climb trees very well and there were advantages to being able to climb trees so every single innovation came with the tradeoff well here's a question i guess i've always wondered about maybe it simplistic but but humans evolved from apes but we still have apes so why did some of us become human and others just stayed apes so apes have been changing too if you look at chimpanzees gorillas you know our most recent common ancestor with chimpanzees is about seven million years ago but that incested wasn't a chimpanzee and it didn't look like a chimpanzee it probably looked a little bit more like a chimpanzee than it looked like a human just because we've been involving faster but we're no more closely related to that ancestor than the chimpanzees are so every species is constantly chain aging and guerrillas we go back even further you're talking about ten eleven million years but that ancestor wasn't a guerilla wouldn't look like a girl i looked like you know something else i mean between human chimpanzee and gorilla but we know that our line was evolving fairly rapidly and that we we do know that guerrillas have been living in mostly the same kind of way for a long time which is why actually their fossil record is so poor actually because in the rainforest things don't fossilized very well but what what we do know is that human started really changing in their behavior and how they were living and how they were thriving and that is a good recipe for evelyn for fast evolution because when you start doing things differently you change the.

ten eleven million years seven million years
"seven million years" Discussed on StarTalk Radio

StarTalk Radio

04:14 min | 2 years ago

"seven million years" Discussed on StarTalk Radio

"Hi and welcome back to start all your reagan here experiencing an extension and joining me now is co host chuck nice my hilarious comedian yes talk about something a little bit different now we're talking about cloning cloning primates because with the goal cloning going on in the news there's been talk about human cloning but let's talk about actual primate cloning we have a biological anthropologist dr ryan rahm from lehman college here to weigh in on the subject and most recently there's been some cloning done in china of macaques yes indeed so published just this year looking at crab eating macaques why eating those crabs who knows why we need more of them who knows but they've successfully cloned to live viable clad crab eating macaques it's not a fish int you know they had forty embryos twenty pregnancies to live births oh my goodness but you know it's a step towards human glowing i gotta tell you something those are those are pretty much house casino odds eight yeah i know i don't i don't like those odds yeah so so only two survived all this whole process mind you that's much better right so dolly was to seventy five to one wow like forty two twenty that was nineteen ninetyseven progress i'm gonna say funny that of all things that scotland clone they cloned the one thing that they have and access of cheap i don't i never understood that i never i never been understand that she was special no i can we all just have a moment of silence for for dolly anyway moving on but clothing of primates it's controversial because obviously you know we're much more laid it to them and close to home right right it's a little funky little you know let me ask you as primatology natalia how close are macaques to home safe i mean in our closest genetic relatives are chimpanzees bonobos we share about ninety eight percent ninety eight point seven percent of dna i don't know what is macaques don't know the exact percentage amounts there's like yeah the dave we diverged far back you know we the common ancestor we have with chimpanzees about six seven million years ago twenty five because at new world monkeys about twenty yeah so yeah so yeah so not we're not super super close but at the same time they are primates in that is a little it's close to home close to home but we learn anything ryan from when we clone a primate do we learn anything about cloning us and is that the purpose of cloning the primate to get closer to cloning us i think the some of the main purposes there are you know macaques are a big by medical research animal and the if you can introduce some genetic changes macaque predispose it to heart to diabetes or something then you could perpetuate that right then you can hear it or you gonna clone you so you that you get heart disease right away then i'm gonna cure you of your heart disease this house very cruel we do that all the time i mean that's like super common with mice right there are these wines of mice yeah are they're not cloned but they're so like just in breed them incredibly until they're genetically modulus right and then like make a change and they just you know all get cancer we give them cancer right yeah is just there's a lot of things you know we've cured cancer in mice like a hundred times but mice really distant from humans so you try and take the thing that you've cured cancer and money so you take it humans it doesn't work right i mean there's even arguments in in in terms of animal welfare and medical research that because even chimpanzees are distant enough where some of the same things don't affect us the same way i mean they get certain illnesses that we don't i mean there is no says which is.

reagan six seven million years ninety eight percent seven percent
"seven million years" Discussed on Ologies

Ologies

04:33 min | 2 years ago

"seven million years" Discussed on Ologies

"And dine on it in several months you have my blessings speaking barbecues let's talk pyro technology wait technics isn't that have fireworks good i hope so when i started researching this episode i was like what if i had a pyro technologist on to talk about the bombs bursting and air in the fourth of july displays in baseball games sky booms and such but i found that fireworks people are technically pyro technicians not pyro technologists so firework talk will be limited to allie telling you don't blow your goddamn hands off this summer okay just be careful and if you're drunk let someone else explode stuff just sit back and watch don't say never help to pyro technologists are actually anthropologists who study chilling in grilling barbecues cooking with fire but wait what is a barbecue and why can't i spell it right well it comes from the spanish for barak coa which is derived from a caribbean word meaning a rack made of sticks those were used for either sleeping on a cot or for smoking meat or fish above a fire there you go i think americans added the q u at the end and you can spell either way but let's be honest all caps bbq it's easiest no one wants to fuck around with the is there a sea and also q in it to spell it bbq i don't care also there's a heated fiery debate on the demolishing of barbecue the first time it was recorded in english was in sixteen sixty one by edmund hickory gill who was a british churchman with a shady history who was describing cannibalism in jamaica he wrote somo slain and the flesh for with bob acuity and eat but barbecue historian and yes that is job andrew worn ms wrote a whole book on the colonialist and racist origins of the word and says that hickory and gil was full of shit and he was making up tails and the barbecue is one of america's oldest and most beloved traditions so going back in time a bit humans i started to learn about fire control maybe as far back is one point seven million years ago but they were really getting good at it about one hundred twenty five thousand years ago there's the hotly talked about cooking hypothesis now this is a hypothesis that credits charring otherwise inedible starchy food with humans ability to grow these bigger glucose hogs known as our brains i mean when was the last time you ate a rob potato and slade at word with friends like never think about it now another thing to molo while waiting for your melon rhinestone pickle is why historically have women been expected to cook but men handle the outdoor grilling what the fuck i try to look for an answer and i found that a coach tural anthropologist richard sweater has written such a book about many psychological societal mysteries on different continents this book is aptly titled why do men barbecue i found this after googling the phrase why do men barbecue and if i ever read that book report back but the consensus on the web and i did look it up is because much of outdoor grilling just involves standing around looking busy while other people are inside fussing over jello macaroni salad and icing down fruit platters and also you only have to do it for one season out of the year so you're like sure i'll be grow master if you were to ask yale researchers about pyro technology not only would the archaeologists talk about cooking relics but they would also point you to periods of time when we really started to make firework for us we were glazing vessels we were hardening weaponry we were doing metallurgy things so pyro technology so many directions to go so when you're outside side the summer casing into a campfire just think there are people who have been indoors writing books about your hairy scared relatives gazing into a campfire one last allah g on the topic of fiery summer evenings lamb period dala gee what the hell is that word it's the study of firefly's which are not flies at all they're rather beatles with super magic butts do you call them fireflies or lightning bugs you probably just all muttered aloud on the subway or jogging path or into your knitting light pini walis okay what one researcher bert vox who's a linguistics professor at the university of cambridge polled ten thousand americans and.

one hundred twenty five thousa seven million years
"seven million years" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:36 min | 2 years ago

"seven million years" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"So let's see there's like some number of billions of people in the world seven maybe seven eight billion people in the world these days legos they gotta be making would they make a lot of legos per year they got to be making millions of legos a lot of them get lost a lot of get angrily thrown away after a parent steps on a material the night but still that's a tunnel legos average average lego kits gotta have hundreds of pieces in it so that's even if one kid just has one kit that's hundreds say this is crazy i'm going to say they're a thousand legos per person on earth thousand legos okay our audience guest fourteen thousand six hundred per person the answer is eighty it's still pretty impressive so you win again was that an audience of five year old boy four hundred that's my son's goal jonathan according to guinness how many years did the world's oldest cat live one point seven million years i had a cat that i got when i was a sophomore in college and we're like oh let's get a cat and then i didn't realize that the cat was gonna live many years i hadn't really thought about it and so this cat was still alive when i had children can live to be like twenty one years old that was pretty old for a cat so i don't think it's going to get too much older than that but i'm going to say surprisingly older than that i'm going to say twenty six twenty six our audience guest thirty three years the correct answer is thirty eight years and three days thirty eight years in three days holy mowing yep i know everyone is freaking out about that i i guarantee you that was no fun for the last twenty years of its life well done i feel like yeah you were amazing on that and so is our crowd that the crowd well jonathan audience it's time to crown our big winner let's bring back our finalists demon vendor putin who learned that he's more afraid of falling than spiders and amanda gilligan who will give her third graders credit for making fart jokes.

putin amanda gilligan guinness thirty eight years three days seven million years thirty three years twenty one years twenty years five year
"seven million years" Discussed on The Pat McAfee Show

The Pat McAfee Show

01:38 min | 2 years ago

"seven million years" Discussed on The Pat McAfee Show

"The world's not done i'm still good this is was what killed the dinosaurs it was twenty seven million years ago todd i thought that was meteors it was i was joking about that i took out the dinosaurs somebody had to fucking lit asked new year's eve party on fireworks is actually two or three and donnas there's also lived on paying gio and when that meter hit meteor hit that's when pantaleo broke off on him on obtain him it says this'll trigger a small ice age so i think polar vortex is behind this son of a bitch is gonna haul harder winter fucking texan around right after this whole thing and going to have to worry about nobody should anymore could make a huge comeback sabertooth tigers too they're not called the north america one is called a smile on florida's so people forget that's the greek name smothered on flurries is it's the north american sabertooth tiger name so if you could please have some respect for that that's the nashville predators logo it's because in nineteen seventyone they were building building downtown and they found the bones of it while building for the last ice age now it's the smile don flirty ass so if you're wondering what the predators mascot is it's a phone fact well fun fact smile floride these people are brilliant smiling sh i don't know if you're right there ha gladiator sabertooth tiger so this bucket volcanoes real it's all too real i think we're fine.

todd florida nashville predators north america twenty seven million years
"seven million years" Discussed on WHO NewsRadio 1040 AM

WHO NewsRadio 1040 AM

02:13 min | 2 years ago

"seven million years" Discussed on WHO NewsRadio 1040 AM

"And that's because bone does not preserve very well unless it's lucky enough to be fossilized or unless the paleontologist you're lucky enough to come upon fossils but teeth are very hard you have the tooth enamel and so forth and they tend to preserve when everything else goes by the wayside so part of it is trying to find the right geological formations to dig into as you indicated and part of it is just the rare ness of these fossils and the difficulty of finding them it's it's the proverbial needle in a haystack but if you have good giant geologists on your team and you know where to look in these formations eventually there's a good chance you will find something the rift valley looks like rolling small hills leading to larger hills and you can see that layers would have been put down and geologic periods michael just to last detail because we're going to go onto the ear bones the question here is we don't know what drove the split if it did happen twenty five million years ago we have no one cause is that correct that's right i think that when you have a split but we can make some guesses when you have a split between two different have legionary groups one of the features that usually accompanies that is that they become geographically isolated and once they become geographically isolated then they're not interbreeding and each is sort of free to go its own evolutionary way so it's quite possible that whoever the communist sister was of old world monkeys and apes was living somewhere in this rift area then you had these tectonic events you had these plates separating and slamming into each other it's quite possible that some of the common ancestor found himself on one side of the split and the other half of the group or whatever to found itself on the other side once they became genetically isolated then natural selection was free to act on each group independently that also probably explains the much later split between five and seven million years ago humans and chimpanzees you had a common ancestor and then you had two groups that split and they each winter on the middle ear michael and i are speaking and we here between two and.

rift valley michael twenty five million years seven million years
"seven million years" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

01:42 min | 2 years ago

"seven million years" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"That they're going to say oh you're you're not eligible to vote you're not a citizen well are you legal show me your papers that's not what occurs but the left since they really don't want to have an accurate count of how many illegal aliens are in this country is a math trick you ask are you eligible to vote are you a citizen gotta come up with a number x and then they can extrapolate from that the number of legal immigrants that the country is aware of and those are that's data points that can certainly let's see x minus y equals z z would be the number of illegal aliens in this country it's a tool that the government needs in order to determine who gets what basically but again the democrats don't want that to happen because should those numbers come out then we'll have a fuller understanding because we've been tossing around the same numbers now for years fifteen twenty years ago you're saying they're ten to twelve million illegals coming over the border at a rate of roughly one point seven million a year but somehow that number has grown what's find out our case maybe people are leaving at a rate of one point seven million years well maybe the living at a rate of one point five million net net we're only guinea two hundred thousand a year i have no idea but you can't figure out that stuff and lets you actually check out what is going on and that is leading to the most recent kerfuffle this is a question that's been included in every.

fifteen twenty years seven million years
"seven million years" Discussed on WCHS

WCHS

02:09 min | 3 years ago

"seven million years" Discussed on WCHS

"You so much for having me okay first question how did you as a youth get interest did in science anthropology journalism what's set you off on this journey i think it it must have begun for me whenever i have is an ivy the newspaper boy so i spent a lot of my time when i was a little kid walking around the neighborhood throwing newspapers on the peoples porches and in between i was always reading the newspaper and i think that's where i got both my interest in human nature and my interest in journalism because you've read these things as a kid and you say wow you know we're doing we're waging war on the one hand and were uh sending rockets to the moon on the other hand how do you end up with a creature that does that sort of thing where do we come from now your book talks about the story that began seven million years ago when we humans separated from the aid so paint a picture for us we are now in in africa someplace near ethiopia no one knows for sure but at seven million years ago in africa what happened what was it like to be in africa at that time and how did humans begin well at the time there were some global climate changes that were taking place particularly in the indian ocean and the change of the current there had caused the climate to get colder and to dry out a lot of africa much of africa in fact much lower europe was uh rainforest up until uh around that time and so which started c is the rain forest start that thin in retreat you know more to the lines where they are now and because of that you know you all a lot of different kinds of primates that we're living in those forests but some of them got stranded you know as the force retreated and increasingly over time it took a long time but overtime the four a screw thinner they became more scrub and trees and uh and and then more or like savannah which is the way it is now so then you have much more open space and it's much more difficult to get the food you have more predators life in general gets much more dangerous now painted a picture as to what.

ethiopia europe open space africa seven million years one hand
"seven million years" Discussed on KMET 1490-AM

KMET 1490-AM

02:09 min | 3 years ago

"seven million years" Discussed on KMET 1490-AM

"Thank you so much for having me occupy this question how did you as a youth get interested in science anthropology journalism what set you off on this journey i think it it must have begun for me whenever i have is an ivy the newspaper boy so um i spent a lot of my time when i was a little kid walking around the neighborhood throwing newspapers on the peoples uh porches and uh in between i was always reading the newspaper and i think that's where i got both my interest in human nature and my interest in journalism because you've read these things as a kid and you say wow you know we're doing we're waging war on the one hand and were uh sending rockets to the moon on the other hand how do you end up with creature that does that sort of thing where do we come from europe book talks about the story that began seven million years ago when we humans separated from the aid so paint a picture for us we are now in africa some place near ethiopian no one knows for sure but at seven million years ago in africa what happened what was it like to be in africa at that time and how did humans begin well at the time there were some global climate changes that were taking place particularly in the indian ocean and the change up the current there had caused the climate to get colder and to dry out a lot of africa much of africa in fact much lower europe was rainforest up until uh around that time and so which started c is the rain forest start that thin in retreat you know more to the lines where they are now and because of that you will all get into a lot of different kinds of primates that we're living in those forests but some of them got stranded you know has the forest retreated and increasingly over time it took a long time but overtime the the a screw thinner they became more scrub and trees and uh and and then more like savannah which is the way it is now so then you have much more open space and it's much more difficult to get the food you have more predators life in general gets much more dangerous now painted a picture as.

open space europe africa seven million years one hand
"seven million years" Discussed on WHYR 96.9 FM

WHYR 96.9 FM

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"seven million years" Discussed on WHYR 96.9 FM

"Discovery magazine called where are we going why are our brain so big who was the first human why do we walk upright and other great mysteries of human evolution so let's start this story about six to seven million years ago in africa when many scientists think that we first began to split off from the chimpanzees and the apes so tell us a little bit about the evidence for what happened in africa six to seven million years ago and why did we split off there are two primary kinds of evidence that you can look at uh one is fossils and uh if you look for fossils of hamad's that is um eighths that are more closely related to us than to other uh living apes um you if you go back you can fight you can find hamad's off all over the old world going back about uh million years and then further back it gets a little harder to find a little harder uh before about a million and a half years that all in africa and then the oldest one that's been to sound is somewhere between six and seven million years old uh that was found in the sahera and it's called suhel anther bits and it was actually just announced last year so it's quite a tremendous discovery uh and and really a very important one uh so you have that as as uh oldest evidence of hamad's evolution uh going on in africa but you can also look at another kind of evidence you can look at the evidence in our own dna you can compare our dna to the dna of other aides so our closest living relative are uh chimpanzees and but noboa's which look like chimpanzees uh but they're actually different species anyway they are basically sort of our first cousin and if you compare our dna to their it's astonishingly similar uh if you look at the parts of the human genome where uh.

Discovery magazine africa hamad noboa human genome seven million years million years
"seven million years" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:56 min | 3 years ago

"seven million years" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Still pretty impressive so you win again i give him was that an audience of five year old boy was forty house that's my son's goal jonathan according to guinness how many years did the world's oldest cat live one point seven million years i can't that i got when i was a sophomore in college and we're like oh let's get a cat and then i didn't realize that the cat was going to live many years i hadn't really thought about it and so this can't was still alive when i had children this cat live to be like twenty one years old how that was pretty old for a cat so i don't think it's going to get too much older than that but i'm going to say surprisingly older than that i'm going to say twenty six twenty six our audience guest thirty three years the correct answer is thirty eight years and three days thirty eight years in three days holy moley yep and now everyone is freaking out about that i i guarantee you there was no fun for the last twenty years of its life well done i feel like yeah you were amazing on that and so is our crowd that was of the crowd well them jonathan well audio it's time to crooner big winner let's bring back our finalists damien vendor putin who learned that he's more free to falling then spyders and amanda gilligan who will give her third graders credit for making far jokes a group greg klis get take it away amanda in damien we have played hundreds of games over the years on asked me another and i'm happy to announce that your final round is our one thousandth of game.

putin guinness amanda gilligan greg klis thirty eight years three days seven million years thirty three years twenty one years twenty years five year
"seven million years" Discussed on KMET 1490-AM

KMET 1490-AM

02:09 min | 3 years ago

"seven million years" Discussed on KMET 1490-AM

"You so much for having me okay first question how did you as a youth get interested in science anthropology journalism what's set you off on this journey i think it it must have begun for me whenever i was on a newspaper boy so i spent a lot of my time when i was a little kid walking around the neighborhood throwing newspapers on the people who porches and in between i was always reading the newspaper and i think that where i got both my interest in human nature and my interest in journalism because you've read these things as a kid in a while you know we're doing but waging war on the one hand and were stunning rocket to the moon on the other hand you end up with a creature that does that sort of thing where do we come from now your book talks about the story that began seven million years ago when we humans separated from the apes so paint a picture for us we are now in africa some place near ethiopia no one knows for sure but as seven million years ago in africa what happened what was it liked to be in africa at that time and how did humans begin well at the time there were some global climate change is taking place particularly in the indian ocean and the change of the current there at caused the climate to get colder and the dry out a lot of africa much africa in fact much of lower europe was rainforest up until around that time and so which started he is the rain forest start that thin in retreat more to the lines where they are now and because of that you all and a lot of different kinds of primates that we're living in those fourth but some of them got stranded as the forest retreated and increasingly over time took a long time but overtime the forest screw thinner they became more scrub and trees and and and then more like savannah which is the way it is now so then you have much more open space and it is much more difficult to get the food you have more predators life in general and get much more dangerous now painted a picture as to what.

ethiopia climate change open space africa seven million years one hand
"seven million years" Discussed on KOIL

KOIL

02:18 min | 3 years ago

"seven million years" Discussed on KOIL

"Now we cover this before goethe's before this program and just to put you in nemesis here's a a theoretical dwarf star thought to be a companion doors son in the theory was postulated to explain a perceived cycle of mass extinctions in earth's history scientists have speculated that such a star could affect the orbit of objects in the far our solar system sending them on a collision course with earth now does this sound familiar to allow you yes it does because people said the same thing about planet x now there have been recent astronomical surveys and they have failed to find any evidence of this red dwarf for the store star a 2017 study suggests this year that other could have been a nemesis in the very ancient past read in the early nineteen scientists knows that extinctions on earth seemed to fall in cyclical pattern mass extinction seem to occur more frequently every twenty seven million years the long span of time caused them to turn to astronomical events for an explanation nineteen eightyfour richard mueller of university of californiaberkeley suggested that a red dwarf star 15 light years away could be the cause of these mass extinctions later theories some suggested that nemesis could be a brown or white dwarf or low map star only a few times this massive is jubal her all would cast the dim light making them difficult to spot scientists have speculated that nemesis may affect the ort cloud which is made up of icy rocks surrounding the son beyond the range of pluto the many of these chunks of travelled around the sun in in a longterm elliptical orbit as they come closer of course to the starlet the these ice crystals begin to melt in stream behind them which of course bar comets businesses why we see cops will devos's travelled through the ord cloud every twenty seven million years summer arguing that it could kick extra comets how of the sphere and send them curling towards.

solar system richard mueller devos goethe university of californiaberkel twenty seven million years 15 light years