35 Burst results for "Seven Meter"

The Archeological Dig of Gobekli Tepe

Everything Everywhere Daily

01:52 min | Last month

The Archeological Dig of Gobekli Tepe

"When close schmidt began his excavation of go. Beckley tempe in nineteen ninety-four. He had no idea what he was going to find. And by the way the name go beckley tempe in turkish means pot belly hill. The spot was a hill. That had been previously noted in an archaeological survey conducted by the universities of istanbul in chicago in nineteen sixty three. They noted the presence of stone tools as well as some stones sticking out of the ground which they thought were gravestones based on work. At previous sites schmidt realized the stone sticking out of the ground might not be headstones but could be ancient monoliths as he began his dig. He realized that his hunch was correct. The stones work gravestones but were in fact carved ancient monoliths as the dig progressed over the years. They discovered a much larger complex. There were multiple monoliths with elaborate carvings on them. Some of them had pictures of animals and people. The large megaliths stood about fifteen feet or five meters tall. These were surrounded by circular walls. In the at twenty of these circular enclosures that have been discovered so far. The largest megalithic which has been discovered is seven meters or twenty three feet tall and is estimated to weigh fifty tons. The entire complex is located on the top of a hill which has a great view of the surrounding countryside and it isn't near any source of water. There were cisterns found at the site which were designed to collect rainwater. Whoever built this clearly had some form of societal organization in the ability to move large stones in addition to doing artistic carvings. If this was all there was to beckley tepi this would still be incredible find however there was more much more. They found embers from cooking fires on the site and did radiocarbon dating on them. They were also able to date. Many of the tools found at the site. What they discovered was astounding. They were dated as being eleven thousand years old.

Beckley Tempe Universities Of Istanbul Schmidt Chicago Beckley Tepi
The Problem With Track & Field World Records

Everything Everywhere Daily

02:45 min | 7 months ago

The Problem With Track & Field World Records

"What goes into a world record. Obviously it has to be an incredible performance. Everything has to come together just right. They don't happen very often. When bob beamon broke the world's record in the long jump in nineteen sixty eight. See my previous episode about that. The conditions were perfect. He had the maximum allowable. Tailwind it was at a high altitude in mexico city. He had perfect form and he put together his best jump ever at just the right time since the advent of competitive athletics nine thousand nine hundred twelve. The international association of athletic federation's has been keeping world records in every event. There's been a progression of world records. As people of incrementally bested previous performances. Most world records are only broken by less than one percent. The greatest single increase in a world record was the aforementioned bob beamon jump which beat the previous world record by six point five percent so that is sort of the world record of world records. Each event has a very different progression in how frequent and how recent world records get set. And this gets into the real heart of what i wanna talk about. You should expect to see world records being broken at a slower and slower rate over time as humans. Approach the limit of human performance should become harder and harder to break records. Records will require more luck and more people who have the perfect physique in the very peak of their careers. But this isn't quite what happened in some events there hasn't been a new world record set in over thirty years. You're shulte set the world record in the men's discus in one thousand nine hundred eighty six at seventy four point zero eight meters to put that into perspective. The gold medalist in the two thousand nineteen world championships had a distance of sixty seven point. Five nine meters a full six point five meters or twenty one feet short of the world record the men's hammer throw was also said in nineteen eighty-six yuri set up of the soviet union through the hammer. Eighty six point seven meters. The two thousand nineteen world champion through it. Only eighty point five meters that six point two meters less than the world record. The oldest existing world record in track and field is the women's eight hundred meters. Your meal acrostic viola of czechoslovakia set a world's record finishing the eight hundred in one minute. Fifty three point two eight seconds. That's almost five seconds. Faster than the two thousand nineteen world champion. You might have noticed something that all these really old records have in common. They're all held by athletes from former communist countries. If you're thinking that these records might be tainted by performance enhancing drugs. You aren't alone.

Bob Beamon International Association Of A Mexico City Athletics Yuri Soviet Union Czechoslovakia
What Happened To Berlin After the Second World War?

Your Brain on Facts

06:19 min | 8 months ago

What Happened To Berlin After the Second World War?

"The end of world war two signaled and unsure future for the defeated germany. Between the alta and potsdam peace conferences it was decided to split germany into four allied zones the eastern part of the country going to the soviet union to control and the western parts going to the united states britain and eventually france west germany was technically the boondocks republik deutschland or federal republic of germany and east germany was the jewish democratic republic german democratic republic or gd are despite berlin sitting entirely in the eastern part of the country. And i constantly have to remind myself. That berlin was nowhere near the east west divide. The city was also divided into similar zones. The mere existence of west berlin a conspicuously capital city deep within the communist east germany quote stuck like a bone in the soviet throat according to soviet leader nikita khrushchev so tenuous where the relations between the east and west that russia began plotting to drive the us britain and france out of berlin for good in nineteen forty eight. A soviet blockade of west berlin was set up blocking off all rail and road access in an effort to starve the western allies out of the city. In one of the most dramatic standoffs in the history of the cold war the berlin blockade saw the us and its allies supplying their sectors of the city from the air known as the berlin airlift. The allied nations flew in more than two point. Three million tons of food fuel and other supplies over the course of a year until the soviets finally gave up an the blockade things. Were relatively calm for a while. But in the late nineteen fifties. The soviets noticed a trend. Developing people saw how life on the capitalist side was recovering faster than life on the communist side. Not to mention there were a lot fewer spies keeping tabs on regular folks on the western side and people began to emigrate. This was especially true of doctors. Scientists and skilled professionals resulting in a serious brain drain in the east got worse year. Over year khrushchev ordered the east german government to stop the flow of emigrants for good on the night of the twelfth nineteen sixty one in one night barbed wire barriers blockade and even some sections of brick and mortar wall were constructed. It was later reinforced multiple times to become an impenetrable twelve footer. Three point seven meter high concrete wall. Roughly one hundred miles or one hundred and sixty one kilometer. Long complete with no-man's-land. Landmines guard dogs guard towers and checkpoints the relatively fluid border which had until that point allowed some sixty thousand east germans to commute daily to good paying jobs in the west visit. Family and friends attend soccer games and so on was gone with no warning. Whatever side of the border you went to sleep on on august twelve. That was where you stayed for the next twenty eight years. This opposing structure didn't stop people from trying to make a great escape to the west. Roughly one hundred and seventy one people. Some of them defecting soviet soldiers lost their lives trying to cross the border but over five thousand more succeeded and some of them got really creative with it but the first person to cross that foreboding line just hopped over it when the wall was three days old much of it was not actually a wall at all but sections of barb wire fence though with soldiers and police to enforce it one of those was eighteen year old. Conrad shuman stationed at the corner of bernauer. Stresa and opener stresa. He might have been young but he could tell which way the wind was blowing. He wanted out of the gdr like now he pays his feet nervously while chain smoking and occasionally pushing down the barbed wire coil. It was only two feet high. While the other guards were distracted by a gathering crowd shuman swapped out his loaded. Submachine gun for an unloaded and therefore lighter one at four. Pm shoe inflict away. His cigarette took a running start and deathly leapt over the barrier dropping. His gun and just leaving it. As he was whisked into a waiting west german police car a west german journalist captured the leap to freedom in what would become one of the most famous images of the wall until nineteen eighty nine. The west loves shuman but many of the people he left behind considered him to be a lowly traitor even after he was reunited with his family after the fall of the wall a generation later many people still shunned him as a deserter. Shuman was the first soldier from the national people's army to escape. But it's estimated that twenty seven hundred east. German soldiers and policemen followed his example. If someone had turned your home into a prison then you should treat it like a prison and start digging a tunnel in nineteen sixty four thirty students from west berlin spent several months digging a four hundred and seventy six foot or one hundred and forty five meter long tunnel tell people in the east escape one assumes they had to crawl to freedom because the tunnel was only about three feet high less than forty eight hours after it was finished the stasi the german border patrol discovered it but not before fifty seven men women and children had managed to escape. Which i assume is why. It's referred to as tunnel fifty seven

East Germany Berlin West Berlin Britain East German Government France Nikita Khrushchev Potsdam Federal Republic United States Soviet Union Khrushchev Conrad Shuman Stresa Russia Shuman
Lunar Water is More Abundant Than Previously Thought

SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

05:45 min | 1 year ago

Lunar Water is More Abundant Than Previously Thought

"Astronomers have discovered that water maybe far more abundant on the moon than previously thought water is is already being detected on the permanently shadowed floors of craters neither Luna polls with some never reaches and signatures for hydroxy polls that he's molecules made up one hydrogen and one oxygen atom has been detected on the lunar surface now, and you study reported in the Journal. Nature Astronomy is confirmed that water molecules comprising one oxygen and two hydrogen atoms. Good outage to uh-huh has been found in lunar regular. Even sunlit areas of the Moon, the observations were made by Sophia the stratospheric observatory for infrared astronomy a converted Boeing seven, four, seven SP airliner fitted with a two point seven meter infrared reflect telescope. The observatory which is operated by Nassar and the German Aerospace Centre de la was able to detect the molecules in the Moon Southern Hemisphere Safiya Project Site Alexandra Roy from dealer says scientists have been looking for water on the moon ever since the first lunar rocks were brought back to earth in the nineteen sixties. However evidence it's been hard to come by the first confirmation of Luna, water came in two thousand and eight from this moon. Meteorology Mabuhay aboard the Indian Chan One spacecraft which detected frozen on the shaded floors of Doc. Paula. Craters Sophia was able to identify the mistake fingerprint of water molecules in the mid infrared range at a wavelength of six micrometres in the vicinity of the the crater in the moon southern fear, and that raises some interesting questions where did the water in these non polar regions come from and how come it can persist in these areas without an atmosphere surface temperatures can read something like two hundred and thirty degrees. Celsius hot enough to cause water to evaporate under the hate of the light of Sun. Now, it's possible that micrometeorites which are. Constantly falling onto the lunar surface I carrying small quantities of water which deposited the lunar rocks during collisions. In the process, the water becomes enclosed in tiny glass bead like structures in the ground. Another idea involves a two stage process in which hydrogen from the solar wind riches the lunar surface combined with hydroxyl molecules on the ground to form water molecules. The data required by Safiya indicates that most of this water being detected so far lies within the substrate covering the lunar surface. Now, we're not talking about much Roy estimates. It's about the. Equivalent of a three mealy milliliter. A can of drink spread a resurface area, the size of a football pitch in reality, it means the moon still dry than the desert's of earth, but the quantity of water that's been discovered could still prove important future missions to the moon severe. We'll now observe the moon sunlit surface during different. Luna faces to investigate this water phenomenon in greater detail sinus that this will open up a new insight into where the water on the moon comes from how it's stored and how it's distributed across the surface. Meanwhile a second study also reported in the journal Nature Astronomy modeled areas of the lunar surface cast in permanent shadow finding that these so-called cold traps contain at least twenty percent of all the water is on the moon it seems small scattered. Cold trips are scattered across the lunar polar regions and could provide accessible water resources which could be used for drinking for making oxygen for breathing and making oxygen and hydrogen for rocket fuel. One of the study's authors. No, but Shraga, offer from the Planetary Science Institute says Future Lunar Rovers may have a hard time driving into date dot craters. With extremely low temperatures but smaller cold traps would be far more accessible. He says approximately ten to twenty percent of the cold trap area for water is fantasy contained within microcode traps must witcher less that a major across the discovery changes sciences perspective of water on the Moon, which until now is focused on the largest water as was situated within the broadest deepest craters at high latitudes astronomer. Johnny Horner. From the University of southern Queensland says these latest discoveries of water on the moon will play a major role in the autumn missions returning humans to the lunar surface in twenty twenty four. Ways, you can look at of them that he's much more general and the people took much. It's what really shattering this myth, the Walter Scott in the innovest, which is something that's been a bit of bath mindset. A couple of decades since got my career Walter is everywhere. It's just it's Walter ice rather than liquid. Well, what we found over the last decade of so it's the most lessons that we look the more West finding. Walter, in it never imagined, we're announcement of Wall Toronto Mercury it will not last thing to look what we're finding. The. Central Time there is Walter. The colts of the mode have been confirmed on the mall, the compound as more water than people my. Locations way will be able to access that won't actually from a technology on down the line I'm not hungry exciting locations, the future of kind of human space exploration particularly from the point of view I've going places and then creating your own fuel back to go on from that, which if you do that, it says a huge amount of because if you only continues feel. You've lost fueling. To take with you for whatever future and he wants to attack the problem is that launching prevented big Strong gravitational. You've got much better as well. So every time you wanted few, you've been going to use more fuel to launch fuel. So you have this kind of runaway way.

Nassar German Aerospace Centre De La Alexandra Roy Luna Safiya Nature Astronomy Sophia Boeing Shraga Planetary Science Institute Paula Journal Johnny Horner Walter ROY
How Long Can Andean Condors Fly Without Flapping Their Wings

BrainStuff

03:03 min | 1 year ago

How Long Can Andean Condors Fly Without Flapping Their Wings

"Imagine your average three-year-old human child something around three feet or a meter tall probably covered in jam a now imagine that child trying to get off the ground with a pair of wings bid have to be pretty big wings. Welcome to the plight of the Indian condor species name Volt Hor griffiths the heaviest flying bird in the world. Weighing in at up to thirty three pounds or fifteen kilos, they keep their heavy bodies in the air with some of the longest wings in the world there wingspan can range over ten feet long that's over three meters. There are only a handful of birds carnally living on our planet have larger wings spans, and they're all pelagics, birds, a plastic birds being seabirds that soar over the open ocean for weeks at a time, such as fast petrels and sheer waters. As far as we know, the largest brand ever fly was the Pella. Gorna Sanders C., which lived twenty five to twenty, eight million years ago and was twice as large as the biggest bird living today with a wingspan of twenty four feet over seven meters. Seabirds can accomplish this. Thanks in part to the literally uplifting winds that flow over oceans the Indian condor. Mostly relies on updrafts high in the Andes mountains across much of Western, south. America. The problem with being such a huge bird is that it makes getting off the ground or even flapping those giant wings and flight a bit of an ordeal. Soaring is easy once they're up in the sky and that's mainly what Andean condors do they just float like hang gliders in the air currents sometimes serving the ground for dead animals to eat as a scavenger and sometimes just having an APP. But this means that taking off is the most costly part of the birds overall energy supply. Scientists have always known that they spend very little time flapping their wings but a study published in July of twenty. Twenty and the proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences found the Andean condors flap, their wings, a sum total of almost never. Not, only to the researchers find colossal birds, flap their wings one percent of their total flight time they discovered a bird could fly for five hours and more than one hundred miles or one hundred, fifty kilometers without flapping them once. The research team found that weather didn't affect how much flapping the condors were doing. Study Co author Hannah Williams a postdoctoral researcher at the Max Planck Institute for Animal Behavior said in a press release. This suggests that decisions about when and where to land are crucial as not only do condor's need to be able to take off again but unnecessary landings will add significantly to their overall flight costs. All of which means that in Congress must understand how to use thermals, thermals being invisible patterns and bubbles of air moving all around in the atmosphere to their advantage, and they must understand this much better than scientists previously gave them credit for.

Max Planck Institute For Anima Gorna Sanders C. Pella Postdoctoral Researcher National Academy Of Sciences Hannah Williams Congress America
"seven meter" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

03:40 min | 1 year ago

"seven meter" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"Have a heat advisory 95 off to the east. On ABC seven meter. All just brought down on this for seven, currently in the nation's capital 78 degrees, 8 46 There was a a meeting in conference call yesterday with members of the House Freedom Caucus, and they got into it on the call Mac Gates, Jim Jordan, Tommaso Chip, Roy Biggs and our body along with Liz Cheney. She's the House GOP conference chair. They got into it, And it wound up with Matt Gates calling for Liz Cheney to step down or be removed from leadership. After this call yesterday morning in a podcast that was obtained by the Hill in advance of its release, Matt Gates said, I do not believe that Liz Cheney's the right person to leave the House Republican Conference. In this upcoming November election. Jim Jordan, My colleague, My mentor. My friend made the case strongly that Liz Cheney is hurting President Trump. They criticized her backing Thomas Massey's primary opponent and and funding him. And she went withdrawing that after that guy was found out to have made some very distasteful tweets legend, Supposedly they the criticized her for breaking with the president on Afghanistan policy for supporting Anthony Fauci, the president's Germany policy the president's response to Corona virus. Her tweets attacking him on and trying. As I said to Thomas Massey, she fought back. She defended herself and she went back after Jim Jordan. But this was a big back and forth and Naked, saying that you know what? Um, We need to stand together as a repose as a Republican conference, And he thinks that she's out of step with the majority of the Trump supporters and the Republicans in the country. It's nice to see that the Republicans are going to try to stand together something the Democrats do come hell or high water. They circle the wagons and the Republicans, you know, form a line into, you know a firing squad, so at least they're trying. I think they realize that they're not going to win the house back and the Senate, maybe indeed. Agers Wells, the presidency for the Republicans, so at least trying Tio show in the United Front and they'll think she's a personal lead it well. I got to say something working against her is for recent adoption of this species claim that there were Russian bounties on American troops that she went straight away to indulging that Which remember when that first came out. One of the first things we talked about his boy, This smells suspicious. This smells like somebody's trying to keep us in Afghanistan that there's an effort to do that. And what it was Cheney do immediately. When that report came out from the New York Times, she ran to the microphones. She ran to Twitter. She claimed that she wanted investigations into all of this, and she wanted answers from the White House. What do you know? And when did you know? Right? That's what you directed at the president. Then it turns out it was all a lie. It was all just a fantasy. It was false. You have NSA. You have Centcom. You have the United States military. All responding. There is no evidence to support the claims in the New York Times piece, and that thing crumbled ashes, But in the meantime, she indulged it and she helped get a firestorm started against the president of the United States. As a result, that's not the kind of thing that's going to unify the Republican Party's gonna leader GOP caucus. Lida GOP Caucus. I couldn't agree more. But again, I'm warms my heart to see Republicans trying to stand together. It's about time. 8 49 and businesses are starting to bounce back. But what if you could do better than that? What if you.

Liz Cheney Jim Jordan president House Freedom Caucus President Trump House Republican Conference Matt Gates New York Times Thomas Massey Afghanistan ABC Republican Party Anthony Fauci Mac Gates White House GOP United States Centcom Senate
The Great Escapes with Life Death and Taxonomy

Your Brain on Facts

04:44 min | 1 year ago

The Great Escapes with Life Death and Taxonomy

"If you've been staying inside as much as possible these past few months. That's a little easier to do now that the summer heat has fully set in your probably anxious to get out to fly the coop as it were. Animals who can fly should be getting out of zoos all the time. It would stand to reason. Though. usually therein enclosures netting across them, or they've had their wings clipped. That's a process of trimming off birds largest flight feathers, so they can't get enough. Lift when they flap which I'm probably going to end up doing to our backyard chickens if they don't knock off the free ranging. Birds generally stay in captivity pretty well, but of course there are exceptions to the rule or I wouldn't have brought it up. In two thousand, five and African Flamingo managed to get away from the Sedgwick county sue in Kansas. A massive search was launched, but The crabs backup singer was nowhere to be found. Until two thousand thirteen, when he was spotted, six hundred and fifty miles away on the Gulf coast of Texas among a flock of wild local flamingos. Bird watcher named Neil Hayward have been able to confirm the flamingos identity by the numbered band on his leg and offered to help recapture it. The Zoo essentially said I'm not even mad. I'm impressed and told the folks in Texas to leave the Flamingo to his new life with a mate who had herself escaped from a Mexican Nature Reserve. Anyone who's dealt with a parrot knows that they're too clever by half, and that certainly applies to Cuba the mccaw a resident of Vancouver's Zoos Parrot Gardens. Even, though the suet taken all precautions to prevent the parrots from escaping, it seemed that the clever girl was hell bent on getting out. On a pleasant Spring Day in two thousand nine zoo staff had moved the parrots to an outdoor enclosure. A little while later, their headcount came up short. The keepers weren't panicked. All the birds had their wings clipped. So how far could you have gotten? Surprisingly are considering. She hitched a ride in an RV. Juba got into a compartment near the vehicle's Engine Bay and hung out for three days before the family in Rv, found her. Luckily they were on one of the more stationary parts of their vacation and had only gone twenty miles, so it was barely out of their way to take what I'm assuming was a very annoyed parrot back to the zoo. Anyone who's watched? Jailbreak movie knows that you won't get very far without stealing a set of wheels. Try to imagine the end of the great escape without the motorcycles. No good. Even one? The Indian spectacle at the Berlin soon knew that. In two thousand and four, he rode a log across the moat, the rounds, the bear habitat and scaled a wall to freedom. Now that he was out, he had to use this time wisely. I stop the zoos playground. Terrified parents rushed their children away while one had a jolly go on the merry go round and went down the slide. After getting bored of that fairly quickly, one wandered off only to find a bicycle across his path. When he stopped to examine it perhaps to assess it for its usability as a getaway vehicle, the keepers who had put it there were able to track him and carry all three hundred pounds or one hundred and thirty six kilos of air to his habitat. And potentially dangerous could also describe a gator named Chuckie who got loose from the Alabama Gold Coast in two, thousand, four with a little help from Hurricane Ivan. Zookeepers hadn't been able to evacuate the gators and the storm surge destroyed their enclosure, setting them loose. Them meaning plural gators, though only chucky got any real publicity. Rapidly due to the fact that he was twelve feet or three point seven meters long and weighed about half a ton. That makes for better copy. Zoo officials weren't as worried about Chucky, going native, as they were of Chucky, going up to people expecting to be fed as he had for the past fourteen. Here's a situation that could get very ugly very fast. Luckily dedicated alligator retrieval team from gator land in Orlando was able to catch chucky less than a week later. Some animals get by with a little help from their friends or even from strangers. Three kangaroos staged a daring escape from a wildlife park near Frankfurt Germany. The name of whom I am now going to attempt to say. The hawksbill shoot par concert. It is what it is taken early vote. They escaped by going under the fence. Thanks to the work of a Fox and wild boar.

Chucky Gators Zoos Parrot Gardens Chuckie Texas Juba Sedgwick County Gulf Neil Hayward Frankfurt Germany Mexican Nature Reserve Cuba Berlin Zookeepers Hurricane Ivan Vancouver Engine Bay Alabama Gold Coast Orlando Kansas
What Are The World's Biggest, Baddest Jigsaw Puzzles?

BrainStuff

06:18 min | 1 year ago

What Are The World's Biggest, Baddest Jigsaw Puzzles?

"Even before. It became a popular way to while away the hours days and weeks during isolation putting together. Jigsaw Puzzles was a favourite family activity. But did you know that? Jigsaw Puzzles have their origin in education. Sir John Spills Berry an English engraver and map maker in the mid. Seventeen hundred is credited with creating the first jigsaw puzzle in seventeen seventy six by attaching a map of the world to a piece of wood then cutting the country's out teachers used the maps to teach geography to their students and a recreational activity was born spills berry would hardly recognize his creation today in the early part of the twentieth century. Jigsaw Puzzles were used as marketing tools often given away or sold for mere pennies today companies. Still use puzzles for creative marketing. Take Kodak for instance. It's selling what it. Claims is the quote world largest jigsaw puzzle. We HAVE TO ADMIT. This thing is pretty huge. The fifty one thousand three hundred piece puzzle features twenty-seven injuries from around the world and when completed measures twenty eight point five feet by six point. Two five feet. That's eight point six meters by one point nine meters and this beast costs more than four hundred dollars but all due respect to the Kodak Jigsaw puzzle. The world's largest jigsaw puzzle by surface area. According to Guinness World Records was put together in Dubai in July of twenty eighteen. The puzzle was an honor of the year of Ziyad a year long tribute to the founding father of the United Arab Emirates. The late Shahid there are more than twelve thousand pieces in the puzzle which was an image of Zayed the official record size measured sixty five thousand nine hundred and five point one seven square feet which is six thousand one hundred twenty two point six eight square meters putting together. Jigsaw puzzles is a Greek group activity but one thousand six hundred students of the University of Economics Ad Hoc Human City in Vietnam took it to the next level. When they completed the jigsaw puzzle with the most pieces on record five hundred fifty one thousand two hundred and thirty two to be exact when it was finished the puzzle measured just over. Forty eight by seventy six feet about fourteen by twenty three meters. It took the students seventeen hours to create the massive puzzle which featured a lotus flower with six petals. But what about the hardest jigsaw puzzle? Ever it contains only nine pieces and it's called the puzzle nine it was designed by Asaka. It includes a small board. The nine pieces include right angles and curved edges. That fit together in several combinations. Think Tetris but way harder. The challenge is getting the last piece to fit. It's nearly impossible to fit all the pieces on the board. It took Chris Ramsey a magician video creator and master puzzle or two hours nine minutes to solve the ice nine and by his own description. He was completely exhausted. By the end of the experience. You Sokha created another equally. Difficult puzzle called the Jigsaw Puzzle. Twenty nine the challenge here is to fit twenty nine pieces into a five by five inch. That's twelve by twelve centimeter trae. It comes with five corner pieces. Just let that sink in. Then there's the largest hand cut wooden jigsaw puzzle Guinness record held by Dave Edmunds England. Who created a forty thousand seven hundred sixty three piece puzzle celebrating the Queen's Diamond Jubilee the puzzle which featured thirty-three Images of Jubilee celebrations was twenty by eight feet? That's six by two and a half meters. When completed though it collapsed soon after Evans completed it took him and force. More than sixteen days to rebuild the puzzle and move at Sandringham where it went on display and was confirmed as the Guinness World record holder. We spoke by email with Caitlin vesper records manager with Guinness World Records North America. She said one of the main criteria for all Guinness World Records titles is that they must be breakable. Every record titled S- monitored is open to being challenged which allows for all kinds of record breaking opportunities all over the world. The Guinness record for most Jigsaw puzzle pieces tattooed on the human body belongs to the aptly named enigma. Sometimes known as Paul Laurence. Who'S A sideshow performer? Actor musician originally from Seattle in two thousand eleven enigmas set the record for having two thousand one hundred twenty three puzzle pieces tattooed on his body from head to toe in no word on whether anyone comes close to second but many puzzle records are held by companies such as the record for the largest spherical jigsaw puzzle. It measured fifteen point seven feet. That's four point. Seven seven meters in circumference and it was made by unit industrial limited in Hong Kong and featured scene from Winnie the Pooh vesper said brands and businesses. Come to US looking to harness the power of record-breaking to commemorate anniversaries and celebrations or to highlight the launch of a new product. Whole communities can come together to attempt to record to a like in March of two thousand nineteen when more than one thousand seven hundred people formed the largest human jigsaw puzzle piece on record a I. The record raised awareness for autism spectrum disorder. The puzzle pieces the symbol for the autismspeaks organization. Vesper explained each Guinness World. Records title has a set of guidelines. That must be followed. The record for the largest human jigsaw puzzle piece is a great example to highlight. This is considered one of our largest human image categories and the idea is to have a group of people gathered together to form a recognizable image. We define a jigsaw puzzle piece as an oddly shaped interlocking and Tessa leading piece designed to be part of a larger picture. The human image to be created would need to be instantly recognizable as a puzzle piece and not an entire puzzle. This record title can be broken if another group creates same image with a larger group of people. Anybody up for the challenge.

Guinness World Records Kodak Caitlin Vesper Sir John Spills Berry United Arab Emirates Chris Ramsey Dubai University Of Economics Hong Kong Tessa Shahid Seattle Dave Edmunds England United States Sandringham Paul Laurence Evans Official Zayed Vietnam
Birds on Rhinos' Backs Help Them Avoid Poachers

60-Second Science

02:37 min | 1 year ago

Birds on Rhinos' Backs Help Them Avoid Poachers

"This is scientific American sixty seconds science. I'm Suzanne barred black. Rhinos have terrible eyesight even so these giant African urban floors easily fend off. Hungry Lions and Hyenas. The body plan has proved to be good enough to survive on Savannah full of large predators. Being very thick skin big ripe. Eli Cohen's Victoria. University of Melbourne behavioral Ecologist Rhone Plots but those protective traits are no match for humans with guns today the species as critically endangered largely due to poaching but the rhinos may have an unlikely ally against poachers the red billed ox pecker the chatty sociable birds often hang out on the backs of rhinos feasting on parasitic ticks. And actually we such a sign that take his favorite diets of a nonsmoker. And if they feed on ticks that is a good thing the birds also get nutrients by picking it soars on the rhinos bodies out suspected that the rhinos put up with this indignity because the packers make loud alarm calls whenever they see. Humans approach giving the rhinos in early warning to flee and then sort of a distinctive rustling hissing sort of sound to test whether the ox Pecker is due in fact act as noisy lookouts plots and his team implanted radio transmitters in the rhino horns. This didn't hurt the rhinos and allowed the researchers to track the animals and approach undetected win. The Oscars are on the back when the pictures are not on their backs to get deer. Birds do alert them and if the runners do listen. The researchers found that rhinos without ox packers detected in approaching human only twenty three percent of the time at an average distance of twenty seven meters. But when ochs packers were present the birds alerted the rhinos one hundred percent of the time and they detected the human sixty one meters away on average and the more ox packers on the scene. The greater the detection distance which means the earlier the warning respect sense because the moral is you have a new back looking out for you. The more chance that they can pick up anything coming. What we think is going on. Fundamentally is wanted to resist dropping on the obstacle can be no doubt that there's really strong and human benefit to listening talks pickles. The study is in the Journal. Current biology with ox pecker recording by Tiffany plantain of the University of Miami. Plots thinks the packers may have evolved their sentinel behaviour because it protects their convenient food source. And the more. Lookouts the better in. What seems like a win win for both species. The birds thrive and the rhinos survive. Thanks for listening for scientific American sixty seconds science. I'm Suzanne Bard.

Packers Suzanne Bard Plots University Of Melbourne Eli Cohen Savannah Tiffany Plantain Ochs University Of Miami
"seven meter" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

02:13 min | 1 year ago

"seven meter" Discussed on 710 WOR

"Seven meters from of the seven centimeter mass in her breast and she had a three centimeter mass inner arm pit should stage three cancer I examined we staged her up and by the way I can say that we treated her more than a year ago with his big mass distorting the brass big mass in the breast of the under the armpit and she's eighty six years old members is eighty six years old and she doesn't want surgery she doesn't want chemotherapy and most people at that age probably wouldn't one of chemo because it's often debilitating and surgery well surgery by itself would have most likely cure this cancer and she came to us and she chose our treatment to one of our treatment and more than a year ago we treated her for this big mass in the breast of the big mass in the armpit stage three cancer with our treatment only he came in this week I just saw her actually yesterday and she is doing great she's in remission that big mass is gone the distortion of the breast is gone the bass under the armpit is gone clinically she's in remission doing while she's happy of course to do blood tests and imaging tests to make sure that she is fine this is what we do every day for this woman whose has this large breast cancer didn't want chemo didn't want surgery one of the effective treatment to take care of this cancer and that's indeed what we did the cancer is gone apple bowlers no orders to cancer and shows no symptoms this is what we do every day but Amanda sixty years old was born in New York City he has four children and you came because of prostate cancer was diagnosed a year before the Gleason seven cancer PSA seventy the cat scan was normal bone scan that was normal and he had no treatment the ways to earn forty four pounds examined him get a localized cancer Gleason seven PS eighty seven and that the surgeon who saw him just was encouraged him to have.

chemotherapy chemo cancer New York City apple Amanda
"seven meter" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

02:25 min | 1 year ago

"seven meter" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"Day seven meters tracking when we can maybe may see some sunshine leave us come back on the court how the Pacers star returned every scene what he calls the monumentality in his first game back from injury he's a great the morning see on this Thursday January thirtieth and we're glad to have you on wish TV and of the I. B. C. this hour seventy meters joining us right now without first forecast yeah they're pretty pretty much the same day we had absolutely out rinse and repeat almost for us here across central Indiana temperatures this morning starting off just below freezing I think for a lot of locations here in Indianapolis were at thirty two degrees or sing a lot of cloud cover there could maybe be a light drizzle or an isolated flurry around but most of us this morning I think should wake up dry just keep an eye out for some of the overpasses bridges often Agah exit and entry ramps to the interstate this morning just because those are an elevated surface as temperatures though for the most part in the lower thirties and it's going to be a cold start for us here to start up for Thursday morning we're starting to see precipitation now exit the state so we should be at least for the most part this morning preset free aside from an isolated drizzle or two but again most of us should see a fairly quiet morning in terms of preset we'll see a lot of cloud cover though that's still going to hang out with us they're a good portion of the day today we have a bit of a wintry mix now developing out in the plains states that same system eventually will track in our general direction so we are increasing our chance of some precipitation will time that out for you in our full forecast but right now we should see a primarily dry Thursday tens in the lower thirties thirty to nineteen thirty two in Bloomington thirty one in Lafayette ground temperatures right now pretty much widespread well below freezing so if any if we get any precipitation this morning there is that possibility of seeing some isolated slick spots and we're gonna give you a green light is because we're not looking at that much added precipitation temperatures hovering just below freezing so just keep in mind you could see a few slick spots here and there but nothing widespread for the morning commute temperatures starting up this morning lower thirties are gonna continue to see our times climb into the mid thirties by noon and then eventually upper thirties to near forty five five o'clock we will eventually track that next chance of a wintry mix coming up Michael forecasts roadways here this morning for the most part really good shape especially closer to Indianapolis I seventy here close to rolling keystone.

Indianapolis Agah Bloomington Pacers Indiana Lafayette Michael
Boeing 777X: World’s largest twin-engine jet completes first flight

BBC World Service

00:23 sec | 1 year ago

Boeing 777X: World’s largest twin-engine jet completes first flight

"Boeing says it has successfully completed the first test flight of the world's largest twin engine jet the seven seven seven X. the seventy seven metre long plane flew for three hours taking off and landing at Boeing field outside Seattle the flight is a boost for betting which has been struggling since it's seven three seven Max headliner was grounded following two fatal

Boeing Seattle MAX
Paddlefish is now extinct, scientists say

AP 24 Hour News

00:42 sec | 1 year ago

Paddlefish is now extinct, scientists say

"Chinese media outlets and internet users have been paying tribute to the Chinese paddlefish which sciences declared extinct in a research paper in early January China youth daily said it's a fair well at first sight noting many were unfortunately unfamiliar with the paddlefish before learning of its divine user shared similar sentiments on the Twitter like way both platform scientists believe the Chinese paddlefish or Chinese sword fish has a lineage dating back at least thirty four million years it was one of the largest freshwater species in the world research paper in the environmental science journals science of the total environment so they could grow as long as seven meters or twenty three feet but in

Twitter
Time for hip waders: Venice sees record 3rd exceptional tide

AP 24 Hour News

00:46 sec | 2 years ago

Time for hip waders: Venice sees record 3rd exceptional tide

"Venice was hit Sunday by our record third exceptional tied in the same week while other parts of Italy struggled with the series of weather woes from rain swollen rivers to high winds to an out of season avalanche stores in museums in Venice were mostly closed in the hardest hit area around St mark's square that didn't stop tourists from putting on high rubber boots or even hip waders to witness and photograph the spectacle most were disappointed when officials close down the historic square is wins rippled across the rising waters the doors of the famed Saint mark's basilica were securely shocked the public menaces tight office said this is the third time since Tuesday nights one point eight seven meter flood the worst in fifty

Venice Italy St Mark Saint Mark's Basilica Eight Seven Meter
Italian PM: Govt set to declare state of emergency in Venice

AP News Radio

00:35 sec | 2 years ago

Italian PM: Govt set to declare state of emergency in Venice

"Tennis has been hit with the highest tied in fifty years is the Italian government it's expected to declare a state of emergency and improve the first match is aimed at helping the city's recovery prime minister Giuseppe contagious quite the flooding of the blade to the heart of our country contains spent the nights in Venice well world famous monuments homes and businesses were hit hard by the exceptional flooding the will to recently reached one point eight seven meters above sea level the second highest level ever recorded in the city then this is math that the damage is estimated that hundreds of millions of euros I'm Karen Thomas

Tennis Prime Minister Venice Karen Thomas Giuseppe Eight Seven Meters Fifty Years
Italian PM: Govt set to declare state of emergency in Venice

AP News Radio

00:24 sec | 2 years ago

Italian PM: Govt set to declare state of emergency in Venice

"Prime minister Giuseppe contagious quite the flooding of the blade to the heart of our country contains spent the night in Venice well what famous monuments homes and businesses were hit hard by the exceptional flooding the will to recently reached one point eight seven meters above sea level the second highest level ever recorded in the city then this is math that the damage is estimated that hundreds of millions of euros I'm Karen Thomas

Venice Karen Thomas Prime Minister Giuseppe Eight Seven Meters
"seven meter" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

02:51 min | 2 years ago

"seven meter" Discussed on 710 WOR

"And happy to be with you what a what a woman was seventy eight years old she came with her son and her daughter in law she's seventy eight cheese with just three children has a history. of a skin diseases using right to doctors who treated with acid on the skin and have progression in the left eye and nose area second to my brother for had he seen by a second dermatologist to one do surgery Mohs surgery she has no headache or visions okay. he has had called us computers one colonoscopy just want mammography shows on testing shows a one surgery so someone cutting shows one bleeding. and I saw her and she had a one and a half centimeter lesion right in the forehead right where the hair stops in the forehead starts. and the big mass seven meter and a half and she moved her hair down the covered up but it's a big mass as a squamous cancer inches a second lesion on the bridge of her nose the badge on the left side of the nose of the top towards the bridge going to the eyelid affecting the I live it's raised in red and a regular and looks like a cancer. and the surgeons wanted taker to surgery and most likely with surgery with radical surgeries in a lose part of her nose and her eyes an or a lid. and she just doesn't want that she wants non invasive treatment here and that's what she wanted and she and her children were there are kind of fasting and fussing and do well. or is the patient is always right and we always like the families to come to resolution so I encourage her to go home and talk to her family she has three children and some in laws about the treatment but we have lots of experience she is adamant she wants no cutting no bleeding we have a high success rate and we have a new skin cancer booklet with also a book of the concerned about skin cancer Israel see skin cancers before and after our non invasive treatment with us it's not cutting and bleeding this is the work that we do every day at thirteen eighty four Broadway Broadway in thirty eight street in the heart of New York City those luxuries is whether this woman with two skin cancers on the forehead of the nose in the eyes who just does not want to have radical deforming surgery this is the work that we do every day every day it was because about a woman who is seventy four she's a woman from Germany she came with her friend his sister high blood pressure and breast cancer she was diagnosed six years ago and shoes were temple in neighboring states she's been seen by a chemo.

cancer. New York City Germany chemo Mohs seventy eight years seven meter six years
News in Brief 6 September 2019

UN News

03:13 min | 2 years ago

News in Brief 6 September 2019

"This is the news in brief from the united nations in yemen. Lifesaving reproductive health care services for more than one million women are threatened. Thanks to severe funding shortages shortages the u._s. Population fund or u._n._f._p._a. said on friday according to the agency although donors made humanitarian pledges worth two point six billion dollars is in february less than half has been received every two hours a yemeni woman dies from complications of pregnancy and childbirth and another twenty suffer preventable injuries juries infections or disabilities u._n._f._p._a. executive director dr talia canham said that unless more funds found immediately women and their babies could be at risk risk by the end of august one hundred of the more than two hundred and sixty hospitals u._n._f._p._a. supports had closed. It says that another seventy five will shut by the end of this month. The closures will directly affect some six hundred and fifty thousand women and more than one million would be at risk if all facilities close. The agency has warned as the u. u._n. And other aid partners respond to huge humanitarian needs in the hurricane struck bahamas latest reports indicate that the death toll is likely to rise considerably way to date thirty people are confirmed to have died after hurricane dorian hit the islands of avocado and grand bahama last weekend with maximum wind speeds of two hundred ninety anti seven kilometers per hour. That's one hundred and eighty five miles an hour but the government says that thousands are still missing after the category five storm bought with a storm surge of eighteen to twenty three feet high or five point five to seven meters. Here's dr in norton who heads the world health emergency medical teams initiative speaking in geneva. We certainly expect the death toll to rise. I can't tell you what that will be but we're really worried about it. What we've seen unfortunately this devastating storm surge especially with a stationary storm produces what you could see maybe after saddam and what we don't see in those cases injuries are such we see unfortunately a lot of people drowned round and losing their lives or surviving latest information suggests that some seventy six thousand people are homeless on the worst hit islands tamale finally where a trial project is underway to help aid workers get a better understanding for the needs of communities vulnerable to escalating violence and extremists the initiative is run by archer gotcha the u._n.'s aid coordination wing it relies on a local individual going into villages and asking people what they want most here's became agnew who's been a community community mobilizer for archer in timbuktu for four months so when i'm talking with the people i feel that people learn something from me like when i'm asking them get information from them about what they need and make monthly report and give it to the office of timbuktu which are office of timbuktu an there to give a better response youth they ask for training and dedication the project comes amid attacks by armed groups and militias against both both government forces and the u._n. Peacekeepers in the center and the north of the country according to archer the number of people displaced in mali has doubled in the last year to nearly one hundred and seventy thousand daniel johnson u._n. News.

Timbuktu United Nations Dr Talia Canham Yemen Hurricane Dorian Executive Director Bahamas Geneva Saddam Mali Daniel Johnson Agnew Seven Kilometers Per Hour Six Billion Dollars Twenty Three Feet Seven Meters Four Months Two Hours
Hurricane Dorian: Bahamas suffers ‘huge damage’ as storm becomes joint strongest ever

All Of It

01:00 min | 2 years ago

Hurricane Dorian: Bahamas suffers ‘huge damage’ as storm becomes joint strongest ever

"The most powerful storm to hit the carribean islands of the Bahamas since records began has torn roofs from buildings and caused severe flooding forecasters have warned of a life threatening storm surge of up to seven metres hurricane Dorian will head next towards the US eastern seaboard anemic bull reports from the Florida coast Dorian the most powerful hurricane ever recorded in the Bahamas continues to pummel the island chain so it's a stained wind speeds of broken records the only of the storm is currently moving across grand Bahama island it's an excruciatingly slow paced causing devastation over many agonizing hours it's already close the Abaco islands some of those start could manage to get out footage of submerged and destroyed homes and vehicles over the coming twenty four hours the hurricane's projected the head here to what's Florida when many of already boarded up and abandoned their

Bahamas Dorian Grand Bahama Island Florida United States Abaco Islands Twenty Four Hours Seven Metres
"seven meter" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

02:09 min | 2 years ago

"seven meter" Discussed on KTRH

"To tell in the dark plus forty seven meters down upon cage door and the lost city of gold once upon a time in Hollywood blinded by the light and the arch of racing in the rain badger weekend box office preview on I heart radio it's time for your TV to five on Saturday one of the most famous record labels of all time it's it's due in the documentary the making of Motown featuring plenty of behind the scenes footage plus new interviews with berry Gordy's Smokey Robinson Dr drain John legend and more see it's Saturday at nine eight central on show time Sunday's psychological drama the affair is that for its fifth and final season by the premier of piercing done intently beam in the dark comedy on becoming a god in central Florida see the ball starting at ten nine central on Showtime also on Sunday Curtis fifty cent Jackson said claimed crime drama power kicks off season six at eight seven central on Starz and Dwayne the rock Johnson and rob Corddry return for season five of the comedy drama ballers Sunday at ten thirty nine thirty central on HBO and that's your TV tip off on I heart radio B. immigrations are comes to the Texas border I'm Corey Olson with your top of the hour update on newsradio seven forty K. T. R. H. first let's check your forecast from meteorologist Scott Lori more at the weather channel what we end up with a a pretty decent coverage day of some widely scattered showers and thunderstorms some dumping some heavy rainfall these have not been quick movers by any stretch of the imagination more rich humidity coming in for the next several days our night time will temperatures just barely beneath the eighty degree mark in daytime high temperatures close to the eighty eight to ninety degree mark with more widely scattered thunderstorms around for mid week Wednesday and Thursday late week might see another shot of tropical humidity coming up from the Gulf I'm Scott Lori more the weather channel thanks Scott our top story president trump's acting director of U. S. citizenship and immigration services is defending the administration's public charge rule set to take effect in October Ken Cuccinelli was asked about it during a visit to the border in.

Scott Lori president K. T. R. H. Texas rob Corddry Dwayne Curtis Ken Cuccinelli acting director trump Hollywood Corey Olson HBO Johnson Starz Jackson Florida berry Gordy Motown forty seven meters
"seven meter" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

03:33 min | 2 years ago

"seven meter" Discussed on 710 WOR

"Cancer and their loved ones their girlfriends their wives their partners because it's a mutual issue a man doesn't suffer alone so it's very important to have the best chance to be cured to go back to your normal life life how it used to be this is what we do every day I don't know what a woman dramatic woman eighty one years old she's whittled has three children she was born in New York City and she came to me well five years ago she had a larger mass in the breast very large mass of the breast she was going to have surgery she started on hormone therapy she had a cat scan she stopped her medicines or cancer cap on growing should cancer markers CA ninety not say twenty seven twenty nine was going up to ninety eight three times normal should a cat scan showed the cancer was growing in the left breast and was eating through the breast it was distorting the breast cancers eating through the pectoralis muscles and to the mediastinal lymph flows of the lymph nodes in the center of the chest when the family of the patient were never told that the cancer had traveled and she lost weight surely his job a stroke so I saw her examined her should a very distorted left breast there was shortening of the press two was of nine seven meter mast on my fist is eight seven meters so bigger than pretty good size man's fist in the press and the breast was turned over on itself so the nipple rather pointing away from the woman was pointing towards the whole breasted been so distorted due twisted back so the nipple was pointing at and there were probable lymph nodes so is a very advanced left breast cancer it grew on hormonal therapy and she came here years after being diagnosed to try to get better you can imagine that to try to get better and she came to me more than a year ago with this terrible cancer eating through the lymph nodes and the pectoralis muscles and the cancer eating through itself and twisted herself and we talked to were about all the options and she chose our treatment she's eighty one she just does not want to have chemo surgery would be impossible the cancers eating through the packed rows of deep inside the chest and she chose her treatment a year ago and she came this week a year later with only our treatment refusing declining surgery and chemo and other methods of treatment and she is now in remission the breast is turned back up the cancer's gone away the pet scan shows that physical exam shows that she is happy we're happy everyone's happy your family's happy and this is the work that we do every day here at thirteen eighty four Broadway Broadway in thirty eight street in the heart of New York City but I'm such a leader men dinner just myself because of so many people talk on the radio I'm a board certified cancer doctor ruse I am D. real doctor so people talk talk talk talk talk and you don't know who they are what they are one explain who I am I was born and raised in Ohio with public schools went to university graduated twenty five just like my illustrious side.

Cancer eight seven meters eighty one years nine seven meter five years
"seven meter" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

03:29 min | 2 years ago

"seven meter" Discussed on 710 WOR

"Western hemisphere body radiosurgery you can also call doctor leader minute to win two choices for free informative booklet and DVD Hey doctor leader men were back we are I want talk about a woman who is eighty six years old she's eighty six born in Jamaica she is single she has three children she came with her family he felt a lump in the right dress the year before she saw our doctor the doctor did a pet scans staging and buy up Sydney put her on hormones her cancer doctor program hormones well formal treatment for breast cancer is okay but hormone treatment for breast cancer doesn't care anybody and first of all doesn't always work nothing always works number one number two hormone treatments even if they work for breast cancer only work temporarily and she came to us with pain she came to us for the big mass you came to us with cancer and she wanted to have a fresh second opinion and many people come to radio surgery New York for a fresh second opinion I contacted her doctor examined her breast her right breast was very distorted it was shortened the cancers eating through the breast was a seven seven meter mass my first you know got big hands and feet my fifty eight centimeters from of the seven centimeter mass in her breast and she had a three centimeter mass inner arm pit should stage three cancer I examined her we staged her up and by the way I can say that we treated her more than a year ago with his big mass distorting the brass big mass in the breast of the under the armpit and she's eighty six years old members is eighty six years old and she doesn't want surgery she doesn't want chemotherapy and most people at that age probably wouldn't one of chemo because it's often debilitating and surgery well surgery by itself would have most likely cure this cancer and she came to us and she chose our treatment to one of our treatment and more than a year ago we treated her for this big mass in the breast of the big mass in the armpit stage three cancer with our treatment only he came in this week I just saw her actually yesterday and she is doing great she's in remission that big mass is gone the distortion of the breast is gone the bass and do the armpit is gone clinically she's in remission doing while she's happy of course we do blood tests and imaging tests to make sure that she is fine this is what we do every day for this woman whose has this large breast cancer didn't want chemo didn't want surgery one of the effective treatment to take care of this cancer and that's indeed what we did the cancer is gone a boat or snores to cancer and shows no symptoms this is what we do every day Amanda sixty years old was born in New York City he has four children and you came because of prostate cancer was diagnosed a year before the Gleason seven cancer PSA seventy of the cat scan was normal bone scan that was normal and he had no treatment the ways to earn forty four pounds examined him get a localized cancer Gleason seven PS eighty seven and that the surgeon who saw him just was encouraged him to have.

eighty six years fifty eight centimeters forty four pounds seven seven meter seven centimeter three centimeter sixty years
"seven meter" Discussed on This Week in Computer Hardware

This Week in Computer Hardware

03:05 min | 2 years ago

"seven meter" Discussed on This Week in Computer Hardware

"Seven meter processors side by side on the same package nestled on top of. This larger twelve nanometer. I o die. So that's the whole idea of this approach is being able to have the flexibility of taking these CPU cores like these dyes that each of these dyes can contain up to eight active cores, and then assemble CPU after the fact after the after the process of making the CPU die is all done, and then decide to I wanna put one two or in the case of those epic server processes on a much larger package up to four. So in theory, you could stretch this same modular approach out all the way upscale it up to a sixty four core processor for a thirty two core. Sixty four thread processor, probably in reality. So there is a lot. I probably don't wanna pay for it. Yeah. I mean on the server side of their higher core counts with, with epic, which is their server process one. There will. With, with zen to and Reisen, but it's, it's really interesting because if done the work they've gotten to this point, they have seven nanometer going with a TSMC is the name of their fab that they're working with. They don't have their own fab, like Intel and Intel is rather famous at this point for their struggles with their own fab. They don't outsource their CPU work. They do all the design and manufacturing in house, and that's why it has been a struggle for them to get off of fourteen nanometer, and get going on ten nanometer and get the performance. They want the power consumption that they want so, well, I mean years until was ahead of everyone else in terms of their their, their process fab and it's only in this last jump from fourteen meter to God help us anything other than fourteen and meter where they've, they've hit a wall at rather high speed rather publicly, you know. So, you know there. Are, you know, whether that's because they diverted their internal engineering, focus or getting to ten or seven nanometers is much harder than anybody thought, or they make sarong engineering decisions. At some point, they have certainly been struggling with that base still make money. Hand over fist. I was starting to think about a friend of mine because, you know. Yes. ABA is crushing it on desktops. You know, we're very, very curious to see what their next generation of mobile parts looks like they've certainly scored some winds from some very major vendors in the laptop world. But the vast majority of CPS being sold these days, they're not desktop their in laptops. Right. Well, I want to say you know, there was something crazy, like thirty seven billion dollars of Intel's revenue last year came from, you know, personal computing or desktop and mobile computing out of the seventy billion they made last year, the significantly large chunk of it. So it's not like they're hurting. Although they are hurting based on the reports. We're hearing for vendors and, you know, the simple fact that AMD is..

Intel Reisen AMD ABA thirty seven billion dollars fourteen nanometer seven nanometers twelve nanometer seven nanometer fourteen meter ten nanometer Seven meter
"seven meter" Discussed on Science Friday

Science Friday

04:46 min | 2 years ago

"seven meter" Discussed on Science Friday

"A sewage treatment plant and wetland plants in that pool will clean the water further and then allow it to filter down into the aqua- furs. And then during the monsoon that extra channel will be reserved for the extra flood waters and the sewage will just be treated industrially. Chris Evan Bergen. You know, one of the criticisms of of people who get flooded out is that they continue to rebuild in a flood plain isn't that a bigger solution? If you if you want the water to naturally go where it wants to go isn't a solution, not to build in the flood plain. Oh, yeah. That's of course, the the right thing to do. But also in in countries, like the Netherlands where we have low laying flip place, and we we elect of space, and and so there's enormous pressure on those areas to to get to get built and developed. So it is inevitable that that also the low laying areas in China Bill, we'll get urbanized, and but see that they're also concepts which allow say that flood water will enter into the areas without having real damage. An example is for instance, in Hamburg, where we have on the flood plain and and never been area, which which can deal with seven meter of fluctuating water level. So I think we can also adapt our cities to. Two flights much more than than we were used to. So I think there's there a little upper at and China is is what be seen China for instance, urban agriculture, which which is now being promoted in Kunshan and I've seen their. Green areas where these citizens can use those green areas for for crops and for for for for agriculture purposes. And so there are a lot of combination spas -able way, we see that flood plains can be used to to allow flood what to come in. But also to urbanize it we have considered floating houses, we have Phoebe is housing floating mean houses so as possible, and and China is is really exploring. Also, those those opportunities and one of the advantages of allowing the water to come in you want to reuse as you say seventy percent of the rainwater that will will clean it as percolates back down into the soil will be you'll be cleansed by the marmot will not. Yeah, that's right. And one of the things that is kind of crazy as like a lot of places are importing water or desalinating water. At the same time. They're rushing. This storm water out of the city as fast as possible. So, you know, it's a it's a underused resource that were basically throwing away at this point. I have another clip from landscape architect onion, you he talks about if the mindset of how to build is really moving towards this direction in China is changing at least phones leadership gradually. We are changing code system. Also, but as that take a known time because of the interest conflict between different group of cadet Mia of engineer and of business, but it the same time many of the concrete wall, I've been moved by some citizens because Demet as understand on Zeh, no atop Kasese idea. So we are is in the way of added promising. I'm IRA Plato. This is science Friday from WNYC studios talking about our new or series on climate change. But. But China's is unique in in the sense that because it, you know, there's no position to the leader in China wants to do something it can just say, let's spend the money on it is it isn't that true? Chris. Yeah. That's that's true. And that is also an advantage. If we see for instance, in in western countries to to really get get the plans flying and to get get sort of inclusive process to for then it it takes quite it's quite some time in China. We have no time. It's the the the the mom for for housing is it's you and and so everything is going in haste. And of course, the county side of that is that there is no time to reflect on mistakes, and to to to to Beila tting.

China Chris Evan Bergen cadet Mia of engineer the Netherlands Kunshan WNYC studios Beila tting Hamburg IRA Plato Demet seventy percent seven meter
"seven meter" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

05:24 min | 2 years ago

"seven meter" Discussed on 710 WOR

"If you wanna put clip DVD or to make an appointment thought about a seventy three year old man's this, man. Some of the man I just spoke about but there's one big difference. It's not that they both have Gleason seven cancer. It's not that they both have PSA around six while. This is a man who is married. He's got three children. He works in the aircraft industry here. The cat scan. It showed a large prostate. But no spread he wakes up at night three times to urinate, and the difference is that rather than just going to a surgeon. And being cut on he came here for a second opinion. And yes, they both have Gleason seven cancer, and they both have PSA's about the same. And they both have about the same stage cancer. But this man came to me for treatment and we treated him with our unique approach outpatient therapy, only though, radical no robotic aunties cancer-free, his sex life works is urinary life works, and he is cancer free. It's a big difference between our patient and the patient who said this. I had all those complications and recurrence after robotic surgery. And I want to speak to you about a patient who came this week who has breast cancer. She has a right sided breast cancer. She's sixty five she's marriage has two daughters. She came with her husband. She had trauma to her spine years ago was left unable to walk. She's been no wheelchair. She's had spine surgery and she's on medicines. But about six months ago. She had a mammogram was found to have a mass in the breast shit a biopsy lumpectomy, but she's had no treatment. Well, this raises several points number one of which is is removing the lump of cancer in the breast enough. And the answer is no there are randomized. Studies where thousands of women have have lumpectomy half have lumpectomy and radiation or compared over years and years of follow up and the success rate is markedly higher in women who have radiation after the lump of cancers removed. So this woman has not had enough treatment shared the lump removed. The nothing's happened. And luckily, she came here for a second opinion. She had been seen at one of the big hospitals in New York. She'd had no chemo, no radiation. No pet scan her weight is two hundred pounds same as a couple of years ago. She's five foot three I examined her and the breast while others, the incisions healed, but she did not complete the therapy for her stage. Dj to cancer. She has a stage to cancer we've got her records to explain to her. Why to be treated the reason to be treated as to try to save her life saver breast prevent recurrence in the breast the armpit and that she should live a normal life without cancer. And the best way to do. It is by coming here. What she did for a fresh second opinion. And it's a little shocking Houston at one of the big hospitals six months ago and never got a recommendation for completing her therapy. This is the work. We do every day. I wanna talk about a fifty nine year old woman born in Dominican Republic. She's married with two children. She has an adenoid carcinoma the left lung. She has a three point two centimeter mass the long it's pet scan positive Emory positive. This is a woman she was just walking down the street and she fell down on the sidewalk went to emergency room. Had a chest. X Ray the chest. X Ray showed. A mass and that precipitated they work up at a biopsy showing adenocarcinoma. So she has a three point two centimeter about an inch and a half mass. Inner long was in the left upper lobe. Well, I should tell you this all happened the year ago, she never smoked shed. No secondhand smoke. So this is a case where just because she never smoke doesn't mean she didn't get lung cancer. She did have a lung cancer at an oak carcinoma. She got staged up. Her whole body was not anywhere else. Only in the lung show had diabetes, and she has lost weight because of the diabetes. I examined her and their exam was normal. So it tells you a lot you can have a massive along with a normal physical exam yet she has this left upper love three seven meter mass. So we talked about all the options, we talked about surgery to lymph node staging radiation and chemo treatment combination. And she was already scheduled for surgery when I saw her. She was already scheduled for surgery, but she's smart. Woman. She was told by a radio listener to come in for a second opinion that she may not need that surgery and doesn't really want that surgery. I should tell you that she's already short of breath. And it's a surgeon removes her long for lung cancer treatment, she's going to be more short of breath. Because why do we have lungs while we have lungs to get oxygen into our body and without the lungs? We won't get enough oxygen and she is short of breath. As is her lungs are impaired her lungs are damaged and at that surgeon removes her long or part of her lung her breathing will be less good. So it's another reason why so many people come here to thirteen eighty four Broadway for cancer treatment for lung cancer treatment. And why well we're I in America with radio surgery for lung cancer when every hospital and every doctor and facility thought standard treatment was okay, which means soften removing the.

cancer lung cancer Gleason diabetes chemo upper lobe Dominican Republic Emory America Ray New York Houston two centimeter six months seventy three year two hundred pounds three seven meter fifty nine year five foot
"seven meter" Discussed on The Bobby Bones Show

The Bobby Bones Show

02:35 min | 2 years ago

"seven meter" Discussed on The Bobby Bones Show

"It's not ever sicker. Now. Okay. Let me let me ask you this. This is great because you don't drink. So I feel like an expert at something that you don't know. I mean, I'm not I'm not let me say this too. Because I was getting criticized by some people present, I don't drink. Let me tell you. Why don't drink my family all drank into died. I'm not too good for I wish I could drink people be like jink. On that. I don't know. Need to go back through that every time. But right, I don't drink. So I don't understand how this stuff makes you feel. And when I see people so hung over or I see the memes about being so hung over. I go is it that much better like plus to mind ratio to be drunk and have that much fun than feel miserable. The next day. Does it go back to even is it worth? Like, what's that? What's that? Plus minus Amy. I don't know. I don't if you get a hangover. Do you wish you hadn't drink? Yeah. Are mike. Why why did I have too much? I don't drink with the goal of like, I mean at this point in my life. It's not like drinking to just get hammered. So I guess if I do I look at like, what did I drink? What what brand was it is it off like was it worth it? I don't know, Bobby. It's been a while. It's never worth it. It's not worth. No. Like, the hangover is terrible. It's like it's almost like you just wanna get sick. Oh, I have an example that not being your middle. You don't think about while? You're drinking. You're like, oh, yeah. Can't wait for tomorrow. But the next day you're like, I'm never drinking again. And then come up Friday again, you do it all over. Okay. Then what's the pl-? Like if the plus is a seven like fun goes up to the seven meter. What's the minus on the miserable meter? I don't understand. Yeah. But I have an example of where it can be. Okay. You get Morgan number two. Now, I'm confused. I want to answer your meter question. How would I say this? Okay. If the enjoyment is a seven you get up to seven being drinking, right? It's like that much fun. Yes. Drunkenness go higher. Let's go eight like you have that much fun that it gets up to an eight the nights at eight because you've got drunk. Yup. Then what's the miserable? The next day on the scale of just being miserable on the other side. Oh, eight okay. I got it. Eight is fun so much fun. The miserable is at ten. It's more. It's more of the miserable. Her. Why would you do it? If it's more like if it's a ten on that side. Why would you go one for that for ever wants to drink the day that they're hung over? It's four days later when they're literally people say the day, they're hung over that minute there. Like, I'm never drinking again. I'm sure everyone says that come Friday, you don't even remember saying that your thoughts Morgan number two. I'm totally with that. Like, I always love it in the moment..

Morgan Amy Bobby seven meter four days
"seven meter" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

05:05 min | 2 years ago

"seven meter" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"Now, it's been a year since her treatment, and she's been checked up at blood tests and exams and mammograms and ultra sounds and physical exams, and she is in remission doing well. And that's the way we like it here at thirteen four Broadway. Another woman would talk about yet. Another woman who sixty nine years old the last woman, you couldn't feel anything in breast. I wouldn't have a woman who has a massive cancer shed, a large Kantian, Nebraska, she came to me and two years ago. She came to me and already then she had a two year history. So four years since this time she had a mass in the brass by the nipple the cancer who grew cancer was eating through the breast. It distorted the brass was involving the skin. There was cancer of the skin and distortion and irregularity in advanced cancers can grow just eat through the skin. That's what's happened here. Eight through the breast and examined her and that time she had about a seven seven meter mass in the breast and was going up and involving the nipple distorting, the nipple distorting, the skin and the skin was just filled with cancer the breast was going away. So she had an untreated breast cancer for years came to me two years ago, I met with her she had lymph nodes also involves so should've very advanced cancer. We talked about all the options two years ago, and she's still declined all the options. She just wanted to go home now, no treatment. Well, now, it's four years from her diagnosis two years from when she saw me I you came back and people could come back. It's okay. Go home think about it. Whatever. Do you want? That's the beauty of outpatient therapy. Not in a hospital so much to the hospital. People feel compelled certain comes in and says we have to do this or you have to do this. Or you have to his you're in the hospital. You're there with IV's and cut a locked up. Why you could sign out you can sign out from a hospital. You don't have to be their side of prison. Some people don't understand that. But you can sign out and many people with cancer do sign out the come over to thirty four Broadway and get a fresh second opinion, you of that right while this woman was outpatient is are two years ago. She saw other doctors two years before that. And now she's come back to me, and we treated her and now she's being treated in the cancer is bigger than it was before. Well, it was until we treated her. She's just finishing treatment. Now in this cancers all going away, and that's a beautiful part of our work here at thirteenth for Broadway. Where we treat women with early breast cancers that cannot be felt some people have surgery back to me. Some women choose mastectomy. That's the woman's right woman. Can choose anything. She wants for her breast cancer. And like I have a man right now getting breast cancer therapy. So just because you're breast cancer. Doesn't mean you're a woman small proportion of people with breast cancer are men so men and women can get breast cancer, and everyone should check their breasts and make sure that the breast are fine. Of course, the vast majority of breast cancers are women, and that's why the emphasis on women for mammograms and self examine physician exams. This is the work that we do to women one came with a non palpable of master. We couldn't feel and yet had treatment only with us. Another woman waited four years with a massive cancer eating through the breast and nipple in the skin and she too was successfully treated with tremendous shrinkage of the cancer. This is the work that we do every day. And we're talking about a decorator was Samantha who sells the fanciest furniture, New York City high end furniture, and he came he had a prostate cancer. His PSA has been very high for a long time two and a half years ago was PSA was fifteen. Wow. Fifteen and he waited two years to get a biopsy the ad Gleason seven cancer in ten areas. Usually when a urology, Dr newsreel biopsies of the prostate on by urology doctors usually there's twelve areas twelve little needles go in the prostate should be paid listen easy. And we're happy to send people to excellent doctors. If you want in MRI, which is highly suspicious to scale how the prostate looks by MRI hit up was caught a pie read four, which is one of the highest risk cancers had biopsy showing Gleason seven cancer in ten positive cores and this PS. Was fifteen he came to me had been seen by doctors all over New York City and came because we give the day that we give the results we communicate were accessible. And so he came to us. I repeated the PSA repeated the PSA it's got all the way up to twenty three. So just because it was fifteen before now of cancer.

prostate cancer PSA Nebraska New York City Gleason Samantha two years four years seven seven meter sixty nine years two year
"seven meter" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

KNBR The Sports Leader

01:37 min | 2 years ago

"seven meter" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

"Up to two thirty seven metering lights are green at the bay bridge. Gary and Larry on KNB are six eighty the sports leader learned Krueger here for the sleep number. I'm loved my sleep number bed. Man. It is the best bet I've ever had. It is awesome. You've heard me talking about how much I love my band. That's all true. My sleep number setting is fifty five. My wife's is forty. It is the greatest bed of all time. And maybe you've considered a sleep number bed. But thought man I can't afford one of those. But can you really afford another night where you're not getting that deep restful sleep that your body needs to heal itself where you're tossing and turning and you're not sleeping deeply? Well. There's never been a better time to save on a proven quality sleep. And now during the ultimate sleep number event. A Queen three sixty smart bed starts at only eight hundred and ninety nine dollars. Now, somebody couples disagree on mattress firmness, sleep number bed. That lets choose your ideal firmness and each side of the bed. So it's right for her. It's right for you. Everybody's happy the new sleep number three. Sixty smart beds are so smart. They actually censor every movement while you're sleeping, and they automatically adjust to you. So that you stay sleeping comes. Throughout the night. I know it sounds amazing. You gotta check it out for yourself come in this weekend. And you can it's the ultimate sleep number event. You can check it out for yourself and say fifty percents on a sleep number three sixty limited edition, smart pet sleepnumber, the official sleep and wellness partner of the NFL. You only gonna find a sleep number bed at a sleep number store, but they got stores all throughout northern California. If you're down in the south bay, check him out, Westfield oakridge mall, right across from old navy their valley fair mall as well. Second level right near the Macy's men's department. And if you're out in Pleasanton on that, I eighty six eighty five eighty split.

Westfield oakridge mall Gary bay bridge Macy Pleasanton California KNB Krueger NFL Larry official partner ninety nine dollars
Why Are Whales Big (But Not Bigger)?

BrainStuff

04:15 min | 2 years ago

Why Are Whales Big (But Not Bigger)?

"Today's episode was brought to you by the new Capital One saver card with which you can earn four percent cashback on dining and entertainment. That means four percent on checking out that new restaurant everyone's talking about and four percent on watching your team win at home. You'll also earn two percent cashback at grocery stores and one percent on all other purchases. Now when you go out you cash in what's in your wallet? Welcome to brain stuff from how stuff works. Hey, brain stuff, Lauren bulk bomb here, if you've ever been whale watching visited a large barium or even seeing the skeleton of a whale in a museum of natural history. You know, the majestic massive Bassus of these aquatic mammals, the largest mammal ever lived on earth in the history of the planet is not some prehistoric monstrosity. It's actually the blue whale and is alive right now swimming around in our oceans whales range in size from the massive blue whales, which can grow to more than ninety feet. That's twenty seven meters in length to the relatively tiny pygmy sperm whales, which measure a measly ten feet or three meters in length, but with all that ocean swim around in why aren't Wales even bigger it's not like they have to support their big bodies on legs and walk around for that matter, though, why aren't they smaller? Both answers have to do with food and heat at least that's what researchers at Stanford University found when they compiled the body mass data for nearly four thousand living whales. And three thousand fossilized species there now asus determined that aquatic mammals actually face more size constraints than their counterparts on land. The study authors determined that. There are two main factors. Why Wales are big, but not bigger heat loss and metabolism oceans can be pretty cold places to live and Wales while very intelligent don't really have the aquatic equivalent to thermal underwear, so because they're warm blooded mammals. They have to be large enough to keep from losing too much body heat to these rounding water Thermo regulation than it keeps Wales from being the size of say dogs study co author Jonathan pain eight professor of geological sciences at Stanford school of earth, energy and environmental sciences explained. In a press statement when you're very small you lose heat back into the water so fast. There's no way to eat enough food to keep up and speaking of eating whales have to do it a lot like all mammals, they convert that food into energy for swimming, growing and doing other wail like things that's the metabolic system at work. But the researchers suggest. That the metabolism of Wales only gets faster as they get bigger. And so they can only get so large another study co author Craig MacLean of the Louisiana, universities marine, consortium, explained it. This way, basically animals are machines that require energy to operate this need for energy places hard limits on what animals can do and how big they can be. So it boils down to how much Wales can eat versus their metabolic rate that keeps Wales from getting infinitely large. But how do those massive blue whales get so massive they have baleen instead of teeth and strain their food a little shrimp like creatures called krill instead of chewing it krill are only a few centimeters long, but they really add up every day. A blue whale eats about eight thousand pounds that's over three thousand six hundred kilos of krill. So blue whales are not only the largest whales in the ocean. They're also the most efficient eaters of all. This episode was written by Kristen hall, guys lawyer and produced by Tyler clang for iheartmedia, and how stuff works for more on this and lots of other huge topics. Visit our home planet. Testif- works dot com. Today's episode is brought to you by smart water. Twenty years ago sparked water reimagined, what water could be from thoughtful bottle designed to supporting smart people who are changing our world through fresh thinking. Like, you smart water has added electrolytes for taste and great tasting water helps you stay hydrated, feeling refreshed and ready to take on your day. Refresh yourself with smart water.

Wales Capital One Stanford University Asus Craig Maclean Kristen Hall Testif Stanford School Of Earth Louisiana Professor Tyler Clang Jonathan Four Percent Three Thousand Six Hundred Kil Eight Thousand Pounds Twenty Seven Meters Twenty Years Three Meters
"seven meter" Discussed on Main Engine Cut Off

Main Engine Cut Off

02:23 min | 2 years ago

"seven meter" Discussed on Main Engine Cut Off

"They. Welcome the main engine cutoff. It is question time. Once again, we've got some questions about I assess commercial crew human spaceflight science missions. We've got a whole bunch of stuff to get to. So let's start with the S and commercial crew questions. We'll start off with an easy one from Mark. Why is star line are much more squished vertically than crew dragon? This is really just the difference between heritage and the route that both of these spacecraft got to to where they're at today. So dragon two was evolved from the original dragon, and the original dragon was made to match the diameter of falcon nine which is three point seven meters. So dragon to continued that trend and is the same really the same shape. Overall. There were some differences, you know, that that came about with the differences of the abort system and all the other stuff that goes into dragon two, but both are free point seven meter diameters. They both have about ten cubic meters of internal volume star liner on the other hand. Had a different heritage itself. The design it was loosely based on stuff that was going on with Ryan and some other spacecraft at the time that's diameter is is four and a half meters. So it's significantly wider than dragon two is ended has eleven cubic meters of internal volume. So roughly the same volume one is a lot skinnier and one is a lot wider. So that makes the difference the height difference the thing that is the variation between them the weird bit about star liner is that it is a four and a half meter capsule sitting on top of a three meter upper stage in Centaur. So you get weird things like that new aerodynamic skirt that's going to attach to the bottom of star liners trunk and extend down Centaur about halfway down Centaur which helps with era dynamic loads, and some instability that was going to happen in flight moving onto a question from Robert what do you think about India's recently announced human spaceflight program? How would low cost capsule built by rela? Wli US friendly democracy impact programs like Soyuz and commercial crew and a second somewhat related question. What do you think about Sierra Nevada? So the the question on India..

India Sierra Nevada rela US Mark Ryan Robert seven meters seven meter three meter
"seven meter" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

04:41 min | 2 years ago

"seven meter" Discussed on 710 WOR

"Thanks, bob. And this is Dr Liederman I'm happy to be with you every day. We're here every day. We're learning and we learned about how to get better medical care. And we learn about what's going on in the world in the medical world to people with cancers and suspected cancer. So we're going to jump right in. And we'll talk more about general things in a few minutes. We'll talk about a woman. I just saw yesterday. She's seventy six years old. She's widowed. She has three children. She came with her daughter, and she had many skin cancers. She's fair complected and people who are fair complexion have tend tend to have more skin cancers, and she's been having surgery MOS surgery on her body, and that's her background. And then she came to me with a shortness of breath. And her breathing was getting worse and worse and worse yet a chest. X Ray almost two years ago. And it showed a mass in her lung shoes and found three centimeter mass by C T skin. So I shed a chest x Ray which is not so fantastic to pick up things, but it shows gross things. Get a cat scan with shows more detail more resolution than than she had a pet. Scan a pet scans something like a cat scan. But with an injection of radioactive sugar. We know that cancer likes to eat. It's anything some people think falsely it only sugar. But no cancer can eat anything just has a high metabolism because it's eating and growing at a rapid rate. Everything that eats and grows at a rapid rate needs a lot of nutrition. So the chest x Ray was have normal. The cat scan was normal the pet scan was normal all showing a three seven meter mass in the Highland. What's the high while the Highland is kind of like the door to the lung? So the long needs blood and oxygen and the door to the long where the blood goes in and out, and we're the oxygen goes in and out the air goes in and out is by the Highland, and she had mass there, should amass extra shed a three centimeter mass and several smaller masses nearby called the satellite lesions and her breathing capacity is only at fifty percent. No. She never smoked. So this is a woman who never did anything wrong to get this cancer. Does she was married to a? Smoker, and she probably had lots of secondhand smoke. And that's another teaching point that you can have damage to your body by getting secondhand smoke that you're not the smoker, but someone next you worker home or somewhere is new get the adverse outcome of that smoke on in your lungs while that's another reason why we all should want. Good atmosphere around us and good environment around us. And so from that most likely she got COPD asthma. She weighs two hundred thirty pounds. She's five foot seven Chesnot pain, visions, fine. Shortness of breath on exertion. She has difficulty climbing. Even a step of stairs. One flight of stairs. And she's short of breath. And so she saw surgeon who wanted to remove her lung, and well, we know that had she had surgery her. Lung capacity was already at fifty percent, if they remove long or part of the long her breathing would be worse. And a friend of hers like. Probably you said, hey, you might want to learn about non invasive treatment for your lung cancer. And she came to me with this history of skin cancers in the past. And now this mass in the long pets get positive it, by the way, her mother died of lung cancer says a family history even going back now two generations. This woman's been whittled for many years. Her husband had lung cancer. Also, and he went to one of the super duper big hospitals, and he had lung cancer, and he had surgery and he died of complications from the surgery at that super big hospital. So can you imagine the mother her mother died of lung cancer? Her husband died during surgery for lung cancer. And now she comes to me, and I examined her and she was short of breath on even a little bit of exertion or even sitting up. She was just being examined goody on the exam table. She was short of breath. She has lung cancer. She's refusing any procedure..

lung cancer Ray Dr Liederman bob COPD goody three centimeter fifty percent two hundred thirty pounds seventy six years three seven meter five foot two years
"seven meter" Discussed on This Is Only A Test

This Is Only A Test

04:48 min | 3 years ago

"seven meter" Discussed on This Is Only A Test

"Is built off of a seven nanometer process. That's bonkers. I mean, that's just lows. We're getting right. That's it. That's the floor and that it's officiant sees the stack gnome. Yeah. Seven meter manufacturing process fig Abass they say up to twenty seven to sixty two percent performance boosts on graphics benchmarks. They didn't release a price. Right. Seven hundred bucks. Seven hundred bucks. Seventh radio seven seven nanometer. It's all about the seconds. Also, the Invidia I forget, the two standards, but like the free sink. Yeah. The Invidia is NVIDIA freezing. Because I am d there you go. So in in videos now saying that their cards will work with the free sink monitors meat from what I understand that they will approve a set of them by it's likely that it will work beyond that with other ones has frozen over NVIDIA kind of evolved position because the radio cards done, so well and the freezing performances great. And there are a lot of those monitors out there. People aren't gonna people are probably more likely to upgrade the Ravitz heart than to buy a new monitor just because you're swapping from. Yes, we sink to sink. This is for people who don't know. This is the technology that allows your video card to sink. It's re- have like a dynamic refresh rate with whatever your monitor can handle, especially when it's one hundred forty four Hertz for I guess, the monitor sinks to the video heart. Yes. Yeah. And so you don't get any screen, tearing and. It looks mover. Overall, do either of you have a four K monitor that you use? Now, I aiming quad eight St. four K monitor do you. It doesn't matter. If you're running sixty f- PS on the four K versus like thirty noted doesn't matter like, I know it matters. But I note, I can tell you. I can't do thirty f. Yes. It's just not tenable depends on what I think is interesting about this radio on thing is that they supposedly are running some four K games at sixty F B S easily. It depends on the game. Would you know? Like it always decided before they made a game. Is it going to be thirty or sixty Hertz game? And you know, the thirty her scans are just a little slower. Yep. Yep. Speaking of manufacturing processes, Intel had a press conference and announced some exciting new processors for the next generation this is going to be ice lake. Now, these are the ten nanometer process ten real ten products, which they had a few products. Ten enemy was before told me about seven nanometers. How can I be excited about ten graphics cards there manufacturer fewer of them, but for CPU's ten Atta meter for laptops. And it's going to be really important. I is lake falls up on coffee lake which was ninth generation Intel, and this is part of their kosh Intel's before the you're in tick tock tick tock. Yes, now, there's different name for it. What is it is a process architecture Ono, right? Say. Process refinement. Right. So they were fine a process and then to do architecture overhaul. And so I believe this is the process refinement to ten nanometer to talk. It's the big one is the tick. No, I think the talk is the big one a really tickets the small start with tick doesn't always start with talk as the big tick tick, braces you for the talk. This is a this is an old. This only test discussion, everyone has different ideas about this process. Architecture are often dish in this is the architecture step sorry architecture, not processed up architecture step because it's not the process often sation change in actual no my God architecture. What it means is that this year's desktops, and laptops, or next year's laptops, will probably he did. That's what it means. White. Yes. Okay. Yep. Yeah. They they're still getting milk more performance. They able to maybe not exactly move along Moore's laws curve, but they're still continues. Improvement. I don't think we've seen any like benchmarking tests yet, though, we've just seen what they debuted at that press conference. And basically last year we didn't get anything from Intel. So this is this is sort of overdo. So I always for the benchmark see how into also has, you know, the GP side of their chips and so gentle Evan GPS's on their desktop chipset. She started offering nine gen Intel chips without built GP us more competitive price point. So for people building PC's. New options. Cool. All right..

Intel NVIDIA Evan GPS lake falls Ono Moore coffee lake four K ten nanometer one hundred forty four Hertz seven seven nanometer sixty two percent seven nanometers seven nanometer Seven meter sixty Hertz milk
"seven meter" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

Stuff To Blow Your Mind

03:51 min | 3 years ago

"seven meter" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

"Volcanic ash about three point six million years ago or three point three point six three point seven and it had hardened and been preserved for us to discover in the twentieth century, and then so after these tracks were initially discovered in nineteen seventy eight Paul able a colleague of Leakey's discovered that the formation also contained a twenty-seven meter or about eight foot long trail of ancient hominids footprints. In addition to the other animal footprints probably made by Australopithecus forensis the species to which Lucy. Belonged and there are about seventy hominem and footprints at all in all in this formation. And so the thing about these footprints is they're quite clearly bipedal. You know, you're not seeing four legged movement is somebody who was just walking onto feet through this volcanic ash. The prince I've read are space close together, meaning short stride might mean short legs. And the prince also show a big toe in line with the foot rather than opposed to the foot as you see in our boreal apes alike. You know, your human big toes? Go straight out, the are boreal apes have more kind of a toe. Thumb like a big toe. Thumb that they use to climb trees and grab hold of stuff. And also their footfalls apparently went heel toe just like ours tend to so by about three point six million years ago. We we've got direct evidence that our ancestors in their close relatives were walking onto feet, and I also can't help admission I've read supposedly there's the story of how the prints were discovered because one of Leakey's colleagues paleo. Apologist named Andrew hill stumbled across the fossil formation when he and another Cali were running around throwing elephant pooping gentler. Well, you know, you gotta keep it light hearted on the dig right? So like, you said we we know of this based on mostly fossil remains in this. You know, we're looking at the bones of our ancestors, and observing what the gradual shift to bipedal ISM did to us. And it certainly certainly came at a cost. Yeah. Now to be sure it was it was worth it. I guess it made it easier for us to pick up fruits and pick up pick from low lying branches at gave us free hands for carrying food. And and also very importantly carrying tools carrying our young as well it allowed us to rise up in appear larger and more fearsome to our enemies are many enemies of the wild. This is something that I think we often don't think about but unless you're being instructed on how to react to a bear in the win the wild. And they say make yourself as big as possible. And certainly there are other animals do just the same thing. But that's one of the strengths of being able to at least rise up onto feet. Yeah. No. You can't know this for sure, but I tend to think that by people ISM is a sort of necessary precursor to advanced tool using intelligence. I mean, you see some use of tools in quadrupedal apes. But the fact that the fact that you're walking onto feet gives you free hands and having free hands seems like suddenly you've got much more incentive to be using them for all kinds of stuff. Well, it's interesting when you think about the animals that do display some form of tool use. I mean, certainly of the which are going to more or less align with the human experience of tool use. But then of course, you have the core of and fear the birds that that also use tools now, obviously, they are engaging in bipedal ground movement their wings are tucked away. But it's perhaps it's a slightly different situation with birds because those wings do have a purpose. They've just specialized there. Their their beak functionality. And and have learned how to use tools with that. Yeah. The same is true of dolphins. They're using when they engage until user using their snout octa pie silently different situation..

Leakey Andrew hill Lucy ISM Paul Cali six million years twenty-seven meter eight foot
Space Economics

The Indicator from Planet Money

09:58 min | 3 years ago

Space Economics

"Thirty seven meters. Thirty meters twenty meters seventeen meter standing by for touchdown. These were the sounds inside of Nasr's Jet Propulsion Laboratory near Pasadena, California on Monday afternoon, as the people working there eagerly-hoped Nasr's unmanned spacecraft. The insight would nail the really tricky landing on the surface of Mars touchdown confirmed. Ever gets. It doesn't rats NASA. No, it's thrilling thrilling the landing did the insight which was carrying instruments that will help scientists to study the surface of Mars, and it's an habitants and learn whatever it can about the planet occupied or not this is able to prove it's not occupies. This is all very inspiring stuff. But our interest in space missions here. The indicator is not actually about the science as always it's about the economics. I'm Garcia, and I'm Stacey Vanik Smith and technically Cardiff economics is a science science issue. It's a social science. I think they. This is the indicator from planet money today and tomorrow on the show, we're going to take a look at the economic history of the US space program with a space economist. Yes, there is such a thing as a space economists. There's kind of thing. We'll tell you why the incites mission to Mars is actually a throwback to the way NASA used to do things. And we'll also explain what the economics of space looks like now. This message comes from the indicators sponsor capital. One capital. One's indicator is zero because they offer accounts with zero fees or minimums, and they offer accounts that can be opened from anywhere in five minutes. Capital one. What's in your wallet capital? One NA. Support also comes from SAP. Concur employees can submit expenses from anywhere. It's how the best run businesses make their expenses run better SAP. Concur. Learn more at concur dot com slash NPR. Matt Weinzierl is our space economist, well sort of he teaches at the Harvard Business School. He's an economist, and he has a really passionate interest in space. Matt knows that most people have a fascination with space because of like the grand themes exploration. The search for aliens going to the moon so planets AB someday living on Mars with its other inhabitants. Exactly, not Matt. He got excited about space for a different reason is the over the last decade, really almost two decades. Now, we've seen a real flourishing of a commercial space sector. See back in the Cold War decades, the sixties seventies and eighties. When the US was researching the Soviet Union to the moon and developing the space shuttle, Matt says the US space program was meant to provide Americans with so-called public goods. And this is a really important concept in economics public goods are defined by two things first when someone uses a public good it does not. Prevent another person from being able to use it and second when a person uses a public good. It also doesn't take away from how much someone else can use it. So a computer is not a public good. No, not at all. Because I'm using it. And you. One example of public good is clean air. My breathing. It does not stop Stacey. From also, breathing it or military protection. Just because I'm protected by the US military doesn't mean that Stacey is not protected. Matt gives three examples of the public goods that NASA originally was meant to provide the first one national security being able to defend ourselves from space or do something else space was critical importance to national security the second scientific discoveries. So too early. It's hard for the private sector, which is motivated by profit to do basic research in things that won't obviously be sellable. The third public good something you just really can't put a price tag on national pride. Don't usually talk about as much. But I think if you think back to the Cold War that was clearly a big part of it that we wanted to show that our model. Our our society was was the better choice for other societies to take and as the name suggests public goods tend to be publicly provided or. Vied by the government using taxpayer money because there isn't always an obvious motivation for the private sector to provide these public goods, there just isn't an immediate way to profit from them. And yet these goods are valuable to society. So the government uses its unique ability to direct massive amounts of money into providing those goods, it's a centralized economic model. The government agency in this case NASA decides what to do, and it has no competition for how best to do it and using this model. Matt says NASA has really accomplished amazing things over the years, think of the moon missions. And yes, the Mars landings like the one this week and also helping to build the international space station, which is a research laboratory the size of a football field that orbits the earth. And finally, of course, there was the space shuttle program, which was designed to transport people and stuff into space. But Matt says by the early years of this century NASA was struggling to define what its next mission should be NASA hasn't put a man on the moon. Since nineteen seventy two and the space shuttle program, experienced two tragedies, I when the challenger space shuttle exploded in one thousand nine hundred six and second when the Columbia space shuttle disintegrated in two thousand and three and that says it was a lot more expensive per space shuttle flight than people hoped and it got into space a lot less often in two thousand four the administration of President George W Bush announced that it was canceling the space shuttle program and this left NASA with a problem. How is it going to send cargo and cruise into space to do things? Like, for instance, supply, the international space station without space shuttle program NASA came up with two strategies one was a conventional big government centralized program, which would last many years and cost many billions of dollars and then on the margins. There was this idea to spend a little bit of money to encourage a more decentralised, private sector driven space economy. But basically it turned. Out that that conventional program went over budget and behind schedule and eventually got cancelled. But that little experimental program that involved NASA, partnering with the private sector that worked out. This programme was known as cots c o t s and that is an acronym. For commercial orbital transportation services. Nasa issued a report last year saying that the cots program had been this huge success and a model for the public sector to partner with the private sector. And since then NASA has launched no pun intended, is maybe slightly intended other partnership programs that are just like it. Yeah. And the basic way these programs work is that when NASA needs something NASA tells private companies how much it might be willing to pay for it. And then those private companies get to work on figuring out how to provide it for example, last decade when NASA wanted a better way to send supplies to the international space station, and in fact to private companies orbital sciences and SpaceX convinced NASA that they could use their shuttles to resupply. The. Space station. So NASA paid them combined three point five billion dollars for a total of twenty resupply. Flights to the space station. And there are plenty more examples. Like right now NASA is asking private companies to propose technologies they can build and which NASA will pay for that will be useful for future moon missions. We're going back. Yeah. Matt says that NASA is more of a partner with such private companies than a supervisor NASA sets the goal, but private companies compete with each other to come up with the best way to meet that goal and the private companies, then get to keep most of the innovations that they come up with and which they can use to develop new products that they can sell in the private sector or which they can sell to organizations other than NASA. From an economic standpoint this newer, decentralized model has a lot of benefits there's competition between companies which tends to make products better. There's also a profit motive for those companies and incentive for them to discover new technologies and NASA gets access to these new technol-. Gies for a lot less money than it would have cost to develop them. Plus this model is laying the groundwork. Or Stacey laying the space work. Very nice. Very nice, not very nice for the future. When a lot of activity in space will be driven mostly by the private sector. In other words, these partnerships between NASA and the private sector are creating new marketplace for space technologies. We're one did not previously exist and private companies right now are coming up with technologies that will have actual value that could be bought and sold for actual money in this possible future. So what are these new exciting activities going to be and what weird new economic challenges might these activities themselves create Matt tells us about them on tomorrow's episode to tune in. I'm excited to hear more about the martians. Hey, it's catch out with the code. Switch team few years ago. I adopted this queue, but also shy eagle next from a dog rescue. But I noticed really fast he mostly barked at my friends of color made me wonder is my dog racist. So I went to find out check it out on the next code. Switch podcast.

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Mars Mission Makes Clean Landing

60-Second Science

03:09 min | 3 years ago

Mars Mission Makes Clean Landing

"This is Americans sixty seconds science. I'm Steve Mirsky passed through peak. Deceleration telemetry shows the spacecraft saw about eight G L, and Markle Bravo and Iraq radio science reports carrier detected. Inside is now traveling at velocity of two thousand meters per second control room of the NASA insight Mars mission earlier today as the spacecraft landed on the planet after a voyage of six months and three hundred million miles. It'll be sending a probe some five meters below the Martian surface to measure heat flow and listen for tremors. Most of the talking is by Christine's ally of Nasr's Jet Propulsion Laboratory travelling at one thousand meters per second. Insight about four hundred meters per second. It will deploy it's twelve meter diameter. Supersonic parachute. Parachute. Parachutes deploy nominally at about mach. One point seven thirty. One seconds pass round. Patients are serving signals consistent with parachute. Deploy. Trees shows parachute deployment radar powered on. Did you separation commanded twenty two seconds pass? We have radar activation. Where the radar is beginning to search for the ground once the radar locked on the ground and inside is about one kilometer of the surface. The Lander will separate from the back show and begin terminal descent using twelve descent engines, twenty seven seconds pass altitude convergence the radar has locked on the ground. Yes. Danny by the Lander separation. Lander separation commanded altitude six hundred meters. Gravity turn out four hundred meters. Three hundred meters. Two hundred meters. Eighty meters. Sixty meters. Fifty meters constant Rossi thirty seven meters thirty meters twenty meters. Seventeen meters standing by for touchdown. We'll be until about eight PM eastern time today that NASA knows if inside solar panels are out and working correctly. They needed to literally wait for the dust to settle from the landing before deploying the panels catch down confirm. Scientific Americans sixty seconds science. I'm Steve Mirsky.

Steve Mirsky Nasa Markle Bravo Jet Propulsion Laboratory Iraq Christine Danny Rossi Nasr Sixty Seconds Four Hundred Meters Per Second One Thousand Meters Per Second Two Thousand Meters Per Second Three Hundred Meters Twenty Seven Seconds Four Hundred Meters Thirty Seven Meters Two Hundred Meters Six Hundred Meters