33 Burst results for "Seti"

"seti" Discussed on Astronomy Cast

Astronomy Cast

05:51 min | 11 months ago

"seti" Discussed on Astronomy Cast

"All right through the eighties through the nineties early two thousands the only people doing any kind of steady research. Pretty much at all was through donations privately. Funded privately built telescopes. You could not ask for a penny from nasa from the government and he similar situation was happening really across the world in in countries. So how did things shift suddenly that. Now it's not a bad thing to be an astrobiologist. It's not a bad thing to search for some kind of evidence of smart aliens. The difference came in the kinds of science that we can do. And in the fact that we've womanly found planets fairly normal planets orbiting other stars up until nineteen ninety-five. We didn't know if there would be planets everywhere. Planets nowhere and in one thousand nine hundred five. We finally started to find planets. That are big old round things not the crazy little things found around pulsars big old round things. Hot jupiters snuggled up next to giant and sunlight stars and this difference in going from not knowing if there are planets to knowing there are probably more planets than stars in our galaxy. Meant that it really made sense to start saying what kind of chemistry. What kind of biology can exist out there now. So did the first call for proposals for the astro biology institutes in the early. Two thousands and alabama's astro biology. Institutes us saw multidisciplinary collaborations arising for the first time under public dollars. That were geared saying okay titan titan has methane discuss right. What's pasta yeah bar. Mars has evidence of water. Discuss europa has has oceans of ice and also all of the amazing places that they were finding life here on earth. I mean our modern idea of life can exist wherever there's liquid water. A lot of those discoveries have been made in the last couple of decades with life found in nuclear reactors under antarctic ice high up in the atmosphere incredible salinity temperatures down at the bottom of the ocean with black smokers completely severed ecosystems like like life really found ways. And we've only finally discovered how all the shenanigans that had gotten up to while we weren't looking very well pretty much you can't find an ecosystem doesn't have something living in it and while you might be able to grab a couple of tablespoons of non-occupied soil rocks whatever go much further than that and there's going to be something alive there. Yeah yeah so so then as you said sort of in the early two thousands dances to make the call and the budgetary floodgates..

astro biology institutes nasa government alabama
2 Dead in Synagogue Bleacher Collapse in Israel

BBC Newsday

01:35 min | 1 year ago

2 Dead in Synagogue Bleacher Collapse in Israel

"David Willis. We stay in Israel, where At least two people have died off the temporary seating at a crowded synagogue in the occupied West Bank collapsed. It's the second deadly accident at a Jewish religious gathering in the country in a matter of weeks. Gareth Barlow has the details This incident happened is people were celebrating the Jewish holidays shove water in about 650 Ultra Orthodox worshipers have gathered in this synagogue in Seti's CCTV footage shows them start on rape, seating and all of a sudden in a split instant the back half of that seating just plunges to the ground. People on it disappeared from view. Those on the front of the seating sent tumbling forwards and we know that in that moment, two people lost their lives around 100 and 70 people injured. This took place in this synagogue, which were led to believe in by the police and authorities was under construction, and local authorities say that they had warned the organizer's that it was unsafe and that the event took place despite permits not being given. Benjamin Netanyahu, The Israeli prime minister, has said that he's praying for those injured. Local police have blamed negligence for this and say that arrests will be made. I think it's important to note that this no link being made between any of the conflict that was seeing in the region, but this does come just over two weeks after 45 people lost their lives in a crusher. Religious festival in northern Israel. Both of these events was supposed be celebrations festivals and they turned into tragedies and this is surely going to post questions for the organizer's and

David Willis Gareth Barlow West Bank Israel Benjamin Netanyahu
Manchester City Stage Superb Fightback to Stun Paris-Saint Germain

ESPN FC

01:55 min | 1 year ago

Manchester City Stage Superb Fightback to Stun Paris-Saint Germain

"Dan thomas joining the cd. Today by craig burley we also welcome to the program. You can frank and native newer. Of course only one place to start today show and that's in paris. We saw that champions league semi final between manchester city. Another brilliant game. She completely dominating the first half one deservedly. Thanks to a great header from martinez manchester city completely different side though in these second up kevin lebron's and riyadh marez giving them a two one league going into the second lack in manchester next week. Craig let's start with you and just talk about the then. If half time. I told you the city. We're going to win this game. Two one it would be a big stretch pants completely. Dominant well at halftime. If you said to me we're going to play in the monitoring wasted the second half of would have been surprised. That's how big a turnaround was and credit to them for that dot was they set the and the second that we know can perform but the so much talk about for all the guys just quick summary here yeah they look to let tentative mindset in the first half wary but that was known to what. Psg dead psg. The depressed setting normally have that flustered. seti pushed back to the walls the edge of the box when psg varada was coming in off that left side when they didn't eavesdropping by making a four foot. Making it difficult and set. You looked flustered but then swung sixty. He followed up the field and he's economic mindset people nado silver pushed up the brain appreciate they got the press on and they passed so much better from a possession of twentieth thirty yards higher up the field so the starting position in the second half was so much better. An passing in the second half was so much crisper excellent.

Dan Thomas Craig Burley Martinez Manchester Kevin Lebron Riyadh Marez Manchester City Frank Paris Psg Varada Craig Manchester PSG
"seti" Discussed on Podcast RadioViajera

Podcast RadioViajera

04:14 min | 1 year ago

"seti" Discussed on Podcast RadioViajera

"Medicine in africa asia la vida this tanisha. Theol- geico fiat hobson demean togo latter atoll baraboo scar by subtle connell. Cassius mccormick laugh. You re those implicit experience battalion. Ghana issue here Aloof the spurs. Do not believe in them. Show free though. In shukla's up in india in mill within does shawn the cather relevant the mafia hip trustee in their mutual musalia leaders they sturdier in moon academico borges showmanship. Serono's equal motels send demo- bv most famous gandhi. Another's worcester appropriate saint kimbler the onset. The kemba mascaro demi stereo in in wounded than us for our news. Ucla cho- mutuel Standard quarter lutheran determiners Depot the hoesch alvie dhahran but i almost identical shock in the weeks. The most radio sean. Authors grandees expertise la casa. the guy. Okay shoo on is over. Laura respite. Lie fear alab. The mass strenuous. Shalita the city kennedy ceo qura bethune mala polara they stumble in like i said chico and luke show laguna del hip or here stubbornly them say in in a heap because there's no law nor salvatore imbera this So much of immune to the in fia bitter.

africa luke india Laura kennedy ceo qura Ghana chico bethune mala polara salvatore imbera asia Shalita Serono Ucla cho dhahran musalia shukla alvie
"seti" Discussed on Podcast RadioViajera

Podcast RadioViajera

03:42 min | 1 year ago

"seti" Discussed on Podcast RadioViajera

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Chicago Teachers Union: City has stopped negotiating

WGN Showcase

00:50 sec | 1 year ago

Chicago Teachers Union: City has stopped negotiating

"Ed Cluster. Teachers who failed report on Monday will be terminated from system access at the end of the day. CPS and see to you are still negotiating over the timeline for reopening schools for K through eight students, accommodations for staff with vulnerable family members, metrics and vaccinations. Air. Lori Lightfoot is on the record, saying vaccinations for all staff is not possible. In order to implement Seti's plan. We would have to stop vaccine distribution across the entire city for everyone else, literally. Chicago Teachers union says the mayor in school district officials were meeting with them over the weekend. Union statement says the mayor's last offer is woefully inadequate. In its last offer, CPS proposed to staggered return over the course of three weeks. Open the Pritzker Visitor Mobile vaccination

Ed Cluster Lori Lightfoot CPS Chicago Teachers Union Seti Pritzker Visitor Mobile
"seti" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:44 min | 1 year ago

"seti" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Offering from SETI Project, read the studio also responsible for smash hits such as the Witcher Series. But for some, the game was unplayable so unplayable that Sony, which owns PlayStation It's something unprecedented for a game of this size. It removed the game from its story entirely, offering refunds to anyone who purchased it. Microsoft, which owns Xbox also offered refunds. SETI Project, the Game Studios parent company, is now facing a lawsuit over the launch. They did not respond to our request for a statement. By her time, they've also lost a lot of money and the trust of fans such as destined to Gary, This is going to be something that people look back at. And remember, this isn't gonna be something that people forget. But games have come back from this kind of released before the studio has already begun sending out updates that have improved the experience of players across platforms. He had much NPR news signature was still hoping to time the Corona virus pandemic as much of the world in its grip. Britain's Queen Elizabeth today praise what she called the indomitable spirit of those she says, have risen magnificently to the challenge of the pandemic. Seated behind a desk at Windsor Castle, the queen expressing sympathy for the ordeal of the past few months. Well angle hope for a return to normality down the road. You Kay is the second highest covert 19 death toll in Europe around 70002nd only to Italy. This is NPR. Support for NPR comes from NPR stations. Other contributors include the Walton Family Foundation, working to solve social and environmental problems to improve lives today and benefit future generations. More information at Walton family foundation dot or g'kar. Support for KQED counselor to Silicon Valley Community Foundation, whose donors provide over $500 million to.

SETI Project NPR Walton Family Foundation Queen Elizabeth Gary Sony Silicon Valley Community Found Windsor Castle Microsoft Game Studios KQED Kay Europe Britain Italy
Cyberpunk 2077 developers offer refunds after bug-ridden launch

Radio From Hell

00:38 sec | 1 year ago

Cyberpunk 2077 developers offer refunds after bug-ridden launch

"Year's most anticipated video games is apologizing. Just days after its release, Cyberpunk 2077 has been plagued with bugs and crashes since its debut Now SETI Project Red is offering refunds for customers unsatisfied with the game. Cyberpunk 2077, which features cameos from Chiana Reeves and Elon Musk is an action role playing game set in megalopolis. Developers say the $60 game was pre ordered more than eight million times. Wow, guys. You know, bad Something has to be to have counter reason it and people still don't like it. Now, In case you're wondering what

Chiana Reeves Elon Musk Megalopolis
Georgia voters head to the polls for special election to fill John Lewis’s seat — temporarily

Herman Cain

00:41 sec | 1 year ago

Georgia voters head to the polls for special election to fill John Lewis’s seat — temporarily

"The special election to fill the late John Lewis's place in Congress. A slow but consistent number of voters coming out to the CT. Martin Rec Center on Il Killed MLK Drive this morning. The combination of a rainy day in a runoff election where the winner will only serve until January did not stop Mildred and Robert Byrd from coming out to vote to make sure that John Lewis's seat is filled. Congressman Lewis is tiring me. They need someone to feel it, so it was important for us to choose someone. Birds are also planning to head back out in a couple weeks to cast their ballots for the November 3rd election as well at the SETI Martin Recreation Center. Michelle right, 95.5 ws in depth coverage of

Congressman Lewis Seti Martin Recreation Center Martin Rec Center Michelle Right Robert Byrd CT Congress Mildred
What Does A Healthy Rainforest Sound Like?

Short Wave

05:14 min | 1 year ago

What Does A Healthy Rainforest Sound Like?

"Today we're speaking with Sarah, Seti about ecosystem health monitoring using sound. But before we dig into it, let's first look at one traditional method for evaluating the health of an ecosystem. Say you're interested in measuring bird biodiversity. For instance, you might use the point count method where you stand outside for hours on end with a lot of patience and a talented pair of ears. Every single bud you have a closing will you see visually united down what species that was what time you saw it? You kind of repeat that thing over the twenty, four hours a day different house at different locations it's. A super thorough process for monitoring ecosystem health, but incredibly tedious. So Sarah and his colleagues thought you know with all this modern technology, we have sensors, wireless networks. Solar panels there has to be a more efficient way to do this. Can we get something this? So approximately as good as this kind of data, but is completely yours mason methods, recorders uploading audio to the internet straight from the field allowing them to potentially track ecosystem health. In real time, they've set up this acoustic monitoring network in Borneo part of the safe project which records audio continuously, and it is a staggering amount of data. About seventeen thousand dollars so far from the network seventeen thousand. One seven zero. Gosh but it's not just background noise housed in those seventeen thousand hours is a treasure trove of. Impossible for us, mere humans to listen through. But fortunately, the folks Google have figured out a way to sort through all that audio Sarah and his team turned to Google's set a massive data set of sounds that was developed using machine learning Odier says done is it has labeled data for. kind of almost every type of sound that you can imagine that being an so from that a cannon knows the amongst all dog box. There is something that is consistent about old dogs that makes it dog and so it knows the this is one fingerprint, and then amongst all of gloss smashing into, it knows that says finding things the kind of we as humans perceptually consistent in touch the sound. And then fixing them down to one type of fingerprint taking Google Technology, they applied it to their forest recordings, training their machine to create an audio fingerprint a way to kind of identify that forest brew, it sound, and the algorithm they've developed can potentially predict important indicators of a forest health like habitat quality and biodiversity based on it soundscape alone, and it didn't just work in one particular kind of Forest Sarah and his co authors analyzed the audio recordings of forests around. The world they published their findings this summer in proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences What did you and your team show with these audio recordings beyond the fact that yes, the technology worked, what did it reveal about the character and what's happening in these forests? What you see quite nicely full out from all of this is we looked at really Clinton is diurnal patterns so that so of how they annoy a different in how odier consistently follows the same kind of trajectory. Fingerprints when you can start see West season change in weather day. So how evolve through the day as the sun comes off goes down and how that changes the species communities of licensing. That's lovely because we think about days and years and months mostly in relation to light like the sun coming up the sun coming down. Yeah. But you're saying there's like a rise and fall of sound exactly throughout the twenty four hour day that you. You measure? Yeah. Exactly. Unto the point where you can and we did this analysis within the papers that you can just take random piece of audio and you can gas with pretty good accuracy. Our the rodeos recorded that again, is questionable. What's what's the point in time I recall it Kinda. Just shows you the amount of information that's like temporary coded in this audio as well, and you can guess what month is recorded from so. We're GONNA actually listen to some of the sounds that your team has recorded from the safe acoustics website, acoustic dot, safe project, dot net. So these recordings they're all the all uploaded like wirelessly. Yeah. Wow Cova did not live right now, but they would normally be recorded in real time and uploaded. So you'd be able to listen to the forest sounds like an all these different locations right now. So, this very mood setting. The rain at night in an old growth forest. In Borneo. Yeah. He spent some nights under a tent in these conditions. Yeah. I mean this kind of rain is like Gold Senate because most of the time spent doing fieldwork sweating. So when the rain comes in, it's Nicer Wendy and COO. Yeah Music

Sarah Google Forest Sarah Cova National Academy Of Sciences Borneo COO Odier Gold Senate Clinton
Liverpool 4-0 Crystal Palace: Reds move within two points of league title

ESPN FC

00:27 sec | 2 years ago

Liverpool 4-0 Crystal Palace: Reds move within two points of league title

"Course, the primarily title Rice Liverpool with a four nil victory over crystal. Palace they were pretty good today saving. The team the the. Certainly the team they were before the break. Never in doubt. Probably could've should have been more. And by the end. What five substitutes taken most to? Most of his team off and. Getting ready for Seti next week

Rice Liverpool
"seti" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

Newsradio 1200 WOAI

09:19 min | 2 years ago

"seti" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

"Seti institute in Mountain View California he has an undergraduate degree in physics from Princeton University a doctorate in astronomy from California institute of technology for much of his career south conducted radio astronomy research on galaxies and for a decade the chair of the international academy of astronautics seti permanent committee and each week he holds the study institutes one hour science radio show big picture science study stands for search for extraterrestrial intelligence he's also is also an author including because some fashions of an alien hunters Seth welcome back my friend how are you yes fine George wonderful to talk with you you too you're all hunkered down and I'm sheltering in place yet very good what is new with seti well listen there are always things that are new in any of them tend to be instrumentation all things you know that we have this Allen telescope array up here in northern California about three hundred miles north of San Francisco yup and that we've been building some new receivers for for a while funded by a fellow down in San Diego actually for Franklin Antonio the thing Sir you're all over much of the band may be twice as sensitive as the receivers we used to have and if you have a receiver it's twice as sensitive you can you know you can check out three times as much of the university at the same sensitivity level so there's that other things in here something that I think is very interesting we're also setting up a collaboration with the very large array sometimes called the Karl Jansky VLA but anyhow that's the one down in New Mexico just about an hour west of saguaro he seven antennas and a big Y. and we will be using that in what's called commensal mode might not be a word you use every day but what that means is that while astronomers you know we're doing if you will conventional astronomy we can also tap off some of those data and look for signals from E. D. now you know the great your whole case out there at the corner of New Mexico with the late police officer Lonnie Zamora who claim to have seen an object with two each sees that scurried back into the craft and took off it's one of the best stories ever out there Seth yes I have heard that it seems that the the visiting aliens seem to prefer the what they like New Mexico thank you yes I do ten and let's let's clear the air for a lot of people who want to know about said the and you you do not believe that they have visited us but you do believe they're out there or you wouldn't be doing what you're doing right right George and and I I know that that is not angry she ate me through some of the listeners but then you know they can just stay tuned and be aggravated well you get your views and that's the important thing about it house two months ago a comet was discovered originally called the C. two nineteen Q. four that's not your average comment what was going on how was it discovered yeah they're they're a bunch of comics that have been making the news at least in terms of them possibly being something other than comment this one called three slash twenty nineteen Q. four that you just mentioned is better known as too high a border show off because this guy again at the border shop and I'm sure I mispronounce his name but he's a Russian amateur astronomer and he found this thing actually in it it took a while before was confirmed that by you know professionals with bigger telescopes the interesting thing about this comment is that it's not local it's a kid from some other neighborhood it did it came from somebody else's star system we're not quite sure which one and so that's the second rock we've seen in our solar system that said you know with him interloper if you will an invasion from another planet earth another well another solar system presumably from another planet so it that's kind of interesting we know this one is a comedy has a okay it's something like a hundred thousand miles long and it's throwing up gas and dusted about know about a hundred pounds per second which I guess speaks weight watchers it sure does what about that object from the two thousand seventeen that nobody can pronounce but I'm I'm sure I did not yeah the mobile well it was the first one that was found to be you know on an orbit that proved that it was sent from someplace far away and you know it's in there the thought was okay it's a comedy it's an asteroid whatever it is when they made a photo of it all you saw was one pixels from hard to tell what it is when that's the only you know that the only image you have but on the basis of the way the the brightness of the thing very you could tell that it was probably a lot longer than was wise who's maybe shaped like a cigar and I think that many people who pay attention these things will seem that artist's impression of the Mula Mula which looks like a you know kind of a a wrinkly cigar yeah what made that's sort of interesting beyond you know your average asteroid aside from the fact that it's somebody else's asteroids that's right is that the Abbe Lowell who's the head of the S. astronomy department at Harvard is said is against it in the paper that you know maybe this wasn't a totally natural rock maybe it was a solar sail powered craft and so he made an interesting argument of why this might be and I think he still stands by that to some degree so you know I it is the thought was if you could only get up close to that thing so you might see that it has a role windows along the side with little green faces fine them you never know now what's the significance of these objects leaving their domain or solar systems well this significance is insignificant I don't what significance means the what's the meaning of life but the significance here I think it's only that you tend to think of you know solar systems the way you see them in another way and diagrams in books of the local planetarium that you have the the the the the planets going around a star and they just keep doing that forever but if you happen to be for example in the around four and a half billion years ago and I'm you know I can't say that was but if you ran for half two years ago when our own solar system was being formed then you would have noticed that there were probably a lot more than eight or nine planets may but some of them because they sort of you know have that kind of close encounters if you will they kick some of their brethren out of the next and I heard a talk in a Celtic years ago which is one of the theoreticians figured this you know for every three planets that you form maybe two of them get kicked out at least one of them so you know the fact that things get thrown out of their solar systems and you know who wander the depths of space or sort of a boring eternity that that seems to be a very common thing over the next month and a half we don't we get a chance to see another comedy called swan yes if you're in the southern hemisphere I don't know that southern California accounts for the southern hemisphere but indeed swan that's an acronym for what is that solar wind and I stopped to appease instrument that's on those so sat like this hotel it is you know one of these NASA space well actually at the European satellite that European satellite this you know in order right so that they can study the sun that's pretty close to the sun and you discover a lot of comments when you're near the sun because comics tend to run around the you know the sun as they come into our solar system then you know they go back to the depths of the solar system or something like thirty or forty new comets discovered every year I mean finding a new comedy it's not such a big deal but this one is visible you know maybe to the naked eye and if you have binoculars even better better but you have to be south of the equator I think it's not a matter of if but when we discover some kind of alien signal well I do yes of course I mean you know if if given where I work it would be you know how many years you've been at this now what will Georgia I'm home and I'm not sure I want to say but I think that you and I first talked probably I don't know in the mid nineteen nineties right nineteen ninety five ninety six yeah you were in that error C. ball importer Rico at the telescope when I got to do in my local night talk show in St Louis that's right I do remember that that's right and a bill that actually had me on is about the same time that's right absolutely I'd like to say he stole you from my show you never know published on or I may have stolen it from his I love itself stay with us we're gonna come back in a moment but I want to ask you about the Pentagon revealing that yes these navy videos are authentic we don't know what the heck they are but they sure are unidentified I want to get your take on that and we'll talk some more and then later on next hour we'll take phone calls with south shot stack from city is websites are all linked up for you and coast to coast AM dot com so we will be back in a moment with the confessions of.

Seti institute Mountain View California Princeton University California institute of techno international academy of astro
"seti" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

04:20 min | 2 years ago

"seti" Discussed on TechStuff

"A mountain of processed data from this project that has to be further analyzed, and that taps into something else that I plan to talk about more later on this year, the challenges of big data were able to collect mind staggeringly huge amounts of information, but understanding and using that information is another matter. It presents a really big challenge, even with all of these analyzed chunks of Info that data still has to be processed to see what's actually been found over the two decades of city at home. The researchers overseeing Seti at home hope to publish a paper on the subject and to do that. They need to look at all the results of the stuff that the program actually found, and so they need to stop gathering data while that happens. They have to actually stop so that they can see what they have. As opposed to continuously adding to that pile, this hiatus will allow the team to look at the results form conclusions and write a paper based. Based on the whole project, and while we don't anticipate any reports of intelligent communications, popping up as a result of this analysis, the endeavor as a whole has been really successful, particularly in the context of getting people excited about participating in science on the back end of Seti at home is an infrastructure that grew over time. It is called the Berkeley Open infrastructure for network computing this support system hosts, numerous distributed computing projects that work on the same basic principles. Principles as Seti at home. It's just that each of these projects have a different goal or purpose. Some are dedicated to detecting and measuring asteroids some provide sern processing capabilities to help analyze data produced by the large Hadron collider in an effort to gain a deeper understanding, a particle, physics and quantum mechanics. There are projects that focus on climate science physics, cognitive science and more, and you can check them all out at blink dot. Berkeley DOT EDU slash projects. PROJECTS DOT PHP. Let's be Oh. I N C DOT Berkeley dot edu slash projects dot PHP. If you want to dedicate some of your computers, idle processing power to solving really interesting problems in science. It's a great way to contribute. You're not even doing anything active, but you are helping you know. Peel back the border of our understanding we're. We're pushing that boundary further and further out, and you can do it just with your computer's idle time. It's pretty incredible. So while city at home is writing off into the sunset at least for a while. Anyway, there are still efforts around the world dedicated in full or in part to the search for extra terrestrial life. The search hasn't ended yet. Even if Seti at home is. At least for now over, and when we don't have anything jumping out to us as a positive absolutely, yes, we need to check this out. We're pretty sure someone's talking to us kind of. Incident. It's. Good to remember that space is really big. Who knows maybe the next star we point a telescope at will be beaming. Whatever the alien version of the Great British bake off is. One can only hope. And that wraps up this episode of Tech Stuff. My hat is off to the Seti at home crew I think it was an admirable use of technology to inspire people to get into science I. Think it was a worthy endeavour to search for extraterrestrial intelligence. It was great to see other projects. Take that same model and apply it to their own scientific endeavors, so it's to me. Me One of those great stories in Technology even if we didn't find any direct evidence of little green men out there, who knows what the future will bring? If you guys have any suggestions for future topics for tech stuff, reach out to me. You can find me on facebook or twitter. The handle for both is tech stuff H...

Seti Berkeley facebook twitter
"seti" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

04:20 min | 2 years ago

"seti" Discussed on TechStuff

"A mountain of processed data from this project that has to be further analyzed, and that taps into something else that I plan to talk about more later on this year, the challenges of big data were able to collect mind staggeringly huge amounts of information, but understanding and using that information is another matter. It presents a really big challenge, even with all of these analyzed chunks of Info that data still has to be processed to see what's actually been found over the two decades of city at home. The researchers overseeing Seti at home hope to publish a paper on the subject and to do that. They need to look at all the results of the stuff that the program actually found, and so they need to stop gathering data while that happens. They have to actually stop so that they can see what they have. As opposed to continuously adding to that pile, this hiatus will allow the team to look at the results form conclusions and write a paper based. Based on the whole project, and while we don't anticipate any reports of intelligent communications, popping up as a result of this analysis, the endeavor as a whole has been really successful, particularly in the context of getting people excited about participating in science on the back end of Seti at home is an infrastructure that grew over time. It is called the Berkeley Open infrastructure for network computing this support system hosts, numerous distributed computing projects that work on the same basic principles. Principles as Seti at home. It's just that each of these projects have a different goal or purpose. Some are dedicated to detecting and measuring asteroids some provide sern processing capabilities to help analyze data produced by the large Hadron collider in an effort to gain a deeper understanding, a particle, physics and quantum mechanics. There are projects that focus on climate science physics, cognitive science and more, and you can check them all out at blink dot. Berkeley DOT EDU slash projects. PROJECTS DOT PHP. Let's be Oh. I N C DOT Berkeley dot edu slash projects dot PHP. If you want to dedicate some of your computers, idle processing power to solving really interesting problems in science. It's a great way to contribute. You're not even doing anything active, but you are helping you know. Peel back the border of our understanding we're. We're pushing that boundary further and further out, and you can do it just with your computer's idle time. It's pretty incredible. So while city at home is writing off into the sunset at least for a while. Anyway, there are still efforts around the world dedicated in full or in part to the search for extra terrestrial life. The search hasn't ended yet. Even if Seti at home is. At least for now over, and when we don't have anything jumping out to us as a positive absolutely, yes, we need to check this out. We're pretty sure someone's talking to us kind of. Incident. It's. Good to remember that space is really big. Who knows maybe the next star we point a telescope at will be beaming. Whatever the alien version of the Great British bake off is. One can only hope. And that wraps up this episode of Tech Stuff. My hat is off to the Seti at home crew I think it was an admirable use of technology to inspire people to get into science I. Think it was a worthy endeavour to search for extraterrestrial intelligence. It was great to see other projects. Take that same model and apply it to their own scientific endeavors, so it's to me. Me One of those great stories in Technology even if we didn't find any direct evidence of little green men out there, who knows what the future will bring? If you guys have any suggestions for future topics for tech stuff, reach out to me. You can find me on facebook or twitter. The handle for both is tech stuff H...

Seti Berkeley facebook twitter
"seti" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

04:20 min | 2 years ago

"seti" Discussed on TechStuff

"A mountain of processed data from this project that has to be further analyzed, and that taps into something else that I plan to talk about more later on this year, the challenges of big data were able to collect mind staggeringly huge amounts of information, but understanding and using that information is another matter. It presents a really big challenge, even with all of these analyzed chunks of Info that data still has to be processed to see what's actually been found over the two decades of city at home. The researchers overseeing Seti at home hope to publish a paper on the subject and to do that. They need to look at all the results of the stuff that the program actually found, and so they need to stop gathering data while that happens. They have to actually stop so that they can see what they have. As opposed to continuously adding to that pile, this hiatus will allow the team to look at the results form conclusions and write a paper based. Based on the whole project, and while we don't anticipate any reports of intelligent communications, popping up as a result of this analysis, the endeavor as a whole has been really successful, particularly in the context of getting people excited about participating in science on the back end of Seti at home is an infrastructure that grew over time. It is called the Berkeley Open infrastructure for network computing this support system hosts, numerous distributed computing projects that work on the same basic principles. Principles as Seti at home. It's just that each of these projects have a different goal or purpose. Some are dedicated to detecting and measuring asteroids some provide sern processing capabilities to help analyze data produced by the large Hadron collider in an effort to gain a deeper understanding, a particle, physics and quantum mechanics. There are projects that focus on climate science physics, cognitive science and more, and you can check them all out at blink dot. Berkeley DOT EDU slash projects. PROJECTS DOT PHP. Let's be Oh. I N C DOT Berkeley dot edu slash projects dot PHP. If you want to dedicate some of your computers, idle processing power to solving really interesting problems in science. It's a great way to contribute. You're not even doing anything active, but you are helping you know. Peel back the border of our understanding we're. We're pushing that boundary further and further out, and you can do it just with your computer's idle time. It's pretty incredible. So while city at home is writing off into the sunset at least for a while. Anyway, there are still efforts around the world dedicated in full or in part to the search for extra terrestrial life. The search hasn't ended yet. Even if Seti at home is. At least for now over, and when we don't have anything jumping out to us as a positive absolutely, yes, we need to check this out. We're pretty sure someone's talking to us kind of. Incident. It's. Good to remember that space is really big. Who knows maybe the next star we point a telescope at will be beaming. Whatever the alien version of the Great British bake off is. One can only hope. And that wraps up this episode of Tech Stuff. My hat is off to the Seti at home crew I think it was an admirable use of technology to inspire people to get into science I. Think it was a worthy endeavour to search for extraterrestrial intelligence. It was great to see other projects. Take that same model and apply it to their own scientific endeavors, so it's to me. Me One of those great stories in Technology even if we didn't find any direct evidence of little green men out there, who knows what the future will bring? If you guys have any suggestions for future topics for tech stuff, reach out to me. You can find me on facebook or twitter. The handle for both is tech stuff H...

Seti Berkeley facebook twitter
"seti" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

08:15 min | 2 years ago

"seti" Discussed on TechStuff

"Go! So. There are many different models for computing when I was growing up, I was familiar with a more centralized model. So in my case I was growing up in the era of personal computers and the computers. I I used were completely self contained. They didn't connect to a larger network. All the processing capability all the programs, all the capacity for storage connected to the physical computer itself. They might be peripherals, but it was all part of the personal computer a few years ago, the big trend was cloud computing so with cloud computing. You've got networked servers that are doing a lot of the processing power for big applications, the devices we're using whether their. Their computers or mobile devices or sensors, or whatever are mostly acting as transmitters and receivers for many tasks we provide input to these devices, and the device then transmits commands to some distant group of servers that takes information does some sort of operation on it produces some sort of result and sends that back to us, so no longer do we have to have really powerful computers directly at our disposal? We can rely on cloud services to do that computing for us at least for some things for other things like if you want to do, low latency. High Graphics Fidelity Gaming for example. You want to have a really good strong. Strong computer processor at your disposal, because latency with transmission can completely ruin that experience, but for the most part you get what I'm saying, well, said he, at home was an example of sort of third model called distributed computing. The idea was that you could take a group of regular old personal computers, the kind that any average person could have in their home you would install some software on those computers, and that software would allow the computers to process chunks of data in some particular way before sending the results back to wherever that data was coming from in the first place, so if someone needed to tackle a really big data processing. Processing job one that could be divided up into smaller chunks that person can use a centralized computer, or maybe a network of computers to send out these smaller chunks of data to this distribution of personal computers for processing, and then wait for the results to come back, and then group them all together and see what you got. It speeds things up. Considerably it increases the processing assets of the project as more computers joined that project, and it reduces the need to turn to stuff like supercomputers, and it also achieved another goal which the founders that the project had in mind, which was to encourage enthusiasm and excitement around the subject, of science. Computer, scientists David Gigi astronomers woody, Sullivan and Dan Worth Amer and David Anderson. Who Was David's graduate school advisor collectively came up with this idea all the way back in nineteen, thousand, nine, hundred, ninety, nine, specifically with Seti at home, they were trying to come up with a scientific application. People would be excited to participate in and while they weren't necessarily Sukhbir optimistic that Seti at home would produce you know incredible results from a scientific perspective. Perspective. They thought from a motivating perspective. It was just the ticket, and it was pretty genius upon launch anyone with a computer and an Internet connection could conceivably help in the search for extraterrestrial intelligence. The researchers created a screen saver program. So if you wanted to participate, you could download the screen saver and install it on your personal computer. When your computer we go idle and activate the screensaver, the processor of your computer which otherwise. Otherwise would be doing very little would get to work on. Some data sent over from the city research project, so the research project would pull information from a radio telescope divided into chunks, and then parcel it out to people participating in this project. When complete when you're processor was done working on chunk of data, it would send the results back to the central point for the project and wait for the next chunk of data and. And if you were to come back to do some work on your computer, let's say you come back after taking a break for half an hour. The screensaver goes inactive and the program would surrender your processing cycles back to you, so you didn't have to about Seti at home suddenly taking up all of your computers processing power, it only jumped back onto the job when your computer went idol again and your your CPU had availability. Now as I said this idea was genius, but the original implementation of the idea was less. Oh. Now. That's not a slight on the researchers. Because when they launched the project in May, nineteen, ninety nine, they were expecting that they might get as many as a thousand people signing up. They figured that well. This is an interesting idea and we'll probably see some folks. Really you know who are really into science joined, but I'm not sure about anything beyond that. Now with an expectation, they only dedicated a single desktop p. c. for the purposes of assigning processing tasks and receiving the results from the distributed computers. They did not anticipate how enthusiastic reception for the project would be. They didn't see a thousand people sign up when they launched, said he at home. They saw a million people. Sign Up, so let's put that into perspective. Let's say you've set up a lemonade stand and you did some brief scouting work and you anticipated that the location you're setting up and you're gonNA see maybe ten customers thirty minutes, and you think that's manageable, but what you didn't realize is. Is that you've actually set up your stand in Sour Puss, scurvy town, it's a town populated entirely by people with an unquenchable thirst for lemonade, so instead of ten people showing up in that first half hour. Ten thousand people mob, your lemonade stand. You are overwhelmed well. The same thing happened to the Seti at home pc that was in charge of sending out in receiving all that data. It was a good problem to have, but it was still a problem. Sun Microsystems jumped in and donated a bunch of computers to help the city at home. Administrators make the system work, and from that moment on the program went into high gear. People in the program were contributing to scientific exploration, just by allowing their idol computers to focus on complicated mathematical problems. When the computer was otherwise not use, it was a beautiful thing. The response also meant that the project could go through information orders of magnitude faster than if it had all been handled in house the they had the advantage of a million. Million processors, that's something that no said project could have afforded on its own. At that time it also inspired other scientific projects to launch distributed computing efforts folding at home, for example taps into idol computers to solve protein folding problems that could lead to incredible advances in medicine and biology on top of that online communities formed around Seti at home, people connected over forums and formed friendships, the reason stories about people meeting online, falling in love and getting married out in the real world all while using their computers to seek out evidence of intelligent life, it was all really remarkable and beautiful, but hey. If, it was so super cool. Why the Heck is the project shutting down now? Twenty one years after it launched is the book closed on extraterrestrial intelligent life. Are we done? Have we given up well, not quite. The problem now is that we've got a ton..

Sukhbir David advisor David Gigi David Anderson Dan Worth Amer woody Sullivan
"seti" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

09:25 min | 2 years ago

"seti" Discussed on TechStuff

"Potentially thousands or millions of stars from our otherwise unmanageable. List of potential targets to look at and so with this in mind, another astronomer and astrophysicist named Frank Drake decided to take this hypothesis, and to actually put it in action. He conducted the first search for extraterrestrial intelligence with the help of radio astronomy, and it was called project asthma named after the character asthma from l Frank Bombs Oz books. Drake secured time on a Radio Telescope, the measured twenty six meters or eighty five feet across to scan for radio frequencies that originated out of towel, city and Epsilon Eridani. Those are two different stars, and both stars are relatively close to our own solar system, and both our son like enough that they could serve as potentially good targets based on Coney Oni and Morrison's proposed guidelines. Apart from one outlier, his team found no evidence of radio signals, indicating potential intelligent communication, the one outlier they did pickup while initially interesting proved to be terrestrial in nature meaning that it originated from an aircraft made by dull old humans didn't come from outer space. It was something that we had created and this radio telescope just happened to pick it up and then actually illustrates another challenge with using radio telescopes, weeding out the signals that are actually coming from us as opposed to coming from space, and it sure would be. Be Embarrassing to come forward with claim that you've discovered alien communication only for it to turn out to be a terrestrial signal like an old mork and Mindy, episode or something that's only got a character who's supposed to be an alien, then it. It's not actually alien now. Luckily, this early experience taught researchers to include a secondary antenna that would only be sensitive enough to detect terrestrial signals, so you put the secondary antenna near the first antenna. They're both pointed at same section of sky, and then when you get A. A A a a beep. You know you register a signal. You can compare the primary telescope the one that you're using to search for extraterrestrial intelligence against this smaller antenna, and if the smaller antenna also picked up the signal, you know that signal was terrestrial, because the smaller antenna isn't powerful enough to pick up stuff from outer space, so you say all right well, if it appears on both, we know that that came from Earth. We know that that's not actually a signal sent from somewhere out in space so they. They learned that lesson very quickly, and that was very helpful. Drake further contributed to the discourse about the search for extraterrestrial intelligence by proposing a way to sort of conceptualize the possibility of detecting intelligent civilizations in the universe. These days we call it the drake equation, and it's a pretty cool concept, and it goes something like this all right. There's a variable that we're going to call in in represents the number of civilizations in our galaxy, with which we could possibly communicate so in is that number? It's an unknown number. What determines the value of that number while it's a bunch of stuff that you have to take into account, and that includes the average rate at which stars form in the Milky Way? The number of those stars that will actually have planets form around them, because not every star has planets. The average number of those planets that could potentially support life the number of planets that could support life that actually go on to support life so far we haven't found any that definitively fit that that definition, then the number of those planets, in which the life that forums can develop to the point of gaining intelligence, the number of planets with intelligent life than develop and use communication tools that would be detectable from Earth, and then the links of time such civilizations have been doing that. Because that length of time will determine whether or not they would be detectable right so even if they exist again if they're far far away, there's no way we could. Could detect them anyway because again. The speed of light is a limiting factor. So this equation is not meant to give a hard and fast number like three or something. Instead it helps us frame the likelihood of detecting intelligent life, specifically intelligent life that is using radio communication. We don't really know anything about the number of plants that can definitively support life or anything else beyond that particular variable. Right we. We've got information about some of the other stuff. We have a general idea of how frequently stars in the Milky Way. We are refining our understanding of how many stars have planets turns out that way? More Stars have planets than we initially thought. then. We have to think all right well. How many of those plants could potentially support life based upon their distance from the star, The star of the heat of the star, all of those other variables. So we're slowly learning more about the front half of equation, and the back half is still largely a mystery to us now. It's important so that we can use that kind of information help refine our search, right. We WanNa make sure that we are looking at the places most likely to produce good results because again spaces really big. If we just randomly point telescope in any given direction, the odds of success are minuscule. We want to improve those odds as best we can. By making some intelligent decisions based on educated guesses really. Now The Seti Institute a not for profit. Scientific Research Organization wouldn't come into being until nineteen eighty four, however, between Drake's project asthma in the early nineteen sixties, and the Seti, Institute's formation in nineteen, eighty four, there were lots of astronomers who were looking for signals that might have originated from an intelligent civilization out in space I find a lot of people confuse Seti. The science that's the general science of searching for extraterrestrial intelligence and he the institute those are the Seti. Institute is dedicated toward a deeper understanding of life in general and its place in the universe and the potential existence of extraterrestrial intelligence. But the two are not synonymous. It's not Seti and the Seti Institute are related, but distinct now back in nineteen, sixty seven. There was an astronomer named Jocelyn Bell. Who noticed something that initially seemed really promising from a city perspective turned down. It was incredible information period, but we just didn't understand its significance at the time. She noticed what appeared to be a pulsing radio signal. She and her supervisor charted the pulses that they were detecting, and they were detecting at. Intervals like each day on slightly. Off By hours or whatever, but it was. It was unusual. They weren't expecting it. And at the time they didn't have an explanation for the origin of those radio pulses, so the handle label it as something. And at the time they labeled it L. G. M. One. L. GM stood for little green men. Was, a somewhat tongue in cheek. Wade indicated that I don't know. Maybe this is purposeful radio broadcasting. We don't know they kept looking into it. They kept trying to figure out exactly what it was. And where the signal was originating from and over overtime, they concluded that it was actually a naturally occurring pulse. It was not. Like an l., going phone message from beyond the stars or something, ultimately this hunch that they had that it was a naturally occurring phenomenon. Proved correct and scientists were able to figure out that the pulse was coming from rotating neutron stars called pulsars, so while didn't turn out to be aliens. Astronomers were able to expand our understanding of space, so is still super. Cool it just. Wasn't aliens. Ohio State University launched the first long-term Seti study in nineteen, seventy three, and unlike other attempts, this one surveyed the entire night sky, as the earth rotated instead of honing in on a specific region of space, and then just staying locked onto that region. It would do a full scan. Slightly different arc each night, but a full scan of the night sky in nineteen, seventy, seven, that system registered a signal that was many times stronger than the background signals that the telescope was recording. There was an analyst named Jerry Aiman who wrote down the word. Wow in the margin of the computer printout for that detection, and to this day we call it the wile signal and the signal had. Had A profile that suggested it wasn't your typical. Naturally occurring radio-wave is this weird spike, but despite numerous efforts, the telescope did not pick up any subsequent signals from that part of Space Eminem..

Frank Drake Seti Institute Frank Bombs Oz Epsilon Eridani mork Ohio State University Jocelyn Bell Coney Oni Eminem Mindy Morrison analyst supervisor Jerry Aiman Scientific Research Organizati L. GM Wade
"seti" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

15:44 min | 2 years ago

"seti" Discussed on TechStuff

"Coney and Morrison wrote a paper about their proposal titled Searching For Interstellar Communications The journal Nature published this paper and the two scientists address. Some PRETTY BIG QUESTIONS. See now as the late great. Douglas Adams once observed spaces big really big and these radio. Telescopes are directional. So you have to pick a spot to point the telescope at but how do you determine where you should look? How do you decide? This is the point in space. We're going to search right now. You might start off searching the equivalent of a ghost town and it could be a neighboring region of space might be absolutely teeming with life but because of that directional telescope. You wouldn't know that you're just beginning data from a total uninhabited part of space. So the implication you get as others nobody out there. Meanwhile like to space doors down. There's a raging party going on. It's Kinda like if you were staring into a warehouse from the Keyhole of door. You only see stuff within the view of that keyhole but there could be a whole lot more warehouse just outside your view. You would have no idea if anything was actually in the warehouse or not you would only be able to see from that narrow range of the. Keyhole. That was the same issue they were having with radio. Telescopes moreover you could point the radio telescope at a place where there is intelligent life. But maybe it's a region that's so far away from the Earth. We can't detect that life. So let me put that another way. Human beings started broadcasting radio in the early nineteen hundreds. So it's really been less than one hundred fifty years since we started using radio. Communication there are stars in the Milky Way Galaxy again the same galaxy that our solar system is in that are around nine hundred thousand light years away from us that means it would take light nine hundred thousand earth years to travel from that distant star to us so it takes nearly a million years for that information to get to us a radio. Communication would require the same amount of time to get to us. That means that if intelligent alien life exists or even existed on a planet around that distant star that life would have had to have invented and made use of radio technology a million years ago for us to pick up those signals today. That's assuming that intelligent life would have somehow survived that million years for us to say that intelligent life exists. Today right we. We wouldn't know that for sure all we could say is there appears to have been an intelligent civilization that existed a million years ago. We aren't really sure what they're up to now because we'd have no way of knowing we would only know from the signals that were sent from the past the neat thing about space to the further. You look the more you're looking into the past the not seeing present situations just because the restriction of the speed of light so need you only really be able to see any current alien civilization if they were you know relatively close to us Otherwise you can't be certain that that civilization still exists if it's thousands of light years away. Moreover Alien Civilizations would only have been able to hear us if they were around one hundred fifty light years or closer to Earth if they're further than one hundred fifty light years away then our broadcasts would not have gone far enough out to reach them. This by the way is why a lot of science fiction stories are really more like fantasy stories. A lot of them involve aliens finding out about Earth because they picked up a radio or television broadcast but those broadcasts have only been around for a few decades so that would require the aliens to be relatively close to Earth in the first place to pick up those transmissions because of those limitations of the speed of light anyway my point was we might be quote unquote looking at the right spot but the right spot might be far enough away that any radio broadcasts would still be in transit to us and wouldn't have arrived yet may not arrive for thousands of years and that's just one more tiny part of why looking for meaningful signals in the sky is a huge challenge. You've heard the phrase looking for a needle in a haystack. Well it's like that. But you know roughly a bazillion times harder than that could schone and Morrison said AL argument about which areas of the galaxy would be most likely to host an intelligent civilization capable of radio transmissions this included targeting stars. That are neither too hot nor too small or cold. Hot Stars burn out quickly and the thought was. If it's a really hot star it might go through. Its life cycle fast enough. That life doesn't have a chance to evolve on any planets that might be in orbit around that star so the stars life cycle is literally too short for life to have formed around that system smaller. Colder stars tend to be the really old ones ones. They've been around for billions of years and with that much time eventually orbiting planets will lock on a star so that one side of the planet always faces the star and the opposite side of the planet always faces away from the start so one side is always lit and the other side is always dark and that kind of planet would probably be incapable of supporting life so said Coney and Morrison. We should look for stars that are not that different from the Sun. These would be the right age and size to potentially support life if an orbiting planet were within a certain range which we tend to refer to as the goldilocks region has to be a distance. That's not too close to the sun but not too far away either. And that really narrows things down in fact it means we can cross potentially thousands or millions of stars from our otherwise unmanageable huge list of potential targets. To look at and so with this in mind another astronomer and astrophysicist named Frank. Drake decided to take this hypothesis and to actually put it in action. He conducted the first search for extraterrestrial intelligence with the help of radio astronomy and it was called project. Asthma named after the character. Asthma from L Frank Bombs Oz books drake secured time on a radio telescope. The measure twenty six meters or eighty five feet across to scan for radio frequencies that originated out of towel city and Epsilon Eridani. Those are two different stars and both stars are relatively close to our own solar system and both our son like enough that they could serve as potentially good targets based on Coney Oni and Morrison's proposed guidelines apart from one outlier. His team found no evidence of Radio Signals. Indicating POTENTIAL INTELLIGENT COMMUNICATION. The one outlier. They did pickup while initially interesting proved to be terrestrial in nature meaning that it originated from an aircraft made by dull old. Humans didn't come from outer space. It was something that we had created and this radio telescope just happened to pick it up and then actually illustrates another challenge with using radio telescopes weeding out the signals. That are actually coming from us. As opposed to coming from space and it sure would be embarrassing to come forward with a claim that you've discovered alien communication only for it to turn out to be a terrestrial signal like an old market mindy episode or something. That's only got a character who's supposed to be an alien then it. It's not actually alien. Now Luckily this early experience taught researchers to include a secondary antenna that would only be sensitive enough to detect terrestrial signals. So you put the secondary antenna near the first antenna. They're both pointed at same section of sky. And then when you get a a a a beep you know you register a signal. You can compare the primary telescope the one that you're using to search for extraterrestrial intelligence against this smaller antenna and if the smaller antenna also picked up the signal you know that signal was terrestrial because the smaller antenna isn't powerful enough to pick up stuff from outer space so you say all right well if it appears on both. We know that that came from Earth. We know that that's not actually a signal sent from somewhere out in space. So they learned that lesson very quickly and that was very helpful. Drake further contributed to the discourse about the search for extraterrestrial intelligence by proposing a way to sort of conceptualize the possibility of detecting intelligent civilizations in the universe. These days we call it the drake equation and it's a pretty cool concept and it goes something like this all right. There's a variable that we're going to call in in represents the number of civilizations in our galaxy with which we could possibly communicate so in is that number. It's an unknown number. What determines the value of that number while. It's a bunch of stuff that you have to take into account and that includes the average rate at which stars form in the Milky Way the number of those stars that will actually have planets form around them because not every star has planets the average number of those planets that could potentially support life the number of planets that could support life that actually go on to support life so far we haven't found any that definitively fit that that definition then the number of those planets in which the life that forums can develop to the point of gaining intelligence the number of planets with intelligent life than develop and use communication tools that would be detectable from Earth and then the length of time. Such civilizations have been doing that because that length of time will determine whether or not they would be detectable right so even if they exist again if they're far far away there's no way we could detect them anyway because again the speed of light is a limiting factor so this equation is not meant to give a hard and fast number like three or something. Instead it helps us frame the likelihood of detecting intelligent life Specifically intelligent life that is using radio communication. We don't really know anything about the number of plants that can definitively support life or anything else beyond that particular. Variable right we. We've got information about some of the other stuff. We have a general idea of how frequently stars in the Milky Way. We are refining. Our understanding of how many STARS HAVE PLANETS TURNS OUT THAT WAY. More Stars have planets than we initially thought. Then we have to think all right. Well how many of those plants could potentially support life? Based upon their distance from the star the age of the star of the heat of the star all of those other variables so we're slowly learning more about the front half of equation and the back half is still largely a mystery to us now It's important so that we can use that kind of information. Help refine our search right. We WanNa make sure that we are looking at the places most likely to produce good results because again space really big. If we just randomly point the telescope in any given direction the odds of success are miniscule. We want to improve those odds as best. We can by making some intelligent decisions based on educated guesses really now The Seti Institute a not for profit scientific research organization wouldn't come into being until nineteen eighty four however between Drake's project asthma in the early nineteen sixties and the Seti Institute's formation in nineteen eighty four. There were lots of astronomers who were looking for signals that might have originated from an intelligent civilization out in space. I find a lot of people confuse Seti. The science that's the general science of searching for extraterrestrial intelligence and Seti the Institute Those are the Seti Institute is dedicated toward a deeper understanding of life in general and its place in the universe and the potential existence of extraterrestrial intelligence but the two are not synonymous. It's not Seti. And the city institute are related but distinct now back in nineteen sixty seven. There was an astronomer named Jocelyn Bell who noticed something that initially seemed really promising from a city perspective turned down. It was incredible information period. But we just didn't understand its significance at the time. She noticed what appeared to be a pulsing radio signal. She and her supervisor charted the pulses that they were detecting and they were detecting At regular intervals like each day on slightly off by Hours or whatever but it was. It was unusual. They weren't expecting it and at the time they didn't have an explanation for the origin of those radio pulses so the handle label it as something and at the time they labeled it l. g. m. one L. GM stood for little green men was a somewhat tongue in cheek. Wade indicated that I don't know maybe this is purposeful radio broadcasting. We don't know they kept looking into it. They kept trying to figure out exactly what it was and where the signal was originating from and over time they concluded that it was actually a naturally occurring. Pulse it was not like an L. Going phone message from beyond the stars or something ultimately this hunch that they had that it was a naturally occurring phenomenon proved correct and scientists were able to figure out that the pulse was coming from rotating neutron stars called pulsars. So while it didn't turn out to be aliens. Astronomers able to expand our understanding of space. So is still super cool. It just wasn't aliens. Ohio State University launched the first long-term Seti study in nineteen seventy three and unlike other attempts. This one surveyed the entire night sky as the earth rotated instead of honing in on a specific region of space and then just staying locked onto that region. It would do a full scan every night slightly different arc each night but a full scan of the night sky in nineteen seventy seven. That system registered a signal. That was many times stronger than the background signals that the telescope was recording. There was an analyst named Jerry. Aiman who wrote down the word. Wow in the margin of the computer printout for that detection and to this day we call it the wile signal and the signal had a profile. That suggested it wasn't your typical naturally occurring radio-wave..

Morrison Coney Oni Drake Seti Institute Douglas Adams Asthma Keyhole Frank Bombs Ohio State University Epsilon Eridani Jocelyn Bell Aiman analyst Seti the Institute supervisor Jerry
"seti" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

09:03 min | 2 years ago

"seti" Discussed on TechStuff

"Potentially thousands or millions of stars from our otherwise unmanageable. List of potential targets to look at and so with this in mind, another astronomer and astrophysicist named Frank Drake decided to take this hypothesis, and to actually put it in action. He conducted the first search for extraterrestrial intelligence with the help of radio astronomy, and it was called project asthma named after the character asthma from l Frank Bombs Oz books. Drake secured time on a Radio Telescope, the measured twenty six meters or eighty five feet across to scan for radio frequencies that originated out of towel, city and Epsilon Eridani. Those are two different stars, and both stars are relatively close to our own solar system, and both our son like enough that they could serve as potentially good targets based on Coney Oni and Morrison's proposed guidelines. Apart from one outlier, his team found no evidence of radio signals, indicating potential intelligent communication, the one outlier they did pickup while initially interesting proved to be terrestrial in nature meaning that it originated from an aircraft made by dull old humans didn't come from outer space. It was something that we had created and this radio telescope just happened to pick it up and then actually illustrates another challenge with using radio telescopes, weeding out the signals that are actually coming from us as opposed to coming from space, and it sure would be. Be Embarrassing to come forward with claim that you've discovered alien communication only for it to turn out to be a terrestrial signal like an old mork and Mindy, episode or something that's only got a character who's supposed to be an alien, then it. It's not actually alien now. Luckily, this early experience taught researchers to include a secondary antenna that would only be sensitive enough to detect terrestrial signals, so you put the secondary antenna near the first antenna. They're both pointed at same section of sky, and then when you get A. A A a a beep. You know you register a signal. You can compare the primary telescope the one that you're using to search for extraterrestrial intelligence against this smaller antenna, and if the smaller antenna also picked up the signal, you know that signal was terrestrial, because the smaller antenna isn't powerful enough to pick up stuff from outer space, so you say all right well, if it appears on both, we know that that came from Earth. We know that that's not actually a signal sent from somewhere out in space so they. They learned that lesson very quickly, and that was very helpful. Drake further contributed to the discourse about the search for extraterrestrial intelligence by proposing a way to sort of conceptualize the possibility of detecting intelligent civilizations in the universe. These days we call it the drake equation, and it's a pretty cool concept, and it goes something like this all right. There's a variable that we're going to call in in represents the number of civilizations in our galaxy, with which we could possibly communicate so in is that number? It's an unknown number. What determines the value of that number while it's a bunch of stuff that you have to take into account, and that includes the average rate at which stars form in the Milky Way? The number of those stars that will actually have planets form around them, because not every star has planets. The average number of those planets that could potentially support life the number of planets that could support life that actually go on to support life so far we haven't found any that definitively fit that that definition, then the number of those planets, in which the life that forums can develop to the point of gaining intelligence, the number of planets with intelligent life than develop and use communication tools that would be detectable from Earth, and then the links of time such civilizations have been doing that. Because that length of time will determine whether or not they would be detectable right so even if they exist again if they're far far away, there's no way we could. Could detect them anyway because again. The speed of light is a limiting factor. So this equation is not meant to give a hard and fast number like three or something. Instead it helps us frame the likelihood of detecting intelligent life, specifically intelligent life that is using radio communication. We don't really know anything about the number of plants that can definitively support life or anything else beyond that particular variable. Right we. We've got information about some of the other stuff. We have a general idea of how frequently stars in the Milky Way. We are refining our understanding of how many stars have planets turns out that way? More Stars have planets than we initially thought. then. We have to think all right well. How many of those plants could potentially support life based upon their distance from the star, The star of the heat of the star, all of those other variables. So we're slowly learning more about the front half of equation, and the back half is still largely a mystery to us now. It's important so that we can use that kind of information help refine our search, right. We WanNa make sure that we are looking at the places most likely to produce good results because again spaces really big. If we just randomly point telescope in any given direction, the odds of success are minuscule. We want to improve those odds as best we can. By making some intelligent decisions based on educated guesses really. Now The Seti Institute a not for profit. Scientific Research Organization wouldn't come into being until nineteen eighty four, however, between Drake's project asthma in the early nineteen sixties, and the Seti, Institute's formation in nineteen, eighty four, there were lots of astronomers who were looking for signals that might have originated from an intelligent civilization out in space I find a lot of people confuse Seti. The science that's the general science of searching for extraterrestrial intelligence and he the institute those are the Seti. Institute is dedicated toward a deeper understanding of life in general and its place in the universe and the potential existence of extraterrestrial intelligence. But the two are not synonymous. It's not Seti and the Seti Institute are related, but distinct now back in nineteen, sixty seven. There was an astronomer named Jocelyn Bell. Who noticed something that initially seemed really promising from a city perspective turned down. It was incredible information period, but we just didn't understand its significance at the time. She noticed what appeared to be a pulsing radio signal. She and her supervisor charted the pulses that they were detecting, and they were detecting at. Intervals like each day on slightly. Off By hours or whatever, but it was. It was unusual. They weren't expecting it. And at the time they didn't have an explanation for the origin of those radio pulses, so the handle label it as something. And at the time they labeled it L. G. M. One. L. GM stood for little green men. Was, a somewhat tongue in cheek. Wade indicated that I don't know. Maybe this is purposeful radio broadcasting. We don't know they kept looking into it. They kept trying to figure out exactly what it was. And where the signal was originating from and over overtime, they concluded that it was actually a naturally occurring pulse. It was not. Like an l., going phone message from beyond the stars or something, ultimately this hunch that they had that it was a naturally occurring phenomenon. Proved correct and scientists were able to figure out that the pulse was coming from rotating neutron stars called pulsars, so while didn't turn out to be aliens. Astronomers were able to expand our understanding of space, so is still super. Cool it just. Wasn't aliens. Ohio State University launched the first long-term Seti study in nineteen, seventy three, and unlike other attempts, this one surveyed the entire night sky, as the earth rotated instead of honing in on a specific region of space, and then just staying locked onto that region. It would do a full scan. Slightly different arc each night, but a full scan of the night sky in nineteen, seventy, seven, that system registered a signal that was many times stronger than the background signals that the telescope was recording. There was an analyst named Jerry Aiman who wrote down the word..

Frank Drake Seti Institute Frank Bombs Oz Epsilon Eridani mork Coney Oni Jocelyn Bell Ohio State University Mindy Morrison analyst supervisor Jerry Aiman Scientific Research Organizati L. GM Wade L. G. M. One
"seti" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

09:03 min | 2 years ago

"seti" Discussed on TechStuff

"Potentially thousands or millions of stars from our otherwise unmanageable. List of potential targets to look at and so with this in mind, another astronomer and astrophysicist named Frank Drake decided to take this hypothesis, and to actually put it in action. He conducted the first search for extraterrestrial intelligence with the help of radio astronomy, and it was called project asthma named after the character asthma from l Frank Bombs Oz books. Drake secured time on a Radio Telescope, the measured twenty six meters or eighty five feet across to scan for radio frequencies that originated out of towel, city and Epsilon Eridani. Those are two different stars, and both stars are relatively close to our own solar system, and both our son like enough that they could serve as potentially good targets based on Coney Oni and Morrison's proposed guidelines. Apart from one outlier, his team found no evidence of radio signals, indicating potential intelligent communication, the one outlier they did pickup while initially interesting proved to be terrestrial in nature meaning that it originated from an aircraft made by dull old humans didn't come from outer space. It was something that we had created and this radio telescope just happened to pick it up and then actually illustrates another challenge with using radio telescopes, weeding out the signals that are actually coming from us as opposed to coming from space, and it sure would be. Be Embarrassing to come forward with claim that you've discovered alien communication only for it to turn out to be a terrestrial signal like an old mork and Mindy, episode or something that's only got a character who's supposed to be an alien, then it. It's not actually alien now. Luckily, this early experience taught researchers to include a secondary antenna that would only be sensitive enough to detect terrestrial signals, so you put the secondary antenna near the first antenna. They're both pointed at same section of sky, and then when you get A. A A a a beep. You know you register a signal. You can compare the primary telescope the one that you're using to search for extraterrestrial intelligence against this smaller antenna, and if the smaller antenna also picked up the signal, you know that signal was terrestrial, because the smaller antenna isn't powerful enough to pick up stuff from outer space, so you say all right well, if it appears on both, we know that that came from Earth. We know that that's not actually a signal sent from somewhere out in space so they. They learned that lesson very quickly, and that was very helpful. Drake further contributed to the discourse about the search for extraterrestrial intelligence by proposing a way to sort of conceptualize the possibility of detecting intelligent civilizations in the universe. These days we call it the drake equation, and it's a pretty cool concept, and it goes something like this all right. There's a variable that we're going to call in in represents the number of civilizations in our galaxy, with which we could possibly communicate so in is that number? It's an unknown number. What determines the value of that number while it's a bunch of stuff that you have to take into account, and that includes the average rate at which stars form in the Milky Way? The number of those stars that will actually have planets form around them, because not every star has planets. The average number of those planets that could potentially support life the number of planets that could support life that actually go on to support life so far we haven't found any that definitively fit that that definition, then the number of those planets, in which the life that forums can develop to the point of gaining intelligence, the number of planets with intelligent life than develop and use communication tools that would be detectable from Earth, and then the links of time such civilizations have been doing that. Because that length of time will determine whether or not they would be detectable right so even if they exist again if they're far far away, there's no way we could. Could detect them anyway because again. The speed of light is a limiting factor. So this equation is not meant to give a hard and fast number like three or something. Instead it helps us frame the likelihood of detecting intelligent life, specifically intelligent life that is using radio communication. We don't really know anything about the number of plants that can definitively support life or anything else beyond that particular variable. Right we. We've got information about some of the other stuff. We have a general idea of how frequently stars in the Milky Way. We are refining our understanding of how many stars have planets turns out that way? More Stars have planets than we initially thought. then. We have to think all right well. How many of those plants could potentially support life based upon their distance from the star, The star of the heat of the star, all of those other variables. So we're slowly learning more about the front half of equation, and the back half is still largely a mystery to us now. It's important so that we can use that kind of information help refine our search, right. We WanNa make sure that we are looking at the places most likely to produce good results because again spaces really big. If we just randomly point telescope in any given direction, the odds of success are minuscule. We want to improve those odds as best we can. By making some intelligent decisions based on educated guesses really. Now The Seti Institute a not for profit. Scientific Research Organization wouldn't come into being until nineteen eighty four, however, between Drake's project asthma in the early nineteen sixties, and the Seti, Institute's formation in nineteen, eighty four, there were lots of astronomers who were looking for signals that might have originated from an intelligent civilization out in space I find a lot of people confuse Seti. The science that's the general science of searching for extraterrestrial intelligence and he the institute those are the Seti. Institute is dedicated toward a deeper understanding of life in general and its place in the universe and the potential existence of extraterrestrial intelligence. But the two are not synonymous. It's not Seti and the Seti Institute are related, but distinct now back in nineteen, sixty seven. There was an astronomer named Jocelyn Bell. Who noticed something that initially seemed really promising from a city perspective turned down. It was incredible information period, but we just didn't understand its significance at the time. She noticed what appeared to be a pulsing radio signal. She and her supervisor charted the pulses that they were detecting, and they were detecting at. Intervals like each day on slightly. Off By hours or whatever, but it was. It was unusual. They weren't expecting it. And at the time they didn't have an explanation for the origin of those radio pulses, so the handle label it as something. And at the time they labeled it L. G. M. One. L. GM stood for little green men. Was, a somewhat tongue in cheek. Wade indicated that I don't know. Maybe this is purposeful radio broadcasting. We don't know they kept looking into it. They kept trying to figure out exactly what it was. And where the signal was originating from and over overtime, they concluded that it was actually a naturally occurring pulse. It was not. Like an l., going phone message from beyond the stars or something, ultimately this hunch that they had that it was a naturally occurring phenomenon. Proved correct and scientists were able to figure out that the pulse was coming from rotating neutron stars called pulsars, so while didn't turn out to be aliens. Astronomers were able to expand our understanding of space, so is still super. Cool it just. Wasn't aliens. Ohio State University launched the first long-term Seti study in nineteen, seventy three, and unlike other attempts, this one surveyed the entire night sky, as the earth rotated instead of honing in on a specific region of space, and then just staying locked onto that region. It would do a full scan. Slightly different arc each night, but a full scan of the night sky in nineteen, seventy, seven, that system registered a signal that was many times stronger than the background signals that the telescope was recording. There was an analyst named Jerry Aiman who wrote down the word..

Frank Drake Seti Institute Frank Bombs Oz Epsilon Eridani mork Coney Oni Jocelyn Bell Ohio State University Mindy Morrison analyst supervisor Jerry Aiman Scientific Research Organizati L. GM Wade L. G. M. One
"seti" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

07:09 min | 2 years ago

"seti" Discussed on TechStuff

"If you're a couple of degrees off, if your antenna is not pointed directly at the source, you may not pick up the signal at all so if you have. The Directional Antenna pointed north for example, but the source of radio waves is to the West then your antenna. Pick it up because it's pointed in a different direction. However this is an incredibly useful tool. If you're trying to look for a specific, you know source of of interference in your telephone communication system, I should also add that There's another important thing about directional antennas that. Even. They have a limit to how far they can pick up a signal here on earth, and this has to do with the fact that our earth is and brace yourselves. Round. It's not a flat earth people. The way radio waves propagate, and it can be transmitted and received that alone would tell us that the earth has to be curved, and here's the reason when you broadcast radio waves, they travel outward in a straight line from the source of radiation, and if the earth were flat, then no matter how far away you were. If you had a sensitive enough antenna, you'd be able to pick up radio waves from that source, however, because the earth curve. Then you look at two different points on the planet that are far enough apart that curvature means that. If you're having radio, waves travel out at a straight line from point A., they won't reach point be because it's curved away from the path, right it'll. Israelis will just go out into space instead there is. An exception to this, and that's certain radio waves are the right length where they can bounce off the earth's ionosphere, so you can use the ionosphere sort of like a mirror you can point radio waves toward it. It will bounce off the sphere, and then angle back down toward the surface of the earth that way you could actually transmit much further than you could just from line of. Of sight you can think of it as line of sight. You don't even actually have to be able to see. The thing just has to be like I said a more or less straight path from point A to point B for you to pick it up. Okay, but that's beside the point jetskis antenna was a directional antenna meant to pick up that source of of interference. So he's. Picking up weird signals as he's using this directional antenna, the don't seem to have any terrestrial source to them like if he pointed the directional antenna up into the air, he was picking up signals, but he could not identify where those signals were coming from and nineteen thirty one, after he had been scratching his head over where this source could have come from, he concluded that at least some of the signals had to be extraterrestrial in origin, they had to becoming from outside the earth from space itself. He didn't know. Where they were coming from or what was producing them, but he was sure that it wasn't coming. From Earth, it was seemingly coming from the center of the Milky Way Galaxy. That by the way is the galaxy that that we're in the Milky Way, we'll Jansky published his findings in nineteen, thirty two, and then he moved on to work with other stuff with a telephone system I mean he wasn't an astronomer and astrophysicist or anything like that, so he dedicated his attention elsewhere, but another American engineer named Grote Rieber. Below on Jetskis work, and by the way I I am certain. I mispronounced his name entirely, but we're GONNA soldier on. He read Jetskis work, and then he decided. You know what I want to find out more about these these signals that seem to be coming from space, so he built. An actual radio telescope he set out to build a device specifically to detect these kind of signals, and so he built a bowl shaped antenna, a parabolic kind of antenna in nineteen, thirty seven, and it was capable of detecting radio signals from space. Now when I say radio signals from space, I am not necessarily talking about stuff that was purposefully or intelligently transmitted because a lot of stuff in space generates radio waves, the sun for example, does it other stars do it? pulsars and quasars produce radio waves. Radio Astronomy gave scientists tools to detect and learn more about stuff in space than we could manage with things like optical telescopes that is light based telescopes, so in the decades following rebours work. We saw a lot of progress in astronomy. Thanks to radio telescopes. Now we're going to skip up to nineteen fifty seven, and that's when a telescope designed by Bernard Level and Charles. Husband went live for the first time at Georgia'll bank at the University of Manchester and it was called the Mark One telescope though these days folks tend to refer to it as the lovell telescope. And this thing's big as a parabolic dish to help focus radio waves on the antenna, and that dish measures, seventy six meters or two hundred fifty feet across a complicated analog computer, consisting of electromechanical components was designed so that it could position this antenna, could it at different sections of the sky, and this antenna could actually track radio source as it moved across the sky, so you could point it at something and then use the computer to constantly adjust the radio antennas position so that it moved along with this whatever the source was of the radio waves. Waves and you could get a better read on it, and those are really impressive piece of technology and it also picked up the third stage of the rocket that was used to launch sputnik. That's the first man made satellite. That's the one the Soviet Union put up into space. And A it was launched just a few months after the level telescope came online, so it actually detected that that was one of the things that indicated how useful and important radio telescopes could be beyond just their astronomical cosmological uses now the power of the level telescope. Impressed a lot of very smart people and a couple of those people were just sippy Kashani and Philip Morrison. They proposed the sufficiently powerful transmitter, and a sufficiently powerful receiver would be able to send communications across vast reaches of space so if you had. parabolic antennas of particularly strong power in two different locations. You could transmit and receive really signals even if you were. You know light years apart from each other. Now that communication is still restricted by the speed of light, because radio.

Radio Astronomy lovell telescope Jetskis Soviet Union Bernard Level sippy Kashani University of Manchester Philip Morrison Grote Rieber engineer Georgia Jansky
"seti" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

06:56 min | 2 years ago

"seti" Discussed on TechStuff

"Strickland. I'm an executive producer with iheartradio, and I love all things tech. And as I record this, it is early March twenty twenty just days after I received some devastating news. Technically, the whole world received this news taking particularly hard, I heard that the distributed computing project Seti at home is shutting down at least for a while. It's going on hiatus by the end of March twenty twenty now for two decades. This project has been relying on computer. Processing cycles provided by. People like all of you guys out there just using regular computer processors rather than some sort of massive supercomputer. Why was it making use of that? Well? It was combing through massive amounts of information gathered by radio telescopes in search for signals created not through some natural cosmological process, but rather as evidence of intelligent communication. Seti UC stands for the search for extraterrestrial intelligence. Now in this episode. I'm going to talk about the history of Seti. Seti as a science, and then as well I'm GONNA I'm GonNa Kinda pivot around and talk about the distributed computer programs and the Seti at home program in particular. We'll find out how distributed computing works. We'll talk about a couple of other distributed computing programs that you could still participate, and if you're so inclined, and we'll also look into what's next for Seti at home and learn why it's going on hiatus in the first place now. We human beings have hypothesized about the possibility of extraterrestrial or alien intelligence for a long time. It's a frequent topic in pop culture. But perhaps I shouldn't even use the word hypothesize because for a really long time in our history. There really wasn't any way to test that hypothesis other than for us to. Look up at the sky and say. nope that ain't it. But that would all change with the invention of the radio telescope, so it was in the nineteen twenties when an engineer named Karl Jansky, working for bell telephone laboratories set the stage for radio astronomy, but that wasn't jetskis goal. At the time he had been tasked with figuring out where the source was of some signal interference that was affecting telephone communications at that time, so in an effort to kind of figure this out. He built a directional antenna and I guess that itself deserves its own quick explanation, so antennas can transmit pickup signals right I. I mean that's what they do, and it actually helps to talk about transmitters. I to understand how a receiving antenna works, so a transmitter takes an electrical signal typically one that's been boosted with amplification and sins that signal to a transmitting antenna. Now we know that electricity and magnetism are related right. We've talked about that a ton in previous episodes, and we've talked about electromagnetism and the electromagnetic spectrum a lot on this show of even recently, so if you run a current through a conductor, it generates electromagnetic waves, including if the conductors big radio waves. Now on the electromagnetic spectrum radio waves have the longest wavelengths. All of you look across that spectrum. A non ionizing form of radiation meaning they lack the power to strip electrons away from Adams and they aren't harmful. The way stuff like x rays or gamma rays are so you can wander around and abs have radio waves hitting you. It's not gonNA affect you in any way, you won't even notice okay. So sending a powerful electrical current through a big conductor generates radio waves along with other electromagnetic radiation. You can encode information on radio waves by. By altering that signal in some way, otherwise, you're just sitting out a long steady tone like a sine wave, the two main ways to do this our frequency modulation in which you change the frequency of the radio waves that you're sending out within a certain band of frequencies or amplitude modulation, in which you change the amplitude, or you can think of it as almost like the strength of the radio waves that you're sending out out that would. End Up Being FM and am radio respectively all right so receivers take that same process, but they reverse it so as long as the signals that the antenna pickup are fluctuating in some way, then it's going to create an electric current in that antenna so properly tuned receiver that encounters the respective radiowave radiation will see that whole process go in reverse the radio waves will induce electricity to flow through the antenna to whatever device the antennas hooked up to might be a meter. In which case you'll see, the little indicator show that there's a current running through that circuit. or it'll might may a radio so that you can listen to a radio station? That way could be any number of things. It usually will require amplification of that signal. Typically, the signal is too weak to actually power anything significant, so you'd run it through an amplifier and thus take that same signal boost its power before sending it on to do whatever it was supposed to do now I've dramatically simplified. Simplified this whole process, there's other stuff we could talk about. that. Really plays an important part like the concept of resonance, but that is really the matter for a different episode entirely and a half covered in previous episodes to so essentially that's how antennas works. So Jansky designed a directional antenna as opposed to an Omni. Directional Antenna, so an directional antenna as the name implies, can pick up signals transmitted from. From around that antenna like just imagine an antenna poking up straight in the air, and it can accept radio ways from any direction Now a directional antenna is designed in such a way where it is much more sensitive. At picking up signals that are coming from specific points. You have to point the antenna toward the area where you expect there to be a radio wave. And the benefit is you can pick up much weaker. Radio waves typically with a directional antenna than with an Omni Directional antenna. However, if you're a couple of degrees off, if your antenna is not pointed directly at the source, you may not pick up the signal at all so if you have..

Karl Jansky iheartradio Strickland. executive producer engineer Adams Omni
"seti" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

06:56 min | 2 years ago

"seti" Discussed on TechStuff

"Strickland. I'm an executive producer with iheartradio, and I love all things tech. And as I record this, it is early March twenty twenty just days after I received some devastating news. Technically, the whole world received this news taking particularly hard, I heard that the distributed computing project Seti at home is shutting down at least for a while. It's going on hiatus by the end of March twenty twenty now for two decades. This project has been relying on computer. Processing cycles provided by. People like all of you guys out there just using regular computer processors rather than some sort of massive supercomputer. Why was it making use of that? Well? It was combing through massive amounts of information gathered by radio telescopes in search for signals created not through some natural cosmological process, but rather as evidence of intelligent communication. Seti UC stands for the search for extraterrestrial intelligence. Now in this episode. I'm going to talk about the history of Seti. Seti as a science, and then as well I'm GONNA I'm GonNa Kinda pivot around and talk about the distributed computer programs and the Seti at home program in particular. We'll find out how distributed computing works. We'll talk about a couple of other distributed computing programs that you could still participate, and if you're so inclined, and we'll also look into what's next for Seti at home and learn why it's going on hiatus in the first place now. We human beings have hypothesized about the possibility of extraterrestrial or alien intelligence for a long time. It's a frequent topic in pop culture. But perhaps I shouldn't even use the word hypothesize because for a really long time in our history. There really wasn't any way to test that hypothesis other than for us to. Look up at the sky and say. nope that ain't it. But that would all change with the invention of the radio telescope, so it was in the nineteen twenties when an engineer named Karl Jansky, working for bell telephone laboratories set the stage for radio astronomy, but that wasn't jetskis goal. At the time he had been tasked with figuring out where the source was of some signal interference that was affecting telephone communications at that time, so in an effort to kind of figure this out. He built a directional antenna and I guess that itself deserves its own quick explanation, so antennas can transmit pickup signals right I. I mean that's what they do, and it actually helps to talk about transmitters. I to understand how a receiving antenna works, so a transmitter takes an electrical signal typically one that's been boosted with amplification and sins that signal to a transmitting antenna. Now we know that electricity and magnetism are related right. We've talked about that a ton in previous episodes, and we've talked about electromagnetism and the electromagnetic spectrum a lot on this show of even recently, so if you run a current through a conductor, it generates electromagnetic waves, including if the conductors big radio waves. Now on the electromagnetic spectrum radio waves have the longest wavelengths. All of you look across that spectrum. A non ionizing form of radiation meaning they lack the power to strip electrons away from Adams and they aren't harmful. The way stuff like x rays or gamma rays are so you can wander around and abs have radio waves hitting you. It's not gonNA affect you in any way, you won't even notice okay. So sending a powerful electrical current through a big conductor generates radio waves along with other electromagnetic radiation. You can encode information on radio waves by. By altering that signal in some way, otherwise, you're just sitting out a long steady tone like a sine wave, the two main ways to do this our frequency modulation in which you change the frequency of the radio waves that you're sending out within a certain band of frequencies or amplitude modulation, in which you change the amplitude, or you can think of it as almost like the strength of the radio waves that you're sending out out that would. End Up Being FM and am radio respectively all right so receivers take that same process, but they reverse it so as long as the signals that the antenna pickup are fluctuating in some way, then it's going to create an electric current in that antenna so properly tuned receiver that encounters the respective radiowave radiation will see that whole process go in reverse the radio waves will induce electricity to flow through the antenna to whatever device the antennas hooked up to might be a meter. In which case you'll see, the little indicator show that there's a current running through that circuit. or it'll might may a radio so that you can listen to a radio station? That way could be any number of things. It usually will require amplification of that signal. Typically, the signal is too weak to actually power anything significant, so you'd run it through an amplifier and thus take that same signal boost its power before sending it on to do whatever it was supposed to do now I've dramatically simplified. Simplified this whole process, there's other stuff we could talk about. that. Really plays an important part like the concept of resonance, but that is really the matter for a different episode entirely and a half covered in previous episodes to so essentially that's how antennas works. So Jansky designed a directional antenna as opposed to an Omni. Directional Antenna, so an directional antenna as the name implies, can pick up signals transmitted from. From around that antenna like just imagine an antenna poking up straight in the air, and it can accept radio ways from any direction Now a directional antenna is designed in such a way where it is much more sensitive. At picking up signals that are coming from specific points. You have to point the antenna toward the area where you expect there to be a radio wave. And the benefit is you can pick up much weaker. Radio waves typically with a directional antenna than with an Omni Directional antenna. However, if you're a couple of degrees off, if your antenna is not pointed directly at the source, you may not pick up the signal at all so if you have..

Karl Jansky iheartradio Strickland. executive producer engineer Adams Omni
"seti" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

06:56 min | 2 years ago

"seti" Discussed on TechStuff

"Strickland. I'm an executive producer with iheartradio, and I love all things tech. And as I record this, it is early March twenty twenty just days after I received some devastating news. Technically, the whole world received this news taking particularly hard, I heard that the distributed computing project Seti at home is shutting down at least for a while. It's going on hiatus by the end of March twenty twenty now for two decades. This project has been relying on computer. Processing cycles provided by. People like all of you guys out there just using regular computer processors rather than some sort of massive supercomputer. Why was it making use of that? Well? It was combing through massive amounts of information gathered by radio telescopes in search for signals created not through some natural cosmological process, but rather as evidence of intelligent communication. Seti UC stands for the search for extraterrestrial intelligence. Now in this episode. I'm going to talk about the history of Seti. Seti as a science, and then as well I'm GONNA I'm GonNa Kinda pivot around and talk about the distributed computer programs and the Seti at home program in particular. We'll find out how distributed computing works. We'll talk about a couple of other distributed computing programs that you could still participate, and if you're so inclined, and we'll also look into what's next for Seti at home and learn why it's going on hiatus in the first place now. We human beings have hypothesized about the possibility of extraterrestrial or alien intelligence for a long time. It's a frequent topic in pop culture. But perhaps I shouldn't even use the word hypothesize because for a really long time in our history. There really wasn't any way to test that hypothesis other than for us to. Look up at the sky and say. nope that ain't it. But that would all change with the invention of the radio telescope, so it was in the nineteen twenties when an engineer named Karl Jansky, working for bell telephone laboratories set the stage for radio astronomy, but that wasn't jetskis goal. At the time he had been tasked with figuring out where the source was of some signal interference that was affecting telephone communications at that time, so in an effort to kind of figure this out. He built a directional antenna and I guess that itself deserves its own quick explanation, so antennas can transmit pickup signals right I. I mean that's what they do, and it actually helps to talk about transmitters. I to understand how a receiving antenna works, so a transmitter takes an electrical signal typically one that's been boosted with amplification and sins that signal to a transmitting antenna. Now we know that electricity and magnetism are related right. We've talked about that a ton in previous episodes, and we've talked about electromagnetism and the electromagnetic spectrum a lot on this show of even recently, so if you run a current through a conductor, it generates electromagnetic waves, including if the conductors big radio waves. Now on the electromagnetic spectrum radio waves have the longest wavelengths. All of you look across that spectrum. A non ionizing form of radiation meaning they lack the power to strip electrons away from Adams and they aren't harmful. The way stuff like x rays or gamma rays are so you can wander around and abs have radio waves hitting you. It's not gonNA affect you in any way, you won't even notice okay. So sending a powerful electrical current through a big conductor generates radio waves along with other electromagnetic radiation. You can encode information on radio waves by. By altering that signal in some way, otherwise, you're just sitting out a long steady tone like a sine wave, the two main ways to do this our frequency modulation in which you change the frequency of the radio waves that you're sending out within a certain band of frequencies or amplitude modulation, in which you change the amplitude, or you can think of it as almost like the strength of the radio waves that you're sending out out that would. End Up Being FM and am radio respectively all right so receivers take that same process, but they reverse it so as long as the signals that the antenna pickup are fluctuating in some way, then it's going to create an electric current in that antenna so properly tuned receiver that encounters the respective radiowave radiation will see that whole process go in reverse the radio waves will induce electricity to flow through the antenna to whatever device the antennas hooked up to might be a meter. In which case you'll see, the little indicator show that there's a current running through that circuit. or it'll might may a radio so that you can listen to a radio station? That way could be any number of things. It usually will require amplification of that signal. Typically, the signal is too weak to actually power anything significant, so you'd run it through an amplifier and thus take that same signal boost its power before sending it on to do whatever it was supposed to do now I've dramatically simplified. Simplified this whole process, there's other stuff we could talk about. that. Really plays an important part like the concept of resonance, but that is really the matter for a different episode entirely and a half covered in previous episodes to so essentially that's how antennas works. So Jansky designed a directional antenna as opposed to an Omni. Directional Antenna, so an directional antenna as the name implies, can pick up signals transmitted from. From around that antenna like just imagine an antenna poking up straight in the air, and it can accept radio ways from any direction Now a directional antenna is designed in such a way where it is much more sensitive. At picking up signals that are coming from specific points. You have to point the antenna toward the area where you expect there to be a radio wave. And the benefit is you can pick up much weaker. Radio waves typically with a directional antenna than with an Omni Directional antenna. However, if you're a couple of degrees off, if your antenna is not pointed directly at the source, you may not pick up the signal at all so if you have..

Karl Jansky iheartradio Strickland. executive producer engineer Adams Omni
The Abominable Yeti Crab

A Moment of Science

01:38 min | 2 years ago

The Abominable Yeti Crab

"Yeti. He's big big covered in white fur and you'll grab you with long. Claws hate to disappoint you done but I think that's just a legend. I can offer you the next expense thing though how about a Yeti crab. A crab is nothing like the abominable. Snowman is just described. This one is like your creature. The YETI JETTY CRAB is in its long claws are covered in Pale for and sure six inches long. It's not exactly big that would definitely strange the crab lives at the lips of hydrothermal vents thousands of feet below the ocean surface thaw I'm familiar with those events were lava rises up in splits the ocean floor these vents heat the water around them and Gush Minerals and metals like hydrogen sulfide and methane plenty of bacteria flourish down there on that gushing shing vent fluid are then realized crabs could to it's thanks to all that bacteria that the Yeti crab can survive the for the crabs clauses. Actually something called called. Seti dense bristles that are covered in vent loving bacteria a Yeti crab will scrape off the bacteria with its mouth young a young dinner seemed like a dull life no sunlight no colorful markings dough variety of Diet. Well don't forget the best part in order to feed the bacteria on in their claws the Yeti crab constantly wave its arms through the mineral rich water when you get a group of these crustaceans together the result is an endless endless. YETI CRAB DANCE party. This moment of science comes from Indiana University. There are thousands

Gush Minerals Indiana University Six Inches
What It Means to Be a Young Hairdresser in 2019

How To Cut It in the Hairdressing Industry

07:05 min | 2 years ago

What It Means to Be a Young Hairdresser in 2019

"Young lady has been tearing up in hairdressing industry and I she meta at fantastic address. I got got talk and she she was was actually dragged onto the state. I'm really pleased to welcome onto the how to cut it. PODCAST lizzy Williams Acehnese style is to say Allen so welcome to the show Lizzie. Thank you for having made into beyond here. Finally I've been really looking forward to eh well we did we connected it but you remember that day will because Allen Austin direct hugh upon to stage at a fantastic hairdresser. Yes I remember how is I was shaken at the side before going out and because it was just you know so so and we'll actually truck you to the state. I'm with Molly We've had quite a big involvement with fantastic address. The probably is the past two years on opportunity to of she mental Allen on his team throughout no no just like she wanted to thank him because since being with the fantastic hey just run having condescended encouragement we started to see a change in my career role almost a change in pace of what things will happen and so. I just wanted to thank him because assault thank you which I think's really now is the analysis to the show so I'm sure he will love that but I think he's very proud on when we interviewed Allen on the on the podcast all cast and he is so inspirational his knee and particularly to you know not just young hairdresser but everybody in the industry solemn owners and I think I think the thing that really stood out for me about you. Liz is just you as a young hairdresser and you'll passion and that's really where I wanna go into tonight because I want this to be an episode you know what does it mean to be a young hairdresser in new in two thousand nineteen so yeah so good and we stood at the side of the state didn't win introduced to your kid was who introduced me. It was Becky candy so she's actually our business mentor for she fantastic. What's the catch and coach. She's meg risen sheet. She's absolutely fabulous. I loved working and being coached by us. She's incredible so she introduced. May We got to okay now you listen to the podcast and you're not kind of Seti. I said I think you'd be perfectly still of episode and really to connect with young hairdressers out there. You know around and the world and to get use of inside so i. How old are you lizzy. So I turned twenty. One Saturday just gone so what was that the twenty four so it was my first happy birthday then okay so twenty one so I mean you're achieving a lot and just get the listeners some of the things that you kind of just what's going on for you. Roy Now okay so the main and I've just really recently probably in the last week or side Launch Mars last episode collection of not having much as which for me is locked must milestone house titan. I'm currently on generation eighteen nineteen team a generation now program on Makoto member of the cage out off team a have been saw from twenty one now make full years yet that was I think I'm I'm currently stage for the Atlas Rising Star and I'm currently preparing for the trend vision and and finals this year in the Collision Catch Gray parties bonkers twenty one to achieve this boys all this so important to you. Could it be simple to the young hairdressers to enter into these competition teams. I mean for me. Why why are important is it gets me out of mock in terms of it really pushes me to be the best come not only the has has a passer like the growth of seeing myself in confidence in you know my self esteem just from doing these competitions has been astounded me. It's really important to keep pushing myself to keep going to be more confident an how we do with dealing with boxes of teach you of life lessons so I think doing these things teach you a lot about half for Simba about license while now get completer finisher so brilliantly but would you aware aware of all this within the industry before you saw it you know when you came into hairdressing was you're wherever this was going on so uh on the most to- vision anyone you've ever met. I came in here fifteen and I said you you know I wanna be a big hydrosol. Sitting in the south on was just as much as a great great my career. The competition petitions on the stage work is always wanted to go so I just wasted. No time in making that happen decided in five years time hi. This is why I wanted to pay backwards on how to achieve it so I'm not clear planning. My mind. Just really helped me go for things of they. Just say that because I think this is really important. I know in a previous episode with Sean Dawson. We talked about young hairdresser. Get them a break and a lot of young hairdressers. This is sometimes lizzy probably get a bit of a bad rap because I said what always WanNa be famous now and you know they wanna be safe. What's your answer to that. You know when you you say look I want to be on stage. I want to make a name for myself. Why is that so important for me. Passively it's really hard to me because I don't want children which is really vandalism but for me. It's what I'm going to leave. All WanNa make mark on this industry St Louis Children what do believe and for me. It's something I love to leave an imprint on Mizen. I love it so let's go back then because we're going to go right into a little bit more sunny about those things connor gone on for you certainly the it list as which is just mega so it just gives us a heads up. You're seeing Stalinist. Yeah I just recently got promoted a few months ago which is absolutely fabulous really something something that you'll with hungry side of say within being in the Stylus but then with with the cage franchise itself. I'm actually an educator for the surgeons pass along but almost I thought of that act creative team that lost his stick team as well so I have a lot of involvement with the presponse muscle

Allen Austin Williams Acehnese Becky Candy St Louis Children Molly Mizen LIZ Assault Connor Makoto Hugh Simba ROY Sean Dawson Vandalism Five Years Two Years
How did Canada and China end up here? How does it end?

The Big Story

12:27 min | 3 years ago

How did Canada and China end up here? How does it end?

"Fess is one of those stories that starts with a news event, the makes bold headline in Asia, and the US falling sharply on news, that top Chinese executive has been arrested in canon, while we see a mum long show. Appearing today in VC supreme court she since been released on ten million dollar bail, awaiting possible, extradition to the US move. She's about to fight from there. The narrative splits into stories about retaliation stories about political posturing trade, stories and business stories and technology stories most of these items are small enough that unless you're really paying attention. You might not notice them, but they are all part of the same big story and that story is still unfolding even when it's not dominating headless yesterday. The president signed an executive order effectively banning US telecom companies from using wall, way technology for five G. This is the next Canada updating its. Travel advisory for China, telling Canadians to exercise, a high degree of caution in China Canada's rocky relationship with China hit another bump today. Beijing has now blocked canola imports from a second Canadian producer Tara over alleged contamination by pests is it an show them? One day you look up your country is four months out from an important election and finds itself. Caught directly between two superpowers with no easy way. So what happens now how did Canada and China's relationship end up here? Can the liberals really soften their talk and deescalate tensions in the middle of an election? And if they do that, and Donald Trump doesn't like it. What happens then? I'm Jordan heath rulings? And this is a big story about a rock and hard place and us David Maas crop is one of our favorite. Geopolitical analysts is a political scientist, and he is the author of too dumb, for democracy. Let's start with the really basic simple stuff. How is Canada's relationship with China right now? It's pretty awful unless something changed in the last couple of hours. And I don't think it has it is that one of the lower point the being out in years, when I was doing my masters I became deeply interested in international relations and China and took a course on China studied, I are SETI, global international local economy. And so that was that's the baseline that I'm going from from my head. I doubt for a couple of years, I was expecting to China and I didn't. But then in the last year or so I doubt back in, especially the last six months, and there's been a notable decline since Canada arrested. Among one Joe on request of the Americans would like her extradited to the US where she's indicted on a couple of dozen or so charges. Of working with a Ron, which is under American sanctions. And that was really the sort of opening salvo in deteriorating deteriorating relationship between Kennedy and China and that sort of decline has been marked by obviously the arrest, but Dan, China, banning Canadian, canola imports arresting to Canadian nationals, Michael covert. Michael Foulon sentencing to Canadians to death on drug charges and Canada, considering banning while way for five technology which the Americans would very much like us to do. So there's you can see from bats quick rundown at the last several months half year or so a growing tension. But, but fundamental rift surrounding largely long-term geopolitical interests. Explain for me if you can how Weiwei is tied to the Chinese government, because I. Here in the west in the, the coverage that we get it almost seems like an arm of the government. And, and I don't understand that. So well, I don't think it is. I mean, I'm not a China expert. I'm a. A writer observer scientists democracy interested in this. And so something I track across several different types of reporting. So it's interesting to see how different countries report on it. How international media reports on it? But also have business media reports on that versus political media. And one of the things you see is that there is some doubt to the rich while as connected to the Chinese government. And as one observer point of there's no smoking gun. But the concern is that either now or at some point while technology could be used in at least one of two ways to undermine geopolitical interests, including economic interests in corporate interests. And one is through the Chinese government, requesting data from the company extra-territorially and a company to comply. So one is they show up. China's government says, look, this is the rules, give us the data and they had no choice. It's a little bit of Kim to the US Patriot Act. And if. You've got stuff. But that's that's a domestic thing. So if you're a Canadian that uses g mail on your stuff is stored on American servers, the government, the US government can access that stuff under the Patriot Act, right? This is one of the concerns with using American service in American technology. It's a bit like that. So it's not like this is just the China issue in their, their concerns with the United States from since as well. So that's one of the Chinese government will be able to request that information. And from what I've read that is generally probably true. The government asked for it while we would have to provide the other is that why would actually build back doors into the technology that would allow spies the Chinese stayed to directly access that tater through the back door? Now, China has a long history of corporate XP knowledge stealing ideas, stealing intellectual property. They're not the only ones, of course. I mean, a lot of America was built and stealing intellectual property. But that is part and parcel of the struggle, you mentioned America couple of times, I because we arrested while way CFO on their request and second. Because there may now be some pressure to not allow away on the five G network because of them. How is our relationship with the state's play into diplomacy with China, and what's Canada going to do if we're caught in the middle? I don't know. I would not want to be Christophe land right now because there isn't an immediate obvious good solution to this. If you're thinking, geopolitically, if you if you're worried about your relationship with the United States for all kinds of reason, the US has been in long-term decline. Then you have a problem if you specially if you wanna look around the world. Develop new alliances and new relationships and China's one of those, especially if you rely on China for things like canola exporting canola, which is significant for Canadian partners. On the other hand, you're dealing with Trump who's Curiel at the best of times. And you're trying to get the US MCA agreement, the US NCA ratified, which is increasingly difficult and unlikely in the current US congress, it might have to wait. So what do you do your bound to the US for other reasons to the border, the movement of goods and individuals? Whatever it was eighty percent or so of our trade, but also defense, right? I mean they're a defense arrangements, whether it's NORAD or NATO. And then on top of that, we're part of the five is intelligence community, and there are concerns that if, if those countries allow countries that are part of the fun is allow wobbly technology. They may not want to share intelligence with them for fear that it's compromise. So what do you do if you're Canada, I have no idea. You know, eve version, who's a scholar at UB a China scholar. I usually Pacific scholar thinks that the immediate move is you deescalate with China and to rebalance that relationship, the more, I think about the more I think he's onto something. But as a recently for the boat mail, we also have to think forward fifty to one hundred years, and they go, what kind of international order. We want to be part of building to ensure that we have a just and ideally democratic. World. Order governed by very careful norms. What country is due to one another into their own people? Well, how does China's global strategy play into what Canada's facing because you've used sort of outlined, some of their bigger strategies towards trade, and trying to lead that international order? So the Chinese belt and become sort of modestly obsessed with the Chinese and road initiative. Explain explain exactly what the belt in Rhode initiative is for those of us who are hearing about it for the first time. So it's several years old now, dates to give or take twenty thirteen and what it is, is in short oversupply a little bit on attempt to recreate the silk road. Through a massive roughly one trillion dollar US infrastructure and development program that will stretch across give or take between sixty and seventy countries and dozens of organizations, and this is a factory China launching a massive investment throughout the world. Now. Depending on how you see it. It's a bit of a rohrschack test for your perspective on China. You could be seen as a development project. It could be seen as a trap China's investing in these countries and that has them on the hook largely, like, by the way, developed countries have been doing around the world for years, in, for instance through IMF programs, but it's also potentially a projection military force, and building of allied ships, strategic partnerships while in the Americas in western Asia in Africa. It now has a growing military component as well to some extent, for instance, with Pakistan, who's building Chinese fighter jets, depending on how you see it. It's some combination of development program infrastructure program, military program and debt trout and big geopolitical play to help China direct the global order in the next in this. In the next century, if one of the options is to deescalate with China and ease the tensions kind of become become more of a part of what they're doing. Can the liberal government do that in an election year? I mean they've they've been standing tough so far. Can they turn around and deescalate this thing without losing face, what would what would the other parties have them do? I'm very curious to I mean Andrew shears line is that he wants to reset the relationship? I don't know what that means. What that would look like I don't know if this is a get tough on China plant, what you're possibly to get tough perspective is that China has been sort of bucking the international order for years, and they talk a lot about rights rules, but they don't follow them themselves. The liberals have been trying to for instance, negotiate some sort of settlement, obviously on canola, but also to try to secure the release of my covert space for China's been hesitant to take meetings, high level meetings and. And we don't have an ambassador in China, currently, and the Chinese investor is leaving at the end of the month. He's been quote unquote promoted to Paris. So now he hasn't exactly been, I think particularly easy to work with. And obviously, if you remember back to John McCallum, who was retired by premise, true toe that relationship wasn't particularly productive. I think either so they're caught. So I don't know what they do in, in lection year because even if the get tough on China rhetoric might play well to some it's not going to serve the country. Well, conserved, canola farmers is not going to serve detained Canadians is not going to serve two Canadians, who are right now have been

China United States Canada Chinese Government China Canada Donald Trump Asia Beijing America Us Congress Tara Rhode David Maas Jordan Heath Producer Executive UB Nato
Lava Tubes Could Aid Humans Life on the Moon and Mars

BrainStuff

06:37 min | 3 years ago

Lava Tubes Could Aid Humans Life on the Moon and Mars

"Today's episode is brought to you by the Capital, One card with Capital, One saver card. You can earn four percent cashback on dining and entertainment. That means four percent on checking out that new French restaurant and four percent on bowling with your friends. You'll also earn two percent cashback at grocery stores, and one percent on all other purchases. Now, when you go out you cash in Capital, One, what's in your wallet terms apply? Welcome to brainstorm a production of iheartradio. Hey brain stuff, learn vocal Bon here ever since Neil Armstrong. I set foot on the moon. Scientists have been toying with the idea of forming potential colonies, there and more recently on Mars to, but extreme fluctuating temperatures cosmic radiation, and micrometeorites showers colloquially known as space dust pose challenges to human excavation of both the moon and Mars, however, Astro biologists are in the process of exploring nifty geological structures the conservative natural shelter from these harsh elements lava tubes. So what are lava tubes? We spoke by Email with doctor Ricardo puzzle Abban of the department of geosciences at the university of pet ova. He's been at the forefront of European research on lava tubes. He explained lava tubes are caves that are carved by flowing lava, that eventually drained out leaving a subsurface void, although there are different types of lava tube formations, these caves often form out of a type of fluid basaltic lava that flows down a slope, like. The side of a volcano as the outermost portion of the hot lava flow comes in contact with the cold air, it cools rapidly forming a hardened crest, but liquid lava continues to flow like water in channel underneath this newly hardened surface. At some point that liquid lava runs out, and cools underneath the surface forming a curvy tube shaped structure, and thus Alava tube is born geologist. No lava tubes from volcanic areas in Hawaii, or Iceland, but they've also become a hot, commodity within the Astro biology community due to high resolution images, indicating that lava tubes may exist on the moon and Mars as well. Many sites thought to be lava tubes are detected by the presence of these curvy channels and more recently, the SETI institute announced the discovery of possible skylights or lava tube openings in a crater near the North Pole of moon using images obtained from Nasr's lunar reconnaissance orbiter, but lava tubes are tricky business. Scientific technology is still playing catch up and identifying these underground habitats, we also. Spoke by Email with Leonardo career of the remote sensing laboratory at the university of Trento. He said the main difficulty comes from the fact that lava tubes are centrally subsurface structures. Very few instruments are capable of performing direct measurements of underground structures. But careers team is working to modernize the technology and bus aid future human settlement of these lunar caves the technology involves using radar, which can detect lava tubes from orbit based on their unique electromagnetic signatures, basically, they can pro below the surface of the moon using low frequency electromagnetic waves, and then measure the reflected waves that come back to them. Those reflections offer insight into a lava tubes characteristics, like its shape size and composition. But one thing is clear lava tubes on the moon and Mars are invaluable is natural potential habitats, or at the very least could serve as convenient storage units between space missions. Meanwhile, back on earth, scientists are preparing for future missions to the moon and Mars through a little cave, diving the European Space Agency, developed a program called Penn Jia. The prepares European astronauts to explore other planets one of its projects concerns, a lava tube in Spain called corona that's eight kilometers long, or about five miles the team has undertaken advanced mapping of the tube to create three D model. That's attract down to the millimetre. They've also been testing out new robots or Rovers to identify how best to navigate these tubes. Developing a greater understanding of the challenges associated with incursions into lava tubes on other planets in the process. Other researchers have also taken an interest in exploring the microbiology of lava tubes by focusing their efforts on the lava beds, national monument in California, this project funded by the Canadian space agency is looking to explore lava tubes habitats of biker organisms, which may leave traces behind through certain minerals, and thus indicate the presence of life once upon a time, which is cool enough. On earth, but would be an amazing find on the moon or Mars. So what's the difference between lava tubes on earth in their lunar, and Martian counterparts? Well, gravity for one, the lower gravity on the moon and Mars seems to impact the size of lava tubes, significantly tubes on Mars can stretch for two hundred and fifty meters in width, or about eight hundred and twenty feet and tubes on the moon can reach a whopping Colombia, or more across that's about two thirds of a mile, the lower gravity. Also stabilizes, the roofs of these tubes and causes fewer collapses, especially on the moon, thereby creating a potentially safer dwelling for human habitation, but otherwise lava tubes on earth are fairly similar in composition and structure to those on the moon and Mars and serve as excellent reference points for researchers. The potential for lunar caves, and possible human settlements has many people excited even the White House is making a bid for moon colonies in the near future, and the possibility of answering whether life has existed or may still flourish in caves on Mars is a tantalizing one for space explorers. But if you're wondering whether or not martians will be found hanging around these lava tubes on the red planet, the answer is likely no, unless you count microbial critters radiation, a dry environment and frigid temperatures make the planet inhospitable to most forms of life while using ground Rovers to access lava tubes on the moon and Mars could be difficult due to surface conditions other devices are being developed to aid these explorations including climbing, and hopping pit bots and flying helicopter, like vehicles likes of which may appear Nasr's Mars twenty twenty Rover mission. Today's episode was written by Terry llegado and produced by Tyler claim brain stuff is a production of iheartradio's, how stuff works for more on this, and lots of other totally tubular topics. Visit our home planet. How stuff works dot com and for more podcast for my heart radio. Visit the iheartradio app, apple podcasts or wherever you listen to your favorite shows. Today's episode is brought to you by the Capital One saver card earn four percent cashback on dining and entertainment. Two percent at grocery stores and one percent on all other purchases. Now when you go out you cash in what's in your wallet terms apply.

Iheartradio Rovers Nasr Capital One European Space Agency Neil Armstrong Seti Institute Geologist Department Of Geosciences University Of Trento Spain Iceland California Leonardo Hawaii Apple White House Penn Jia Colombia Terry Llegado
University research center will search for extraterrestrial intelligence

Financial Issues with Dan Celia

00:14 sec | 3 years ago

University research center will search for extraterrestrial intelligence

"A shot in the arm for those who believe there's life outside our solar system. Search for extraterrestrial intelligence or SETI is made up of a group of scientists. Dr premieres and educators were backing a research center at Penn State to provide reliable funding for Chevy for the long-term through endowments

Chevy DR
Neptune's newest, tiniest moon likely piece of bigger one

Bloomberg Surveillance

00:35 sec | 3 years ago

Neptune's newest, tiniest moon likely piece of bigger one

"And math, scientists are shunning ally on Neptune's 21-mile diameter moon hippo camp named after the mythological seahorse the SETI institute's Mark Showalter discovered Neptune's fourteenth moon in twenty thirteen using. Hubble space telescope images. She'll Walter and his research team theorized hippocampal was formed from debris created billions of years ago when a comet slammed into protease, the largest of Neptune's, inner moons Voyager to being back pictures of a massive impact crater on Proteus, and she'll Walter Hsieh's. Thanks to Hubble. Now. We know a little piece of Proteus got left

Neptune Walter Hsieh Mark Showalter Seti Institute 21-Mile
If We Find Aliens, This Is the Protocol for Announcing It to the World

Curiosity Daily

02:30 min | 3 years ago

If We Find Aliens, This Is the Protocol for Announcing It to the World

"Discovered has to be extraterrestrial intelligence, if it's not then go back to the drawing board. If you still think it's 'Lions, then only tell your fellow researchers and observers so they can independently confirm what you found if everyone agrees it's aliens, then you can tell more researchers and scientists specifically you'll do this through the Central Bureau for astronomical telegrams of the international Astra nominal union for then. And only then do you do the next thing? Tell everyone do it fast. And then make sure all of your data is available to the international scientific community. We're talking publications meetings conferences face timing. Scientists on the other side of the world the whole nine yards, then Herman record and store your evidence. As securely as possible back up that data you'll need help from the international telecommunication union. Five to protect the data. If it's in the form of electromagnetic signals, the SETI committee of the will keep an eye on your discovery for the rest of time. Just don't try to send a message back to the aliens that is a whole different can of worms. Yes. If you thought five ish organizations was a lot ho boy, we're not going on that rabbit

Astra Nominal Union Central Bureau Herman Nine Yards
Kaiser Permanente's CEO on how the mission of health care is changing

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

03:36 min | 3 years ago

Kaiser Permanente's CEO on how the mission of health care is changing

"Of the high cost of care is passed on to people and the two parts of the affordability that I think about all the time the affordability of coverage and the affordability of care help me out then because what what's the difference? Well, you think about the affordability? Oh covers a lot of that has to do with how much of the costs you shift to different funders. Right. So which maze that I'm my find something that I can pay that's less expensive for the coverage. But then when I need care. And now the sudden discover what it means to have a five thousand dollar deductible. Then I can't afford to get the care is a lot of stuff that goes into the calculus. Action of health care. Call d think it's solvable. This dilemma of coverage and care and cost. Absolutely. Do you really have? So have you called people in Washington kit's? I think anyone who's really been thinking about this. A lot would come in and say, no, they're more things that we can do to create more efficiencies and effectiveness in the healthcare industry. There are many people working on that. I mean, obviously Permanente has been working on it for years. I wanna get to Kaiser and what you're doing in a minute. But I do have to ask a follow up question to that. Then which is why isn't it? Being done. Why isn't it changing? Is he Volve it? I mean, it you still have the center gravity of healthcare. Still the hospital. Seti? I think as more people are paying out of pocket, they're asking the harder questions of the industry. What all the turn. It is why am I taking this? How else can I get what I need and rightfully so they're asking the right questions to Kaiser permanent day then. And and what y'all are doing your data guy from way way back for Shelvin hospital was data analyst cousin permitted. Does. A lot of really localized covered. You look at it by zip code, you have special project going to lot of cities one of which is Baltimore I want you to tell me how Kaiser permanent as doing in both more with barber shops and beauty salons. You know, we don't just think about when you get sick. We're here for you. We think what are the determinants of your health that we can predict now based on many factors. One of which is where you live. We also now have data that shows in populations different health outcomes. High blood pressure heart disease, asthma all these kinds of illnesses. And so we have gone into barber shops and churches and the trusted environment to promote health because you have to convince folks that they need to be men. That's the deal. This is not a boring time to be in healthcare in this economy knows there's a crystal ball question to be asked. But but that would be almost too complicated. But but the question is what is the trajectory of your industry the hospital based healthcare industry in this economy? Are we going to see lower costs that you've been talking about? Are we going to see people being able to get more care as they ask these questions that you and I've talked about you going to continue to see the healthcare industry. Volve? You're going to continue to see the hospitals plan a critical role. Not the central role that good thing. Absolutely. Because it's all about the right here in the right setting. Tyson, the chairman and CEO of Kaiser permanent most Tyson. Thanks coming into appreciate.

Kaiser Shelvin Hospital Tyson Chairman And Ceo Washington Baltimore Analyst Five Thousand Dollar
What is Spotify really measuring?

podnews

01:57 min | 3 years ago

What is Spotify really measuring?

"From Brisbane the latest pod news, what your Spotify stats actually say, blueberries, Todd, Cochran comments on the new media show that they measured. It listens not download, and that someone just needs to listen for thirty seconds to count would note that the version two guidelines require at least a minute of audio to be downloaded to be valid. Anyway, we've updated article on how to understand podcast stats. The apple watch now includes a podcast app. We linked to how to use it and also overcast has had an update it now supports the apple watch and has had a redesign of particular note. It highlights when a podcast is daily or weekly, and as of now, so to we is the podcast bubble bursting asks the Columbia journalism review. Yes, of course. The podcasting bubble is bursting response blurb magazine. Radio public is reminding Kosters to claim their podcast on the radio public platform. Dave, Jackson Hsieh's the proper way to use a blue. SETI microphone. It's not a bad microphone he says, but you'd need to know how to use it crypto publication. Hacker noon is pivoting into podcasting with Trent Lipinski host. The fuss podcast will come out in late September buzzfeed's audio team, which the company announced will be laid off, have posted the teams, resumes and contact details on Twitter. Marketplace highlights the booming podcast industry in China. Unlike the rest of the world revenue there is from paid for podcasts, Jack rice, Ryder posts about the three biggest challenges for podcasters making marketing and sustaining. He also links to a set of podcast about podcasting, including this one and the BBC's new audio at BBC sounds will be launched on the thirtieth of October. We hear it all contain some third party podcasts though, be available within the UK only for all the links most Aures ans- to subscribe to our free daily newsletter, visit pod news dot net.

Apple BBC Jackson Hsieh Ryder Columbia Journalism Review Brisbane Trent Lipinski Spotify Jack Rice Kosters Twitter Cochran Todd UK Dave China Thirty Seconds