23 Burst results for "Seth Kaplan"

EU Further Sanctions Belarus After Roman Protasevich Arrest

Here & Now

01:44 min | 2 months ago

EU Further Sanctions Belarus After Roman Protasevich Arrest

"The european union has now imposed additional sanctions on belarus after that eastern european country forced a ryanair flight to lithuania to land in belarus under a false claim of a bomb threat. A pretense for arresting roman produce age a- prominent opposition journalist from belarus. Who was on board. So what questions does this now. Race for the airline industry here. Now's transportation alice. Seth kaplan is here. And seth we know some countries are now ordering their airlines to avoid the airspace over belarus. The eu advise them to do so. How big a deal is this. Well i you just start with the logistics of that and indeed if you look one of those websites or apps where you can see live radar flight radar twenty four to wear one of those. There's basically as big hole over belarus. Right now he's the airplanes all over europe except there as as flights have begun again in the aftermath of the pandemic but not over belarus. And so that tells you that airlines are basically having to fly out of the way having to spend more on fuel that sort of thing at time to their flights where they usually would have flown over belarus. Well yeah a lot of airlines saying. They're not even going to travel over the country. At all which means you can't fly in or out of belarus right if to western europe at least right and you know not a lot of demand right now probably because of what's happening right exactly in terms of actually fighting to were from there and and the greater impact is yeah just the fact that airlines typically overfly belarus the eighties along a lot of common routes so even a lot of us who have never been to belarus like myself I almost certainly flown over it. If we've flown ever between europe and asia. Let's say

Belarus Seth Kaplan European Union Ryanair Lithuania Seth Europe Asia
"seth kaplan" Discussed on NEWS 88.7

NEWS 88.7

03:40 min | 4 months ago

"seth kaplan" Discussed on NEWS 88.7

"It's here and now United Airlines has announced plans to team up with companies from around the world to purchase cleaner fuels. The goal is to help offset emissions, but as climate change worsens, environmental advocates warn that Initiatives like this might fall short here knows transportation analyst Seth Kaplan joins us now. Hi stuff, Robin. Yeah. First of all, tell us what is this? They're calling it sustainable aviation fuel. So what is it and talk about how United is going toe further incorporated into its business. Oh, probably these air fuels Robin that are not your traditional fuels. You're not traditional petroleum based fuels so it could be turning municipal waste into fuel. For example, it could be something that's grown, but for it to be sustainable, and here's the rub. It has to be something that truly over its life cycle is, environments would say is sustainable. So you know if you're growing it on farmland and displacing food that would feed People that's not sustainable. Maybe if you're growing algae that's growing somewhere where you wouldn't otherwise be growing food That could be And so that's really the question here and and there's disagreement over what exactly is sustainable But what's clearly not sustainable In the eyes of anybody who's trying to define this is the current traditional jet fuel. Which makes up well more than 99% of the fuel consumed by airlines today, right? It's been such a conundrum, you know had what do we do about flying? But what about what about the cost and the cleaner fuels that passed those tests of being sustainable how much they cost compared to traditional jet fuel? They're far more expensive, United said. Related. That is now it's been 2 to 4 times as much as traditional fuels and two right now, Robin double the cost would be optimistic. And that's if you could even produce it at the scale that you would need, which, right now it's just not there. That's kind of part of the point of why it's so expensive. So when you think about what every dollar in crude oil prices means to airlines the way it moves their profits upper down right now, their losses up her down right. It's all about tricking losses. That right now is is rather expensive. Well, But what about people who say that this whole thing is just a publicity stunt? It does united have skin in the game here. Well. United CEO Scott Kirby went out of his way to say so anticipating that have pushed back. This is not just words, he said. This is not just marketing, but look it Zm United Being very vocal about this. They're saying we're putting actual money into this. Although a lot of this Robin, the details here is that they're asking some of the people who fly them to help cover part of the cost of the more expensive fuel on also lobbying so basically using political capital that ostensibly they could be using for something else to get something else they want to ask politicians. Tonto to make the rules such that basically, it makes sense for them in other companies to do this. Yeah. And United says they want to cut greenhouse gas emissions by 100% by 2050. So they seemed to be actively working towards that Just a couple seconds here. You know, there is a business case for this for airlines. Right there is I mean, there are people first of all who want to support companies doing these kinds of things. And so you know that that that part of the flying community which is not a majority, right? Most people are looking at price and schedule they picket airline. But more and more people are paying attention and be united to try to get.

Seth Kaplan United Airlines Robin 2 United 2050 100% Scott Kirby more than 99% united two 4 times First Zm United today double CEO every dollar couple seconds
"seth kaplan" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:56 min | 7 months ago

"seth kaplan" Discussed on KQED Radio

"And news in slow Italian dot com educational programs to listen and learn a language at one's own pace designed to uncomplicated language learning. This is your now Indonesian navy divers have recovered one of the black boxes from the commercial plane that crashed into the Java Sea on Saturday. Investigators are hoping the flight data recorder will provide clues into why the Boeing 7 37 jet took a nose dive. Just minutes after taking off from Jakarta in heavy rain, all of the flights 62 passengers are presumed dead here in now. Transportation analyst Seth Kaplan is following the latest into this investigation, and he joins us now, Seth welcome. Good to be here, Peter. Sure, and divers are still searching for the plane's second black box. That's the recorder that captures pilots conversations from the cockpit so we could know more soon, but what we know so far. And what's complicating that just a bit is that there's a beacon that both of these boxes emit. It helps them find the boxes that Beacon separated from the voice recorder. But on the other hand, this plane did crash in shallow water That's helpful. This is not Peter going to remain a long term unsolved mystery like Malaysian Airlines. 3 70. You've got a debris field. All of the pieces are close together. So one clue that that gives is that this plane probably did not let's say explode. Then you'd have more of a scattered debris field so easier right now to say what didn't happen then what did happen, Aziz said the voice recorder when they find that that'll help too, too early to say what might in fact have happened. There are a lot of clues, including, as I said that it was raining very heavily, but also the Indonesian Transportation Ministry says. The plane didn't fly for nine months last year due to air travel being down during the pandemic. Do you think that could have played a role? It's a possibility. U. S airlines. Other airlines around the world were very conscious about whatever planes were going to be flying again that they weren't for permanently mothballing, keeping them in circulation, even at a reduced level, So that's something that just hearing that alone. Of course we can't say was likely caused But that you would want to know more about what was happening with that airplane how it was being maintained while it was grounded in another issue could be that pilots aren't flying nearly as much as usual because of the pandemic. What can you tell us about that? Well, that too, and again airlines around the world put programs in place to make sure that pilots remained active remained in good practice, you might say, but that's something they're too will want to learn more about, because no question it's like anything else except more critical for an airline pilot to remain. In good practice and just keep their training current right. Still early days of this investigation, Big picture Seth since 1945 Indonesia's had the most civilian airliner accidents of any other country in Asia, including that 2018 Lion Air crash, which was the first of two involving the Bowens, Boeing 7 37 Max. What's going on. What's the problem? And Indonesia? There was also Asia, Indonesia back in 2014, another plane where everybody aboard died there, So you're right country with just a a minuscule percentage of all the flights and all the seats in any way you can measure airlines in the world with a number of notable crashes dating back to World War two as you said, but also Just during the past decade. This is three. Now we can name in less than seven years s O a country that has had its issues here and something. Obviously, investigators around the world are gonna be looking at in terms of the country's status within the global aviation community. You're now transportation analyst.

Seth Kaplan Indonesia analyst Peter Boeing Asia Indonesian navy Jakarta Indonesian Transportation Mini Java Sea Aziz Malaysian Airlines. Bowens
Southwest may furlough nearly 1,200 BWI workers this spring

Here & Now

03:47 min | 8 months ago

Southwest may furlough nearly 1,200 BWI workers this spring

"Some 6800 employees they could face furloughs mandatory temporary leaves of absence, the first in the airline's history. The notice comes as the pandemic continues to depress demand for travel in the air and on the ground. Gas consumption over the Thanksgiving weekend hit the lowest level since 1997. For more. We're joined by hearing out transportation analyst Seth Kaplan myself, Robin. S O. Southwest has never laid off or furloughed employees and it's 50 years of flying. But the pen having we know is put this airline and others in a pinch with labor unions, in particular over cost cutting measures. So what are they looking at? In a deficit? What's going on? Well, they lost more than a billion dollars in the third quarter. Robin. So you know, the unions were saying, Hey, they stole some money in the bank. But there's no question of things are as bad as they've ever been at that airline. This is an airline that almost never lost any money at all through past crises. When you look back to 9 11 the global financial crisis they always got back on their feet before almost any other airline in the world, and now they're very much in the middle of this one. That billion dollar loss, by the way, compares to a Nearly a $700 million profit for the same quarter a year earlier, a $2 billion profit in 2019. That's the kind of money Southwest usually makes its giving it all back now. Wasn't asked. How is it that they've never been able? They have been able to be O N voided these involuntary job cuts throughout their history. And how come they're making You know so much more money and avoided would sometimes other companies had to do? Yeah, they've been profitable, and they've always been growing up until recently. She always kind of needed more employees and and that was critical to hiring rather than firing people. But a lot of it was that model that sort of simple model of one fleet type. Turn the plane around quickly, Right. Everybody's fooling Southwest knows the plane pulls up to the gate. People get off people get back on and get the plane back up in the air. It's been a sustainable model, not the only way to make money in the airline industry, But nobody has done. It has consistently over two decades as Southwest has no, we know that more Americans flew over Thanksgiving, then they have since March. Gas sales fell by 19% from last year. That sounds sort of contradictory, but we just see crowded airports over the holiday. So overall, what was the impact of the pandemic on Thanksgiving travel travel was way down compared to usual Thanksgiving travel men for perspective the day before Thanksgiving that Wednesday or the Sunday after Thanksgiving, usually to the busiest days of the year. They were the busiest day since the pandemic started, but they were less busy than the least Busy day that I confined back in 2019 so air travel down by more than a half road travel down significantly, too. But as you said, by less than a half if you look at those gas sales But we're seeing, you know, hospitalizations up. So you know, health experts are telling us that travel is leading. You know a little bit later to this surge. So what's the outlook for Christmas? Well, it'll likely be a lot like Thanksgiving. In fact compared to the expectations in earlier November back before the surge got as bad as it ended up getting the expectations were for significantly more travel than we ended up seeing. So those warnings from health officials and just people's own fears seem to have caused people to back out of some trips that they plan to take. And you get better at it as Christmas approaches that we're also going to see not nearly as many people traveling as usual, even if we see more people traveling that we're seeing today in early in the December and more infections here now transportation analyst Seth Kaplan Thanks as always, Thanks, Robin, stay safe. You two. It's here now.

Seth Kaplan Robin Southwest
For The First Time Since Grounding, American Airlines Boeing 737 MAX Flight Takes Off From Dallas

Here & Now

02:33 min | 8 months ago

For The First Time Since Grounding, American Airlines Boeing 737 MAX Flight Takes Off From Dallas

"For the first time in nearly two years civilians are taking a flight on a boeing. seven thirty-seven max plane today. The demonstration flight operated by american airlines will travel from dallas to tulsa with members of the media as the first passengers since those two fatal crashes grounded the aircraft for twenty months spring in here now transportation analyst. Seth kaplan inset. Today's flight designed to build. Consumer confidence approve their safe after the faa recertified. The max last month so tell us more about today's flight and when we can expect commercial flights yeah ninety journalists wearing masks as any flight these days plus the flight crew. You've got obviously pilots and flight attendants on there. So you add that all up and it's something like two thirds full which nowadays is rather full flight compared to a lot of commercial ones right robin and exactly the fact that they're doing this shows that they are concerned about consumer confidence. of course. now you have cova. Vid impacting consumer confidence in terms of flying. As well as those max issues the flights the crashes rather killed three hundred forty six people terrible well. Undergrounding was a huge blow to boeing financially. Pretty critical. I'd imagine to get these planes back in the air. So you know how critical and what's the sense that this is gonna work. People will get on them even more critical than before because before. At least you had airlines clamoring for the planes to despite the problems you just sort of had this natural inertia. You might call it. Air of airlines just needed the airplanes Now that's different. Now they have most of these airlines too many airplanes even though they still want these planes because they're more efficient they can afford to wait. They can afford not to buy new planes. So this this is is now a double blow to boeing. We thought the worst thing was that they couldn't deliver all these planes airlines wanted The airplanes on their hands airlines don't necessarily need even though over the very long term look airlines want to renew their fleets well and is that just to be clear is that they don't necessarily need it because of covid because so few people are flying right now right because demand is lower. So so if you remember robin when the grounding i happened before the busy summer travel season of a year earlier well airlines couldn't fly their schedules. They were killing on these planes. They count on every airplane to fly during a normal summer whereas now there's just a lot of slack in their fleets and so they might not have the plane they want but they have a plane.

Seth Kaplan Boeing American Airlines Tulsa FAA Dallas Robin
"seth kaplan" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:56 min | 9 months ago

"seth kaplan" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Kids Circle round, thoughtfully Selected folktales from around the world Adapted for Today's families that circle round available on apple podcasts. From NPR and W bur. I'm Tanya. Mostly it's here and now the day before Thanksgiving is usually the busiest travel day of the year, and even in the middle of a global pandemic this year, looks like to be in no exception. Since the weekend, millions of Americans have been flocking to airports even as health experts have been urging people to stay home. Let's talk about all of this with here and now transportation analyst Seth Kaplan, who's standing by at the Harrisburg International Airport. And Pennsylvania. Hey, Seth. Vittoria. What's it like there today? Well, if I go by what I see and also the data, the story is very much that. Yes, this is one of the busiest travel day. It's not the busiest day at least since March, when everything changed, but in far less busy than usual, the airport here tells me that normally be 5000 people coming through sort of his medium sized airport on the day before Thanksgiving. Today. They're looking for less than half that, perhaps 2200 people. Yeah. Even with 2200. People put those numbers in perspective for us. What does that tell you about how people are responding to warnings about travel? Well that corroborates what going on nationally. Also, if you look at those p ece throughput numbers, any evidence you can see people are traveling in greater numbers than they were most other points during the pandemic, but in far fewer numbers. The unusual. It's kind of a mixed message. Right? You've got the CDC and a lot of state health officials saying, Don't travel but airlines air flying, and it's leading it. The people to make their own decisions about sort of the need versus the wonk. Right. What truly is discretionary and what's not tough choices these days. Right. So with the numbers that you're telling us, that means that many of these flights are more more full than they were just over the last few months. And if that's the case what what airlines doing to keep people safe? I know that many had the middle seats empty. Is that still the case? As of today, Delta and Southwest among the largest U. S. Airlines still blocking middle seats, But Southwest is going to stop doing that December 1st that will leave on Lee Delta, which is Said that it's going to do something to mark. Now. There's debate about how much that matters because, of course, the middle seat 18 inches wide. That's not true social distancing and so you know. How do you weigh a nonstop flight on an airline that attacking its planes vs Locked middle seats on Delta. If you have to connect and go through another airport, you know it's tricky questions. But Delta is in fact doing that will soon be alone among the largest airlines and doing that. Yeah, really quickly. I know that many airlines have modified their policies to allow people to cancel their flights at the last minute. How is that playing out? People are taking advantage of that. United said recently that with the new surge, people were in fact backing out of some of their Thanksgiving plans. So based on that, based on what Triple A has been telling us about people on the road, clearly fewer people traveling today then looked like might be the case as it is not a month ago, but still plenty of people are indeed going to visit friends and family for Thanksgiving. Yet less than a minute with you. But are the airlines counting on this holiday travel rush to kind of make up for some of those losses? Will will the holiday rush be able to do that? And good times. Airlines kind of run up the score when, when a tease big movements right during holidays during special events, and this year is no exception. It's just on a very different scale. Tanya All right, so it's not about making a lot of money today and making less money. Other times. It's about not losing too much money today versus losing a lot more money and other times here in L transportation. Alice Seth Kaplan is always thank you and Happy.

Harrisburg International Airpo Lee Delta Seth Kaplan Alice Seth Kaplan analyst Pennsylvania apple NPR Tanya All W bur CDC Southwest United
"seth kaplan" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:21 min | 1 year ago

"seth kaplan" Discussed on KQED Radio

"This is here and now from NPR. And you are I'm Jeremy Thompson. Today, Boeing reported a $2.4 billion quarterly loss and announced it would slow production of new aircraft. Another sign How the pandemic is devastating the airline industry jet Blue also reported a huge lots this week and said revenue in the next quarter is expected to drop by 80%. His air travel demand plummets. Let's bring in here now Transportation analyst Seth Kaplan and said Let's start with Boeing, which was already in financial trouble before the pandemic, and second quarter earnings are worse than expected. What does that tell you? Is it more of a long term concern for the industry to see a problem like that of bowing then at an airline That's exactly what it is. Jeremy, You know if you're looking for good news, and how could there be any good news about a $2.4 billion losses? You said? Well, that's a smaller lost that Boeing reported a year earlier nearly $3 billion for the same quarter last year. The difference, though Jeremy is that back then it seemed like sort of. Ah, one time thing that was right after the second Max crash the first full quarter after that, and Bowie sort of thought, Hey, we'll get through this setting aside the obviously the human toll there, But in financial terms that we get through that go back to selling in delivering airplanes. Now it's dealing with something very different. A world that doesn't really want nearly as many airplanes as Boeing and its competitor, Airbus thought they would want if you're looking for actual good news, Boeing's defense business, at least the other side of your company. Relatively stable. And what about jet Blue and its loss reported out is that weak performance compared to the other alliance? They all kind of in the same boat at this point? Yeah, I've never seen numbers like these before. Jeremy A JetBlue reported a Negative 191% Operating loss margin. I mean for perspective, German usually like a negative double digit margin. You see airline with negative 12% somewhere in the world. That's terrible. Negative 191% was actually better by that measure than most other U. S. Airlines, which were in excess of negative 200%. So this is just off the charts compared to any other environment. JetBlue fortunate leased to be a mostly domestic airline. Unlike Delta, United and American, to a lesser degree, which, of course, I can't fly to many other places around the room like a fly. When it comes to Delta, it is updating its policy for face coverings, what it allows in what it demands and what it doesn't allow. What's the latest there? Delta has taken the lead in many of these regards. JetBlue actually is the first to mandate masks, but Delta now enforcing its mandate. Very strictly it actually Jeremy, you know the stereotype about the parent telling a child in a car. Hey, I'll turn this car around. If you don't behave, I'll turn the plane around the other day, not one that had taken off. But at Detroit Back to the gate made a couple of passengers get off because they refused to wear masks, according to local news reports. They're also now banning masks with exhaust valves. You've seen these masks with a little the little valves, they say, Look, that's not about preventing the spread of this virus. That's for industrial reasons. You can't wear those either on Delta. And what about Amtrak? They're cracking down when it comes to face Mass to they are basically saying, no exceptions..

Boeing Jeremy Thompson Delta JetBlue jet Blue NPR analyst Airbus Seth Kaplan Amtrak Bowie Detroit
"seth kaplan" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

03:36 min | 1 year ago

"seth kaplan" Discussed on Here & Now

"Boeing's troubled seven thirty seven Max aircraft is probably still months away from carrying passengers again, but the federal. Aviation Administration is taking steps toward that day. The FAA said. It plans to issue a proposed air worthiness directive for the grounded jetliner in the near future. The seven seven was grounded and twenty nineteen after crashes in Indonesia and Theo Pia killed three hundred and forty six people here in l.. Transportation Analysts Seth Kaplan joins us now and seth. I remind us why those planes crashed and what Boeing has been trying to fix on this seven thirty seven Max. Tanya in simplest all basically, the plane or systems anyway. We're trying to correct for a problem that didn't actually. And then the correction called the problem caused the problem so a bit more detailed. A bad sensor told the plane that it was stalling and the way you get out of a stall kind of counter intuitive for those of you who aren't pilots, but you actually Kinda die point than those down to regain airspeed the problem. The plane wasn't stalling and pointed the plane down, and the plane kept going down until it ultimately crashed in both cases and the pilots. Even though knew something was wrong. They weren't able to overcome that system. The details are horrifying. How is Boeing evaluating whether? Those changes are making the thirty Max safer. Right so one thing they've done is they've now required systems to rely on to sensors both sensors would have to indicate a stall rather than just one part of the problem last time bad sensor. And they've given the pilots more control now, but they're taking these planes through test flights through simulator training on the ground, basically simulating those same conditions so that if the same thing happened, would the pilots be able to take back control and it's not of course is Boeing evaluating that it's the Fha and all of its counterparts around the world where it was accusations, that Fam Boeing were too cozy. The rest of the world is not GonNa just as word for it regulators everywhere also will have to sign off on this. What's the timeline now for getting to that point where this plane is again carrying passengers. and. Don't you think people are going to be a bit apprehensive? I mean also pilots were speaking out about this saying they don't want to fly these planes until they can be one hundred percent assured that is seven thirty. Seven Max is safe. Incredibly Tanya there's a realistic scenario now where it will have been two years, it was march of two thousand nineteen. When the second crash happened, and the planes were grounded, it could be almost march twenty twenty one before the planes are flying again in the initial moments after the second crowds, people were saying well. Is it going to be weeks or months? It's going to be years. Likely years plural literally two years before passengers flying on a plane again. Yeah with the thirty seconds I have with you. We know that airlines are emerging right now. because of the pandemic. What are the latest numbers? Can the airline industry actually recover from this pandemic? United Airlines the latest report. Earnings were really lack there of lost one point, six billion dollars, or even more than that. We're in a two billion. If you strip out some accounting noise Delta lost even more than that last year, and no prospect anytime soon for things getting better especially with the second wave of war, people flying than we're flying a few months ago. Tanya but still far fewer.

Boeing Tanya Fam Boeing Seth Kaplan Max FAA Aviation Administration Indonesia Theo Pia United Airlines Fha
American Airlines to resume full flights in July amid coronavirus pandemic

WBZ Afternoon News

00:48 sec | 1 year ago

American Airlines to resume full flights in July amid coronavirus pandemic

"Potential air travelers may have to deal with sitting and packed flights again we're going idols of coronavirus worries American Airlines will soon start booking full flights again your son pastor or trouble for those still anemic is showing signs of life and airlines are stressing the social distancing or taking a second look the blocking those middle seats they're just doing the math and betting that there are few enough people who cared that much that this is gonna work out for them American Airlines which requires mask on all flights announced he will stop blocking middle streets July first Seth Kaplan says that requiring masses not cost the airlines money maybe a few cents were blocked middle seats cost airlines a lot

American Airlines Seth Kaplan
"seth kaplan" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

03:55 min | 1 year ago

"seth kaplan" Discussed on Here & Now

"White House reporter for the Washington Post and thanks so much for joining us. It's my pleasure. Have President Trump's budget out. This week isn't going anywhere right now. Given the Democratic Control of the House of Representatives but it does give you a sense of his priorities especially if he wins a second. Turn and those priorities do not it. Favorite Greener Forms of transportation like public transit and trains for more. Let's bring in. Seth Kaplan here now transportation analyst. Seth Jeremy Okay. Let's start with the the most famous train line in the country. I would say that is Amtrak. The Nation's rail service which reported a record number of passengers last year more than thirty two million we spoke with with the CEO on this show and he projected positive earnings for Amtrak this year for the first time ever so why are cuts being proposed. Or what kind of cuts are being proposed. The big ones derby a billion dollars skewed more toward the long haul routes as you and I have discussed before the show are the ones that really lose a lot of money. The cuts also in the northeast corridor. The routes between New York and Boston New York and Washington and so forth which are more viable worth noting by the way Jeremy Those long haul routes which the administration noted are the ones that are less viable. Those are the ones that run through rural America. What you might call Red State America of course supports a kind of like? There's surprises some surprises with the budget. Over all right the the administration willing to tolerate headlines about cuts to entitlements like Medicare and social security that are popular among senior. Your voters This too willing to take that chance with with some of their core supporters. And when you look at the other cuts the administration's proposing for transportation spending what stands out cutting money also for across the board all kinds of things including airport improvements for example being slashed by four one hundred million dollars. I if if they were to get what they wanted and and public transit as well absolutely. That's on the chopping block to pretty much everything everything With the exception of of roads and bridges overall now now they're even there a lot of their sort of robbing Peter to pay. Paul well There there are cuts to some of those kinds of things but on a net basis. No question what what you said before. Greener forms of transportation are the ones that no matter how you you measure it or are taking the biggest hit so in terms of what the administration does want to spend money on transportation. What's in there yes? So it's talking about a trillion dollars over ten years for yeah mostly roads and bridges things that that tend to benefit automobiles now. Not all of that would would be new spending. I mean the government would spend a certain amount of money on all that anyway but that would be a big increase that it would also extend the time. Normally this would be. Oh five years. At a time they'd be committing to ten years of big spending and that would even despite what would have been spent anyway be in fact a big increase in for a longer period of time. Ah Seth when you look at this budget proposal from the trump administration and then combine it with some of the other places where Democrats are in charge. California's Democratic governor just pause to the high-speed train being built from southern California to the bay area over cost concerns are advocates of trains in public transit. Losing the fight in the big picture. It's kind of hard to paint with a very broad brush. I mean in California what happened. Is that the public was was all for the idea of a high-speed train but it just ended up costing so much more than anybody had imagine there are localities like Nashville of voted against an expansion transit despite some progressive instincts but others like Phoenix next. That voted in favor of expanding their public transit system. So so a mixed record for sure that is here now. Transportation analysts. Seth Kaplan said. Thank you gary..

Seth Kaplan Amtrak Trump California Seth Jeremy analyst Washington Post White House House of Representatives New York Seth America President Paul reporter Nashville CEO Phoenix Medicare
"seth kaplan" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

04:06 min | 1 year ago

"seth kaplan" Discussed on Here & Now

"When it's too cold to go out or to ICI to make it out of the driveway. Where do you go to find? Just the right movie. Just the right book just the right show to binge pop culture happy hour from. NPR can help you keep warm and keep up at the same time. Join US twice a week on pop culture. Happy hour cradling. Photographs of their deceased loved. Ones families packed. Another hearing on Boeing today while lawmakers grilled the Federal Aviation Agency Agency on its role in the two deadly. Crashes a Boeing seven thirty-seven Max where three hundred and forty six people were killed among the star witnesses today are Stephen Dixon head of the FAA and Edward Pearson. A former senior manager for Boeing who told his superiors he was so concerned about safety and production problems that he was hesitant to put his own family on a Boeing plane for more. Let's bring in. Seth Kaplan here. Now's transportation analyst. And Seth we heard I today from chairman Defazio. Oh He's a Democrat from Oregon. He came down really hard on the. Faa let's listen perhaps most chillingly we've learned that the performed an analysis that concluded and that if left uncorrected the cast design flaw in the seven. Three seven Max could result in as many as fifteen future. Fatal crashes over the life of the pleat tragically the FAA's analysis which never saw the light of day beyond the closed doors of the FAA in Boeing was correct. You know There's also been a lot of scrutiny seth over The FAA allowing airlines to self certify that their planes meet US safety requirements. This was a policy. Congress approved several times. Why was this originally done? And could we see this rule get rewritten originally done partly because of cost. Let's face it but also because some of the best engineering talent resides at these companies companies like Boeing. We're talking not just just about Boeing. But all of its suppliers subcontractors and so forth and the idea was that look if done right Perhaps it could be a really a good use of of of mines and Resources. We've seen now that that obviously something went very wrong here. These allegations that Boeing and the FAA were too cozy in terms of getting adding rewritten. I mean there's a whole ecosystem. Now that set up this way would probably be difficult to sort of tear it down and build it all up again. I think probably more likely that we'll see incremental change but but but most certainly some kind of change here. Yeah I mentioned former senior Boeing Manager Edward Pearson. Who testified today? He's also referred to as being a Boeing whistleblower. Tell us what he will add to the picture at Pearson. Alleges that he saw kinds of sloppy be production issues of said he wouldn't put his own family on a Maxon. And that Boeing largely ignored his concerns. Boeing has said Took US concern. Seriously he's talking as they said about production now the allegations about what brought down the planes mainly have to do with design not production right just a flawed odd design allegedly of of that mcat system. There will be all news so well but nonetheless obviously disconcerting to hear the allegations he's making a- as well with the thirty seconds. I have left with you. What happens next for Boeing in the FAA? Well the FAA already ready. Seems to be scrutinizing Boeing in ways that it perhaps hadn't done in the past. That's a long term issue for Boeing. But you know this is where we are now even issues that have nothing to do with the amax. The next aircraft program is GONNA get all kinds of scrutiny. That the previous ones probably haven't gotten in the short term. The question is when this plane's rain's GonNa get back in the air hard to imagine now that it'll be time before the end of the year is Boeing Previously hoped Seth Kaplan here announced transportation. Analyst I thank you.

Boeing FAA Seth Kaplan Edward Pearson US ICI Defazio mines and Resources NPR senior manager analyst Federal Aviation Agency Agency Analyst Oregon Stephen Dixon Congress chairman Maxon
"seth kaplan" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

04:01 min | 2 years ago

"seth kaplan" Discussed on Here & Now

"This sounds sounds debilitating for those small towns that don't have sophisticated cyber infrastructure. Can you tell us why we don't know more about which cities and towns since last friday have affected. It's a trade off really. I mean there. There's a transparency argument to be made but while cities and towns are still trying to recover. There's there's the potential of highlighting two other attackers that they may be less resources than normal as they have people that have been working to address the current situation asian. What's the first thing some of these municipalities do what can they do right after a ransomware attack. Is it smart to pay the actors with their demanding. It's typically not the best approach to pay the attackers the f._b._i. Is clearly come out against paying ransomware. One thing to keep in mind is there is no guarantee that you will get your data back after you pay the ransom. The other part is it could potentially put you on a list of victims who are willing to pay making you again a target for the next round of attack <hes> the mayor of one of the effect cities keen told n._p._r. That the hackers attacked software by an an outsourced company which is also used by other municipalities. Is this tactic think that these hackers are using to hit as many targets as possible once you're able to find a vulnerability in a software package that may not be as well-maintained or has a public vulnerability that gives the attacker that initial the point of entry than they use for whatever they need yeah. I'm guessing bottom line this effect city services. How is this going to affect residents in the cities. Potentially i mean i think we saw in baltimore where there was a significant impact to the citizens <hes> abilities to pay for municipal services. The the real question is the scale of the recovery and how long it takes to come back online. I mentioned the texas department of information resources. Who says that there's evidence that this is one single threat actor. Do you have any idea of what type of entity would have a motive to do something like this. It really comes down down to organized crime or a nation state actor. You mentioned baltimore. There are also other cities across the country that have been attacked by ransomware. What do you suggest municipalities do to prevent this from happening. So the first thing is is ensuring that you've got a quality incident response plan and that a plan involves a systematic backup and recovery process. That's been tested. A lot of folks will write an incident response plan and then never tested i it so when you look at a small town that outsource to a vendor ensuring that that vendor is capable of managing a response like this is really really critical. That's eddie block and associate at foley and lardner who served as the texas state chief information security officer. Thank you for joining us. Thank you for the amtrak appears to be on the verge of a turnaround later this all the passenger rail service is likely to break even even for the first time since it was founded in one thousand nine hundred seventy one. Let's bring in seth kaplan. He's hearing now transportation analyst seth hi peter and what's happening amtrak as you said on the verge of breaking even on its way to perhaps <hes> generating a profit a modest modest statement by the with exactly and and to be clear this would be an operating profit so once all the infrastructure is in place all those capital costs then being at least turn a profit perhaps at least break even with the operation itself the collecting all the fares having that add up to the cost of running the railroad.

baltimore seth kaplan texas state texas department of informatio chief information security off eddie block analyst peter lardner foley
"seth kaplan" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

02:45 min | 2 years ago

"seth kaplan" Discussed on Here & Now

"Do you expect passengers to start basically voting with their feet, and maybe even getting off of planes, if they're the max, and they don't wanna fly on them. Yeah. Sure. A lot of people. Jeremy right now are are paying attention to aircraft type in a way that very few people. Do I do I think you do a, but, but yeah, this is something that people shouldn't have to think about personally if I were scheduled on one I would get on one because I know that it looked at the DO scheduled data and there've been a quarter million successful max flight, so far obviously to doomed ones that's too too many. But you know, I still feel like getting onto Max's safer than a lot of other things we do in our lives. But that's it. You cannot blame people for for doing what they're doing it for wanting to filter out the next flights that is. Seth Kaplan with airline weekly Seth thanks as always. Thank you. Jeremy? And let us know what you think would you get on a max eight right now, given what we have seen in all of the pressure. That's been building against them. Let's bring in our political strategists for reaction to the Manafort, sentencing and more Simone Sanders democratic strategist is with us. Hi, Simone, gradings and Alice Stewart, Republican strategists, I Alice. Hi, Jeremy great to be here. Okay. So today a lot of news for Paul Manafort, the former Trump campaign chairman another few years in prison for him right now. Although he's waiting for a pardon from the president, which may or may not come. But then after the sentencing, the Manhattan District Attorney indicted Manafort for residential mortgage fraud, this would be pardoned proof because they are state charges Alice. What does this mean for Paul Manafort, this means that he is not going to see the light of day for a very very long time if ever again, and I have to say. Hey, that Justice has been served, and this is a man that has lived in his entire life of greed and opulence and unsavory activity, and I'm glad to see that the the Justice department and the Justice system has taken a decisive action on this. And and even if a pardon does come down the road, it's encouraging to know that the legal system does have provision to make sure that he continues to suffer in pay the consequences of his action. We'll what do you think this means a do you think that the fact that maybe he's not going to be able to be pardoned? I mean, zooming the process moves forward as as it isn't. He maybe he's convicted of these charges that may make him cooperate more with Muller. Well, perhaps, you know, Trump has a long history with Paul Manafort as everyone knows he was a key member of Trump's inner circle in two thousand sixteen paid a very important role in his campaign..

Paul Manafort Max Jeremy Alice Stewart Simone Sanders Trump Seth Kaplan Justice Justice department Manhattan Muller chairman fraud president
"seth kaplan" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

01:46 min | 2 years ago

"seth kaplan" Discussed on Here & Now

"Ambu has ordered a could do it just as a competing Airbus aircraft like the a three fifty could do it. But which also have is just this month the Federal Aviation Administration the FAA. Said the Vietnam is safe enough. It's airline industry is safe enough to allow airlines to now be able to fly here as indeed bamboo seems interested and even larger Vietnam Airlines. The flag carrier has said it to is interested in doing a briefly I want to switch to trains a bit. Amtrak says it may cut some some of its routes to focus on the ones that most passengers Ron you think this is a good move by Amtrak. Yeah. Focusing more on short haul routes that could compete against airlines in places like the northeast between New York, Boston Washington and against cars in some markets. Like, Chicago, Milwaukee Seth Kaplan is editor airline weekly. Thanks a lot. Thank you. We've been following the fireworks today on Capitol Hill where President Trump's former lawyer and fixer Michael Cohen is testifying in front of the house oversight and reform committee. He called the president racist Akon men and a cheat. But Coen's credibility has also been an issue today. He was after all convicted of lying to congress, and he's going to prison in may Republican congressman Jim Jordan also accused Cohen today of being dishonest in the documents that he presented to the committee. Mr. Cohen, I'm gonna come back to the question. I asked before with regards to your false statement that you submitted to congress on here. It was very clear that it asked for contracts with foreign entities over the last two years..

Vietnam Airlines Michael Cohen Amtrak Federal Aviation Administratio congress Airbus Vietnam Seth Kaplan President Ambu Coen Jim Jordan Ron Trump congressman New York Washington
"seth kaplan" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

03:05 min | 2 years ago

"seth kaplan" Discussed on Here & Now

"That's the biggest customer of the eighth three eighty reduced and outstanding order for fifty three of the planes to just fourteen for more. Let's go to Seth Kaplan editor of airline weekly. Hi, Seth Jeremy and this plane is a very big one. It's a double decker. It's five hundred fifty five seats. It was considered a high tech marvel when it was rolled out in two thousand and five why don't airlines wanna buy this plane. Well, the answer that question is not because passengers don't like it from that perspective. It's actually been very successful. I mean, I was on one. Once I was in a regular economy feet. And it was a smooth quiet ride this really big plane just kind of floating through the sky and everybody I've ever talked. He likes flying it. The problem is that the math just hasn't worked out for airlines in terms of the money and Airbus thought they'd sell many of these over a thousand turned out that airlines didn't want really big planes to fly really long distances because the farther you fly actually, the fewer people wanna fly in most cases. So Boeing came out with a plane, the seventy seven Dreamliner which could fly really long distances, but was a lot smaller. And it turned out that that's what airlines wanted Airbus came out with a competitor to that to which has been rather success. So what kind of planes, for example, we'll emerets decide to buy instead of the three eighty well, they're going to buy some more planes from Airbus but planes, while the kinds that you see more often out there, you know, eighty three fifty eight three thirties these kinds of plane, so those are twin-aisle or which call wide-body planes planes that can fly across oceans. Fly long distances. But they just don't have as many seats to fill in Germany. They only have two engines not for that was a part of the problem nowadays with engine technology. You can fly a really long way on just two engine. So in that regard to the three eighty with four engines for fuel guzzling engines was kind of ops elite by time it started flying. And what about Boeing the guest competitor, though? It's still much smaller than the three eighty would be the Boeing seven forty seven eight. How has that plane avoided extinction? Well, it's doing even worse than the three eighty quite honestly, Boeing hasn't even sold as many of those what happened was when Airbus came out with the three eighty and thought that there was all this demand for these planes, Boeing didn't necessarily agree, but it kinda hedged its bets. It didn't build it all airplane like the three eighty it. Updated the seven forty seven as you said called it the seven four seven dash eight, and it's sold terribly. You know, one of these days, I think we'll get a similar announcement for Boeing the difference is that. It's not nearly as much of a problem for Boeing because Boeing didn't invest nearly much. They just updated old plane rather than spending tens of billions of dollars on an all new plane, then became a died. So Airbus is any production of the three eighty. But later this year, they are going to welcome the beluga XL plane, which looks like a whale..

Boeing Airbus Seth Jeremy Seth Kaplan editor Germany seven four seven dash
"seth kaplan" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

04:25 min | 2 years ago

"seth kaplan" Discussed on Here & Now

"The prime minister will give the house a progress report on her negotiations with the EU could face amendments from lawmakers who want to prevent the UK from crashing out of the U with no deal or even delay. Brexit. And it'll be up to berko decide if and when those issues come to a vote Frank Langfitt NPR news London, I'll turn into home. What's going on at Southwest Airlines? If you're flying southwest, you might be in for an extended trip the airline has declared an operational emergency cancelling about one hundred flights over this long weekend. And according to a memo to mechanics of tain by CBS news, southwest called for an all hands on deck to fix maintenance problems. This comes after a CBS investigation earlier this month in which industry mechanic said they were pressured to overlook safety issues. Let's bring in Seth Kaplan editor at airline weekly. Seth what do you think is this an airline that really has this many mechanical problems, forty southwest planes, a day have been grounded for maintenance, or is this part of the ongoing labor relations dispute the company has had with mechanics. What's happening? Well, the only thing we can say for sure Robin is that they really are having this many mechanical related cancellations. The root causes is indeed as you said the the big question here. My math tells me that we're still at a point here. A couple dozen or so mechanical related cancellations a day, you do have labor issues mechanics who've been waiting a really long time for for contract. So on one hand, the CBS investigation mechanics say, hey, we're being pressured to overlook things that we should know look on the other hand, you have an airline industry that by any other measure is that safe as it's ever been so the airline and its communications that have been reported sorta seems to be implying that hey, something here is an adding up, and maybe people are paying some extra special attention to issues that they might not pay attention to it another time that seems to be what they're implying. Although they haven't said it in those words back of what you just said south west has been locked in contract negotiations with the mechanics going back years. But let's listen to a little of this CBS investigation. It found some industry mechanics working for airlines saying they're pressured to overlook potential safety problems. Here's one his voice has been electronically altered against CBS. Team Prempeh walk off the job and Helgoland suspension for multiple because it reported problems that they supposedly outside their scope for finding so Seth which airlines were mentioned in this documentary. We know southwest was one, but you know, who else, and what can we we take from that it mentioned southwest. They mentioned American the FAA follow it up on all of that. And in a few cases issued what are called corrective notices, basically said. Yeah, there is something there. You know, this is tough in a safety sensitive industry. When on one hand. Obviously airlines want employees to speak up whenever there's an issue on the other hand, you know, there have been times over two years where related to contract negotiations and other issues. You know, all of a sudden just sort of get more of those reports of issues at times pilots unions over two years, you know, allegations that pilots writing up issues that maybe weren't mission critical. Maybe they wouldn't have written up at a different time. But it's a tricky line to walk being no airline wants to be the airline accused of asking people to overlook safety sensitive issues, by the way, the ba- Canucks spoke with and again, they were industry-wide, but they said things like damage breaks and fuselages very chilling. Not just trivial problems. And now we have this memo from south west that's been obtained by CBS saying all hands on deck or they could face. Termination, look if you are planning a trip and had hoped to go with south west in the next few weeks. Should you be nervous about mechanics who are feeling threatened with their jobs unless they come in? And you know, what what's your sense if well? That, you know, by the most important metrics of all is as safe as it's ever been. No, I would fly south west of just as I would any other airline at this point..

CBS Southwest Airlines Seth Kaplan Robin London Frank Langfitt EU UK prime minister FAA Helgoland editor two years one hand
"seth kaplan" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

02:42 min | 2 years ago

"seth kaplan" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"I have never understood airline pricing structures. Well, let's try to figure them out. I when you travel by bus or train the ticket typically costs more the longer the distance you're going, but with airlines says industry. Analysts Henry heartfelt at atmosphere research distance really doesn't come into it. It doesn't cost an airline twice. As much to fly you twice as far not even close. Once the plane is in the air at cruising altitude the cost for additional fuel is pretty marginal. Seth Kaplan at airline weekly says these hard to fathom fares are common on airlines own websites and also travel sites like Expedia. There are times when you will pay more to fly from Portland to San Francisco than from Washington to Hong Kong. Kaplan says tickets price at any given moment isn't based on the airlines costs to fly you from here to there. But on how many other people have already bought tickets to fly that route how many seats are left how long before the day of travel. They look at empty airline seats. When a flight takes off kind of the way a bakery. Looks at bread at the end of the day. Spoilage airlines call it the airlines going to take something for that seat rather than get nothing at all for it. In the end, what determines airline fares is a complicated. Balance of supply and demand says Henry heartfelt. And how much competition there is between airlines to service that supply and demand on a moment to moment basis. Airlines are the industry that pioneered revenue management how to price each individual seats on each flight to extract the maximum economic value. So let's go back to Jeff Sorensen's flights where it would have cost less to fly from Des Moines to Seattle through Phoenix than it would to just fly to Phoenix heartfelt says there could be a few reasons for that Des Moines to Seattle may actually have more competition on it. There may be multiple airlines that can take you there through different hubs. And it's possible there could be a budget airline. But for a flight starting in Des Moines and terminating in Phoenix or some other hub airport. There may be only a couple of airlines competing. So ticket prices will likely be higher heartfelt says in one thousand nine hundred ninety s several airlines actually tried to price their tickets based in part on. The distance traveled. It lasted about a nanosecond longer distance route that has more competition just has that much more battling going on between carriers for those customers. So it's best not to try to think logically. When you're looking at airfares because you'll only drive yourself crazy, which is not recommended when preparing to fly, I'm Mitchell. Hartman.

Des Moines Seth Kaplan airline weekly Henry Phoenix Seattle Expedia Hartman Jeff Sorensen Portland Hong Kong San Francisco Washington
Why the cost of airfares will never make any sense

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

03:04 min | 2 years ago

Why the cost of airfares will never make any sense

"Listener, Jeff Sorenson has encountered even more crazy seeming airfares he found. A one way economy ticket from demo- into Seattle with a stop in Phoenix, and it was one hundred fifty dollars. Same exact flight from join to Phoenix alone costs hundred and sixty two dollars. So the airline will fly him fourteen hundred miles farther for ten dollars less to be honest. I have never understood airline pricing structures. Well, let's try to figure them out. I when you travel by bus or train the ticket typically costs more the longer the distance you're going, but with airlines says industry. Analysts Henry heartfelt at atmosphere research distance really doesn't come into it. It doesn't cost an airline twice. As much to fly you twice as far not even close. Once the plane is in the air at cruising altitude the cost for additional fuel is pretty marginal. Seth Kaplan at airline weekly says these hard to fathom fares are common on airlines own websites and also travel sites like Expedia. There are times when you will pay more to fly from Portland to San Francisco than from Washington to Hong Kong. Kaplan says tickets price at any given moment isn't based on the airlines cost to fly you from here to there. But on how many other people have already bought tickets to fly that route how many seats are left how long before the day of travel. They look at empty airline seats. When flight takes off kind of the way a bakery. Looks at bread at the end of the day. Spoilage airlines call it the airlines gonna take something for Nazi rather. In get nothing at all for it in the end, which determines airline fares is a complicated. Balance of supply and demand says Henry heartfelt. And how much competition there is between airlines to service that supply and demand on a moment to moment basis airlines or the industry that pioneered revenue management how to price each individual seat on each flight to extract the maximum economic value. So let's go back to Jeff Sorensen's flights where it would have cost less to fly from Des Moines to Seattle through Phoenix than it would to just fly to Phoenix heartfelt says there could be a few reasons for that Des Moines to Seattle may actually have more competition on it. There may be multiple airlines that can take you there through different hubs. And it's possible there could be a budget airline. But for a flight starting in Des Moines and terminating in Phoenix or some other hub airport. There may be only a couple airlines competing. So ticket prices will likely be higher heartfelt says in the nineteen ninety s several airlines actually tried to price their tickets based in part on the. Distance travelled. It lasted about a nanosecond longer distance route that has more competition just has that much more battling going on between carriers for those customers. So it's best not to try to think logically. When you're looking at air because Bill only drive yourself crazy, which is not recommended when preparing to

Phoenix Des Moines Seth Kaplan Airline Weekly Seattle Jeff Sorenson Henry Expedia Jeff Sorensen Bill Portland Hong Kong San Francisco Washington One Hundred Fifty Dollars Sixty Two Dollars Ten Dollars
"seth kaplan" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

02:41 min | 3 years ago

"seth kaplan" Discussed on Here & Now

"Crashing on Monday. A brand new airplanes sounds like a good thing. But then you wonder, you know, maybe they haven't tested it out enough. And there may have been a problem that didn't come up yet. And here we are as it's so new, and yeah, you know, legitimate to say that on the other hand, we've all flown on brand new airplanes. And in fact, you know, this this max aid is is the newest kind, and there are already hundreds around the world flying for that matter at airlines like. American in south west here in the US airlines like Air, Canada and westjet just north of the border. And you know, of course, this is also very rare for something like that. So sure at this point, you could control you could construct all kinds of ideas about why this could have happened, but the newness of an airplane in and of itself shouldn't cause something any more than, you know, a very older plane as long as it's being taken properly, but we're not talking here. Nobody is talking about pilot error. Nobody is talking about whether or anything like that. They're looking the investigators it appears are looking mostly just at the mechanics of the airplane. Right. And you know, the biggest question of all if we're gonna be talking about human error might not be those pilots on board again, all of this very preliminary. But you know, if all of that happened the day before what happened after that was was the plane taken in for to kind of check that you would expect it to have been taken in for after something. Like what those passengers described? So what does this mean for the seven thirty seven max, eight are other airlines, you think going to be questioning their decision to buy these planes and Boeing is obviously been marketing these pretty heavily. Yeah. Yeah. Way too early to say they would question the decision to to to buy the planes, but we'll have to see here depending on what emerges whether there would be any sort of air worthiness directive as they're as they're called nothing. Like that yet, you know, any kind of even voluntary at this point checks required. Just not enough information. And again, you know, a fair number of these planes flying already in this, obviously, the the the only problem like this so far. But boy is it a grave problem. And you know, if there's any indication of something systemic then. Yeah, they're they're gonna take that very seriously at this point, you know, it's a small percentage of airline fleets. This is an airplane though, that within a few years when you fly those airlines that I mentioned in others going to be very common to rent one of these one of these airplanes that Seth Kaplan of airline weekly talking with us about the Indonesian airline lion air and the crash that happened earlier this week Seth thank you. Thank you. Jeremy?.

Seth Kaplan US Boeing Canada Jeremy
"seth kaplan" Discussed on WSB-AM

WSB-AM

01:42 min | 3 years ago

"seth kaplan" Discussed on WSB-AM

"John higginbotham veronica waters airlines with several international routes like atlanta based delta prepared a factor in a new expense a sudden crisis but is something that's going to impact them having to pay to offset carbon emissions most notably by carriers like delta flying long routes that due to the paris climate deal in the industry's own adopted plan a report by moody's details hits afford to fifteen percent to airlines operating income seth kaplan's editor of airline weekly airline like delta potentially it's going to have to spend some money to offset its carbon emission edgar treiguts wsb a fourteen year old georgia boy drowns and little river canyon national preserve in alabama ho sway lopez of rome was pronounced dead on the scene witnesses say lopez disappeared under the water saturday near martha's falls his body was discovered downstream about two hours later search continues for man wanted for violent home invasion and clarkston fiftysevenyearold amos green is considered armed and dangerous after the attack on market street the left to women was significant injuries last known address was indicator police have not give it a possible motive for friday's attack the latest avengers movie remains king of the box office injures infinity war brought in nearly sixty two million dollars from north american theaters this weekend raising the superhero battle epochs global growth to more than one point six billion reporter ben thomas says it now ranks as the fifth highest grossing film of all time melissa mccarthy's life of the party finishes a very distant second for the weekend wsb time five fifty five black panther video tomorrow let's bring up to state on weather and traffic now today's forecast wsb meteorologist kirk mellish mostly sunny to partly sunny today high around ninety one currently sixty eight on peachtree street and what's happening in.

reporter kirk mellish melissa mccarthy ben thomas alabama little river canyon georgia paris John higginbotham atlanta martha lopez rome editor seth kaplan moody delta sixty two million dollars
Supreme Court Justice Sotomayor to undergo shoulder surgery

Morning Edition

02:14 min | 3 years ago

Supreme Court Justice Sotomayor to undergo shoulder surgery

"From npr news in washington i'm dave mattingly secretary of state jim mattis says us troops in syria will remain there until diplomats can successfully negotiate an end to the country's ongoing civil war we do not want to simply pull out before the diplomat of one piece so you win the fight and you win the peace mattis was speaking to reporters at the pentagon yesterday last week president trump said he wanted to remove american troops from syria relatively soon with the pentagon assessing isis has nearly been defeated in syria the country's civil wars seven years old us supreme court justice sonia sotomayor is undergoing surgery this morning npr's nina totenberg says sotomayor is having shoulder replacement surgery two weeks after she fell on her washington apartment seven meyer has been playing hurt for the last two weeks she's appeared on the bench in court wearing a sling on her shoulder to hold it in place i'm told that she is unable to type and that she's inconsiderable pain but it was important to finish the term at least the oral arguments in the term and as luck would have it the court will be out for a couple of weeks now so to my is sixty three years old justice steven brier had shoulder replacement surgery and twenty thirteen after a bicycle accident i'm dave mattingly in washington and i'm richard hake on wnyc in new york the port authority is updating its storm procedures at kennedy airport this after a nor'easter in january messed with flight schedules around the world wnyc stephen nessin has that during bad weather like a snowstorm all inbound flights will have to get permission from jfk before they even take off from their point of origin that's to prevent backups in the air and at the gates seth kaplans and editor at airline weekly trade publication he says the rule is unusual but so is jeff k because the airport is run by the port authority but the terminals are run by private companies these look like good measures that that should prevent at least the extreme circumstances that we saw in january the.

New York Jeff K Seth Kaplans Wnyc Steven Brier President Trump United States Dave Mattingly NPR Editor JFK Stephen Nessin Kennedy Airport Washington Richard Hake Meyer Nina Totenberg
"seth kaplan" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:39 min | 4 years ago

"seth kaplan" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Cutter airwaves and two other carriers in the gulf over alleged unfair competition they charge those governmentsubsidized ticket prices undercutting u s carriers on routes to the middle east africa and the far east seth kaplan at airline weekly says the gulf airlines have a push back they say the us airlines are hypocritical because there are other allies around the world that our state owns that the us airlines don't criticize but gary hufbauer at the peterson institute says the evidence in the skies over the middle east is pretty clear anybody's ponies airline those fears are quite reasonable comfort is great and they have to come at commended amount of market share from us and european carrier hufbauer says investing in american is a way for cutter to say we support you financially let's not fight but work together instead american airlines is having none of it ceo doug parker said in a letter today the company is excited about cutters investment and we'll keep fighting companies that are quote illegally subsidized by their governments there's another level of geo political play here says steven cook it the council on foreign relations cutters in a fierce fight with saudi arabia and its gulf neighbours this is something of the arteries have done in the past they have made big investments in the united states as a way to employ themselves from who but cook says american policy makers pay more attention to what cutters doing in the middle east then in the us stock market i'm metro hartmann for marketplace mud as well taken the day off on wall street today for all the difference the trading session made will i'll have the details when we do the numbers.

seth kaplan airline weekly us peterson institute hufbauer doug parker steven cook saudi arabia stock market east africa gary hufbauer ceo
"seth kaplan" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:56 min | 4 years ago

"seth kaplan" Discussed on KCRW

"Unsolicited investment they're going to buy shares on the open market like the rest of its it's move in fairly not entirely welcomed by americans management and as marketplace mitchell hartmann explains its possibly not entirely about the money either us airlines including american has bitterly criticised qatar airways and other carriers in the gulf over alleged unfair competition they charge those governmentsubsidized ticket prices undercutting u carriers on routes to the middle east africa and the far east seth kaplan at airline weekly says the gulf airlines have a push back they say the us airlines or hypocritical because there are other allies around the world that our state owns that the us airlines don't criticize but gary hufbauer at the peterson institute says the evidence in the skies over the middle east is pretty clear anybody's cloned meat airline does appear is required reasonable comfort is great had many have come across amount of market share from us and european carrier hufbauer says investing in american is a for cutter to say we support you financially let's not fight but work together instead american airlines is having none of it ceo doug park her said in a letter today the company isn't excited about cutters investment and we'll keep fighting companies that are quote illegally subsidized by their governments there's another level of geopolitical play here says steven cook it the council on foreign relations cutters in a fierce fight with saudi arabia and its gulf neighbours something of arteries have done in the past they have made big investments in the united states as a way to employ themselves from criticism but cook says american policymakers pay more attention to what cutters doing in the middle east then in the us stock market on mitchell hartmann for marketplace baht as well of taken the day off on wall street today for all the the difference the trading session made will have the details when we do the numbers.

seth kaplan airline weekly peterson institute hufbauer doug park steven cook saudi arabia united states stock market mitchell hartmann mitchell hartmann qatar east africa gary hufbauer ceo