6 Burst results for "Seth Bodeen"

"seth bodeen" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

01:59 min | 5 months ago

"seth bodeen" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

Serena Liao Oklahoma Seth Bodeen Dallas Texas United States Earth Noble Research Center Austin NPR San Francisco Bird Observatory next month Oklahoma State University O s U 16 buildings one Scott Houston one hand Cornell Lab of Ornithology
"seth bodeen" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

03:19 min | 5 months ago

"seth bodeen" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"O s U reports the hope is to predict and prevent collisions. Birds chirp as Scott loss walks around buildings at Oklahoma State University. Here's a note pad in one hand and a bird identification book in the other. This is one of the 16 buildings that we monitored losses on a team of researchers setting bird collisions and the buildings like this one at the Noble Research Center. He points out features of the building that make it one of the biggest bird killers that they've studied. Looking up here. You can obviously see it's really extensive large panes of glass, entire facade of the building covered with class. Law says birds don't seek last very well and buildings like this are problematic. Yes, mates upto one billion birds die every year in the United States after building collisions. That has researchers worried. Lost, says bird populations have declined in the past 30 years, and that's not good for the environment. Birds have tremendous value ecosystems and their functions, their pollinators. See this purser's they control certain undesirable insects and other pests. Researchers think using radar technology attract birds flying at night could be part of the solution. Help save them. When large flocks they're seen migrating across the country. Cities can be given a heads up to dim lights. As lost looks at the computer screen, he explains how the colors on the map are similar to a weather forecast. Just like with precipitation. The color scale represents intensity. Of the radar return with heavy precipitation. You get the darker greens, the yellows, the reds with heavy bird migration, you get the same conservation efforts are already playing out in Texas, with the pilot project called Lights Out Texas. The Cornell Lab of Ornithology is partnering with politicians and local conservation groups to encourage residents and businesses to dim non essential lights and major cities. Like Dallas, Houston in Austin. Millions of birds travel every night in the spring, the fall using stars in the Earth's magnetic field to guide them from place to place. Serena Liao works at the San Francisco Bird Observatory. She says. Light pollution throws those guiding senses off. Birds are kind of driven off course by light pollution. They're often attracted to bright city lights, so birds will Kind of veer off course and fly towards the cities, which you know, leads them to even more hazard. Researchers think dimming lights might make a difference. Cured. Elmore is a lead author of a study that found the number of collisions could be predicted by how many birds migrate at night. We saw a lot of birds coming through their space and they were migrating at lower heights. We would expect, you know higher number of collisions to occur, but experts hope the radar technology could be used to help inform public policy. In Texas. The conservation project wraps up next month, Researchers will analyze the collision data collected by volunteers to see how effective the lights out program was in reducing bird deaths. For now, Scientists hope turning down the lights will make a difference for NPR news. I'm Seth Bodeen in Oklahoma.

Serena Liao Oklahoma Seth Bodeen Dallas Texas United States Earth Noble Research Center Austin NPR San Francisco Bird Observatory next month Oklahoma State University O s U 16 buildings one Scott Houston one hand Cornell Lab of Ornithology
"seth bodeen" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:12 min | 11 months ago

"seth bodeen" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Dot org's slash Broadway on PBS and the PBS video APP. Look at a herd of cows and their faces might all seem the same even if they are your own cows, so technologies being developed to identify cattle through facial recognition. Seth Bodine of member Station K. O S U reports that the goal is to track cattle in the event of disease. Partick Calvert. The only way to tell his cows apart is with colorful ear tags. Take those off and it gets a little tricky It be time for me to say, Oh, well, That's 24 match. Obviously the only Red County heard 48 I'd be able to tell her, but cows have unique faces. Just like humans. Facial recognition technology can pick up on about 200 key measurement points to identify a human face What's known as biometrics. It Turns out that concept works for cows to an artificial intelligence is really good at it. The artificial intelligence looked at the pictures for millions of generations. Effectively taught it so which features of the boat buying head were most characteristic of the species. That's Casey Olson, He teaches range livestock nutrition at Kansas State University. He and his team showed the AI a lot of cow pictures. Then they played a game. We'll call it. Have you seen this cow 94% of the time artificial intelligence got the right answer. The ultimate goal is to develop an APP called cattle tracks. Ranchers would snap a picture of the cow than sent it to a database that show Hoagland's company is developing. He says it could lead to a speedier way to track a sick cow. We could trace it and quarantine it and Manager, much like we're dealing today with the coronavirus. You know, if you can get on top of it early, you can control it. Highly infectious illness, like hoof and mouth disease could all but shut down the cattle industry. Disrupting that supply of meat. Right now, Cows have to be tracked painstakingly through paper documents and sales records to figure out how far disease has potentially spread. Rustling. Biggs is a beef extension specialist at Oklahoma State University. We need to be able to limit it because undoubtedly, we will have significant interruptions in our supply chain here in the United States. Our export markets will undoubtedly cut us off. The U. S Department of Agriculture has been eyeing radio Elektronik ear tags to replace metal tags as official ideas now used widely for cows that travel between states. But these tags air met with resistance from ranchers because of cost. That's why, though Calver isn't yet sold on the technology, once facial recognition for cows becomes available, he expects ranchers to embrace It is a $9 even a $20 a year subscription to a phone app is gonna be Far cheaper than tagging 500 calves with R F i D tags. The USDA says it's aware of research in the cattle facial recognition and will continue to evaluate it as a possible way too easily identify and trace millions of cows. For NPR news. I'm Seth Bodeen in Oklahoma City. This is all things considered on W. N Y. C. I'm Shawn Carlson. This week. We're focusing on musical journeys to the Sahara and to the deserts of the American Southwest, but also on a song that focuses on the here and now. With us, as usual is John Schaefer, host of W and my sees new sounds to talk about this week in music. Hey, John. Hi, Sean. So let's start with that song We mentioned Tori Amos has just put out a new single called Better Angels, and it'll be on her next EP called Christmas Tide. S So Is this a holiday? Some? Not not really. Although, if we consider Auld Lang Zain Holiday song. I guess this would have to qualify to the song is called Better Angels, and it starts with the line. What a year to be here, So it's really about the hope that we can overcome obstacles and that Challenges will bring out our better nature on Tori Amos is music here seems to reflect the turbulence of this year because it has these tricky shifting rhythms and lots of distortion effects on the guitars. Please. Opening him See? See that's better. Angels By Tori Amos. Her new EP Christmas Tide comes.

Cows Tori Amos John Schaefer Seth Bodine Partick Calvert Casey Olson Hoagland Shawn Carlson NPR Red County Seth Bodeen United States Kansas State University AI Oklahoma City Oklahoma State University USDA Sahara
"seth bodeen" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:19 min | 11 months ago

"seth bodeen" Discussed on KQED Radio

"You're listening to all things considered from NPR news. Look at a herd of cows and their faces might all seem the same even if they are your own cows, so technologies being developed to identify cattle through facial recognition. Seth Bodine of member Station K. O S U reports that the goal is to track cattle in the event of disease. Fergie cover. The only way to tell his cows apart is with colorful ear tags. Take those off and it gets a little tricky It be tough for me to say. Oh, well. That's 24 minutes. Obviously the only Red County heard 48. I'd be able to tell her but council's unique faces just like humans. Facial recognition technology can pick up on about 200 key measurement points to identify a human face What's known as biometrics. It Turns out that concept works for cows to an artificial intelligence is really good at it. The artificial intelligence looked at the pictures for millions of generations. And effectively target so which features of the bovine head were most characteristic of the species. That's Casey Olson, He teaches range livestock nutrition at Kansas State University. He and his team showed the AI a lot of cow pictures. Then they played a game will call it Have you seen this cow 94% of the time Artificial intelligence got the right answer. The ultimate goal is to develop an APP called cattle tracks. Ranchers would snap a picture the cow than send it to a database that show Hoagland's company is developing. He says it could lead to a speedier way to track a sick cow. We could trace it on quarantine it and manage it much like we're dealing today with the coronavirus. You know, if you can get on top of it early, you can control it. Highly infectious illness like hoof and mouth disease could all but shut down the cattle industry. Disrupting that supply of meat. Right now, Cows have to be attract painstakingly through paper documents and sales records to figure out how far a disease has potentially spread. Rustling. Biggs is a beef extension specialist at Oklahoma State University. We need to be able to limit it because undoubtedly, we will have significant interruptions in our supply chain here in the United States. Our export markets will undoubtedly cut us off. The U. S Department of Agriculture has been eyeing radio electronic ear tags to replace metal tags as official ideas now used widely for cows that travel between states. But these tags air met with resistance from ranchers because of cost. That's why, though Calvert isn't yet sold on the technology once facial recognition for cows becomes available. He expects ranchers to embrace It is a $9. Even a $20 a year subscription to a phone APP is gonna be far cheaper than tagging 500 calves with or if I d tags, the USDA says it's aware of research in the cattle facial recognition and will continue to evaluate it as a possible way too easily identify and trace millions of cows. For NPR news. I'm Seth Bodeen.

Cows Casey Olson Seth Bodine NPR Seth Bodeen Hoagland Calvert USDA Red County Kansas State University United States AI Biggs Oklahoma State University U. S Department of Agriculture official
"seth bodeen" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:29 min | 11 months ago

"seth bodeen" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"ST Francis Heart Center ranked as one of the top 25 heart hospitals in the nation, according to the 2020, U. S News and World Report. More at CHS. Cardiology daughter Warg Netflix presenting Ma Rainey's black bottom. Directed by George C. Wolfe and starring Chadwick Boseman and Viola Davis as the legendary Ma Rainey now playing in select theaters and on Netflix, December 18th rated R. Look at a herd of cows and their faces might all seem the same even if they are your own cows, so technologies being developed to identify cattle through facial recognition. Seth Bodine of member Station K. O S U reports that the goal is to track cattle in the event of disease. Partick Calvert. The only way to tell his cows apart is with colorful ear tags. Take those off and it gets a little tricky. It be tough for me to say, Oh, well, that's 24 Nets. Obviously the only Red County heard 48 I'd be able to tell her, but cows have unique faces. Just like humans. Facial recognition technology can pick up on about 200 key measurement points to identify a human face What's known as biometrics. It Turns out that concept works for cows to an artificial intelligence is really good at it. The artificial intelligence looked at the pictures for millions of generations. Effectively taught it so which features of the bovine head were most characteristic of the species. That's Casey Olson, he teaches, ranged livestock nutrition at Kansas State University. He and his team showed the AI a lot of cow pictures. Then they played a game. We'll call it. Have you seen this cow 94% of the time artificial intelligence got the right answer. The ultimate goal is to develop an APP called cattle tracks. Ranchers would snap a picture of the cow than sent it to a database that show Hoagland's company is developing. He says it could lead to a speedier way to track a sick cow. We could trace it and quarantine it and Manager, much like we're dealing today with the coronavirus. You know, if you can get on top of it early, you can control it. Highly infectious illness, like hoof and mouth disease could all but shut down the cattle industry. Disrupting that supply of meat. Right now, Cows have to be tracked painstakingly through paper documents and sales records to figure out how far a disease has potentially spread. Rustling. Biggs is a beef extension specialist at Oklahoma State University. We need to be able to limit it because undoubtedly, we will have significant interruptions in our supply chain here in the United States. Our export markets will undoubtedly cut us off. The U. S Department of Agriculture has been eyeing radio Elektronik ear tags to replace metal tags as official ideas now used widely for cows that travel between states. But these tags air met with resistance from ranchers because of cost. That's why, though Calver isn't yet sold on the technology once facial recognition for cows becomes available. He expects ranchers to embrace It is a $9. Even a $20 a year subscription to a phone APP is gonna be far cheaper than tagging 500 calves with or if I d tags, the USDA says it's aware of research in the cattle facial recognition and will continue to evaluate it as a possible way too easily identify and trace millions of cows. For NPR news. I'm Seth Bodeen in Oklahoma City. This is all things considered on W. N Y. C. I'm Shawn Carlson. This week. We're focusing on musical journeys to the Sahara and to the deserts of the American Southwest, but also on a song that focuses on the here and now. With us, as usual is John Schaefer, host of W and my sees new sounds to talk about this week in music. Hey, John. Hi, Sean. So let's start with that song We mentioned Tori Amos has just put out a new single called Better Angels, and it'll be on her next EP called Christmas Tide. S So Is this a holiday? Some? Not not really. Although, if we consider Auld Lang Zain Holiday song. I guess this would have to qualify to the song is called Better Angels, and it starts with line. Oh, what a year to be here. So you know, it's really about the hope that we can overcome obstacles and that Challenges will bring out our better nature on Tori Amos is music here seems to reflect the turbulence of this year because it has these tricky shifting rhythms and lots of distortion effects on the guitars. Please. Him booze. See That's better Angels By Tori Amos. Her new EP Christmas Tide.

Cows Tori Amos Ma Rainey Netflix John Schaefer Seth Bodine ST Francis Heart Center Calver Partick Calvert Casey Olson George C. Wolfe U. S News Hoagland NPR Shawn Carlson Red County United States Chadwick Boseman
"seth bodeen" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

01:32 min | 1 year ago

"seth bodeen" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"Some of the damage from the previous quarter with Corona virus lockdowns caused the economy to shrink by 9%. GDP is still about 3.5% smaller than it was before the pandemic struck. Forecasters expect slower economic growth in the last three months the year especially if we continue to see high levels of new Corona virus infections. Scott Horsley. NPR NEWS Washington Down was up 139 points. The NASDAQ was 180 points. This's NPR. About 280,000. People in Oklahoma are still without power following a powerful ice storm that hit large parts of the state. South Bodeen. Remember station K O s U has more With power lines across the state down by the ice. Many people have been living without lights or heat since Monday, some roads remained blocked by the power lines and broken tree limbs. Oklahoma Governor Kevin Stitt declared a state of emergency. In the American Red Cross has set up several warming stations for people to escape the cold On the first day of early voting in the states. Some election boards like Oklahoma County are operating on backup power generators. And using a paper voting system means there are no significant interruptions to the voting process for NPR news. I'm Seth Bodeen in Oklahoma City. Iran's foreign minister is strongly condemning a knife attack that killed three people in southern France, calling it a terrorist attack. David's Arif and a statement on Twitter today, saying, We strongly condemned today's terror attack in nice going on to say such actions must be replaced by reason. Insanity.

NPR Oklahoma South Bodeen Seth Bodeen Oklahoma County Oklahoma City Governor Kevin Stitt Scott Horsley American Red Cross Twitter Washington Iran Arif France David