4 Burst results for "Seth Barrett"

"seth barrett" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

07:27 min | Last month

"seth barrett" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"First, it was John Cougar. Then it was John Cougar Melon camp. And then it was, uh, John Melon Camp. Howard Stern used to call him John Cougar Melon head. I thought that was very funny. Um, anyway, that song is not us. This is a big town, New York City, and it is spiraling out of control. Of course, folks to make heads or tails of it. How he got here. There is a fantastic book that I highly encourage all of you to get If you really want to understand where we are, how we got here. What's going on? The proverbial story behind the story. The book is called the Last Days of New York Reporters. True Tale By Seth Barrett. Seth is a brilliant writer. You see his work all the time at the Manhattan Institute, New York Post. But this book he has really outdone himself. And Seth Baron dropped by right now, actually, two minutes ago, Seth, Welcome to the show. How are you? I'm great, Greg, How are you? Terrific. And although Let's face it well, You just walked in from outside. How was it out there? It was fine. I mean, it's a little empty because it's labor Day. But nothing. Nothing too dangerous. Nothing too strange. Well, I mean, Maybe right now, uh, this afternoon, But you You're a New Yorker. You have felt the shift. This is a different city than it was two years ago three years ago. I would. I would concur with that things have taken a bad turn. We read every day in the paper about Chicago style shootings. And just a general level of Disorder on the streets that has unsettled people. Homelessness has you know street homelessness has has risen starkly. It appears the The city, you know, pretends that things are normal. Like I live by Washington Square Park. Which has just become I mean, people are now you know, I mean, people always sold drugs there, but now they have tables with, you know their wares on them. Uh, there's just a general sense of, uh, Decline, decay and disorder. I would say so. How did we get here in your book? Uh, brilliantly tells the story. It's so good. It's like it's hard for me to get my hands around. I mean, you're a great writer. I mean, by the way, Where'd you learn how to write so well? Well, I just, You know, practice practice practice. I mean, what in school where you go to school? I went to school in Texas. I went to a school called Trinity University. And then I did do a graduate degree at Yale. Uh huh. But I would say that, uh, you know, just Writing constantly for a popular audience is the way to do it. So I'm actually I got the book right here. And if you don't mind, does it annoy you? When people read your words? You do Sure, sure, it may sometimes feel that cities like civilizations are always on the brink of collapse, threatened by unmanageable complexity, Internal strife. And serial misgovernance Lewis Mumford in the culture of cities foresaw imminent urban disintegration and chaos and outlook best captured by one of his chapters titled Brief outline of hell. You see, I could never do this. This is just this is this is very advanced stuff. This is very, very only four years ago. Richard, Florida, normally a civic booster of Babbitt, like enthusiasm. Prophecy doom in the new urban crisis. Little wonder, then that episodes of civic Renaissance and vitality are so striking those fortunate times when things go right. Um So, Seth. How did this happen? How did we get to this point? Well, you know, as everyone is familiar with, we had a 20 year renaissance in New York City. Led by Rudy Giuliani, and continued by, uh, Michael Bloomberg. Where attention was drawn to the little things this is. This is the essence of what's called broken Windows, Police and The idea that You know, look most a safe, functional neighborhood community polices itself and doesn't allow people to defecate on the corner. Scream in the middle of the street throw garbage cans that sort of thing. Uh, commit, you know my minor vandalism. Uh, but when society starts to break down, and neighborhoods are no longer functional, that kind of thing is permitted to To spread. So the idea was well, let's crack down on the little things and, you know, not not insanely. I mean, it wasn't like, you know, North Korea or Singapore. But just to to establish a kind of regularity and teach communities to regulate themselves. Uh, that's you know, things things worked out and the crime rate went down. Stunningly. Um, you know, murders dropped by 90% by the time. Uh, 2000 and nine when the progressives came to power in the City Council and At citywide positions. There was a new tendency floating around, uh, the circles in New York that we had gone too far that we were Maybe instilling order and safety and prosperity but at the expense of civil rights, Perhaps So you know a new? Yeah. So Covid, obviously is a factor here recently may have hastened something's gonna go back to your book now Bill de Blasio as failure to manage the outbreak of Covid 19 as well established But what is less well understood is how poorly he managed the city up to the point of the pandemic and how his mismanagement left New York City vulnerable to the social, economic and cultural shocks. Have leveled its confidence and brought into question is capacity to absorb the creative energies of the world and reflect them back in the form of opportunity and wealth, as it has done for hundreds of years. At a moment when socialist currents are stirring throughout America, Bill de Blasio is term in office in New York. Is a demonstration of what those impulses actually produce debt DK and bloke. And the next chapter is called the worst mayor ever. I mean, so, what was give us an idea? We all kind of know in our gut. But what was DiBlasio doing before the pandemic? Well, um Here's the thing. DiBlasio took this approach that the main problem in the city is inequality. This is how he he ran for office. This idea of the tale of two cities. Uh and look, New York City does have a fair amount of inequality. But that's kind of a good thing, because it means that there's a lot of very rich people here. Rich people are the ones who pay for All of the social services all of the amenities that people like, enjoy and that help, really poor people get a leg up. His war on inequality has stifled. You know, he's given, um he's basically empowered government to quash small businesses. Uh, you know, and.

Seth Barrett Michael Bloomberg Rudy Giuliani Bill de Blasio Lewis Mumford Greg New York Seth Baron Howard Stern Texas John Cougar 90% Trinity University Seth 20 year Richard Washington Square Park New York City Manhattan Institute two years ago
"seth barrett" Discussed on Opening Arguments

Opening Arguments

09:10 min | 2 months ago

"seth barrett" Discussed on Opening Arguments

"Hold and enjoy any public office of honor trust or profit under the state but the party impeach shelby liable to indictment and punishment according to law noticed by the way that is the exact same language that is in the federal constitution. Ten years later rate so might Have an interesting discussion back and forth with our good friend. Seth barrett tillman about the definition of public office of honor. Trust or profit under this state Because it clearly means governor in new york. I think that's another good piece of evidence that contemporaneous -ly it would have meant president applied in the us constitution. But that's a topic for another day. So do you notice what was missing in section twenty four probably not. What was missing was any standard. Like high-crime right. Right right so which i it seems like they cut to the chase of like. Yeah that is whatever they decided is already like i used to. You know i was gonna mention it a minute ago when you said they don't have to have cause or whatever the cause can just be and my first thought was what does it matter if it says you have to have caused like in the end. What seems to decide these things. Is the people deciding it. So does it add even anything to a law to to constitution to whatever to say four high crimes and misdemeanors if the same people who are alleging them are also deciding if they are high crimes so look the answer to that is an asterisk. And here's why because you. Thomas have come at the law from a very very realist. Perspective right Nineteen thirties Approach to the law. That says you know what. Let's not pretend that these high minded theories carry the day the law is ultimately whatever the lawmakers and those who interpret that. Say that it is if you're asking does it. Provide additional substantive protections. I think the answer is no for the reason that you've does. does it. Change the technical procedures it certainly does right and could you argue then that that may have an effect in terms of the difference between Signing onto our their hypothetical. I suppose it also sets norm kind of like from the beginning. You know like okay. This is kind of what we intend by allowing this impeachment ability and that does while i guess once we hit twenty twenty or twenty two eventually might fall apart but like for the time being. This is the norm or setting. That's exactly right. So that's how you impeach indra cuomo in new york and let's talk about procedurally how that will take place. I told you it would be before the court for the trial of impeachment and the correction of errors that court for the correction of errors was abolished by the state constitution in eighteen. Forty six. And so that jurisdiction. I just think it's amazing that initially this impeachment court that consists of the senators plus. The supreme court initially did two things. They presided over impeachments and they served as the highest appellate court in which you could challenge various new york supreme court which would their state trout court opinions. That seems insane at eight. Hundred forty-six new yorkers got together amended their state constitution took out the correction of errors and created. The new york court of appeals but initially right the senators of the state of new york for seven years also were the state's highest judicial body. That seems bizarre to me. Anyway but now what you have is what you have left over. Is the court for the trial of impeachments and since eighteen. Forty seven That is the lieutenant governor although not in this case because the governor is a subject being beach the chief judge of the new york court of appeals the associate judges of that court and the members of the senate so procedurally. How does that work. I you get a resolution coming out of the assembly. The new york state assembly. That is one hundred fifty measures that only has to pass by one. Vote right so seventy six to seventy four or seventy five to seventy four. If somebody sits out right that is the equivalent of of the house of representative passing a resolution of impeachment. That would mean injure cuomo is impeached. And he would go to that high court of impeachment. I did the math and if everybody sits who is allowed to sit that would be sixty nine. People the senators and judges and of those sixty nine. You would need two thirds or forty money out dak to convict if convicted. Lieutenant governor kathy hotel. Who has run with cuomo twice. Not sexually harassing may i. She seems fine. So let's you know kathy hotel would would Succeed to the governorship and She would have the power to appoint a new lieutenant governor so you might recall that that happened when david patterson succeeded eliot spitzer in two thousand and eight eliot spitzer resigned. Resignation of course is also on the table for for cuomo but so far. He's ruled that out. As we read the punishment of impeachment would Bar cuomo from holding any office of profit or under the state of new york that is interpreted as a statewide political office But he could run for non statewide office again. We're Including running for the new york state assembly. That has happened The the last time in fact that a new york governor was impeached. He turned around and ran for the state assembly and won that seat so it would prohibit cuomo from ever serving statewide again would not prohibit from running for congress running for either the house or the senate or for the state legislature or for any local office. But he couldn't be attorney. General or lieutenant governor governor again. So that's what's index for andrew cuomo in new york couple of thoughts. Yeah yeah for. I you know. I hope he's in. He needs to be be short. I think maybe he would eventually resign. Possibly although he's certainly not showing any indication that he wants to. But what are you. Predicting is happening here. I share your predictions right. Like i think that there is right now. Considerable energy being devoted behind the scenes to tell governor. Cuomo look you. You've you've got to resign. Otherwise is we have the numbers to proceed to To each you. Okay final thoughts. This guy's a create any sucks and also. He harassed the victims into not coming forward. You know there's all there's a lot coming out we haven't gone into in-depth on it but he sucks. My vote is for impeachment. If i get a vote. I didn't hear if i did and the rules but i also didn't hear you tell me i don't get a vote in the promptly. I taught in seventeen forty. Okay well then. Let's move on to california. So i think this is a great kind of book ended precautionary tale because of you sitting here thinking like if the state legislature is bought and paid for by the cuomo machine in new york right. And that's and maybe. I should have taken that up as the. You know as a devil's advocate position. That says look you know. The cuomo family is Incredibly politically powerful in new york. Maybe they can intimidate the state legislature in silence. And maybe nothing happens. And if that's the case people will be very very mad and rightfully so you and i will be mad at that end. New york has on three separate occasions in a bipartisan. Way moved to add a recall. Measure to its state constitution and since new york. I think demographically In terms of being a deep blue large state can draw some lessons from california. Maybe we should look to see what recall has done in california as kind of a blueprint for would this be a good idea. In new york in nineteen eleven voters approved the california constitution and section two Which has a seven subsections that are devoted to recall elections since one thousand nine hundred thirteen. The i recall attempt was in nineteen thirteen. It was successful Since then there have been one hundred and seventy nine recall. Attempts fifty five governor fifty at the state senate fifty in the state assembly And then a smattering of others..

new york Seth barrett tillman cuomo kathy hotel new york court of appeals indra cuomo new york state assembly house of representative supreme court eliot spitzer shelby Bar cuomo senate assembly david patterson Thomas legislature andrew cuomo us Cuomo
"seth barrett" Discussed on First Encounter

First Encounter

05:50 min | 3 months ago

"seth barrett" Discussed on First Encounter

"Really special. How do i get over there not like this. What's his what's his deal. Master don berry. He's gonna stab at some point. Oh right you have to figure out how to run. I think does like all the damage right. Yeah it's not good enough. Maybe he'll just leave. Where's he going. Oh he just ran up there. Knife me Gotcha so you're what a run is. Yeah run run. Run would be fun. Is that flow tattoo of that way. I think it's called like evil eye or something. It looks like Like mike was asking with right. We make our way through just some material items. Think the materials that were the big ones where magic counter and mega all pretty cool. Meet up back with everyone after splitting away as last time and everyone has a little bit of an item to give you which was pretty cool except uv tries to hold onto. Here's which i thought it was just a nice cute. Little like throwback to like her stealing your material and all that stuff is just very very fun little side versus like you know what i found it so give that back to me. After you're done with it this is the center of the planet bucking called it. I said it was hollow cloud luck. so yes. that's the different paths down. When you come up that affects items. They quebec with sick. A cloud found this on the way sick cloud. I'm down this hold onto this. Why by the way you didn't you find something now. All right here cloud socks. But i'm the one who found it so you better give it back to me when you're done with it like if not a one time use so after we get our items from everyone. You're allowed to build a party. I went with dream team. V one cloud. Kate seth barrett because vcu is unavailable after we choose our party. Cloud says something very fun. Which i think is probably a more conic line from the game. Because i've definitely heard it before. Let's get going now not yet. Let's get going right everyone. Let's mosey there's actually a really interesting translation explanation for this for let's mosey. Yeah why i'll just have you read the article but basically that's the thing we can do now. You can send me article at least but to summarize really quickly in the japanese version. One of the things. That doesn't come through very well with the translation is after cloud like finds himself in the livestream in realizes like kind of who he is and all that stuff the way he speaks changes himself enough. Zak yeah exactly. Yeah.

don berry Kate seth barrett mike quebec vcu Zak
"seth barrett" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

09:49 min | 8 months ago

"seth barrett" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"Thank you for inviting me to testify. My name is Josh Blackman. And I'm a constitutional law professor at the South Texas College. A lot of Houston. People often think that the courts have a monopoly on interpreting the Constitution. They don't as we speak. The house managers are trying President come for violating the Constitution and here we will discuss the constitutional means prevent abuse of the clemency power. In my brief opening remarks. I like the three primary points First, I'll discuss important purpose of the pardon power. Second, I'll consider propose stashed for regulations. The pardon power and third, I will talk about HR four a proposed constitutional amendment that would limit presidential clemency Today. People open view apartment powers, a form of error correction. For example, the courts made an error by imposing unjust sentence for prosecutors pursued an unjust charge but as originally understood clemency, clemency, conservative greater purpose in Carol's number 74,000 R. Hamilton identified the quote principal argument. The pardon power, quote, restoring the tranquility. The Commonwealth pardons or not merely help individuals president's kinship pardons to advance broader public policies. Some of the most famous pardons in American history served his purpose. President Washington part of participants, the whiskey rebellion. President Jefferson Pardon those convicted on this edition act. After civil war, President Johnson pardoned former Confederates. Each of these decisions was unpopular in some quarters. But in each case the president used his pardon power to pursue the common good as he saw it. This history brings me to my second point last summer, this committee marked up the abuse of Pardon. Internet I criticizes, Build a post like authored from Law Fair with my colleague, Seth Barrett Tillman was a lecturer at the men of the University Department. Long Ireland now submit that post for the record. In short, this proposed bill would alter the presidency such that he would now second guess his official action for fear of prosecution. Congress, not in power for the prosecutors to the power of the criminal process to dictate what the public interest is. Third. This committee is considering HR four, a proposed constitutional amendment that would limit whom the president compartment I opposed this amendment. Attempts to constitutional eyes a single conception of the public interest what is and is not a proper pardon. The public interest is always contestable because no one has institutional knowledge to declare a monopoly on what is in the common good. The president should be able to make important decisions with a bigger independence and dispatch. The president of the Great Latitude issue pardons precise because the president should have a great latitude to pursue what he sees as the common good living the presence power too. Few parties will limit the product is out, promoting Hamilton refer to as the tranquility of the Commonwealth this minute snappy adopted. Thank you for your time. And I'll be happy to answer any of your questions. Thank you, Professor. Appreciate your testimony. We now would like to recognize our next witness. And I'm gonna have to ask you to help me with the pronunciation of your name. Is it? Not that volley? Uh, Professor Doctor Holly. Is that correct? I'm gonna presume is correct. So our next witness is Timothy not folly. And I've seen on television 1000 times, well, dozens of times, and I never get his name quite right. He's a clinical associate professor of Public Service clinical associate professor of history and director of the undergraduate public policy. Major. At New York University. He focuses on national security and intelligence policy, International history and presidential history. He served as a consultant to the 9 11 Commission and recently co authored a book called Impeachment in American History. He's also the author of a December 2020 article. The Atlantic magazine titled Trump's Pardons made the vegetable Real. Party and why you? He served us the founding director of Richard Nixon Presidential Library Museum and your Belinda, California and I kind of guessed that he is considered the top expert on the President Nixon professor enough. Kali received his PhD and Emma history from Harvard and M. A, with distinction from Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies and a B a magna cum laude with a distinct History from Yale University professor, not Holly. You are recognized for five minutes. How I wish to thank the chairman to Cohen, ranking member, Mr Johnson, members of the House Judiciary Committee subcommittee on the Constitution, civil rights and civil liberties for the privilege of testifying to you today concerns about the breath of the president's clemency power. And the desire to in some way reform. It are not new to this moment in our history. It is not solely a product of these deeply partisan times. It is not an unprecedented knee jerk reaction to the conduct of our 45th president, according to Fordham University law, schools, Democracy and the Constitution Clinic. 41 separate occasions since 1974 members of Congress from both parties have introduced legislative proposals designed in one way or the other to modify the president's youth of executive clemency. And over. Half of these initiatives were introduced before the year 2000 and one indeed, 20 years ago, almost to the day this subcommittee held a similar hearing on the presidential pardon. The catalyst then was concerned and disappointment on both sides of the aisle in how and to whom President Clinton had issued 140 pardons and 36 computations on his final day in the White House, most notoriously One to form to be not too Marc Rich, a fugitive facing criminal prosecution for tax evasion, whose former wife was a donor to the Clinton library. All of the Panelists two decades ago caution this subcommittee not to amend the Constitution, reflecting confidence that the Clinton pardons would be an aberration. Because of the criticism they had inspired quote. I very much doubt that future presidents will need to be restrained in their use of pardon power, One Panelist argued. Given the in terrarium example of the final Clinton grants, I quote our distinguished predecessors with humility. Who knows how well today's testimony will age in 20 years, let alone the rest of us, But I think I can say is an historian that history can on Lee Act as a deterrent to bad behavior if we all know it the last few months, let alone the last 20 years. Suggests at least two this scholar that we were far too optimistic about presidential pardon behavior 20 years ago, the Clinton pardons should have led to concrete federal corrective action. Today, I will leave most of the discussion of legal precedents to my fellow Panelists who are lawyers, perhaps my value to you. Is in using the statement to share some history indicating the perils of an UN reformed presidential Kaminsky power and how a few presidents, one of whom later became chief justice of the Supreme Court looked at the matter. The only president to have joined the Supreme Court after leaving office, of course, was William Howard Taft and therefore He is a unique witness. If you will, on looking at the pardon from both the perspective of 1600, Pennsylvania Avenue and that of the Supreme Court, Timothy Naftali, New York University professor and presidential historian. In the book that he wrote as a law professor before he came back to federal service when he was appointed to the court, he wrote the duty involved in the parting power is the most difficult one to perform because it is completely within the discretion of the executive and is lacking so in rules or limitations of its exercise. The on Lee rule he can follow is he shall not exercise it against the public interest. When he became chief justice, he had to look at a case that involved contempt of court. The question that was raised was Can the pardon be used in a in a way to protect those whose actions threatened our very system of justice? And he concluded, yes, The pardon power is unfettered. But, he added, there is always the possibility of impeachment. As a corrective action as a deterrent. My belief in the need for corrective action is founded on what I learned about our nation's 37th President Richard Nixon from publicly available materials at the Nixon Library..

Josh Blackman Seth Barrett Tillman Timothy Naftali Congress William Howard Taft December 2020 Johnson 1000 times Fordham University House Judiciary Committee Yale University Timothy 140 pardons 20 years Lee Act 1974 Houston Holly Johns Hopkins School of Advanc Impeachment in American Histor