11 Burst results for "Services Magazine"

"services magazine" Discussed on WCPT 820

WCPT 820

05:16 min | 9 months ago

"services magazine" Discussed on WCPT 820

"Former Chicago Tribune columnist Eric Zorn now has started his own newsletter, The Picky in Sentinel and carrying on in the tradition of the first Picky and Sentinel, which was started by his grandfather, Eric promises to explain on a regular basis. Mathematical set theory, which is what his grandfather specialized in right, Eric. Let's take news, Johnny the math team really just skipped me. My my father was that the tonic gives us and my son is a math PhD, but I never got past of calculus in high school sell. It's one of those things that skips a generation. I'm sorry to hear that. Yeah, Yeah, obviously disappointment. I ve 100 disappointment. Can we all not only when it doesn't have any advanced degree generations of north so But anyway, I'm I'm cutting my own path here and, uh and, uh, Trying to build a second life after after leaving the Tribune. You said you were thinking of reaching out to some other writers. Maybe your son could handle the, um they've you know, the physics, mathematics, the of the picking and Sentinel. I think he is. He is actually took his mask. HDD went to work on Wall Street, so probably prove it too big to be a little too small time for him at this point. Uh, no. I mean what I'm looking for what? I'm sort of thinking about doing who recruiting some other writers to join me in this and then putting it out more often, and having to be something that I could build on the fact that the other writers in town who have lost their Platforms of their pulpits who have followings the strong foul. Um uh and, uh, you know, Like I said, I'm going to be reaching out. Once I show that it can be done and the people are looking at it. I'm going to be reaching out to some other people to think they want to join me in this in this because I had a lot of people suggest that wonderful. You people who left The Tribune. Why don't you guys get together form year old newspaper from your own magazine, and that's a bit. It's a bit much down an actual full service magazine. But I think there are possibilities here for them to be a sort of a broader outreach. I've some of these people who have no you were tribute lost on a whole bunch of P r o once that they did. They did you were talking about the fact that you publish on Substack. I am a long time ago I started following a couple of writers on medium And I found that after I had hit a certain reading limit. I couldn't read anymore unless I subscribed and I'm not talking about subscribe to the individual people, but I had to have like a subscription with medium Is substack like that. No, it's not. And it's one of the reasons why I did not go with media and I looked at all the different platforms and sort of exploring what the various alternatives were. And what I like about about Substack is that the publishing interface is really easy to use. It couldn't be simpler and it allows you to import your mailing list and that allowed should have various levels of engagement You can have Like a free, uh, iteration of it, And you can also have, like other other elements of it that you might give to subscribe paid subscribers I don't have. I don't have a paid subscription model, but it's very, very flexible platform, and it's also the most established right now of these Obviously scrip shin platforms, the one that has the most big names on it. And who Sullivan and people like that, Uh, there's some stacks and I had a good long talk with John Alter from MSNBC and Newsweek, who has his own sub stack, and he gave me a lot of really useful advice about having to get this stuff going. He's got one So, so it's a good platform. That's solid platform. People know what it is, for the most part of a lot of people do. And, uh um so I'm I'm I was going to be fun. I've decided I don't want to try to put too much time into it, cause I want to make sure that I'm looking at other sorts of opportunities that might present myself. But right now it's been really fun like I just launched it last week in the next edition is coming out on Thursday. Anyone wants to subscribe, just email Me. I'm Eric's Orange Gmail. I'll put your name on the list and you don't like it. You can unsubscribe. It's really easy, so having a good time. Well, People are looking for their Eric Eric Zorn. Jones now know where to find it. Eric. Thank you so much for joining us today and thank you for all the fill in work that you do here. Hopefully, I can take a lot more time off and you can get a lot more radio time in the near future. Well, don't put it that way. But I really appreciate that You thought of me for filling in when you left and you've given me this time today to talk to you and your Muslims appreciated Johnson. We'll we'll be in touch one lie another Yes, definitely. Eric Zorn. Thank you for being here. We are going to take a break, and when we come back, we're.

Eric Zorn John Alter Eric Thursday Eric Eric Zorn Sullivan Johnson last week today The Picky in Sentinel Johnny first Wall Street MSNBC Newsweek Chicago Tribune 100 disappointment one Jones Muslims
"services magazine" Discussed on Fat Mascara

Fat Mascara

03:50 min | 9 months ago

"services magazine" Discussed on Fat Mascara

"Google power pose please. Google power posed by a mate cutty c. u. d. d. y. You don't know we're talking about yes but that's not the only way to do it. You can also do a self talk. Visualize yourself succeeding or reflect on past accomplishments. Do any of those things before you get into a social interaction with a coworker. Before an evaluation situation where you're gonna get hired where you're defending an idea you will portray more confidence than you realize. You would have otherwise which i think is really cool because i always need little tricks when you have like a big meeting or something like that Go in like acting like no. I belong here. Yeah it's got. It's such a mind mind. Tactics can help and they have. Obviously they did a whole study published in the white paper. I could get into all that but basically backing that up so little self talk little boosting yourself up before you have to talk to others really helpful. All linked to the study. So you can. Media is a bummer. But with a little bit of a tool at the end of a little bit of a service service with tips and really really could tell you. Work in women's service magazines like i literally. I like bills like something. I definitely wrote for women's health. Are you ugly. Here's something you can know. Mining scientific papers for useful advice. I got it. I got it. Glad you appreciate do appreciate it. I think i think power poses are the auto god helpful and i do think that but picturing yourself being successful and thinking about the good times sure you know what is also. I found helpful like thinking about somebody who you don't know if this is like a good thing or a bad things so like this rapid disclaimer on this like maybe this is not actually good advice but like acting like somebody who you admire in that situation. Just like pretend acting. I've done that on phone. Calls were like channel. So and so. What would they say. Yeah like just literally pretend like if you think that. I don't know making this up Lake who somebody who's somebody cool until like okay. Torino katie torino. What pretender katie's torino in that next interview like you know. Yeah you know. I'm here i liked it. I not only gave a tip then. It was like we did. Here's the example and you did the the played out the tip for everybody with with an example. Thank you the full service. Story all Poor katie serena has been like her name's embattled about like seventy times in this thing but like i just think just pretend just pretend you're for fifteen minutes and see how it goes. You might get that job or that promote today's podcast is brought to you by one of our sponsors neutral fall. Did you know. Thirty million women are impacted by weakened thinning hair. Make thirty million and one listen. It's been a rough year. You should see my bathroom floor. We've talked about this. no. I'm not laughing at that. I'm just laughing at that like it's a little cheeky that you have to join this club and that people don't talk about it but it's really a big deal in the last year. So many more people have experienced thinning hair but thousands of women had taken back control with neutral. How many times have we had experts on this show. Talk about this supplement..

Google katie torino katie serena katie
"services magazine" Discussed on Thought Row

Thought Row

07:49 min | 10 months ago

"services magazine" Discussed on Thought Row

"Focus on a couple of the, the really interesting questions and you can actually have a really great quote as well. So let's say we found out that people and, you know, the visual arts gifted what they're creating an or relying more on, let's say online prints rather than originals and you know, then you could have a quote saying you know what, I what I believe this wage. Means is that, you know, people are becoming more comfortable interacting with people virtually and also, you know, approaching art virtually as well. And and you can have a really nice quote and it would be you as a fellow artist in there. And again, you could focus on a couple of the really cool questions that are in there. I always say, throw a quirky question or two in there. The one I mentioned with the Auto industry was the strangest things people left in the cars. That was what were Byron almost 95% because we could see yes, so interesting topic. Yeah, 95% of the coverage was the stories because almost everything they got left was a story. A boa constrictor that I left. My grandma was left in an urn and they needed to retrieve it so that they could have a memorial service in the midst of a repair. So, there was this large, a little strange things that people have done over the years and that was what peacock. Resonated with and so always try to come up with some really solid questions and, you know, maybe even take the Pulse of others. And say what would you like to know what's going on right now with your struggles right now on the artist Community. Maybe we can get some opinions out there on it or some suggestions and things like that as well. So I think that's great. I I really like girls attitude to it's so funny to hear all the people who are raising things like that, you know, people people love stories. They love anything that sort of is entertaining and not if you understand that while you want to get media coverage for you. The journalist is actually a gatekeeper and deciding what content will be of interest to his audience. And so anything you can do to increase the likelihood that the audience would find. It engaging interesting titillating that's going to do really well. And you know, if you can approach it from birth, Standpoint, it can work really well for you. So many people are just like I just want to get, you know, sell product X. I just want to announce product X and there's really nothing that's interesting or compelling to share what readers, you know, it's almost like the the journalist sees those types of press. Releases says, just by an ad, you know, there's nothing here for me to create a to create an article. Exactly. Exactly. You're making them have to work pretty hard and they're not and they're getting tons of these things that are handed to them almost daily. Right? Right, right. Okay. So what is the biggest misconception about writing a press release? I think that some I think the biggest hang-up is so many people, just discount PR and just say I'm not wealthy enough. I'm not important enough to remove for to utilize PR. And the Really thing is that the people who often have the most success are the ones that are the small pack. They are completely authentic and upfront about who they are and where they are, and they're chapter of their business. We had a client that was looking to get their story out. And he told me that they had just spent their Thanksgiving instead of eating turkey and everything like normal with a few friends and their dining putting together packages and, you know, working out of their garage as well to try to get ready for all of the orders that they had had because a lot of their stuff was geared up to before Christmas holiday and that was six years. To them. And they, they were, you know, they mentioned it. Just and I said, I think that's the story we should run with and they were embarrassed like I wouldn't want other people to know that and I said, no, that's the toughest or out for a few people resonate with. They find it authentic. It's a struggle. It's an obstacle. Everybody has growing pains and they got picked up by Inked magazine that it resumes did so, well that they got several business newspapers and magazines picked them up. But ink was the big one. And, you know, you know, just because you're small just because you do all your important doesn't mean that you're not, you don't have something that's worthy of sharing with the world. Well, yeah, I'm sorry. That was just very entrepreneurial. I mean off your phone or in the world. They could remotes can relate to that. And they would find that I think that's why ink and people like that picked it up because they know that that's a more typical. That happens, more wage. Quickly than one would think? I mean, I know we've worked on holidays with family and everything else. I'm sure there's probably lots of people have done that. Also. I think that so many of these corporations started out kind of in that same boat in the garage and the garage or in the back room or you know doing it over dinner. There's just you know, you you as an entrepreneur you start somewhere. Yeah, Mickey Mouse is really good, really good thing. And another thing is journalists often like undiscovered Little Gems. They like to be seen as curators and you're generally not going to curate a giant multi-billion-dollar company is going to be a small undiscovered, you know, start up or Indiegogo or Kickstarter or something like that. And that's why a lot of those do really well with p r and it's been a journalist and say, hey, this is kind of interesting and I think my audience would find it engaging. So let me write an article about it. Oh, yeah, see I can see that. Yeah, I've noticed that your company crafts, press releases. In fact, you talk about that on your website, pretty extensively, and it was really informative page. Any experience in writing, press releases that are applicable to people that are in the art world. I know you do corporations and I know you first start ups, but what about people, specifically, artistic people, artistic people? Yeah, we had, we had an an artist who's in class artists. I think she was in the Washington DC area. And she did a few press releases with us. Were we wrote the press releases for her and we accompanied it with the photos of this amazing glass work. A lot of her stuff, gets sucked up for commercial use like a hotel or a signature piece, a corporate building, or something like that, and she did really with getting picked up in service. Magazines. And, you know, they did a really large spotlights of her and ask for many more pictures that they can include and, you know, that, that was one person did extremely well. I think that so many people forget, you know, multimedia is important. So if you have a video and you're an artist or you have really good pictures, they don't have to be like a professional pictures, but just really good pictures you want to include those when you send your release out because a lot of people will look at those and if it's something that's really, you know, interesting they'll definitely you know seek you out and want to know more about your story and it is about this story and especially our room cuz they're so visually absolutely loved it is, you.

Inked magazine Byron Mickey Mouse Washington DC
"services magazine" Discussed on Read Between the Lines

Read Between the Lines

07:10 min | 1 year ago

"services magazine" Discussed on Read Between the Lines

"Reprocess. Sure i've done that a lot. Do you have any specific examples. A well i. I'm afraid of i tell you some of these Let me think something that wouldn't be too incriminating here Okay there there's a. There's an assistant prosecutor. When this case goes to trial. I call him rooney blake and he is. He is based on physically. He is based on a character. A real person that. I knew back in high school teacher and a coach when i was at roseville. High school back in the early sixties. He was not a lawyer. He was a teacher in coaches. They say but he has characteristics that i consider Appropriate to to To the real rudy. Do the real blake is last night was blake in fact the ruling was not the first first name. And i think there'll be a handful of people read this book. I hope who who will say. Hey a who's talking about your or that. Sounds a lot like mr blade. That is so cool. So you said that. There's a lot of different character names in this book. How did you go about choosing them and like. How did they help you with defining the characters. Well that's that's a that's a that's a good question in one of magical things about writing and actually. I don't believe in magic and can of paranormal or anything like that. But i do feel that things come to you when you're writing. Especially when you're writing creatively writing fiction. You have no idea where it came from they are. They are found objects like gulf. Paul the grass that you come across the isn't yours but you will take it's It's a wonderful thing and some of these names. Just they may not be anything to the reader but to me is the writer once. I say them in my head in. I have no idea where they came from. They will really help. I can see the character. I can see nearly character By virtue of the name. There's a there's a minor character in this book. She's a she's a stenographer takes notes for the for the detectives during their interrogation or interrogation of dr roads. Her name is may great. Ray gre y. I don't know where that came from. But i saw her with that name. She is a middle-aged spinster type. and stadia says staffers candidate back in the day in may grey just fit perfectly and i could not imagine another name for her expensive many examples. Do you have that thing when you're writing in like you couldn't have trouble trying to come up with a certain name or a certain phrase to use in the certain scenario and all of a sudden it hits you like the perfect thing and you are not sure where it comes from will. I don't know if it's perfect. I have trouble dealing with perfection and i certainly buying much in my own writing but yes there are there are names in. There are races the gist work. You just there could be a better one. Maybe if i work at it long enough i'd be able to find it but for now it's just it's just it's a gift is our religious man. Might say it's it's a gift from god. It's his grace point. When you're writing do feel like sometimes. The the specific character can inform the story and go in ways that you weren't intending to some degree. I never bought the idea of the characters takeover book your some writers say that they certainly have taken over my books but at some point if they're good characters i mean if they're they're good narrative sense in a dramatic sense They will seem to have a mind of their own. They will seem they will say things. That just seem to come out of a conversation that you haven't plant and i don't know what that is either but it certainly does happen. I'm sure it's happened for you to where you're going. wow. I didn't think she'd ever seen that something i wasn't expected. Sure that apple's yeah. I in fact a lot of authors on here and i tend to ask them that question and i always get so many interesting answers to like and that when is totally different than i think any that i've ever gotten before and it's interesting to see how people reply to so you mentioned earlier that you're a journalist. How has that career impacted your fiction right. Well as that is my career. As how i made my living for raw fifty plus years You know it is it is. I wasn't gonna make much money writing section. I could figure that out early on So journalism was was my trade is my trade. I still have a freelance journalism journalists but beyond that it is it is is it is the means by which i i learned how to deal with narrative to create there. I was drawn early on in my journalism career. And i worked for newspapers and wire services magazines and so forth but i was drawn early on the long form. Journalism and as i was an undergraduate at the university of minnesota now. This was just the beginning of the heyday of the so called new journalism. Where tom walls calls new journalism long deeply researched her works journalism. That used.

tom walls stadia rooney blake first Ray gre y. apple fifty plus years last night university of minnesota Paul the one roseville blake early sixties of authors of blade
"services magazine" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

Newsradio 700 WLW

01:49 min | 1 year ago

"services magazine" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

"Today at shady grove fertility dot com. Here is the latest weather forecast from news radio 700 WLW. It's a chilly start to the day with temperatures just below the freezing mark. But the sky is clear and we'll see plenty of sunshine today as highs rise to 57 tonight Just a few clouds down to 40 and tomorrow another mild day with a high 59, But clouds are expected to increase throughout the day from your severe weather station. I'm nine first warning meteorologist Jennifer Catch Mark News radio 700 wlw. Right now. Radar's clear We are at 35 to freeze again. Big traffic issues this morning, South bound 75 remains blocked right now it is closed at the Buttermilk Pike exit. As you head south because of an accident earlier that claimed two lives. It could be another hour or two. We're being told down before that highway can't completely reopen. Hard Next UPDATES its six Brian comes news Radio seven double double Good morning. How you doing? It's just about 5 37 on 700 wlw Steve Hawkins in for Mike McConnell. He's in for Willie today. Noon to three lot going on. We're also going ahead. Tonto. London Timers are ABC correspondent coming up talking about the Brexit that's back in the news. Didn't that happen already? Here's some good news to see this Cincinnati named one of the U. S cities with the highest rated hospitals, and especially with covert going on. This is pretty good. The study was posted by side dot d dot programs. That's a social Community resource for clinical psychology students on we tied with Austin, Texas for first place, according to the data that was published in the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services magazine. Since they Austin got.

Mike McConnell Buttermilk Pike Jennifer Catch Radar Steve Hawkins ABC Austin Cincinnati Brian Medicare Texas Willie U. S
"services magazine" Discussed on The Dan Bongino Show

The Dan Bongino Show

07:03 min | 1 year ago

"services magazine" Discussed on The Dan Bongino Show

"But most self help books are kind of like stuff they know nobody's going to do it sounds cutesy so. When I read your title right self help for people who hate. So I thought. All right. Like I'm GonNa Actually read this book and your Pr Person Sent me a hard copy. Got I don't like like the PDF files. So y what about this book I know the I've seen it. But what about this book is different than the traditional twelve step book here Well I think it's because I don't I'm not a self-help Percy new I. I worked in service magazines, men's health and and that gave advice an everybody who gives his vice or weird. They're just Weirdos self help authors tend to be really Kinda creepy when you meet them I'm not I'm not I don't consider myself creepy I. consider myself a normal person who wrote a self help book based on kind of like this simple wisdom I was okay. Let me back up because I'm I'm. I wasn't going to write this book. I was GONNA write about canceled culture in mob rule, but I realized that wasn't giving any solutions and meanwhile I was dealing with my own issues with canceled culture in mob rule in my own life I was going on social media too much. I was screwing around on twitter I was drinking in tweeting and I decided like, okay. Before I do everything anything in the day I'm going to ask myself. Is this a plus or minus. So before I tweet that thing is this a plus or minus before I send that email to the five producer is this a plus or minus for that snarky little comment to one of my is that what happened I started doing that I started thinking? Well, you know what? Maybe this is the answer to all the I had like five book proposals oddly enough they all become kept became like the chapters. Go like this could be the solution for these problems on. So obsessed with and that's what it was. So it boils down to like you gotTa make a choice is it a plus or minus, and it's basically providing topspin on your decision making. So every decision you make is just a little better and just you know just. A I can't even I can't even describe my book. This is why book interview suck and author Suck no no. I'm going to describe your book better than you can because I actually have A. Handwritten notes because I actually read the Damn Book is you know to explain the plus because I gotTa tell you like I read the chapter write about the plan. It's such a simple concept like you know why hasn't anyone thought of this before like? What I'm about to do actually gonNA benefit or hurt me like this this is not complicated and yet I've never heard of this plane simply no. Seriously like this thing on the plus explain that is especially in relationship to booze tweeting, which was another question later. So not the cross that one out we already got to that when. You. It's funny. Is it because I just never had this. It's called. It's called Impulse Control Navy combat. Wisdom maybe I never thought of it but I, thought you know what plus or minus every decision that I make like. Okay. So Let's say my wife. ELAINA. I want. To do something that's kind of bugging me. And maybe I'll just point out this Plus or minus. One minus don't do it, and then you just GonNa cruise along and then there's something else and you sit down to there's something on twitter. That is you off beyond belief Jimmy Kimmel Jimmy Kimmel's saying something stupid and it's like I retweeted. Make Patton Oswalt all these losers intimately plus or minus I go. This is GonNa preoccupy you for an hour. You're going to check to see what happened end somebody's GonNa call you and say Greg Twitter minus skip it sometimes you can think like if you want if you think it's going to be a plus you can wait. I tweet myself into an email and I look at it two hours later in a by still big it's funny I'll tweet it but it provides Go ahead. Sorry. No I was going to say about that one it's it's really simple smart. So I'm fighting with Paul Right now is my producer right? So this morning she's now. Hands, it frustration behind these my my wife. I'm sorry I love by the way your dedication to your wife. Wait hold on. I. GotTa Read This folks. This is great. This is Greg Dedication in the book obviously, the Plus Self help for people who hate self help make sure you pick it up Amazon Barnes and noble to. Elena. Moussa. Sorry. I want to say your name Melissa. Some lady I know that's the greatest. To so great. So Greg to but you're plus. So this morning we're in this battle, right I did my regular show? Yes, and we're about this speech I don't want do or anything like that. So we're going back and forth and I'm like, okay. Do I come back with some wise ass comment right now is this a would've taken now if I would have read your book before I would have been in much better shape right now she's still mad at me because it was clearly. A net negative to be a wise ass. So I just wish people would adopt your approach for often including me. Juno Ju it's interesting because you you you work from home and during the pandemic, I worked a lot at home and so I had to do like either do a zoom meeting about a month ago. This is a great story about being married and working. So I'm at home in generally you're in office a different tone, a different set of tools like when you're dealing with it. And in your computer screwed up, you talk to the it guy at least I do not the best kind of tone and it's like dude I can't get this thing to work what is going on and do not tell me to unplug and plug it back in because I already did no no no, you lock me out of my account you. It's A. Setting up, zoom call. My wife is here and I'm talking to it. She was looking at me and horror. She'd never seen Greg at she'd never seen work greg before she never saw greg work and it's like is that what it is that what it is sorry, the hand I don't mean to distract you my wife tells me. I am a lot of different businesses, Bongino report parlor everything. My Wife's I swear she hears me on the phone. So now she's like. Like what do you take the? Prison guards she's like. Secret Service get stuff done. That was their only job. Worry about the feelings of the cutesy stuff waiter she was shocked not stories you. Got Up and walked outside got into a car drove and I think she might have even driven to Manhattan because she was gone for like three hours and it was like she I think she discovered that she was married to like jekyll-hyde thing. The other thing that the only thing that pisses her off and I bet this happened to you and also I talked to Jesse about this. When they say stop talking to be like I'm panelist or a host on your. To be like. The verdict isn paul has been vindicated. She says saved Vegas. Catalyst on the five someone Williams. Without a courtroom..

Greg Twitter twitter Paul Right producer Jimmy Kimmel Percy Patton Oswalt Impulse Control Navy A. Handwritten Jesse Manhattan Amazon Barnes Moussa Vegas Williams Elena Melissa
"services magazine" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

11:20 min | 2 years ago

"services magazine" Discussed on KCRW

"Welcome to the treatment I'm Elvis Mitchell it's always good to have old friends to the show and one of our better old friends is doing more create director at large the gentleman's quarterly I'm sorry G. Q. forgive my emphasis you're welcome back thank you so much of us I like gentleman's quarterly that sounded very gentle handsome yes it does it does so actually it is really because that that title to me is always kind of confirmed that this sort of aspirational thing to people in the magazine didn't absolutely I mean it started as a quarterly so that's where it came from and you know we shorten a to G. Q. not weak because I wasn't there that many years ago but when it went from quarter lead to a ten times a year and then a monthly it was shortly GKO but we never took the Germans Carly away because I thought that was important as you told me before I remember when I was in high school Samantha magazine it came with a question there they had a quarter to two pure newsboy with that use a quarter pay for my subscription that's incredible that's a fun fact that on now it was it was a circular came with a magazine nineteen seventy four Memphis so well because I I moved to the magazine from the days of his own by esquire and it really was a quarterly and and and is just it's so interesting for you to come to the magazine and to have not been subsumed by about it actually you have to make become a part of your life didn't it did and I started in seventy nine on an internship and at that point they're owned by esquire and about a month into it six weeks into it Conde Nast came by and brought us up and you know escort even sold esquire that point that they still had G. Q. and things really change so unfortunately I wasn't able to transition that minute into a full time job even though I was graduating because Conde Nast had to kind of put a freeze on their hiring and firing and just kind of wait and see about this property that they bought this man's book like what is this all about so but six months later and then January eighty I was hired happiest in my life well the book I have from me by Jim Moore is hunks and heroes for decades of fashion a G. Q. and there's no better way to kind of start the conversation to go to the forward by Kanye west which the conversation between the two of you from last just this last summer and the first line is Jim I feel like it's a perfect time for you be releasing this book and for us we have this conversation I feel there's a moment researchers in fashion there are no tricks in fashion anymore as a perfect way to start the season it's you know that's from the man's mouth you know we sat on the couch in his house in Calabasas and he said can we do a conversation I said will forward really isn't a conversation but you know why not break the mold so we had a great talk together for about thirty minutes and that was his opening line it's funny though because I feel like that stupid that just quote from the book really is with G. Q. is which is it's about having a conversation is not about a dictatorial or monologue which you want to reduce to participate with the magazines doing didn't you yes you know we we did love teaching we didn't love preaching but we did to the book to do the magazine we called magazines books and still do the magazine for the readers you know it's it's a reader driven magazine we listen to our readers we give them advice we take them off and adventure that feels aspiration but attainable for them and you know all the years that I was there and still continuing their I'm really really proud of being a part of that adventure with our readers and you came in at a really interesting time the magazine one started shifting star Cooper who you mentioned and really was a guy who spear headed into the magazine new direction by saying it wasn't just really amend service magazine anymore had to be a magazine occupied a place in the culture right our came on board and you know everyone was terrified I was pretty excited I was just a was a fashion editor at that point I had moved up the ranks a little bit and aren't really brought in this whole idea of celebrity and you know internally we were like how is this going to work he wants but celebrities on the covers I mean models sell issues not celebrities this this is like not time magazine this is not you know the York times this is G. Q. it's got to be handsome model wearing beautiful clothes but you're he proved us wrong very quickly with that first cover that actually I styled under a Cooper which is Joe Theismann and as that was also beginning something to it really should for the magazine which is that bring athletes into magazine because a modern have the perfect bill for closed on the yeah they do and you know this is the error of you know Pat Riley is you know the coach of the century and he is influencing you know Michael Jordan to wear suits and dress up and then everybody else wants to look like Mike and then suddenly no one wants to look exactly alike so they'll get their stylus and now we have you know our most robust because style icons now are really athletes because they embrace it I mean my favorite people to work with our athletes because they just want to talk fashion they want to talk about last night's game you want to talk fashion with me they wanna go shopping with me they wanna try on you know ten racks of clothes there they're so excited by it all how can I think in some way that you are responsible for the biggest fashion icon we have it and pop culture and that's lebron James and his collaboration with with our our friend Tom brown yes I mean that was a that was a big big moment and lebron is always looking to push the needle but to do it in his way and if you look back at his style just you know six or seven years ago it was you know very sartorial very dressed up lots of fedoras three piece suits and any kind of moved away from that and got a little bit more you know in the into the street where lane and you know started his obviously his collections that he's working on now and then the Tom brown thing kind of really really threw us all in a good way because he he went in there and you know pick pick the designer that probably is the least known for dressing people outside of the kind of six would then above range and had him and his teammates completely donned in in search Arial splendor Tom brown all custom was Liz exciting moment is the true went on to friend Jim more his book is hunks and heroes he's both for decades of fashion G. Q. and I think what's interesting is is and we were just talking before we got started in a lot of ways how little has changed I mean there's still lots I mean I think it's G. using a magazine still the magazine of tweets and I know that kind of holds a special fascination for you in terms of photo shoots yeah I mean we were kind of trying to find a common denominator is we're putting this book together and it was really the art director Dimitri leave us that said I finally figured out you know the hook or what you're known for and that's you don't really love retro it's like you make everything modern so a lot of these pictures could hopefully run today and I'd like to pick up point out a picture in the front of the book which is a guide jumping a khaki suit and a grey T. shirt now today that doesn't seem like that special a picture but in those days you know I was pretty much raked over the coals buyer Cooper for leaving this leaving the tie as the certain tie off the suit why are you trying to make the suit something casual it needs to be dressed up soon after that he embraced and thought it was a great image but I think that's that's part of of what I do what I did there and you know kind of disrupting things but also keeping this approach that think that a picture shouldn't be from a specific era and it should look modern I was in the one of the things I think about that you brought to to the magazine and that's really evident in this book is you've made style kinetic I mean this so often movement in these in these shoes that you've done and GQ affirming basically thing when there's a guy standing out with a woman or two women to suddenly guys moving in the in the photo spreads and talk about that a little bit because it's really for me I think when the internal things you brought to the magazine ad that has changed fashion photography I think what you had in the you know the late seventies early eighties you had a lot of mostly seventies I guess you had a lot of very stiff models you had that woman is was kind of the accessory in it and there was no interaction between them and then in the early eighties and Bruce Weber came on to the magazine introduced along with you know the campaigns he was doing for Ralph Lauren and Calvin Klein kind of this this term life style and lifestyle was something that we grab right on to right away and started to kind of explore this idea of of joy and you know happiness without being corny so then we're kind of on the hunt for the photographers that could do it obviously Bruce Weber can do it but then you know Pamela Hanson and then pay Sirota and then wait whatever photography worked with weather was in as a new leader cracking teen are Richard Avedon we would try to infuse this kind of you know energy into the pictures so I think when people look at the book at first they probably think it's gonna be a lot of models in suits giving blue steel but what they're what they're really surprised about is not only the majority of the pictures but also just the fact that it's joyful and brash and colorful and and hopefully never corny there's a section and then the other thing there's a shot with with with the a a kind of double truck as we call it the two pages contributed David Hockney and one side is is Orlando bloom and the other is for L. Williams but I also think two of that that sense of a play of color which actually makes it the phone was a whole lot more playful and relatable thousand yeah I mean very early on I showed the book to a few people in the industry and someone had made the point that they didn't realize even though they were ravaging Q. fan that chick he was so colorful and there's like well we love color you know and I think it's you're always gonna shoot a tweeter grey suit but how can you throw that off you know well you can do it by a culture lacquer color para socks or or the the give you could two months that you put with that and I think David Hockney is is someone who resurfaces a lot as a as a style hero of mine and you certainly don't want to do a lot but those to see those two spreads I in the magazine of Orlando bloom to shot by Mario Testino and then for rows up by Paula Kentucky where several years apart I thought it was was time to use that reference again but hawk needs color and you know I'm always influenced by color I'm looking at your pattern shorten thinking like that's an amazing color combination you know I could do a horse shoot based on that why they're going to put me to shoot but I will say this though could because there's just such a sense of of pleasure in this and and the thing that really I want to talk about this little bit you broke down with the that that kind of it is also a cellophane wrap this interview in GQ with you could then to be able to touch the clothes you gave the fabric kind of attack to feel and you sound photographers and pick clothes at a lent themselves to that yeah I think of I think an important picture in the book as in the early nineties I did a picture of mark Vander loonies.

"services magazine" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

13:43 min | 2 years ago

"services magazine" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The great Jewish writer Bernard Malamud author of the baseball novel the natural among many other works which in the business of transformation and redemption in a summer's reading a young man with no job and no purpose makes a bold claim and everything around him changes. my late friend David rack off was the reason. George certainly which was a neighborhood boyhood quit high school on an impulse when he was sixteen. a lot of patience and very was ashamed every time we went looking for a job when people asked him if he had finished and he had to say no he never went back to school. this summer is a hard time for jobs and they had none having so much time on his hands George thought of going to summer school but the kids in his classes would be too young. he also considered registering in a night high school only he didn't like the idea of the teachers always telling him what to do he felt bad not respected him. the result was he stayed off the streets and in his room most of the day. he was close to twenty and had needs with the neighborhood girls but no money to spend and he couldn't get more than occasional few sense because his father was poor and his sister Sophie who resemble Georgia toll bony girl of twenty three earn very little and what she had she kept for herself their mother is dead and so if we had to take care of the house. very early in the morning George's father got up to go to work in a fish market. Sophie left about eight for a long ride in the subway to a cafeteria in the Bronx. Georgia's coffee by himself then hung around the house. when the harasser five room railroad flat above a butcher store got on his nerves he cleaned it up mop the floors with rent mop and put things away but most of the time he sat in his room. in the afternoons he listened to the ball game otherwise he had a couple of old copies of the world almanac he had bought a long time ago and he like to read them and also the magazines and newspapers itself we brought home that had been left on the tables in the cafeteria. they were mostly picture magazines about movie stars and sports figures also usually the news in the mirror serve yourself read whatever fell into our hands although she sometimes read good books. she one thousand George what he did in his room all day and he said he wrote a lot too. I want the sides what I bring home do you ever read any worthwhile books. some George answered although he really didn't. I tried to read a book or two that so if you have my house but found he was in no mood for them. he couldn't stand made up stories they got on his nerves he wished he had some hobby to work out as a kid he was good in carpentry but where can you work at it sometimes during the day went for walks but mostly he did his walking after the hot sun had gone down was cooler in the streets. in the evening after supper George left the house and wondered in the neighborhood. during the sultry days some of the store keepers and their wives satin chairs on the thick broken sidewalks in front of their shops fanning themselves George walked past them and the guys hanging out on the candy store corner the couple made known as whole life but nobody recognized each other. he had no special place to go but generally saving it till the last he left the neighborhood and walk for blocks to the came to a darkly that little park with benches and trees and an iron railing giving a feeling of privacy. he sat on a bench here watching the leafy trees and the flowers blooming on the inside of the railing thinking of a better life for himself. he thought of the jobs he had had since he quit school delivery boy stock clerk runner lately working in a factory and he was dissatisfied with all of them. he felt he would someday like to have a good job and live in a private house with a porch on a street with trees. he won that some dough in his pocket to buy things with and a girl to go with so as not to be so lonely especially on Saturday nights. he wanted people to like and respect him. he thought about these things often but mostly when he was alone at night. around midnight. I got up and drifted back to his hot in stony neighborhood. one time while on his work George met Mister Collins are coming home very late from work. he wondered if he was drunk but then could tell he wasn't. Mister Collins are a Starkey bald headed man who worked in a change both in my R. T. station lived on the next block after George's above a shoe repair store. nights during the hot weather he sat on his stoop in an undershirt reading The New York Times in the light of the shoemakers window. he read it from the first page to the last then went up to sleep. and all the time that he was reading the paper his wife a fat woman with a white face leaned out of the window gazing into the street her thick white arms folded under loose pressed on the window ledge. once in a while Mister Collins are came home drunk but it was a quiet drunk he never made any trouble only walked stiffly up the street and slowly climbed the stairs into the whole. drunk he looked the same as always except for his tight walk the quietness and that his eyes were wet. George like Mr cannons are because he remember him giving him Nichols to buy lemon ice with when he was just court. Mister Collins are was a different type than those in the neighborhood he asked different questions in the others when he met you and he seemed to know what went on in all the newspapers. he read them as is fat sick wife watched from the window. what are you doing with yourself this summer George Mister Collins are asked I see you walking around at night. George felt embarrassed. I like to walk. what are you doing in the day now. nothing much just right now I'm waiting for a job. since the change him to admit he'd wasn't working George said. I'm staying home but I'm reading a lot to pick up my education. Mr cabins are looked interested. mark is red faced with a red handkerchief. what are you reading. George hesitated and then said. I got a list of books in the library once and I'm gonna read them this summer he felt strange and little unhappy saying this but he wanted Mister Collins are to respect him. how many books are there on it. I never counted them. maybe around a hundred. Mister Collins are whistled through his teeth. I figure if I did that George went on earnestly it would help me in my education I don't mean the kind they give you in high school I want no different things and I learned there if you know what I mean. the change maker nodded. we're still in all our one hundred books is a pretty big love for one summer. it might take longer. after you finish was so maybe you and I could shoot the breeze about him said Mr kinds are. when I'm finished Georgia answered. Mister Collins are went home and George continued on as walk. after that but we had the urge to George did nothing different from usual he still took his walks at night ending up in the little park but one evening the shoemaker on the next block stop George to say he was a good boy. and George figured Mister Collins are told him all about the book she was reading. from the shoemaker must have gone down the street because George saw a couple people smiling kindly at him no nobody spoke to him personally. he felt a little better around the neighborhood and liked it more though not so much you would want to live in it forever. it never exactly dislike the people in it yet he had never liked them very much either it was the fault of the neighborhood. to his surprise George found out that his father and Sophie knew about his reading to. his father was too shy to say anything about it. it was never much of a talker in his whole life but certainly was softer to George and she showed him in other ways she was proud of him. as the summer went on George felt in a good mood about things. clean the house every day as a favor to Sophie and he enjoyed the ball games more. so we gave him a Buck a week allowance and there would still wasn't enough I need you to carefully it was a hell of a lot better than just having to bits now and then. what he bought with the money cigarettes mostly an occasional beer movie ticket he got a big kick out of. life wasn't so bad if you knew how to appreciate it. occasionally he bought a paperback book from the newsstand but. he never got around to reading it though he was glad to have a couple of books in his room. but he read thoroughly service magazines and newspapers and at night was the most enjoyable time because when you pass the storekeeper sitting around outside their stores he could tell they regarded him highly he walked direct and then he did not say much to them or they to him he could feel approval on all sides. a couple of nights he felt so good that he skipped the park at the end of the evening. just wondered in the neighborhood where people had known him from the time he was a kid playing punch bowl whenever there is a game of it going. he wondered there then came home and got undressed for bed feeling fine. for a few weeks here doctor only once with Mister Collins are another change makers said nothing more about the books ask no questions his silence made George a little uneasy. for while George didn't pass in front of Mister Collins are as house anymore until one night forgetting himself he approached it from a different direction than he usually did when he did. it was already past midnight the street except for one or two people was deserted and George were surprised when you saw Mister Collins are still reading his newspaper by the light of a street lamp overhead. his impulse. was to stop at the stop and talk to him. he wasn't sure what he wanted to say that we felt the words would come when he began to talk but the more he thought about it the more the idea scared him and he decided he better not. even consider dating at home by another street but it was too near Mister Collins are in the change maker might seem as he ran and get annoyed Sir George unobtrusively cross the street trying to make it seem as if you had to look in a store window on the other side which she did and then went on uncomfortable at what he was doing. he feared Mister Collins are would glance up from his paper in column a dirty rat for walking on the other side of the street. but all I did was sit there sweating through his undershirt his bald head shining in the dim light as you read as times and UPS does his fat wife leaned out the window seeming to read the paper along with him. George thought she was fireman yell out to Mister Collins are but she never moved her eyes off of her husband. George made up his mind to stay away from the change maker until the end got some does softback books read when you started them so they're mostly story books he lost his interest in you didn't bother to finish them. he lost his interest in reading other things too. service magazines and newspapers went on red. she saw them piling up on a chair in his room and asks why he was no longer looking at them and George told it was because of all the other reading he had to do. service said she'd guessed that was it. so for most of the day George at the radio on turning to music when he was sick of the human voice he kept us fairly neat and service said nothing on the days when he neglected it. she was so kind and gave him extra money though things weren't so good for him as they had been before. but they were good enough considering. also his night walks invariably pick them up no matter how bad the day was. then one night George so Mr cannons are coming down the street toward him. George was about to turn and run but he recognized for Mister Collins are as walk that he was drunk and if so probably would not even bother noticed him. Sir George kept on walking straight ahead until he came abreast of Mister Collins are and though he felt wound up enough to. up into the sky he was not surprised Mister Collins our past him without a word. walking slowly his face and body Steph. George drew breath in relief at his narrow escape. when he heard his name called. and there stood Mister.

George Mister Collins Sir George Georgia Sophie Bernard Malamud writer David The New York Times mark R. T. station Nichols Steph Starkey
"services magazine" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:58 min | 2 years ago

"services magazine" Discussed on KQED Radio

"George thought she was fireman yell out to Mister Collins are but she never moved her eyes off of her husband. George made up his mind to stay away from the change maker in Chile and got some does softback books read when you started them so they're mostly story books he lost his interest in you didn't bother to finish them. he lost his interest in reading other things too. service magazines and newspapers went on red. she saw them piling up on a chair in his room and asks why he was no longer looking at them and George told it was because of all the other reading he had to do. Sir he said she'd guessed that was it. so for most of the day George on the radio on turning to music when he was sick of the human voice he kept the house fairly neat and service said nothing on the days when he neglected it. she was so kind and gave him extra money though things weren't so good for him as they had been before. but they were good enough considering. also his night walks invariably pick them up no matter how bad the day was. then one night George so Mr cannons are coming down the street toward him. George was about to turn and run but he recognized for Mister Collins are as walk that he was drunk and if so probably would not even bother notice him. Sir George kept on walking straight ahead until he came abreast of Mister Collins are and though he felt wound up enough to. up into the sky he was not surprised when Mister Collins our past him without a word. walking slowly his face and body stiff. George to her breasts in relief at his narrow escape. when he heard his name called. and there stood Mister Collins are at his elbow smelling like the inside of a beer barrel. his eyes were sad as he gazed at George and George felt so intensely uncomfortable he was tempted to shove the drunk aside and continue on his walk. but he couldn't act that way to room and besides Mr cannons are took a nickel out of his pants pocket and handed to him. go buy yourself a lemon nice Georgie. it's not that time anymore Mr cannons are George said. I'm a big guy now. no you're right said Mr Colin's art which George made no response he could think of. how are your books come along now Mister Collins are asked. we tried to send steady swayed little. fine I guess said George feeling to read growing up his face. you insure. the change makers smiled slyly. away Georgia never seen him smile. sure I'm sure they're fine. there was tense rate in little arcs Mister Collins are as eyes were steady. it's small blue eyes which could hurt if you looked at them too long. George he said. name me one book on that list that you read this summer. and I would drink to your house. I don't want anyone drinking to me. name me one so I can ask your question on it who can tell if it's a good book maybe I want to read it myself. George knew he looked passable on the outside but inside. he was crumbling apart. unable to reply he shut his eyes but when years later he opened them he saw the Mister Collins are I had out of pity gone away. in his ears he still heard the words he said when he laughed. George. don't do what I did. the next night he was afraid to leave his room in the surf we argued with him he wouldn't open the door. what are you doing in there she asked. nothing. I'm reading now. she was silent a minute then asked. where do you keep the books you read I never seen any in your room outside of a few cheap trashy ones. he wouldn't teller. in that case you're not with the back of my hard earned money why should break my back for you so what are you bombing get a job. he stayed in his room for almost a week except to sneak into the kitchen when nobody was home..

Sir George Mister Collins Chile Mr Colin George. Georgia
"services magazine" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:18 min | 2 years ago

"services magazine" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Occasionally he bought a paperback book from the new standard. he never got around to reading it though he was glad to have a couple of books in his room. but he read thoroughly service magazines and newspapers and that night was the most enjoyable time because when you pass the storekeeper sitting around outside their stores he could tell they regard him highly he walked direct and though he did not say much to them or they to him he could feel approval on all sides. a couple of nights he felt so good that he skipped the park at the end of the evening he just wandered in the neighborhood where people had known him from the time I was a kid playing punch bowl whenever there was a game of it going. he wondered there then came home and got undressed for bed feeling fine. for a few weeks here doctor only once with Mister Collins are another change makers said nothing more about the books ask no questions his silence made George a little uneasy. for while George didn't pass in front of Mister Collins are times anymore until one night forgetting himself he approached it from a different direction than he usually did when he did. it was already past midnight the street except for one or two people was deserted and George were surprised when you saw Mister Collins are still reading his newspaper by the light of a street lamp overhead. his impulse. what's to stop at the stop and talk to him. he wasn't sure what he wanted to say that we felt the words would come when he began to talk but the more he thought about it the more the idea scared him and he decided he'd better not. even considered being at home by another street but he was too near Mister Collins are in the change maker might see him as he ran and get annoyed Sir George unobtrusively cross the street trying to make it seem as if he had to look in a store window on the other side which he did and then went on uncomfortable at what he was doing. he feared Mister Collins are would glance up from his paper in column a dirty rat for walking on the other side of the street. all I did was sit there sweating through his undershirt his bald head shining in the dim light as you read as times and UPS does his fat wife leaned out the window seeming to read the paper along with him..

Mister Collins Sir George
"services magazine" Discussed on Monocle 24: Section D

Monocle 24: Section D

04:34 min | 3 years ago

"services magazine" Discussed on Monocle 24: Section D

"Services magazine offers so perhaps there's a new a new clarity. Certainly in the mind of the folks at clove magazine, you talk a little bit in the briefing notes about clove being a welcome look away from the US and a welcome back away from Europe, we can focus on journeys again, though for you next magazine pick, which is cool to migrant micro Odysseys, and I have to admit this is an extremely extremely intriguing choice. Not one I've come across before slightly smaller than a four format with a lot of use of kind of Flora's text heavy in some places, but then amazing expressive photography full bleed images. An illustration who are enough is this magazine about holy. Well, I'm quite late to the party on this as well. So it's a six part magazine, which is interesting that it sets lifespan. It's kind of what it says. So it's devoted to looking at my Gration. I think what it's trying to do is open up the ways we think of migration so it looking at migrations of peoples all of infrastructure data flows. Flora and fauna. So each issue has lightly different theme. The most recent one which is number five is looking at the world of micro and flow of very small things. It's still very new to me as well. But I just find it very intriguing magazine, it's taking a very serious topic. And I think it topic that could do with a little bit more nuance and could do with some more depth to other time when debates about migration at become very polarized. And I think quite shallow and superficial and aggressive. So I quit my what they're doing looking through. It's kind of serious. Highly researched writing it's academic. But I think has that nice trick of wearing it's not mere quite lightly as he says for beautiful they're already pops of this sort of flora coral running through, and then this kind of metallic goal to has this very well defined color. Palette? That's quite poppy and fun and brings you in. So I think it's clever design job of taking something that could be very of putting in heavy and just giving it that level of injury to make you want to dive in and make you want to engage with that topic. We do have enough time to delve into another title, which is the London review of books. Now. Can I give you a compassion herald? I've never read the London review of books, the New York review books older sibling on which this is based while they're both great cities. Yeah. Both great public relations. But won't draws you to the the unabashed text, heavy newspaper esque stylings under review of books. I think London review of books everyone at Tucson you on their to'real stuff is subscribed to it. It's just the most fantastic research results. So it's extremely long form journalism book reviews. So it takes a topic, and then just delve into essays about that book and engaging with its content, and it kind of shows what you can do if you support long form journalism, and if writers at the time to research, a topic and really get to grips with it. So you get these huge often, very stylishly written all the time. So some quite drawing, but that's kind of what I admire about it. But it's unafraid to take on topics which on the surface could be very dry. They're often quite nation often quite historical. But through the strength of the writing in just the kind of classical journalism that has gone into it really draws you in becomes very gripping. And you you get into topics sort of like about seventeenth century diarist working in. I don't know Dr just writing endlessly about wool prices. But because. The way it's being dealt with it becomes fascinating and my sincere. Thanks to all these travel only. We'll be back to join us in April for the next issue is then you suddenly hype side. Thank you very much. And sadly, that's always have time for today. Next week. We sit down with Spencer Bailey. The charismatic new editor in chief a book publisher fighting and don't forget if you need a little more design minded inspiration. You can subscribe to this show or our sister podcast Monaco on design Xtra which is available. Each thursday. You could also pick up leaf through a copy of Monaco magazine at your leisure or peruse on library books or travel goods for bit of inspiration monocle on design was produced by definitely Condie's an edited by the ever patient Christie Evans on Josh Harnett, underplay us out its craft work with computer.

clove magazine London review of books services magazine Flora Monaco magazine US Europe Gration Spencer Bailey New York review editor in chief Josh Harnett Condie Tucson Christie Evans publisher