32 Burst results for "Sergeant Major"

Toby Harnden Shares a Story From on the Ground in Afghanistan

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

04:24 min | Last month

Toby Harnden Shares a Story From on the Ground in Afghanistan

"You mentioned this story, the prison uprising, Mike spann, a former marine CIA paramilitary. For those who know nothing, give us the story of that incredible event and what that man did. Yeah. It is incredible. And so November 25th, 2001. Two CIA officers walk into this fort called calla jangi, which means literally like fort of war outside mazar I Sharif. Now, backing up a little bit mazarin Sharif had fallen to northern alliance forces, aided by our allies. Our allies aided by the CIA green berets and air force combat controllers and the awesome might have U.S. air power overhead on November 10th. Now, less than a month earlier, Mike spann had been one of 8 CIA officers who landed in the Darius souf valley, aboard two Black Hawk helicopters that had flown in from Kashi Khan about K two, a former Soviet air base that Uzbekistan government had given over to the Americans for this post 9 11 mission. So October 17th, 2001, they land at dropped into the unknown. First Americans behind America. So we are barely barely a month out since 9 11. Yeah. First Americans behind them enemy lines. Now there had been a CIA team called jawbreaker that had landed in the pantry of Ali on September 26th, but that was, you know, relatively speaking safe territory controlled by the northern alliance. But this was enemy territory, Taliban controlled territory. So 8 of them, four of them were paramilitaries, one of those was Mike span. So when paramilitary is somebody who's been seconded, usually from the military and is working in the CIA using their skills for the CIA. Yeah, usually they actually in the CIA sometimes their contractors or people who've been seconded and on some of the other teams that were actually serving members of the Delta force and seals. But the four paramount trees on team alpha were serving CIOs special activities, division. Scott spellman, who was on the cover of the book, he was later became very senior, it was the senior CIA guy on the National Security Council during the Trump administration. He became station chief in Kabul, but then a young officer, but already battle hardened he had been wounded in the battle of Mogadishu in Somalia in 1993. It was a guy called Alex Hernandez, who was the deputy chief, who was a sergeant major, gone full career in special forces and then joined the agency and two case officers, JRC, who was the chief who'd worked with the CIA out of Islamabad in the 1980s against the Soviets for the supply and stinger missiles to the mujahideen and David Tyson who you mentioned at the beginning who was with Mike span on November 25th 2001. So they're in unfriendly territory. This is the Ford of war, walk us through that event. So David was a case officer based in Tashkent and spoke Uzbek almost fluently. And so he's the linguist and the main linguist on the team, although JR, seger also he spoke diary, which was the sort of lingua franca in Afghanistan. But on that day, the team split, there's a big fight, a hundred miles to the east. It expected in Kunduz so the bulk of American forces are there. But the night before 400 Al-Qaeda prisoners had arrived on the eastern edge of mazarin reef to surrender, and it was extremely murky why they were there. They should have been surrendering in Kunduz. And basically, I mean, what I was able to establish almost beyond doubt is that this was a Trojan horse operation. It was a deliberate trap. Yeah, it was a Taliban Al-Qaeda operation to put pretend that for these 400 fighters had surrendered, but in fact they were made up remained armed. They sort of exploited Afghan custom to keep their weapons with them and they were planning an uprising. Because you can have lots of people surrender at once if it's a regular army during the Gulf War, we had thousands of Iraqis surrender at once. When it's irregular fighters, you don't usually get hundreds of them surrendering at the same time. It's a little bit

CIA Mike Spann Mike Span Calla Jangi Mazarin Sharif Darius Souf Valley Kashi Khan Mazar Scott Spellman Trump Administration Sharif America Alex Hernandez Kunduz Northern Alliance Uzbekistan David Tyson Delta Force Taliban ALI
Toby Harnden Shares a Story From on the Ground in Afghanistan

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

04:22 min | Last month

Toby Harnden Shares a Story From on the Ground in Afghanistan

"You mentioned this story, the prison uprising, Mike spann, a former marine CIA paramilitary. For those who know nothing, give us the story of that incredible event and what that man did. Yeah. It is incredible. And so November 25th, 2001. Two CIA officers walk into this fort called calla jangi, which means literally like fort of war outside mazar I Sharif. Now, backing up a little bit mazarin Sharif had fallen to northern alliance forces, aided by our allies. Our allies aided by the CIA green berets and air force combat controllers and the awesome might have U.S. air power overhead on November 10th. Now, less than a month earlier, Mike spann had been one of 8 CIA officers who landed in the Darius souf valley, aboard two Black Hawk helicopters that had flown in from Kashi Khan about K two, a former Soviet air base that Uzbekistan government had given over to the Americans for this post 9 11 mission. So October 17th, 2001, they land at dropped into the unknown. First Americans behind America. So we are barely barely a month out since 9 11. Yeah. First Americans behind them enemy lines. Now there had been a CIA team called jawbreaker that had landed in the pantry of Ali on September 26th, but that was, you know, relatively speaking safe territory controlled by the northern alliance. But this was enemy territory, Taliban controlled territory. So 8 of them, four of them were paramilitaries, one of those was Mike span. So when paramilitary is somebody who's been seconded, usually from the military and is working in the CIA using their skills for the CIA. Yeah, usually they actually in the CIA sometimes their contractors or people who've been seconded and on some of the other teams that were actually serving members of the Delta force and seals. But the four paramount trees on team alpha were serving CIOs special activities, division. Scott spellman, who was on the cover of the book, he was later became very senior, it was the senior CIA guy on the National Security Council during the Trump administration. He became station chief in Kabul, but then a young officer, but already battle hardened he had been wounded in the battle of Mogadishu in Somalia in 1993. It was a guy called Alex Hernandez, who was the deputy chief, who was a sergeant major, gone full career in special forces and then joined the agency and two case officers, JRC, who was the chief who'd worked with the CIA out of Islamabad in the 1980s against the Soviets for the supply and stinger missiles to the mujahideen and David Tyson who you mentioned at the beginning who was with Mike span on November 25th 2001. So they're in unfriendly territory. This is the Ford of war, walk us through that event. So David was a case officer based in Tashkent and spoke Uzbek almost fluently. And so he's the linguist and the main linguist on the team, although JR, seger also he spoke diary, which was the sort of lingua franca in Afghanistan. But on that day, the team split, there's a big fight, a hundred miles to the east. It expected in Kunduz so the bulk of American forces are there. But the night before 400 Al-Qaeda prisoners had arrived on the eastern edge of mazarin reef to surrender, and it was extremely murky why they were there. They should have been surrendering in Kunduz. And basically, I mean, what I was able to establish almost beyond doubt is that this was a Trojan horse operation. It was a deliberate trap. Yeah, it was a Taliban Al-Qaeda operation to put pretend that for these 400 fighters had surrendered, but in fact they were made up remained armed. They sort of exploited Afghan custom to keep their weapons with them and they were planning an uprising. Because you can have lots of people surrender at once if it's a regular army during the Gulf War, we had thousands of Iraqis surrender at once. When it's irregular fighters, you don't usually get hundreds of them surrendering at the same

CIA Mike Spann Mike Span Calla Jangi Mazarin Sharif Darius Souf Valley Kashi Khan Mazar Scott Spellman Trump Administration Sharif America Alex Hernandez Northern Alliance Kunduz Uzbekistan David Tyson Delta Force Taliban ALI
Larry's Father Was Awarded a Congressional Gold Medal Posthumously

The Larry Elder Show

01:07 min | 5 months ago

Larry's Father Was Awarded a Congressional Gold Medal Posthumously

"Ceremony, posthumously for my dad. And she worked tirelessly to set it up. And at camp Pendleton, my dad was awarded a congressional gold medal, posthumously by colonel Jason bohm. Congressman war bocker spoke, and then congressman and then colonel Jason baum spoke, and here is what happened. Ladies and gentlemen, the commanding officer of 5th grade regiment, colonel Jason ball. Congressman robot. General colonies, general Monday, members of the elder family, members of the Malcolm point, marine association, the first marine division association, Dana point support group, fellow commanders, sergeant major marines and sailors. We are honored that you joined us today to recognize the service of one of our own staff sergeant Randolph elder. His appropriate that we hold the ceremony here on the hollow ground in which the fight 5th marines memorializes the service

Colonel Jason Bohm Bocker Colonel Jason Baum Colonel Jason Ball Camp Pendleton Malcolm Point, Marine Associat Marine Division Association Dana Point Support Group Randolph Elder Marines
"sergeant major" Discussed on Women of the Military

Women of the Military

04:22 min | 7 months ago

"sergeant major" Discussed on Women of the Military

"And then what comes next when you take that off and not losing yourself your identity and your work at the same time? Because there's so much value and veterans. It just needs to be brought out more and more. Yeah, I was talking to someone. I was like, well, there's like people who are transitioning out of the military. And then there's like when you're transitioning and then you're veterans. I know they're technically veterans when they get out, but they're not really veterans. It usually takes one to 5 years depending on what your life situation is before you're like a veteran. Yes, exactly, because I'm still in that transition, right? I feel like it's just been a year, right? So I'm still to me. I'm still in it. I still learn from different sources and LinkedIn. And I am still learning. And there's so much. You got to figure out, what do I really want to do? 'cause I can't do it all, right? So reinventing yourself or just reflecting on, what is it that you really want to do? And I think it's important for people to take that time. No matter what service, no matter how long you serve, it's important to really know which direction you want to go in. For those of us who retire, especially for 20 or more, I think that's really important. Even more so because you've been doing this for so long, there's a level that has defined you to the point of this is when I'm used to doing, but taking a uniform off doesn't lessen my value, you know? It changes my path. And that's really all I want that to do and that's what I've tried to emulate in my own self is taking it off is just move my path. But who Robin is, has not changed, and I will continue on to press forward to serve. Veterans will always hold dear to my heart now. I could do this well. I'm very much in tune to how we support the active duty, you know, whether it's equipping services, just being supportive as a country. And in this next fight, wherever that may go, my so I think that's important. Just as citizens to continue that support. Yeah. This has been a great interview and I really loved getting to talk to you. And I always like to end my interview with one last question, which is what advice would you give to young women who are considering military service? Yes, great, great question. As always, young women who are considering going into military service, I think the biggest advice I would give them is to be ready to be mentally and physically ready to be willing to step up and outside of their box for the greater good. But at the same time, the reward would be so great and the confidence that we'll be instilled will be enormous. And unmatchable, I believe, in most cases. So if you're considering joining, I would access you always not be afraid to ask the hard questions. You only know what you know, find someone to talk to, find a mentor, actually recruited a link you up with somebody. Make sure you get the right information before you go in. The better prepared you are, the better that that transition.

LinkedIn Robin
"sergeant major" Discussed on Women of the Military

Women of the Military

06:52 min | 7 months ago

"sergeant major" Discussed on Women of the Military

"Message at the same time because I have a mantra of each one teach one and it wasn't about getting here for myself. It was about can someone be at the table, right? And to continue that out and teach the next one and develop the next one so that we can continue that push of someone being at the table. And we will a trit out. It's tough to stay 30 years. For men and women, it's tough to stay 30 years, and I recognize that very tough because I was able to do it. I wanted to make sure that it continues on. And there's so many people so many great marines behind me who is doing just that. Like I see them I said, it's already, I'm gonna stay, you know? They know they're going to stay and that's something really positive to see and hear because during my time frame. And then always an anomaly for those who stayed at 30. That was more of definitely the small though. This is all the percentages. And now I hear so many more ready to stay for 30s. So if I can influence anything I'm constantly putting it out there 30 years 30 years because I want them to see the possible and that it is possible to stay and it's rewarding at the same time. You know, you can get a lot out of it, but you can influence a lot of things. And I think that's just what we need the diversity of thought is just needed at all levels. So once you get to that higher rank when you consider in a room with the common out of the Marine Corps or you sit in a room with generals and saw a major of the Marine Corps, and you have proven yourself credible where they value your opinion. That says a lot. As I retired out and transitioned last year, you know, many people ask me, do you miss it? Do you miss it? And of course, you miss a lot about it. But I can honestly say, I don't feel a void. I feel like I've done what I've been put on this earth to do. I have fulfilled my calling if you will in uniform. I just don't feel a void. And I just never have. And I think I think that's because I was able to stay, but also it's not the years you stayed, but the difference you've made, you know, there's several different initiatives that have been blessed to be called upon for my candid advice. And it's never been just what Robin felt, I would reach out and how will we feel and what are we thinking so that I can articulate those thoughts through me or whoever is at the table, but, you know, something that would benefit the masses and not just specifically for me, but it's been rewarding. And I wouldn't change much. I'm going to be honest. I just wouldn't change much. Of course, there's always things you could tweak, right? There's always things you can think. But I just wouldn't change much. I like for the time that I was in challenges we have. I've been able to be a part of that. And now it's exciting sitting back watching it continue on. I mean, look where they're going. I don't look at her name. I want to say it was on LinkedIn and she young PFC young, young rain and she talked about the best decisions she made was becoming an infantryman. I had a young female saying the best decision she made was infantry. What? I mean, read and hear about that. That was just unheard of during my time frame. So look at the evolution of mindset that we're going, you know? We could talk for days stories of when I came in. What I was taught at boot camp and it was nothing about combat, right? It was nothing of all of very little. It was about being a female in uniform and acting according to that. You know, but here we are training warriors, male or female on as a lot to be said about that. I still think the ball can be pushed further and faster, but I don't want to lose sight of the small and the small and the large hurdles that have already been made and there's a lot that we can celebrate at the same time. Yeah, and right before we started talking, you said there was a lot to do in the military. And now you're a veteran and you see there's a lot to do for veterans. So does that excite you as you have like your second career and what do you see happening with the work that you're doing now? Exactly. You know, it's like continue to serve. I think just that feeling in me can not just be like a light switch and turned off, right? So when I retired, I didn't just turn it off. I think this can always be a graduate. It's going to be always a light in me and any opportunity that I can. I'm jumping on it. As I retired, the first thing that excited me was being able to be on advisory boards and governance boards for Marine Corps association foundation and different organizations where I can be that voice still, right? And I can also support the active duty at the same time. And the more I continue to do that, whether it's on the female side or the intellect that resonates with me and it still is still keeps me going. It very much excites me, right? That I can still serve. And then now from the veteran, I learn more and more about the gap between active duty and veteran service, right? Meaning, when you finally, in your service, whether that's retiring or you get out or medically retired, whatever the case may be. And then you transition to being a veteran to me there's somewhat of a gap in there of handoff, right? And I think I would love to work more in that gap if that makes sense, whether it's mentoring, educating on my own personal experience or opening the doors of things, 'cause there's so overwhelming of what to do next. But those who serve a long time. You've been doing this entire adult life. And now all of a sudden to make that shift, some people do a better than others. But there's just that gap and then we're just so used to that camaraderie and you don't want to take your hand off of that in totality. And I think that would be helpful for many veterans going forward, along with what resources are out there. What benefits are out there helping to tweak those benefits and services that can be more modernized if you will for the veterans of today. So I think there's just so much so much work to be done that hasn't even been touched yet, especially since we, for me, I'm coming out during a pandemic. So there's still more that's revealing itself that I can do or opportunities I can step in. So I'm excited for the future. I'm excited to be more involved. I've been doing my own research for women's services out there and I'm even talking to some of my peer groups who have since retired, same as me recently. And that's to us that I know there's a gap there, right? So I'm always looking, how can I be in that gap? How can I feel some of that? And I do my own things on the side at times, whether it's getting a small cadre together being a part of a small group that just meets weekly. We just talk. Things like that is helpful. And I found this mentally helpful. And it can help the transition from being in a military having this military family.

Marine Corps Marine Corps association found Robin LinkedIn
"sergeant major" Discussed on Women of the Military

Women of the Military

08:01 min | 7 months ago

"sergeant major" Discussed on Women of the Military

"Just specific or unique to us. It's something that we have run across through throughout this entire planet, if you will, right? And many, many, many other countries. During my career, I love being on a drill field actually. I went back twice. But aside from the deployments, we also can talk about some of the pivotal historical things that I was a part of, one that I'm proud of is what we call the ground combat element integrated task force. One name, but in short, it was nothing more than the initial push for testing females in combat roles. So you remember before the exclusion law was lifted, the Marine Corps was the only service who put together a task force unit where we tested that theory to the core. And I got chosen to be the senior listed for that battalion, if you will, right? Again, completely out of the norm for most people because we had never done it before. We've never put a female saw major in charge of combat and Melissa's. This is the first time we're doing it from the operational side, but also from the humanistic side. How do we integrate men and women, you know? It just had never been done in execution to that level. There's two small pockets, but not to that level. It's a very proud of that and what that has led to. Aside from the politics, what we learned, inhibited to the unit itself and how to build that strong unity of both male and female through many challenges, but the end result, once again, as I talked about that chisel affect from where we started, the challenges we went through chisel and chisel and all the way till we ended and the attitudes of our males on the in for me was success. What's in the realm of the possible aside from being held to political strength? What's in the realm of possible for many women to serve together and respect each other to that capacity? It was a huge shift in culture, huge, on a small level, but very proud of that at the same time. Reaching the rank of sergeant major was another. Let's stop and talk about what the experience was like and was that part of how boot camp went from being segregated and to being desegregated where men and women were in the same training or what are some of the other things that you can see that the work that you guys impacted in the future of the core. Great question because out of that unit, you know, again, so much came so much came out of it. We learned a lot about ourselves. We learned a lot about our war fighting capability. We learned a lot about our SOPs. Our standards, we learned so much that we had the kind of reevaluate. One thing we talked about was that you can see now is definitely a lot of effort has been put into the equipment that we wear, right? And the amount of weight that's put into that military, not even just the Marine Corps, but army as well. What an infantryman is required to carry. You know, so if we're asking them to carry X amount of weight and it is like three fourths of a typical average woman wait, I don't care who you are. You can't do it effectively for a long period of time. If a male is supposed to carry three quarters of his weight, the entire time, there will be significant medical implications and is no different, right? So what came out of that that I even saw is the lighting of the load, right? So finding material that served the same purpose give the same protection, but don't have the heavy weight that we were accustomed to bearing, right? So much has changed on them. The mariko has changed their sizing metrics if you will. When we were in the actual unit itself, you would watch female marines. And without complaint, put packs on their back that it just physically, it wasn't correct, right? It just didn't physically fit them in a manner to where they could be effective and carrying it across. Because it wasn't made for them. I mean, it just wasn't. It was made for an average man. It wasn't made for average person. So we had the gender neutralized the way we went about sizing at the same time. So those are just a few. And then from the culture standpoint, we also looked at us saying we, as a marine corp, right? Different task force would actually come in and do different things. But we as a recall looked at, where does this start? And that's where the boot camp came along. That actually has been a conversation for years, even before that, do we desegregate why don't we do things like that. But where does it start? And starting at the initial level, can never go wrong, right? We're going to talk about putting you together from an infrastructure standpoint. You got to be put together from a boot camp standpoint as well, right? And train and learn how to train together and gain that respect. I go back to the cultural piece, putting that chisel, right? Your performance and everything, no matter how much awareness and things you want to push down people's throat. It means something different when they can feel it, you know, when they can go through and see it and feel it. So starting from the beginning is something that was looked at to help in the progress. Many of you would say that is not the end of your. It just it's not, but it's an avenue to really look at an approach. And that's where the Marine Corps went with that. Not to speak on the behalf of all specifics of the leadership, but that's kind of looking at things like the GCE ITF is a good example of where the culture can actually go with success. I learned about the Marine Corps being segregated in an interview and someone was like, what was it like to be with men and women and your basic? And I was like, normal? I don't know. That's just, I thought everybody did it. And so it was kind of shocking to hear that. And he was a marine and he was like, I just don't understand. And then when he talked to me and heard my experiences, maybe the Marine Corps knows what they're doing. Yeah, I mean, I remember being a Jewish shutter down there, actually I was the sergeant major of the actual four battalion who trained all females back then and we would get visited by other services to see how we did it. They were more interested in us back then and how we did it because it will come with pros and cons. You know, it goes back to my original thought process. So it's not about what you do. It's how you do it, right? So even if we integrate how we integrate is still very important. You can almost make it worse. You can almost make it worse if you don't have the right mentality in the right culture in place. Leaders have to be careful even now going forward. How do we do that? Because many of the other services, although it's integrated, they face different challenges still. And we too going to be there's going to be challenges. So to get ahead of those things and treat people like adults. But it's not impossible to do. I am advocate that it's not impossible, not impossible to do. So. Yeah, so the last thing you were going to talk about was making the right sergeant major. I mean, I just wanted to close out with that because that's the last rink I held the highest rank and, you know, it would be cool equivalent to any other service, Massachusetts and things like that. It's once again a few of the few, right? So it really is. It's a small percentage that make it to this rink as it is. And then there's even smaller percentage that are women. But it's also been a highlight of a lot of my career because you're in an influential position, right? And so it really was the time frame for me to say, now it's the give back time frame. To work hard at being at the table or to work hard to be in her to work hard to give the two candid opinions, you know, and not to throw a lot of back. It's taken everything that we worked hard for and making sure that it has footing. And a sense of, it's not going to die when I leave out, right? So there's enough footing there like even now I look back and I see strategic people. I don't want to say it like that, but, you know, folks who will carry on the.

Marine Corps Melissa army Massachusetts
"sergeant major" Discussed on Women of the Military

Women of the Military

07:57 min | 7 months ago

"sergeant major" Discussed on Women of the Military

"Many men throughout my career have actually told me that, you know, Robin, you know, when I first met you, and as well as being a person, you know, from a city environment. So my tongue is not always curb. I can lash out as good as the next one, but I found that I would harness that and make it into a positive productive output versus just channeling it. And it imploding, I made sure that I was able to perform. That has helped my career is going into something I already know in the back of my head. We kind of talk briefly before we started recording. Just having a meeting today. I knew before I got there. I'm going to be the only person of color, and I'm going to be the only female in the room. And what I say and how I say it affects everybody else who falls into those two categories, right? Fair unfair is real. And it's reality to how we need to approach some of the circumstances today. Yeah, last week, I did an interview for the VA born the battle podcast and it was three mil marines and me. And we were talking about Afghanistan and before the interview I felt so much pressure because I was going to be representing women because I knew I was the only woman being there and I was like, I don't feel qualified. I can understand that pressure like you have to think I'm a woman, there were three other men there and me, and I was like, I was the one voice for women. I had a lot of responsibility on sharing my experience and my story and helping share that's how women filled, not all women, but you know, there is a lot of pressure. I think we all buried, right? In some manner, we all buried from the time we start, you know, until the time, I can't even say stop because like you and I after service and uniform, you are continuing to serve. But it's important that I think just in the evolution of any country or any initiative, if you will, if we want to see change, we have to be a part of the change. And we have to emulate the change. That's what's that I welcomed the burden at the same time, you know, and I think leaning on each other and doing things like this and getting around on the females and just venting out or just talking and then you find out you're not on an island by yourself. There's other people doing the same thing. And that can be uplifting for you to go fight another day. But I think the way we fight is important. How we heard, I have set back and I'm sure you have two, set back in room sometimes. Sometimes it's good to just observe, right? And you can watch and you watch the reactions say when another female may talk or you know, even another person of color, another from this, you name it, right? And just watch the reaction. So I've always learned to watch the reaction, right? Because in my head, I always think I have to know the game to play the game. So if my strategic move is not moving mountains, I need to pivot and try it another way because the end result might end goal is for them to be receptive. You put them whoever you want to put the them to be. But you want the people to be receptive. So how are you getting to that end goal? I kind of take a step back since I'm a make sure and reevaluate the how. Just what we have to do, but the how we go about doing it. Yeah, that's really great advice. It's so fascinating to hear you talk about that. And just like you shared your story and it resonated with my story and I didn't even realize how much pressure I put on myself, but then I was like, oh, I know exactly what you're talking about. And how we're not alone. Sometimes we feel alone, like we're the only one who feels that way. And then you have a conversation and you realize, no, you're not alone. I think everybody else. Let's get on with closer back to your career and go through some of the highlights of different things that you want to touch on. I'm not sure. I mean, you served during September 11, so I don't know if you want to talk about that or if there is another thing that sometimes there's hidden history in the 90s that people don't know about. Lots has happened, I guess in 30 years, right? You know, especially in the Marine Corps I think we were talking about how we joined and what was expected of women then and was expected now and I think everybody during that time frame can see their own change. So much, much has happened. We could be on a whole other podcast, but a couple of things to highlight, not just from the 90s. You kind of brought up September 11. That's the key for all the services. I think that was a good turn and point for all. It was different from their system. And the way we got into OIF and OEF and it's a shift for the whole country. So set them 11, again, for me being a New Yorker, you know, was definitely a real pivotal point in my career. It didn't really stop me from wanting to serve or thought I would serve more because I was already on that glide path to serving. But I served differently. You can be trained to be a warrior and is different when you got to really put it into action, right? So that's what symptom 11 to me did. It made everyone true warriors to me. Not just in concept. And not just because we was in garrison for so long, it really brought into putting into execution phase for a long time, as you know. But at the time of September 11 2001, I was serving on the drill field at the time. And for the Marine Corps, if you don't know, we had these words had, 'cause it's past tense now, had the only segregated boot camp at the time down at Paris island. So I was a Jewish doctor and all female battalion. And we trained all female recruits. And I just remember, we was just beginning a cycle when September 11th hit. But the Jules took that I was prior to that and that June stroke to I became, that's what I mean by training that next generation of warriors. It went from conceptual based tactics to really executing and getting into the mindset, not just from the concept, but in the heart and the culture of the recruits. Because we knew that when we graduated them, they were off. They were going just like the guy told me years ago, you're next. It was that kind of mentality shift. I wanted to put into the recruits from day one. That this is not a game. I need you to take everything seriously and we poured that into him. And even after that, you can see the difference in the way we train recruits. It was reality. It was a reality checks. And that started the mindset from the very, very, very beginning. I don't think we knew where I could talk for myself. If you was in an environment that wasn't deployed at that very exact time. Everybody was itching to get to the fight. Everybody was itching to get to the fight. And I remember there was a cut field that came across and it came across about this task force team to center Afghanistan to train the Afghans. And I put my name Manhattan, I put my name in and I was like, yes, send me send me send me. And then it came back out everyone whose name was the only one who got denied. But the reason I got denied was because I was a female, only reason I got denied and where they were going for this particular mission just a culture in Afghanistan would never had allowed for female to come in at the time. You know, again, bumping up against obstacles because of your gender. You know, and I personally learned not to take one under the fence, I was like, you gotta be kidding me. But when you get educated and learned the culture of the Afghan, then you realize how that would not have played at the time. So it took me a minute to get into the fight after the jewel film, but I had to learn. This is my role right now. So back, I need to train the recruits to get to the fight until I'm done with this duty. And then I, too, can get to the fight. But, you know, that just goes to show you that gender biases or just cultural things is not.

Afghanistan Robin Marine Corps Paris island garrison Jules Manhattan
"sergeant major" Discussed on Women of the Military

Women of the Military

07:03 min | 7 months ago

"sergeant major" Discussed on Women of the Military

"Cost my mind at the end of the day, it was definitely family and core. I still loved what I was doing. When I was growing into that, I was growing into my role. I was becoming an NCO, a non commission officer. So that was a big thing for a new recruits if you will enumerate become an NCO right now is becoming an NCL, so for the professional side, I felt like I had a path to grow here in the Marine Corps and I didn't want to let that go. But many women I think suffer from mommy guilt, or even men from parent guilt that where's the balance of an any job if it's a high demanding job, how do you balance family? And that's not just the military that's in any job. And that's where the next enlistment, if you will, and thereafter, that's where it came from. It was no longer about whether or not I was going to stay. It was how I stayed and how effectively I can balance the two because my work ethic and my family life was both important, right? And the more you pull on one side, the other suffers or at least sacrifices something. So how do I do that became my focus from a lot of point on one side listed once? I don't know, something to me. I knew at that point I would at least retire. I knew it. I said, I'm going to say, at that point, I just knew I was going to stay at least till 20, because that's just the path that was there. I was set. We are going to be a marine. So you're talking about being in the Marine Corps and the early 90s and I mean, there's not very many women in the marine and even in thing that you wrote for me where the few of the few. So what was it like to be a woman in the Marine Corps in the 90s and you were a single mom, right? No, I actually was married at this point. I was married to another marine back to your question about, yes, do military for one, but in the 90s, when things were still, you know, the relationship of gender equality was still a hot topic. And it wasn't uncommon just like many other people to be the only one. I think our numbers for the Marine Corps is still the smallest of all services back then we were average in around 7% now in 30 years or so, we've only increased till 9% working our way to ten, but this is why I said few of the few, because we just don't it's just not enough, if you will, it's just not a lot of female marines. So you always on guard of gender biases. And that's just from the beginning. You learned that you're going to face it. Some people face it better than others. I was one that can somewhat take adversity or be able to work and navigate my way through adversity without it depleting me or draining me so much. But it doesn't mean that it wasn't work. Constantly against gender biases that you faced in the workspace. Outside the workspace in programs and policies and everything that was set for you, you know, you needed to work harder. You know, and I know I took it to heart and always make sure I worked hard to ensure that I was representing not just myself, but I knew no matter what I did, I was representing the masses because that's just that's just how it was. Even to the day I retired and even now in retirement, that is always a constant, welcome burden, though, at the same time. But it's a constant for most females that they recognize that they have to go above and beyond at times to truly make the same impact as maybe an average male and then some. Just growing up in the Marine Corps in the 90s, I think I saw an experience a lot of changes, by the time I got to a position to where I can influence I was able to influence a lot of changes. So the longer I stayed in, even after 20 years, one of the reasons I stayed in the Marine Corps because I could have left out as well is I wanted to continue to serve because there wasn't that many at the level that I had achieved. And I knew that if I left right now, who would be at the table, we just don't have it, right? I mean, they just wasn't around, so many people would have tried out whether their bodies or they wanted to raise families for many different reasons. And I knew that it was important for somebody to continue on and be at the tables and be able to speak our piece and be a voice for the voice that you name and all those things that come with it. But I took on that burden early on, just watching the Jinder biases around me even from the 90s. So many different policies and, you know, so much fear amongst men to talk to women, and we were just so ostracized, you know, they were, you know, the Korea killers and all types of names and somebody has to endure. Somebody has to endure. So I think my generation in the 90s, we endured for our time, but before us, there was so much more that they do. And I felt like it was my responsibility to keep it on so that we can get to the level we are now. Still a lot of work to do, but we continue to push the ball forward. And did you feel any extra racism towards you as being a black female because I'm sure you were a minority as a woman, but you were also a minority as a minority in the Marine Corps? I mean, absolutely, a lot of systematic or hidden. So I know we can't see each other right now, but I stand 6 foot tall on a good day, right with boots on. So I have a posture that is overbearing if you will. Full woman. So many times I've learned that when I walk into a room, it's different from maybe a 5 foot two, you know, it's just a different posture. So mind didn't always approach me personally in the same manner, but you get the hidden isms and racism things like that. When you see different clicks and you know, over talking of a person, you know what I'm saying. The ostracism of so there's a lot of that that still continued on because you have to get used to being the only in the room whether it's for me the only person of color or and as male or female or the only female in a room, and how to I learned who thick skin how to be heard and how to add value. And I found that instead of complaining and being angry and you know, just just given up or those type of things that I wanted to probably do deep down inside, I felt that when I perform, I change mindsets based the color like my chisel, right? If I can perform in my box, and I'm chisling on a mindset without really being political about it or to a point where they're not receptive. And you can see it changed. I can recall starting a job at a section or whatever. And you could see the reception of me when I first get there and then throughout the time I'm chisel in mindsets based on my performance, my knowledge, being proficient, staying on top of my game, outdoing them in a lot of different ways. And with that, you could tell in the back end, the chiseling of how they saw people of color and how they saw women. And.

Marine Corps NCO Korea
"sergeant major" Discussed on Women of the Military

Women of the Military

07:52 min | 7 months ago

"sergeant major" Discussed on Women of the Military

"For you with desert storm. Exactly, because, you know, definitely oblivious to world problems, because with shelter a little bit, you know, depending on where you're from, but just shelter from a lot of the tragedies that definitely incur on the international platform. So I had no idea that that's would be entrusted to me, you know, to me, I'm still a young girl from New York City, not the warrior that I was trained to be at the time. And I think that has a lot to do with the mindset. So yeah, you're absolutely right, at least from the beginning. That one sharp tone and that one shot comment. It was like, it stopped everything else and was like, oh, the reality is he's right, you know. We definitely, if it would have lasted longer, we definitely would have been the next wave to go. Absolutely would have. It just didn't last as long as OIF and we have. But if it did, we definitely would have been the next ones to go. It was an eye opener. But again, it wasn't that we shied away or ran from it. It's just it was just an eye opener for a young 18 year old that yes, this is real, and it's not just for play play, it's not girl scouts of boy scout. This is a national service. So. Yeah, that's an interesting start to your career and just to see and hear the impact that ads. So you said that you did really well and you were getting promoted and were you enjoying your time in the marines? Absolutely. I think that's important, right? Because everybody's journey is different. And there's decisions that has to be made once your contract is up. And like I said, I think people to me make a difference. The leadership you have your first four years has a huge impact on how you stay in. Tell me all the time. Try not to leave the Marine Corps because of people, you know, make sure it's something you want to do, but don't let people guide that. I grew into that concept. My first full year is thankfully I was blessed with good leadership. And no, every day was not a rose garden, but I had a great cadre of NCOs who was able to take me under their wing. I'm blessed with that because I didn't join necessarily so polished. I'm gonna be honest with you. I really wasn't. As a city kid, it took me a minute to really understand military ways, right? It just took me a minute. But the leadership is what, and not coddled, they demanded from me, but I was able to step up to that plate. Then they just kept demanding different ways of behavior that was expected of marines. And I was able to step up to that play. Thankfully, because of them, it wasn't about, you know, killing my career or right me up or anything like that. It was leading and guiding because at the end of the day, you're 18, 19 years old, right? So you have to mature into the actual job. And once I did that, it continued on because I always had to work ethic. Think foundationally, my mother always put a good work ethic in me. So that part wasn't the problem. It was just learning how the discipline of being in the actual military. So that was helpful. Like I stated I was able to get put up on my choice boards. I worked my butt off to study for them and perform. And that was recognized. So I was able to flee up a little bit faster than my peer group. At the same time, some of the largest struggles my first year is that like many women sometimes they get caught up and I'm no different. You know, I managed to get to some major, but I was last cooked at some point. And I became pregnant in my first enlistment, which can deter a lot of people back then, this is 30 years ago. We were given a choice. So women have evolved in the military. Back then, I was given a choice that I could have gotten out of the record simply because I was pregnant. And that was something I had to think about. And I did, but I chose to stay in. I felt like watching some of the other lady marines who had already done it, ahead of me, they were thriving and being a marine and a mom, having someone to see and to witness that helped my decision. If I was surrounded by nothing but men say, I might have this way to get out, 'cause I might have felt like I couldn't do it. But I had an example of success where they were thriving and still being a mother to their kids. And also I just had to stop and think, okay, this is possible to do. And I watched my mother work hard and still raise kids. So that was not foreign to me. So I continued on and I was like, no, I'm going to stay in. And, you know, I was warned, it's going to be tough and I'm up on. But it was finding that Marine Corps family to continue and make that happen and still serve well. I vow to myself that that moment like around that time I vowed to myself then that my child would never be a crutch for me and it would never be excused because I saw what that was important. I needed to make sure I balanced them both. Interesting that you talked about the role that you could get out. And it's almost like that rule is there to make you think that you needed to get out, but you were lucky and you had examples of women who had done it and were leading the way and had you not had those. You kind of would have been like, well, they're telling me that I can get out. So maybe I'm supposed to get out. So it's interesting how rules like that. That was a rule when I was in in 2007 and it changed, I think it's only recently changed in the last few years, so it's crazy how much change has happened and how much the stigma around women getting pregnant changes when you remove that type of role. Absolutely. Right. It changed it through was removed, right? Like, okay, this is something I signed up for. This is my obligation. This is something I have to make happen instead of having an out per se. You know, the more we have evolved in the military, the more women that join, and our role, our roles within the military, has changed dramatically, as you know. And that has put us on the equal playing field that yes, you can balance family and being in the military at the same time. Difficult. Don't get me wrong in different challenges as we'll speak about. But it is doable. And it's a prominent thing to say you serve men and women. And to do it underneath those stressful types of conditions and be successful on the back end. But the key part as you know is the representation. You know, like I mean, even now, I think females just need to see that it's possible to see what's in the realm of a possible so happened and they were young NCOs, and that's what made it even more relevant to me because they were closer to my age, and it wasn't thought fetched. There was something there close and at every level I think that's just important that we have those mentors. They don't have to be a sign they're not going to be formal, but just leadership by example, I watched them without them even though I was watching them. And I saw what I needed to do. You know, and they thankfully behaved themselves in a model sense that I can emulate. What was it like to go from being a young marine and then being a young woman who was also a mom? How did you find the balance to keep going? And when it was time to realize to decide to stay in, did you feel like you had to stay in because you needed to provide for your child or did you feel like, no, this is the right thing to do? This is what I want to do. I don't want to man the great questions. I think a little bit of both. I think definitely in my mindset was now there's an added human being. You know, who is dependent upon me and I definitely needed to provide. So I definitely know that at the time, I didn't have many of the options. So going home, I always ask myself, go home and do what? You know, I was be starting all over where once again, when you saw a family thriving in the military, or I can stay provide certain benefits for my child for myself and get my family if you will at the time to a level that we can actually operate on both sides. So I think both of them cost my mind. You know, I'm trying to think back 26.

marines Marine Corps New York City
"sergeant major" Discussed on Women of the Military

Women of the Military

06:48 min | 7 months ago

"sergeant major" Discussed on Women of the Military

"You're listening to season three of the women of the military podcast. Here you will find the real stories of female service members. I'm Amanda Huffman. I am an air force veteran, military spouse and mom. I created a woman in the military podcast in 2019 as a place to share the stories of female service members past and present with the goal of finding the heart of the story while uncovering the triumphs and challenges women face while serving in the military. If you want to be encouraged by the stories of military women and be inspired to change the world, keep tuned for this latest episode of women in the military. Women of the military podcast would like to thank sabio coding boot camp for sponsoring this week's episode. Savio coding boot camp is a top ranked coding boot camp that is a 100% dedicated to helping smart and highly motivated individuals become exceptional, software engineers. Visit their website at WWW SA B IO LA to learn how you may be able to use your GI bill benefits to train at savio. Your tuition and monthly BH type and maybe pay during your training period. They are also a 100% committed and helping you find your first job in tech. So don't forget to head over to WWW savio LA to learn more and now let's get started with this week's interview. Welcome to the show ramen. I'm excited to have you here. Yes, I'm excited to be here. Thank you for having me. So let's start with why did you decide to join the Marine Corps? Oh, awesome question. I get asked that so often. And I think my ass is typical for some people. I was born and raised in New York City and I was born and raised by a single parent. So by the time I got to high school, I just remember by my junior year thinking, what am I going to do next? Many people was going to a college trips and things like that. But because I was very single hard work and mom, don't get me wrong, but I also didn't want to put the burden on her, although she was more than happy to take the burden. When I say that because when I graduated, she I made a promise to her that I would do at least one year college. And I did. And she sent me to college on her own dime, but it's just something in me as the daughter. I just didn't want to put that burden on her. So since junior year high school, I knew I was going to do something different and pay my own way through school. That was my thought process then. And the military was one of those ways to make that happen. Not that in here, but the record got in a much about the Marine Corps. So that was attractive to me because it was something different. But I didn't know much about it and nobody in my family that I knew of had ever joined the Marine Corps. They all joined the army. So I wanted to be different, do something more challenging. And that's how I walked into. I walked into the recruiter's office and just that was my journey. I didn't know where it would take me. And honestly, I didn't even talk about school. I just wanted a platform to get out of your yoga just not put the burden on my mom and just get that transition between young adults and adulthood. Lo and behold, never knew that I would actually enjoy being a marine and continue to serve. Yeah, so you were looking for something a little bit different and the Marine Corps is definitely different. And you didn't want to be a burden to your mom, single parent, who had to work really hard and you saw the military as an opportunity to make that happen. And so were you initially planning on just serving the first enlistment? Exactly. Initially planted with just serving four years, right? That's what they tell me. Although when you're 18, four years sounds like eternity already, right? So I was like, yes, that's all you're getting out of me is four years. But like I said, those four years a lot transpired, you know, I had to grow up really, really fast. I joined underneath the logistics platform. I was a supply clerk, if you will, and I did well at the job. I didn't know exactly what that entailed at first. Once I started getting into it, I was doing well. I was getting meritorious promotions. And I was like, wow, okay, this is different than what I thought. It wasn't just the 9 to 5. It was a lot more in tail to it. Does it shield? Does a storm had kicked off right as I got out of boot camps? I didn't have to go, but we had the back end of it where people were coming back. And folks is telling us stories and things like that. So it felt bigger than just me at that point. And I knew then it was a bigger cause, right? So I was like, oh, wow, this is not just your in here for the 9 to 5. There really is a cultural shifting your mindset that, you know, this is national security. This is for bigger reason than me. So that gravitated with me and I continued to keep that warrior type of mentality. You know, I didn't know where it was going to take me. I really didn't. And listening was just a new adventure, a new adventure. So again, we will continue, but that's kind of how I got started in the military. Yeah, so as you were going through boot camp, did you guys know anything about what was going on in the desert storm desert shield area and you were aware of what was happening? Good question. And I mean, honestly, no. It wasn't a topic of discussion at all. And then when you're 18, you don't always watch the news, right? So I wasn't fully aware, it was when we graduated at a boot camp and went to our MOS school for me, it was the suppliers school a camp lejeune North Carolina. I remember watching it, it was January in 1991 and I just remember watching on the news with everybody else, thinking how will this affect us, right? So you just kind of watching the marines land ashore. And it's like, oh wow, that's that's kind of what I do now. And I remember checking into my first unit in somebody, you know, just a random NCO, you know, everybody got something to say to the newbies anyway, right? And I remember vividly at everything else that they probably said, one person said to us and he said, don't unpack. That was his word, so I was like, don't unpack your next type of thing. So of course, you know, you get the butterflies like, oh shoot. This is real. This is real. But that was my introduction to when you joined the service what it means to serve. And what that is, you know, you are holding up your anti defend the constitution from all enemies foreign and domestic. And that could possibly mean, yes, you may go into harm's way. So at least what's introduced to that early on that I had to be ready to go into harm's way. Yeah, it sounds like it played a big impact in kind of like shifting your focus. Kind of like me, I was kind of like clueless, and then, you know, the military, I was like, oh, yeah. Before September 11th, that was like, oh, the world is happy. Everything's great. And then September 11th happened and everything changed. And I shifted my perspective and eventually led me to the military and it sounds like it was kind.

Marine Corps Amanda Huffman sabio WWW SA Savio New York City LA army marines North Carolina
Crush at Kabul airport kills 7 as Afghans try to flee

AP News Radio

01:00 min | 9 months ago

Crush at Kabul airport kills 7 as Afghans try to flee

"The British military says at least seven Afghans died in a panicked crush of people trying to enter Kabul's International Airport thousands are still trying to flee the country a week after the Taliban takeover in the scene at the gates of Kabul airport has been chaotic at times with people camping outside them for days allied troops are trying to manage the ground as the check documents British army sergeant major dance but man many see the process is working the common stock available it was not good that's how things turn Saturday transports some succumb to the heat with temperatures above ninety degrees Fahrenheit others may have been trampled suffocated for suffered heart attacks Caliban fighters fired into the air to try to drive the crowds back the Taliban have pledged amnesty to those who worked with the U. S. NATO and the toppled government but many Afghans still fear revenge attacks I'm Ben Thomas

Gates Of Kabul Airport Kabul Taliban International Airport British Army Caliban U. S. Nato Ben Thomas
The Army Is Expanding Allowed Hairstyles For Women

Weekend Edition Sunday

03:11 min | 1 year ago

The Army Is Expanding Allowed Hairstyles For Women

"For years, Most women in the U. S Army were required to wear their hair short or pinned back into a very tight bond that time has now passed. Earlier This year, the Army began allowing women who spent most of their day away from the field freedom from the bun. And this month, the army updated that changed to allow female soldiers. A little more freedom. I actually started Tolo practice braiding my hair because I was so excited that we were going to be able to braid our hair and wear ponytails that Sergeant Nickel Pierce, who works at Fort Sill in Oklahoma, she's been able to wear braids and ponytails since January, and now she's able to wear them untucked so long as they don't go past her shoulder blades, thanks to the update to the updated grooming policy. Major Terry Taylor, stationed at Fort Stewart in Georgia has enjoyed not having to chemically relaxed her hair because locks, braids, twists and cornrows can come together in one or two braids or a ponytail and still meet regulation with lax. There is a style called barrel rolls. And which are hair can be rolled back. Taylor usually pins up the ends, but now she can leave them free if she wants very professional and appearance very neat. And it's very user friendly because that style can last at least two weeks, so that allows me to not have to manipulate my hair is much no loose ends from Major Farren Um, A Campbell in Silver Spring. Maryland. Yes, so in the Army on pretty much known as the bald major within my unit on the only bold female she suffered hair damage and loss after years, wearing her hair in a tight bun. And she's not alone. Many black women soldiers reported having that experience Major Campbell says she's happy. The U. S Army allows her to be bald by choice and do shave my head and it's been a very freeing change within a regulation. It's not just comfort here. Thick hair buns make it difficult for women to wear their helmets properly, making it low on the eyes, sometimes obscuring vision. Ah, problem when you have to aim your weapon. We've all mentioned. Some of these things were long overdue that Sergeant Major Jennifer Francis of the U. S. Army Institute for Surgical Research at Fort Sam in Houston, Texas, She was on the panel that gave input to leadership about updating the grooming guidelines. We are an army and we can't necessarily do everything civilians are doing so we've got to figure out what's best for the Army. And its people. Women now make up about 15% of the U. S. Army, and about a third of those are black. Many see rules against certain hairstyles as outdated at best discriminatory at worst. Major Terry Taylor, now set to retire after two decades of service says how a soldier wears her hair when she's on base does not change her leaf aladi or her professionalism. Who's to say that a ponytail is not professional in appearance? Who's to say the locks are not professional in appearance as long as you can, probably where your headgear and look professional in your uniforms. I think that's what matters at the end of the day. The army now joins the Navy, the air Force and Space Force Yes, Space force when it comes to allowing loose

U. S Army Army Sergeant Nickel Pierce Terry Taylor Farren Um Fort Sill Fort Stewart Major Campbell Sergeant Major Jennifer Franci U. S. Army Institute For Surgi Oklahoma Fort Sam Georgia Taylor Campbell Maryland U. S. Army Houston Texas
"sergeant major" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

KTLK 1130 AM

01:41 min | 1 year ago

"sergeant major" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

"It was Sergeant Major. Mitch. Help camp from the 34th The cab on Minnesota Military radio. Please stay with us. We'll be right back. You listeningto Minnesota Military radio on Twin Cities. News Talk. Am 11 30. The number one request of soldiers is take care of my family. And that's exactly what the Minnesota Military Family Foundation does We take care of the military family in times of financial crisis. Please donate at Minnesota Military family Foundation. That or GTA pending too much free time. Check in the fridge. Want something actually fun to do instead? Why not play best beans? Best Means is the five star rated puzzle game. You can play on your phone over 100 Million downloads already, so why not join in? With new levels and new characters on the way this means is ever expanding. So come challenge your brainpower and download best scenes for free from the APP store or Google play. That's friends. Without the our best scenes. They stays down D A V of Minnesota transportation program leads the nation by providing writes the nearly 25,000 weapons per year with the efforts of volunteer drivers all across the state. Devi of Minnesota. Working with our county veteran service officers provides veterans with reliable transportation to and from the medical appointments at no cost to the veterans. You can help our veterans by volunteering with the D A. V of Minnesota transportation program. There's a need for volunteer drivers all across the state. Contact D A. V M and adored. That's devi mn dot org. I don't really know. Okay, it's window. Nope dot What? It's America's new favorite cereal. Lindahl, Leo's exit. Gonna lay down your doctor programming doing Wow..

"sergeant major" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

01:39 min | 1 year ago

"sergeant major" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"And, uh Wow, I, uh I have a screen, so I feel like I could actually do a program today Moments ago in the White House. They're Waas a Medal of honor ceremony. This is Guy by the name of Army Sergeant Major Thomas Paine. I always thought Sergeant majors in the Army where a bunch of old growth guys But then I was a young guy when they're all drenched old guys. Anyway, this he doesn't look very 36. I think Anyway, he received the Medal of honor just moments ago. For his heroism in a daring special ops raid in northern Iraq that liberated 75, Iraq civilians. This is interesting that it's on 9 11. And here is the military attache reading what he did in the East Room of the White House Moments ago. The Medal of Honor is awarded to Sergeant first class Thomas P. Pain United States Army for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond The call of duty. October 22nd 2015. His heroism and selfless actions were key to liberating 75 hostages during a contested rescue mission. The resulted in 20 enemies killed in action Sergeant first class pains, gallantry under fire and uncommon valor are in keeping with the highest traditions of military service. And reflect great credit upon himself. The United States Special Operations Command in the United States Army..

Sergeant Major Thomas Paine Thomas P. Pain United States A White House United States Army United States Special Operatio Army Iraq
Soldier receives Medal of Honor for rescue mission in Iraq

Hugh Hewitt

00:33 sec | 1 year ago

Soldier receives Medal of Honor for rescue mission in Iraq

"President Trump is honored a US soldier for his role in rescuing dozens of hostages who were sent to the executed by Islamic state militants in Iraq. During a White House ceremony, the president awarded the Medal of Honor to Sergeant Major Thomas Patrick Pain who came under enemy fire during a daring mission in 2015 Pain, repeatedly entered a burning building to save hostages. He received orders to evacuate, but it refused to do so. He didn't want to leave anyone behind. Pain was initially given the Army's second highest award for the special Operations raid, which was upgraded to a Medal of honor.

Sergeant Major Thomas Patrick Pain President Trump White House Iraq United States Army
"sergeant major" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

02:45 min | 1 year ago

"sergeant major" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"Your brother, Your brother's A successful one of the family command, Sergeant Major, You're telling me I have four brothers, and this is they're all more success. Yeah, really proud. We're really proud of mad. So he just retired 36 years in the Military. Really an amazing command. Sergeant Major Lee went to work where his love was He Waas command Sergeant Major for the Warrior transition project that looks after Worldwide for the Army wounded warriors, and now he went with the wounded Warrior project project and in the U. S. And Man, He just He just loves veterans. That's outstanding with you. And what the president on for the You know, it's just that this place and now they got accountability, Congressman Cam Brady and finding greater president who wears on his sleeve. His pro life pro God, pro Israel. Pro to Ridley or sins, pallets of untraceable money to the Iranians. This is a guy who stands up for God and the unborn. He's just loved by America. Final thoughts, Congressman Brady No, I think that's exactly right. And then you know, watching at the Democratic convention, part of it in the Republic, But a contrast them Crest message was America's been rotten. Writing since its founding riding for 244 years, it still is and the only guy who could say this is a guy who's been washing for half a century and no one can name a single achievement of his first of the president. Optimistic promises kept a land of heroes, opportunity and greatness, Man, I I don't see I don't see how this is even a close race. But when you've been attacked mercilessly for four years, this president have as I understand. This is this could be a tight race, but we're goingto deliver at home here in Texas. Love it. If you need a dose of Texas Red State conservatism, visit the eighth Congressional District of Texas, which is represented by this guy, Good, pro life, pro gun, pro Israel. So America got Congressman Kevin Brady Super K. Great to have you on have a blessed a day weekend. I look for to seeing with the next pro life event. The same friend. Thanks very much, Sam. You got it. Congressman Brady with us visiting on the Mike Gallagher show and I always bump into the congressman. He really does walk to walk and talk to talk for the unborn. Wei have. Obviously we have a lot of a lot of pro life. Strengthen our state and the congressman is so many events and has to sit through my pouring jokes when I'm on the mic, these pro life events. Congressman Kevin Brief, representing the eighth Congressional District.

Congressman Brady congressman Sergeant Major president America Sergeant Major Lee Texas Congressional District Kevin Brady Israel Ridley Wei Mike Gallagher Kevin Brief Sam
Soldier to receive Medal of Honor for Iraq hostage rescue

AP News Radio

00:45 sec | 1 year ago

Soldier to receive Medal of Honor for Iraq hostage rescue

"The AP has learned an American soldier who helped rescue about seventy hostages set to be executed in Iraq has been approved to receive the medal of honor the hostages were rescued in twenty fifteen sergeant major Thomas Patrick Kane is a ranger assigned to the army special operations command the first rescue attempt failed pain in his unit climbed over a wall and entered the prison compound the team used bolt cutters to break the locks up the prison doors frame nearly forty hostages thirty more were taken out of a burning building there was heavy fighting pain said at that point Islamic state group fighters began to detonate their suicide vests the South Carolina native is a Purple Heart recipient from a wound sustained in a twenty ten mission in Afghanistan at Donahue Washington

AP Iraq Thomas Patrick Kane Army Afghanistan Donahue Washington Pain South Carolina
Soldier to receive Medal of Honor for Iraq hostage rescue

AP News Radio

00:45 sec | 1 year ago

Soldier to receive Medal of Honor for Iraq hostage rescue

"The AP has learned an American soldier who helped rescue about seventy hostages set to be executed in Iraq has been approved to receive the medal of honor the hostages were rescued in twenty fifteen sergeant major Thomas Patrick Kane is a ranger assigned to the army special operations command the first rescue attempt failed pain in his unit climbed over a wall and entered the prison compound the team used bolt cutters to break the locks up the prison doors frame nearly forty hostages thirty more were taken out of a burning building there was heavy fighting pain said at that point Islamic state group fighters began to detonate their suicide vests the South Carolina native is a Purple Heart recipient from a wound sustained in a twenty ten mission in Afghanistan at Donahue Washington

AP Iraq Thomas Patrick Kane Army Afghanistan Donahue Washington Pain South Carolina
Soldier to receive Medal of Honor for Iraq hostage rescue

AP News Radio

00:45 sec | 1 year ago

Soldier to receive Medal of Honor for Iraq hostage rescue

"The AP has learned an American soldier who helped rescue about seventy hostages set to be executed in Iraq has been approved to receive the medal of honor the hostages were rescued in twenty fifteen sergeant major Thomas Patrick Kane is a ranger assigned to the army special operations command the first rescue attempt failed pain in his unit climbed over a wall and entered the prison compound the team used bolt cutters to break the locks up the prison doors frame nearly forty hostages thirty more were taken out of a burning building there was heavy fighting pain set at that point Islamic state group fighters began to detonate their suicide vest the South Carolina native is a Purple Heart recipient from a wound sustained in a twenty twenty mission in Afghanistan at Donahue Washington

AP Iraq Thomas Patrick Kane Army Afghanistan Donahue Washington Pain South Carolina
interview With Marine Gunnery Sgt. Justin LeHew

Jocko Podcast

07:10 min | 1 year ago

interview With Marine Gunnery Sgt. Justin LeHew

"This is Jaakko podcast number two, forty, two with Echo Charles and me Jaakko willink. Good Evening Echo, meet evening. The president of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross. To Gunnery Sergeant Justin de la Hugh. United States Marine Corps. For extraordinary heroism. As Amphitheater Assault Platoon Sergeant Company a First Battalion Second Marines. Task Force. Tarawa. I Marine Expeditionary Force in support of operation. Iraqi Freedom. On Twenty three and twenty, four. March two, thousand, three. As regimental combat to attack north towards on Nasariyah Iraq lead elements of the battalion came under heavy enemy fire. When the beleaguered United States Army Five, hundred seventh maintenance company convoy was spotted in the distance. Gunnery Sergeant La Hugh and his crew were dispatched to rescue the soldiers. Under constant enemy fire. He led the rescue team to the soldiers. With total disregard for his own welfare he assisted the evacuation effort of four soldiers, two of whom were critically wounded. While still receiving enemy fire, he climbed back into his vehicle and immediately began suppressing enemy infantry. During, the subsequent. Company attack on the Eastern Bridge over the afraid he's river gunnery sergeant. Hugh continuously exposed himself to withering enemy fire during the three hour urban firefight. His courageous battlefield presence inspired Marines to fight a determined foe that allowed him to physician his platoon's heavy machine-guns to repel numerous waves of attackers. In the midst of the battle and amphibious assault vehicle was destroyed, killing or wounding all its occupants gunnery sergeant La- hugh immediately move to recover the nine Marines. He again exposed himself to a barrage of fire as he worked for nearly an hour recovering casualties from the wreckage. By his. Display of decisive leadership unlimited courage in the face of heavy enemy fire. And utmost devotion to duty. Gunnery Sergeant La- Hugh reflected great credit upon himself. And upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps. And the United States. Naval Service. And That is. A. Citation. About. One episode. In one marine's life. And it doesn't explain everything in that marines life nor does it explain everything about the Marine Corps? But. It does give eight? Glimpse. into. What Marines do? and. What are American servicemen are capable of, but it's only a glimpse. And you know these these citations. Throughout the military when you when you go to different military bases, not been too many many military bases around the country around the world, these these citations of heroic wards. oftentimes, they're they're posted in various places around the based on on the walls in the classrooms on quarter decks. and. Throughout my career starting as a young. Young. Kid I would stop. And I would read through these. These citations and I would always wish to myself. I would always wish that I could meet these men. And I could talk to them. And I could learn from them and I could see what they were. What they were really like. And with that in mind. It is an absolute honor today to have that opportunity as. Sergeant major retired Justin La- hugh is. Joining us. To share the experiences that he had and the lessons that he learned. In his service in his life. Justin. Honor to have year. Thanks for coming out. It's honored to be here with you today Jaakko and you, etc.. I Um. Every every time I get to talk to somebody and just learn from their experiences and man I've had the opportunity in a we were talking a little bit about this. You know the the opportunity, some of the people that have come on this podcast just unbelievable to to capture their lessons from guys that were on Tarawa e Jima. And just incredible and it's an honor for me to sit here and and be able to. Capture some of these lessons for for people not just not just soldiers not just marines. But just people. So, that we can learn from. Let's. Let's start at the beginning. What started let's start at where you came from. So you were born in. Columbus Grove Ohio is that right Columbus, Ohio small little farm community, but two thousand people. Think it's been upper down of one hundred over the past one hundred years does up there. Kinda was like any Norman Rockwell painting that you would ever say and it was a great place to grow up when I was younger, it was a play she didn't lock your doors. It was a place where parents told you to be in by the time the street lights came on. I truly was like the fabric of America You grew up playing Little League Baseball Pony League Baseball You grew up knowing every kid in the two schools that were in town because it was kind of like a little Northern Ireland it was either Protestants and Catholics wasn't anything else. It was kind of those two choices and for grades one through eight there was the Catholic school that was on the other side of the railroad tracks, and then there was the public school and then you knew by sports and buy. Your neighbors you knew everybody and it didn't matter if it was K. through twelve, you knew the kindergarteners because you were school with their brothers and sisters. It was a really tight very hard working community

Sergeant La- Hugh United States Marine Corps First Battalion Second Marines Marine Corps United States Sergeant Company Assault I Marine Expeditionary Force America Echo Charles United States Army Five Jaakko Iraq President Trump Norman Rockwell Naval Service Tarawa E Jima Navy Cross Ohio Justin
"sergeant major" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

03:34 min | 1 year ago

"sergeant major" Discussed on WTOP

"6 51 Michael Princeton is the sergeant major of the army that is the most senior enlisted member of that service. He calls himself by racial or black and white after the death of George Florida, took to Twitter about the need to fix the nation and the Army's racial problems. On this week's edition of the GOP's podcast Color is a dialogue on race in America with Chris Core and J. J Green. He talks about his personal struggles with racial identity. I think way talk to each other, but maybe we're talking past each other. So the first part of that now is the time to listen and for Maybe the first time and maybe 245 years. That's how long we've had the Army you know to actually listen to what the other person's saying You could see it in our country. You could see it in our soldiers. We've been saying these things, but maybe we're not receiving all the messages. So that was one and not actually know there's words coming out. But the actually here and maybe empathize with the pain. Of what we're going through. So the first pieces actually listen and try to empathize with what's going on. But then I I really want to take it even further and actually taken action. Meaning what? You hear something? Don't just, you know, do what we've been doing going up. Yeah, that's terrible. Just, um actually say, hey, this isn't what we need to do. And we need to fix it. Whatever this is on, we need to do that. Now. Don't wait. And then, Lastly, you know, stand tall for your nation is, um you know, I love the army and I love being in the army for 32 years Is that um, you know, we are a diverse military. I think we've enlisted side. We've done extremely well. But you know, don't don't. I just didn't want to disregard all that way. We have a long way to go with all the things that were going on in the country right now, But I still wanted to stand tall. Be proud of what we've done. But, uh, how are we going to move forward? You say that you have had a difficult time your whole life struggling with your racial identity. Can you explain to me why it is a struggle? Well, you just and if you saw the way, Twitter, you know, sometimes you know, you know what? Enough for the white people, and sometimes you're not black enough for the bike people. That's what that was. The struggle is where do I fit in? You know, I just tried to be the best version of May. I could be regardless of the race, and I think that's what everybody wants. Michael Princeton is the sergeant major of the US Army and download colors on Friday evenings on Apple podcast podcast one Spotify or wherever you get your podcast. What many of us headed into the pandemic lockdowns hoping to stay fit? Nice try could be time for a rest first and foremost, Don't beat yourself up. The Wall Street Journal says she'll have your good days in your bad is just settle back into your routine, which may continue to change and develop for now, and so will your workouts, The Journal says. Make sure to carve out a window of time for workouts in meal prep with every schedule change. And the website. The art of Healthy Living puts a big emphasis on consistency, Mark your workout times on a calendar and then stick to the schedule. No matter what it says. Moving your workout time around is OK, but completely skipping it even for just one day isn't great because you may find it easier to justify skipping again in the future. Joan Jones w T o P News still ahead. If you're house hunting. What's a cove in 19 addendum? I'm Jeff Global, 6 54.

Army Michael Princeton sergeant major of the army Twitter US Army J. J Green GOP Chris Core George Florida America Joan Jones The Wall Street Journal Jeff Global Apple Spotify
"sergeant major" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

KTLK 1130 AM

03:22 min | 1 year ago

"sergeant major" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

"Welcome back to Minnesota Military radio. I'm your host Tom Lions. We've been talking to Brigadier General Mike Wickman. In command Sergeant Major Stephan Oi head who are both out at the first Brigade's training at the National Training Center at Fort Irwin, California, and we learned about the background of that in the first segment and A certain major. I want to come to you for a minute How our soldiers doing out there and they're just getting started. They're going to go out into the back soon. A cz morale I and how are they feeling? Well, you know, if you heard from general this morning that you know the lovely whether we have a sort of known here, it takes a few days for the soldiers to adapt to the warm weather we have here with the new job leaders. They're doing a good job and ensure that drinking water and stay hydrated so they could deal with this heat. And also the general comes to the European box here, make sure they're staying with the cold stuff. No way have two years from the standard military uniform. But now we're through another layer department to make sure that the soldiers were wearing their masks. We will make sure that their station and every amateur possible so when they get down here, we won't you know they're doing really well, other really well. Start major little extra problem to solve this year with the groan of Iris. I understand you got some extra medical personnel there, and you've got the space to Ah, quarantine any troops that might come down with that and and that you're you're watching everybody closely. And of course your soldiers learn quickly, don't they? Well, you know our medics phenomenal job when it comes to taking care of our soldiers, General Minnesota when they got here, and any colder comes up and having any symptoms, or they may think they're feeling ill. The manager right there taking care of woman They know, by the way they do and the way we have affected a separate area that will put the soldiers in them all week for this test to come back. Just to make sure that we're not spreading in error explored in U. S soldiers. So our medics right now doing a phenomenal job. We have area No in the box. If you're into separate folders as well and back here in the cantonment area, so we have plenty of space for the shoulders to be separated from the other soldiers as well. So, Sergeant Major, can you walk us through the last couple days in the next week or so they they arrive, And there's no time for time for Lally gig and they have to gather up their gear get organized. Get ready to go into the box and And then they've got to go in there and try to take on that enemy and keep them on their heels for the next week. Actually general when they hit the ground. The first thing we did to make sure we tested everybody make sure it was clear and ready to go, but didn't getting rest time. They went straight from one to get the message that their clear straining to prep the vehicle's prepping their equipment. And then once they're done, they're rolling off. He'll run away. And right now they're doing today that finishing up their unit training time. To start the fight tonight. Those away and it's fourth and four fighting against enemies night for the next several days, so there's no arrests. There's no ref world and they're constantly pushed general saying this is where we will make sure everything possible to make sure that when they go to the next level disappointment They're ready for so they're being pushed hard and doing a phenomenal job. Go to prepare yourself making attractions really needs to be and adapting to.

Sergeant Major Stephan Oi Sergeant Major General Minnesota Mike Wickman Tom Lions Minnesota Fort Irwin Brigade National Training Center California Iris Lally U. S
The Army's top enlisted service member opens up about race

Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

05:33 min | 2 years ago

The Army's top enlisted service member opens up about race

"Sergeant Major Michael Grinstein is the highest ranking enlisted member of the US army and he took to twitter to share a very personal video message about race. And our army, we have to trust and understand one another. We have to be willing to tell our stories. Here's part of my story. I was born in nineteen sixty eight. Father was black. My mother was flying. When I was three, they divorced and I moved Alabama. Racial identity is something that I struggle with my entire life. Coming to grips with both sides, my Daddy! At one point I decided I would put. Black on the form. And at that time only had two choices. So ended the form that I was given to the lady, and she says that's not funny. What are you talking about? Said you should mark that. I said well. I explained are black and white. have too many choices or anything else on that. Sometimes by life on felt like. It's in the movie the Greenberg where. The actor gets out of the car and he says I'm not black enough for the black people not wide enough for the white, people. That's my story. Here more of his story right now. Sergeant Major Michael Grinstein. Thank you very much for being on the PODCAST. Sure for hosting and I look forward to discussing so you told CBS Sunday morning that your driver's license listed. You cough occasion. When when you enlisted in one, thousand, nine, hundred, eighty, seven, as a result of that. You checked Caucasian, but then you had. An opportunity to check that box again and that's when you checked. Black in the lady said that's not funny. What changed in you in your life? For you to make that change? This was one of those things that. You know I struggle with You know my whole life I mean. You know because people would always ask and even in that same interview, people would say well. You know my you know as I travel around I got older people. Just you know. Walk up and say what are you? which is I, said in the interview was probably the worst thing you could say to anybody and almost brought. You would get was human, and then I'd probably say what are you? But I think for me. It was coming to grips with both sides of me and who I was as a person you know I was I was really proud that i. feel you know a proud of both sides of me? and I struggled with that my whole life. Because there was everybody wanted to put me. in the box box that was And in in my, In my twitter video I said was When I watched the movie Greenberg. I really identified with that character in there when he said you know I'm not. I'm not enough for the bike, people and not wide enough for the white people. So when I when I checked that block it was Kinda myself actualization that there are two scientific. And I and I can be proud of both sides of me. Sergeant major can I get you because that was the line. And he came at the very end of your of your twitter video which I found very moving, and I would love for you to just to flesh out that line I'm not black enough for black people. How were you not black enough? Give you another story then, and this is actually recently. So I was I I'm trying not to. You. Know I really don't want to say exactly where it was I. don't want make any body upset. But I was I'll say a year ago. I was leaving installation. And you know there's there's both I you know. Sometimes I don't even know why we have all these racial blocks on the fort. Does it really matter? But there was a and I said look. You Know Comfortable Ama-. AD, Tech Black! And In I was going in the hospital for surgery and It was an African American female and she looks at me. and. I mean like. Really and And I well. My father's I just like this. My father is black. My mom is white. What would you like me to? And this is her words. We'll put other. so that's what I mean You know I that's I I can't say it. Any other way is when you get those looks from everybody You know that's that's that's the only way I can explain to. You. what it feels like when you know, you're not black there.

Sergeant Major Michael Grinste Twitter Greenberg Us Army Alabama CBS
Climate Change May Make The Snapping Shrimp Snap Louder

Environment: NPR

02:54 min | 2 years ago

Climate Change May Make The Snapping Shrimp Snap Louder

"See if you can guess what this sound is Bacon frying. Maybe a crackling fire. Nope it is underwater snapping shrimp there only a few inches long but among the loudest animals in the ocean. Thanks to climate change. They are getting even louder. That's according to new research and that could affect a lot of other sea life as NPR's Lawrence Summer reports dive into tropical seas and that crackly sound is hard to miss them very easily. They tend to live in colonies or they're clustered closely together. So you hear this chorus of them Erin. Mooney is a scientist at the woods hole. Oceanographic institution whose steady some of the many snapping shrimp species around the world. He says that sound comes from their massive claw and they can really close that claw really really fast and it makes them bubble in the water and when that publ implodes that's what makes the popper the snap it even creates a tiny flash of light and it's surprisingly loud really similar to a large ship or large scale or even some sort of like Underwater HAMMERING DURING WORLD WAR. Two researchers were sent to investigate the noise because he was interfering with the Sonar Navy used to find submarines Mooney and his colleagues looked at snapping shrimp in a lab and the wild and found that the warmer gets the louder. The shrimp are and the more they snap. Warmer water makes them more active as Mooney recently presented to the American geophysical union and oceans are warming with climate. Change says Steve Simpson when we look at any type of global change. What we realize is that there will be winners and losers. Simpson is a professor of marine biology at the University of Exeter. He says sound is incredibly important underwater. Because it's hard to see very far and oceans are already getting noisier because of human impacts fifty thousand ships sailing around the world carrying ninety percent of world trade ad louder shrimp to that noise and it could further stress other animals that you sound like fish that grunt is a sergeant major a small Atlantic coral reef fish. It could mosque the ability of fish to be able to communicate because it will create a higher noise floor. Crackling sound then swamps. Any of the sounds that they might be wanting to listen out for. But there's also a chance that louder. Shrimp could help other organisms since then says when fish clams and coral are young larvae their free swimming floating in the ocean current. They're ready to find a reef to go and make their home and they use the sound. That's coming from that community as a cue to find a place to settle. The sound of snapping. Shrimp is an advertisement. That reef is a good place to live. Which is why Simpson and other. Scientists will be watching the oceans soundscape closely at a time when so many things are changing

Mooney Steve Simpson Scientist Oceanographic Institution NPR Sonar Navy American Geophysical Union Lawrence Summer University Of Exeter Professor
"sergeant major" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

06:33 min | 2 years ago

"sergeant major" Discussed on KGO 810

"Command sergeant major David divinities new book US marine corps retired is they were here as the story episodic story throughout Iraq and Afghanistan and other duties the David's had over the years and friends and colleagues and observe all metals what holds it all together is again and again these men are wounded while they conduct operations that save other people's lives off times they put themselves a great rest to help someone who cannot move out of out of out of a kill Sackets call that's one of the words David teaches you in the book we're going back to the beginning of the Iraq story because David was with the marines when they moved in from Kuwait to Iraq this is operation Iraqi freedom April two thousand and three the marine in question wins the Silver Star posthumously his name is gunnery sergeant Jeffrey bore these are early days David when the marines and the army are moving in in great numbers into Baghdad and their X. as if they're coming up what they think are going to be fixed units fixed combat units but the Iraqi army didn't fight that way they they became insurgents right away and that's what sergeant bore faced which was a series of ambushes and a question marks about rules of engagement that looks to have been a learning process for the marines at the time do you recall that David they are actually during the invasion will very simple actually division two and I see others any if you're after that killed them only we became a problem later later in time bore has it comes up against what looks like an ambush however is he's certain that he's being shot at by the insurgents does he know where to direct his arms deleted Bailey is he didn't really worry about what he wrote about his logistics to drive he he company gunny so he told me he had scrawled sunscreen will goals decision it was an armor and he was told to go back to the logistics train and he refused to he says my memories are well on the road with them he was a self can do it all and you think about going to boys he actually he it's a good thing well lawyers fight like crazy but he brought right into the last two he also going to lose mortally wounded he was he was leading what you called suppressive fire what is active or is it supposed to suppress them to make them not want to fight anymore so if you've got a group of individuals in a building a new section in the windows it prevents them from shooting up those wonderful that's what we call suppressed and bore put himself at risk again this is a story about you tell again and again David because there was a wounded marine that's why he was in a place where he lost his life anyway he was trying to get the marine out what is the teaching about a wounded soldier and one someone's down in a fire zone are you talk to go and get that marine or to continue the combat how does it work to there is an outstanding question and then it depends on what is going on what your job is because we both the company gunny that's because we could become as priority but one thing that we have to emphasize people one of his heart personalization is when you're actually in a fight the best chance of survival everyone has one continues to fight and win big if you stop every time somebody goes down if that's you're taking yourself out of forty and then a you know more people get hurt so what we have to go beat the enemy in the late to back off but in this case he was a rock because he's a company gunny had remote more anyway to do things but he didn't realize he was either he was slowing down he was very what everybody else we go now to a little later in the war this is after the major combat is ended and the insurgents are now strong and we go to a place called has a bio you'll hear it again because it's part of the conflict zone with between the she had in the seventies in this instance the it's it's a Silver Star to corporal Jared Adams and it's a series of events that Gerry Adams and his colleagues are thrown into but they're in a convoy and there's a crash and immediately they come under ambush and it looks like corporal Jared Adams demonstrates leadership spontaneously he very much sacrifice he he puts himself at risk to pull the marine out of a vehicle that's been damaged and subsequently we learned that the marine is dead but he continues to take these risks for F. for someone who's fallen and I read that as you don't wait to see if somebody's alive or dead you're just getting the marine out of out of out of out of whatever Riske's in absolutely no one ever knows when I do call lance crashed global items that he and other styles neighbor he was right with my unit during this exact time so anyway quick items jumped out of the vehicle immediately took up security to allow to to start fighting enemy to allow the guys in the vehicle to try to get out of that all that was stuck so he moved and it now he just moved to a new position and suppress the enemy he moved through multiple he exposed himself multiple times now in it when you talk about here with him going to get the world it was actually a lot cooler Donna and her daughter was bad but even though Clinton Adams did it when he you know he did not like up there but he did after dinner an actual vehicles on fire he refused to leave that line in there and but he has to go in he kept fighting with them I try to get a monitor which is a very difficult thing to do it with a with dead weight another one came up and they finally were able to school to get a lot of good things about this it is so why would we put such a risk for for a body well of course because we would want well we would honor what I've got to come home to give our family all clear also so when I can just leave our or or die close behind whether they're dead or alive and well and a corporal Adams was wounded while he's trying to extract the at the the dead marines body he's he's and he's ignoring his own wounds absolutely and he he jumped on the vehicle multiple times yes he was bleeding from the neck and is on at the time the book is they were heroes a sergeant majors tribute to the combat marines of Iraq and Afghanistan.

US marine corps Iraq Afghanistan David
"sergeant major" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

OC Talk Radio

11:58 min | 3 years ago

"sergeant major" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

"Having to take rank from them where some of the kind of punishment rather than punit rather than leading eating with the pin you leading heart to heart so firm but fair leadership so they know that yes if they screw up if they're going to be out of line then I'm going you know I'm GonNa ruin their inner child from it but they also know if there's a problem that on my website you might notice it says I'm the Solution Sergeant Major. I'm sorry says on my Instagram Age I'm the Solution Sergeant. Major key is an example of that and I have been able to to be the solution sergeant major because honestly it doesn't matter what it is a people bring things to me all the time. I'll give you an example. That's not people related side. Check into my <hes> last unit third Salt Amphibian Battalion Camp Pendleton California and one one of our companies about two hundred Raines is located in twenty nine Palms California a few hours drive a miserable drive away which when he take out the commander in the sergeant major and a few other key staff members for three hours each each way six hours roundtrip plus save three hours on the ground. They've missed an entire day at work or longer. It's ineffective so when I checked in <hes> I say to my commanding Ostra City. This is a long travel I say to him if I can be air in fly up their military air to fly up there at no cost. Would you be interested and everybody in the meeting. Looks at me like I'm crazy. So what I do are using my my network Eric my Rolodex start calling people I know and next thing you know our next year we fly up there instead of driving up there. There's a solution to everything thing is people are quick to turn their minds off and say oh. That's not possible. They may stop right a bear. You know I'd like to have that car but I can't afford it so their mind stops right there rather than thinking. How can I for afford it? How can I get up there? I have to know that we have floods helicopters in planes rinker. I know that Camp Pendleton is the closest bassist Ron Ebbs. Someone's going up there. Let me see if I can put them out. Hitch rides to someone using my network and I've been in for I'd been at the time over twenty years my in my commander same he had been in union longer than me and I I don't see why we can't get on one of these planes against and we did we did it over and over again saved a lot of ours oughta manpower and a lot of personal money because we'd spend our own money guests drive up their back. Oh Wow is that one of the keys of is somebody you learn working within an or a big organization. It's part of a much bigger would is to you talk about overcoming obstacles and you have the Nissan Asia Major Max Garcia two steps to overcome obstacles else is that is that part of it or yes so absolutely so that is just one method if you will but I can say this. Is that whatever it is that you're going after in life. Whatever goal is you must write it down? Thing is that most people are walking around with whatever it is. They want life whatever they want really back a promotion to to buy a house a relationship with someone most people are walking around with a vague emission concept of the things they want to have doer become in life the faint the differences once you put the paper. Excuse me once you put the pen to paper. It's it's yours and the best example I can think of this is millions of people on New Year's Eve make a new year's resolution but I'd bet venture to say that now we're in the month of June. Most people don't don't even remember what their New Year's resolution was. Let alone debate accomplish it and why because they didn't write it down and that's the first step you and why do you think the writing helps you know the the the writing piece goodness that is a great question and Besser very good question. You know honestly I couldn't give Assad answer on why but I can say from our perspective I think has something to do with the subconscious touches mine because once you put the paper I was during your engaging your mind in a more direct manner rather than just like daydream floats around the back your head. Maybe you gauge once in a while and he rated down me on things that you look at it twice. Today I learned from Earl Nightingale the secret science of getting rich you look at or excuse me <hes> the strangest secret earl nightingale saves you know read every day once the morning in once at night and the thing is that is definitely a subconscious mind thing. 'cause you reading it every day. You're when you do it. You're also exercising faith faith being the most important thing you know we we talk about faith very loosely like Oh have face leaving giving yourself. We say those terms very very loosely in society. They're almost meaningless. But what does it mean. How do you invoke that? He exercise that by reading what you want to have become every single day. Most people have such vague goals in their back in their mind like I want to lose weight but when you write down I will wait one hundred fifty pounds by November. I that brings with it a whole different energy because wonder focusing on what you want now what you don't want it also you becoming more specific and then you see it every day on fifty one fifty becomes her focus. It helps you said answer a question Alex because it helps you focus near conscious mind and your subconscious mind when you write down what you want to accomplish yeah allows listening as a reminder as listening to <hes> I think it was Dr Suppose Kia he euro Diese neuro-scientists in erode <hes> couple books on a neuroscience and in a kind of in a for Lehman and <hes> one of the things. I think they found remembrance correctly was <hes> when we write our whatever handed we are that that hand has the best. I <hes> connections with our brain. We have the most dense connections and so when we're actually writing handwriting it actually is better hardwired into our brain than there's a better connection there and and he always something he he was he was handwriting his you'd Handwrite is writing. He found it work better just connection wise yes and satistics. Yes satistics say that just by simply writing down your goal. You're much more likely to achieve it now. I don't want to get into exact percentage of that. Because there is conflicting were percentages online when you read up however I would go for the much more likely than not likely and in the in the sense that once you read it down you're just drastically just under probably ten times more likely to accomplish what you said out to do just by putting the paper yeah I think it also it changes changes the <hes> the dynamic we end up listening a lot to our brain and <hes> we listen a lot to the what's going on in our head but in terms of talking to ourselves usually were not transmitting usually we're in receive mode in our brain kind of has that ongoing dialogue and a lot of we're Kinda prediced predisposed to be negative till five in the wild very much. I you know I hear it all the time. Oh I can't seem to lose weight or I. I can't do math all right here on a lot. Well as soon as you say. I can't do math saved my but I hear that a lot seriously I can't do math than your brain is like a sets off that part of the subconscious mind that could help you to learn that it your subconscious mind is designed to support you at doesn't know deep down that you really want to do math but every time you keep saying you can't do something you keep promising yourself. You can't do something then you're reinforcing that over it over. It's it's almost like we love these. People would say I can eat all day and not gain a pound and we love these people right again all day and not gain a pound the reason as as they keep saying that so they reaffirmed subconscious mind subconscious mind programs the chemical makeup in your body the digestion of the food. I don't know how it works but awed you know is that it does work so e you had a long career in the military. You're you served in <hes> number of tours of duty in war or areas and <hes> you're able to mentor develop young soldiers and now now you've got you've retired. You're now working with civilians or helping them with with the lessons you've learned from <hes> <hes> from the Marine Corps is that is an accurate description. It isn't accurate description however I would consider myself even different from most marines because why hours in the Marine Corps did a lot of a self study on self help and development a study studied the subconscious mind a lot of uh self study to be able to bring myself to this point in my life which also aided me greatly emit time in the Marine Corps so it's almost like I have a twofold to two big toolbox to tools and my toolbox the one being <hes> the self opened development study that I've had but also yes my time in the ring core in in using the the leadership things I learned a lot of great leadership things while I was in the Marine Corps that I saw apply apply today so yes a dancer question plus one. There's a lot there like to cover what you mentioned. Developing the subconscious any major influences their what you what you could share with the audience they're interested in that. Yes absolutely so the first thing I I watched was movie called the secret. It's an excellent excellent movie. I cannot say enough great things about it. I believe in the concepts taught in the movie the secrets so much that I recently wrote a book and published a book with one of the People in the movie is named Joe Vitality and that movie opened my eyes and then I went from there with a lot of self study as the my favorite authors include Food Bob Proctor Marshall Silver and a lot of people who are associated with that movie Joe Vitality. I even like Tony Robbins and just started studying a lot of those things in in great depth. Does that answer your question. Yes absolutely Ashley is so. Can you give an example how you work with people now yes so <hes> such different things one <hes>. I like to speak to crowds so whenever I get get a speaking engagement I love public speaking the larger the crowd the better and the other thing is I coached people one on one <hes> I get context all the time for life coaching and that is a wide variety on a Sunday that you work to narrow down because I get too many people contacting on too. Many <hes> subjects are really need to buckle down a narrow down onto one specialty which I have not done yet because it's still still early for me. I'm used to that I'm used to you know you'd think okay rains. That's a specialty but though they bring with a wide variety of challenges that that I'm used to see a spin the wheel everytime someone comes in my office so I'm Kinda used to that comfortable with that excited but I need to to buck about a narrow down into one specialty. Could you share with us. May How you felt help someone in particular.

Marine Corps commander Earl Nightingale Salt Amphibian Battalion Camp Ostra City Tony Robbins Palms California Joe Vitality Camp Pendleton Raines Eric Max Garcia Assad Besser Ashley Ron Ebbs Handwrite Alex
"sergeant major" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

OC Talk Radio

11:41 min | 3 years ago

"sergeant major" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

"Having to take rank from them where some of the kind of punishment rather than punit rather leading meeting with the pin you leading heart to heart so firm but fair leadership so they know that yes if they screw up if they're going to be out of line then I'm going you know I'm GonNa ruin their inner child from it but they also know if there's a problem that on my website you might notice it says I'm the Solution Sergeant Major. I'm sorry says on my instagram page on the solution sergeant major key is an example of that and I have been able to to be the solution sergeant major because honestly it doesn't matter what it is a people bring things to me all the time. I'll give you an example. That's not people related side. Check into my <hes> last unit third Salt Amphibian Battalion at Camp Pendleton California and one one of our companies about two hundred Raines is located in twenty nine Palms California few hours drive a miserable drive away which when he take out the commander in a sergeant major and a few other key staff members for three hours each way six hours roundtrip plus say three hours on the ground. They've missed an entire day at work or longer. It's ineffective so when I checked in <hes> I say to my commanding Ostra said this is a long travel. I say to him if I can be air in fly up their military air to fly up there at no cost. Would you be interested and everybody in the meeting. Looks at me like crazy so what I do are using my network Workman Rolodex start calling people I know and next thing you know our next year we fly up there instead of driving up there. There's a solution to everything thing is people are quick to turn their minds off and say oh that's not possible and then they stop right right there. You know I'd like to have that car but I can't afford it so their mind stops right there rather than thinking. How can I full afford it? How can I get up there? I have to know that we have floods of helicopters in planes in the rink where I know that Camp Pendleton is the closest based involves. I know someone's going up there. Let me see if I can put my thumb out hitch rides to someone using my network you I've been in for I'd been at the time over twenty years my in my commander same he had been in union longer than me and I I don't see why we can't get on one of these planes aims and we did we did it over and over again saved a lot of ours oughta manpower and a lot of L. personal money because we'd spend our own money guests drive up their back. Oh Wow is that one of the keys of is something you learn working within an or a big organization. That's part of a much bigger would is to you talk about overcoming obstacles. I think you have the Nissan Asia Major Max Garcia two steps to overcome obstacles also is that is that part of it or yes so absolutely so that is just one method. If you will I can say this is that whatever it is that you're going after in life whatever goal it is you must read it down things that most people are walking around with whatever it is. They want life whatever they want really back a promotion to to buy a house a relationship with someone most people are walking around with a vague emission concept of the things they want to have doer become in life the faint the differences once you put the paper. Excuse me once you put the pen to paper. It's it's yours and the best example I can think of this is millions of people on New Year's Eve make a new year's resolution but I'd bet venture to say that now we're in the month of June. Most people don't don't even remember what their New Year's resolution was. Let alone do they accomplish it and why because they didn't write it down and that's the first step you and why do you think the writing helps you know the the the writing piece goodness that is a great question and Besser very good question. You know honestly I couldn't give Assad answer on why but I can say from our perspective I think has something to do with the subconscious conscious mind because once you put the bend the paper I was during your engaging your mind in a more direct men rather than just like a daydream floats around the back your head. Maybe you gauge it once in a while and he write it down Mia- things that you look at it twice today I learned from Earl Nightingale the secret science of getting rich you look at excuse me <hes> the Strangest Secret Earl Nightingale saves you know read every day once the morning in once at night and the thing is that is it definitely a subconscious mind thing because you reading it every day. You're when you do it. You're also exercising faith faith being the most important thing we we talk about faith very loosely like Oh have face leaving even yourself. We say those terms very very loosely in society. They're almost meaningless. But what does it mean. How do you invoke that? He exercise that by reading what you want to have become every single day. Most people have such vague goals in the back of their mind like I want to lose weight but when you write down I will wait one hundred fifty pounds by November. I that brings with it a whole different energy because wonder folks know what you want not what you don't want it. Also you becoming more specific than you see it every day. One fifty one fifty becomes her focus. It helps you said answered question Alex because it helps you focus your conscious mind in your subconscious mind when you write down what you want to accomplish yeah. Allows listening as a reminder as listening to <hes>. I think it was Dr Suppose Kia. He Euro Diese neuroscientists in erode couple books <hes> on a neuroscience and in a kind donovan a for Lehman and <hes> one of the things I think they found is fem. Remember correctly was <hes> when we write our whatever handed we are that that hand has the best I <hes> connections with our brain. We have the most dense connections and so when we're actually writing handwriting it actually would it is better hardwired into our brain. Then there's a better connection there and he always something he he was. He was handwriting his. You'd handwrite is writing. He found it work better just connection wise yes in satistics. Yes statistics say that just by simply writing down your goal you're much more likely to achieve it now. I don't want to get into exact percentage of that because there is conflicting word dipper percentages online when you read up however I would go for the much more likely than not likely and in the in the sense that once you read it down you're just drastically just under no probably ten times more likely to accomplish what you set out to do just by putting on the paper yeah it also it changes the <hes> the dynamic we end up listening a lot to our brain and <hes> we listened a lot to the what's going on in our head but in terms of talking to ourselves usually were not transmitting usually we're in receive mode in our brain kind of has that ongoing dialogue and a lot of we're Kinda prediced predisposed to be negative till five in the wild very much. I hear it all the time. Oh I can't seem to lose weight or I I can't do math are here. A Lot Wilson as you say. I can't do. Math saved my but I hear that a lot seriously I can't do math than your brain is like a sets off that part of the country mind that could help you to learn that it your subconscious mind is designed to support you at doesn't know deep down that you really want to do math but every time you keep saying you can't do something you keep promising yourself. You can't do something then you're reinforcing that over moreover. It's it's almost like we love these. People would say I can eat all day not gain a pound and we love these people right again all day and not gain a pound. The reason is because they keep saying that so they reaffirmed subconscious mind your subconscious mind programs the chemical makeup in in their body to digestion of the food. I don't know how it works but awed you know is that it does work so e. You had a long career in the military. You're you served in <hes> number of tours of duty in war or areas and <hes> you're able to mentor develop young soldiers and now now you've got you've retired you. You're now working with civilians are helping them with with the lessons you've learned from from from the Marine Corps is that is an accurate description. It isn't accurate description however I would consider myself even different from most marines because why I was in the marine cried did a lot of a self study on self help and development a study studied subconscious mind at a lot of uh self study to be able to bring myself to this point in my life which also aided me greatly emit time in the Marine Corps so it's almost like I have a twofold to two big toolbox to tools and my toolbox the one being <hes> the self opened development study that I've had but also yes my time in the ring core in in using the day leadership things. I learned a lot of great leadership things while I was in the Marine Corps that I saw apply today so yes a dancer question plus one. There's a lot there like to cover what you mentioned. Developing the sub-conscious any major influences their what you what you could share with the audience they're interested in that. Yes absolutely so the first thing I I watched was movie called the secret. It's an excellent excellent movie. I cannot say enough great things about it. I believe in the concepts taught taught in the movie the secret so much that I recently wrote a book and published a book with one of the people in the movies named Joe Vitality and that movie opened my eyes and then I went from there with a lot of self study as the my favorite authors include Food Bob Proctor Marshall Silver and a lot of people who are associated with that movie Joe Vitality. I even like Tony Robbins and just started studying a lot of those things in in great depth. Does that answer your question. Yes absolutely nationally and so. Can you give an example how you work with people now. Yes so <hes> said you two different things one <hes>. I like to speak to crowds so whenever I get a speaking engagement I love public. Speaking the large crowd the better and the other thing is I coached people one on one <hes> I get context all the time for life coaching and that is a wide variety honest. I me to work to narrow it down because I get too many people contacting on too. Many <hes> subjects are really need to buckle down a narrow down onto one specialty which I have not done yet because it's still still early for me and I'm used to that I'm used to do you think okay rains. That's a specialty but though they bring with a wide variety of of challenges that.

Marine Corps commander Earl Nightingale Ostra Camp Pendleton California Joe Vitality Salt Amphibian Battalion Tony Robbins Camp Pendleton Palms California Raines Max Garcia Assad Besser Lehman Alex Mia Wilson
"sergeant major" Discussed on WTMJ 620

WTMJ 620

01:33 min | 3 years ago

"sergeant major" Discussed on WTMJ 620

"Citizens lined the route of the funeral procession from Chris firehouse from the Bronx. But the church and then hat. On this day. We remember profit Chris on old who have made the soup cream sacrifice for that country in the armed forces of this nation in the fire departments, and the police departments throughout this land. Sergeant Major Chris Armstrong remembered, Chris com. It sure professional marine didn't pound his chest. Try. Drone on about what he was going to. He just did. Placed his marines welfare above his own always. I never saw credit but he always gave it. He focused on mission and the welfare, he pushed his marines what they thought. It'd be on their physical and mental limits. All to make them safer, more competent, and combat effective. Chris protected the country and serve the city as remembered by fire Commissioner, Dan. Niagara who said Chris, I act of bravery was signing up for the F B M Y in two thousand three he was young firefighter full of endless potential strong, dedicated.

Chris Chris firehouse Chris Armstrong Chris com Commissioner Niagara Dan F B M
"sergeant major" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

KDWN 720AM

07:33 min | 3 years ago

"sergeant major" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

"All right Linnet, Spokane Washington ex m satellite. How are you? Hey, good evening, Mark next to talk to you again. Thank you. I spent almost twenty nine years in both. I'm gonna Marine Corps in time. Any army I will say first and foremost that women provide no force multiplier by being an infantry or Rangers special forces et cetera. What does that mean? It means. It means females do not add to the combat effectiveness of those types of units effectively. Now, you were a sergeant major. So you you you were in a sort of a command structure, correct? Armie kinda does it. Talk right into the mouthpiece. Because I'm losing you. The army does kind of oddball where once you get so highly specialized, and then you move up into the leadership e eight nine realm, you're taking away from your specialty where you were the biggest asset, and I I appreciate the army decided, and I was worthy of of being a sergeant major. That said I was in a very male dominated. Field. I was aviation and believe me I took. I took my beatings, the only, female and female aircraft mechanic. I worked on helicopters. The first female in that particular state aviation unit. I was also the first female see Twenty-three flight engineer in the country. And I worked my way up into actually managing the fight standards program for the enlisted side of the house. But all that said I've watched over the past thirty years. Demand in this country is absolutely being emasculated to the point where they sit around sipping hot cocoa in their footy pajamas. And I don't I understand that the military. Technically since the fifties. You know, the Korean war was when when the military I integrated blacks into the military, so you had blacks and whites serving in the same unit. They weren't segregated like they were in World War Two. That was a positive social experiment. Now, we're working toward the negative side of the spectrum as far as the military being used social experiment, and that they think that women are qualified. Yes, you may be a strong woman might my daughter of of anybody. I know in that age group, she'll be twenty eight next month. I would say she could hack it. But I wouldn't want to do that. What about a draft for crying out loud? Well, I I mean, I could see if if they restructured the selective service programs to where when high school seniors, male and female get to that age where they've got to register for the selective service. And on a funny note, my daughter got one when she was in high school, they had her miss gendered. We got that fixed. But I. It was terrible. Yes. Yeah. We didn't get her fixed. We got that. No. I understand. I could see if they actually did take teams going to high school with people that need to register register for the selective service, both male and female give him an onsite evaluation. Okay. Are you physically capable of, you know, trying to take your time Motors seventy pound load, and and and designate an area that they could serve and I will guarantee you nine percent of the females would not be able to. But that's not what concerns me the bureaucracy at the Pentagon and other places even pressure from congress would change the standards. So that they would. And like, I say, I have no problem with these backup positions and so forth. I'm talking about the heavy lifting in combat. Type situation. And I and I suspect the vast majority of husbands fathers agree with me. And the vast majority of mothers agree with me. And I want to thank you for your service. Linda, don't get mad at me. I gotta roll here. Thank you. Thank you to an interesting topic. I don't think a federal judge should be calling all the shots. That's for sure. Pete Fort Bragg, North Carolina. How are you, sir? Thank our remarks. Thank you for taking my call. I appreciate everything you do. I don't agree. One hundred percent with you or anybody else. That's just the nature of yuma's. But I do agree with ninety nine point whatever percentage things, and I gotta support you on this. I commend the young young lady just gone for twenty nine years. I only did twenty and then the young lady before her I understand where she's coming from. I'm with you nothing against women serving support decisions, you know, even though she was a helicopter aviation mechanic. That's great. I don't think she should be doing that combat zone and the young lady that was a marine. So you know, marines are sold your their soldiers. I carry a weapon all same thing of the army curb your doctor, a lawyer, you know, whatever you are the officers carry a nine millimeter or forty five Cal illicit. And and many of the most of the shows carry a fourteen or sixteen whatever it is nowadays. I don't know. And I don't know. I don't know what percent of the women are. But just sergeants major and the first arches. Unites most century forty five or nine mill. And like I said I've been retired fifteen years. So I don't know what percentage of the military is a female. Now, our right had this debate with my twenty year old daughter and her friends. Rachel is against my face. And I'm not going to go into that right now. But I don't know anywhere. The bible says the woman is supposed to protect a man the man is supposed to protect the woman. I cannot see my daughter going expression interest at one time, I should Rachel and she has five older brothers and a younger sister, brother. Thirty year old now is gonna make it real soon. Very proud of you now one of his older brothers tried to go in there. And he's coast bachelor's degree. In public right now. I'm a serious radio. But he didn't eat it and make it because. On his mathematics, or whatever you call that part of the part that battery of the chest. But anyway, I've got nothing it's women's server to support. But my question to all the ladies out there if you're that patriot. And that much of a patriot you want to serve in the military. Guess what? There are thousands of jobs out there in the military, or do you think all these male soldiers and sailors airman? Training from have an instructor and a trainer. I would commend a woman, and they they do that. Now doctors and lawyers all the different aviation mechanics. Your your point is just have to go your point is there are many many positions. In the military that do not require women to be on the front lines and excuse me. And I absolutely agree with you. And I also believe that women should not be part of the draft period. Let alone a judge ordering it. Thank you for your service,.

army Rachel Linnet Marine Corps Rangers Mark aviation mechanic footy Washington Armie engineer yuma Pete Fort Bragg Motors Pentagon instructor North Carolina Linda
Vietnam Vet Receives the Medal of Honor

The Ray Lucia Show

01:12 min | 3 years ago

Vietnam Vet Receives the Medal of Honor

"In the East Room. President Trump presented the medal of honor to sergeant Major John kenley for his heroic actions during the offense. In nineteen sixty eight the president said while serving as a gunnery sergeant kenley fought off many enemy attacks early in the battle John's commanding officer was seriously wounded command then fell to John who quickly organized his men and led them through the fight. The president said many times he ran through the battlefield to save wounded Marine's. The eighty year old veteran is three hundred US marine to receive the highest honor of valor in military service for

John Kenley President Trump East Room United States Officer Eighty Year
Medal of Honor recipient recalls pulling fellow Marines to safety

Gallant at Night

00:41 sec | 3 years ago

Medal of Honor recipient recalls pulling fellow Marines to safety

"President Trump awards the medal of honor to eighty year old retired marine sergeant Major John kenley for braving gunfire and grenades saving the lives of fellow marines and sailors during the battle of play in Vietnam. Here's CBS was David Martin. According to statements submitted by his men what he did was repeatedly exposed himself to enemy fire wounded marines to safety. They're still alive. Right. So I'm gonna try to get to them. I witnesses saw him pull at least ten wounded marines to safety charge a machine gun that had them pinned down and deliberately exposed himself to fire in order to pinpoint enemy locations. Conley is the first living African American

David Martin John Kenley CBS Donald Trump President Trump Conley Vietnam Eighty Year
President Trump awards first Medal of Honor to Vietnam Army medic

Think Realty Radio

00:34 sec | 3 years ago

President Trump awards first Medal of Honor to Vietnam Army medic

"President Trump will honor of Vietnam war veteran with the medal of honor today retired marine sergeant Major John Canley is being recognized for fighting off enemy attacks while eating wounded marines to safety in nineteen sixty eight he did. So after he had suffered shrapnel injuries

John Canley President Trump