6 Burst results for "Serena Jepson"

"serena jepson" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

04:20 min | 11 months ago

"serena jepson" Discussed on Here & Now

"So much be well. Yeah you to michael j. fox on his book no time like the future an optimist considers mortality three years ago. A man with a grudge murdered five people at the capital gazette newspaper in maryland. And now finally his trial has started. What we wanted to know was how did the staff who survived the shooting. Keep going find out in our capital gazette series from npr's embedded podcast. You may have seen fourth of july fireworks. Light up the sky last night. But did you see any firefly's the charismatic insects are an integral part of summer in many parts of the country. But as beloved as the glowing. Fireflies are there isn't much information about how they're doing molly samuel of member station w. ab in atlanta has this story about a project to learn more about them the kind of firefly. That's most common in yards the kind that people have fond childhood memories of is called the big dipper firefly. They come out around dusk. The males flashing their yellow lights. So yeah we can kind of see them all coming up in the ground cover over here. Just starting to rise up and fight around kelly. Ridenour is a graduate student at the university of georgia. She's on a hill looking out over a damp meadow in atlanta watching the firefly start to sparkle across the view. Beautiful most nights of the week this summer ridenour is out counting firefly's in parks around town there lots of different kinds of firefly's in atlanta beyond the familiar big differs ridenour says more than a dozen different species probably live in atlanta. Many more live in other parts of the state. Florida and georgia had the most diverse verifies. So we are firefly rich state worldwide. There are about two thousand species of firefly's some sparkle in treetops. others blink in unison. Some don't flash just glow ridenour says habitat loss pesticides lawn fertilizers. Artificial light could all effect firefly's but she says the insects are under studied. No one knows how most firefly species are doing. Lynn faust wrote a field guide to firefly's in the southeast. She says one reason. There's so little information is because firefly's aren't bothering anyone. They are not a public health problem. They don't cause disease and they're not an agricultural pest so there's not much grant money for universities to study them but of course people do like them. They're usually associated with warm fuzzy memories of childhood but researchers are hearing from people that the number of firefly's day see just doesn't compare to those childhood memories anymore. Serena jepson is the endangered species program director at zirk society. Her organization started a firefly initiative a few years ago essentially because there were so many anecdotal reports. That firefly's in various parts of the us where becoming less common earlier this year ercsi society released its first assessment of north american. Firefly's the group found that more than a dozen species are at risk of extinction different species face different threats but some of the main ones are loss of habitat light pollution and climate change. But jephson says there are many more species that there just wasn't enough information about to make any kind of judgment you don't know enough about them to even evaluate the level of extinction risk that they face the project in atlanta. This summer is not so much about how different species are doing but more about how what humans do effects how many there are. uga student. Kelly ridenour is going to various spots taking note of how often they're mode or pesticides are used and then counting the firefly's light up so i'm going to set my timer for one minute and try my best to count. All the flashes that i see while she counts there are so many firefly flashes. I lose track. I gave up. I couldn't i couldn't keep.

ridenour atlanta capital gazette molly samuel michael j Lynn faust Ridenour npr university of georgia fox maryland Serena jepson zirk society kelly ercsi society georgia jephson Florida Kelly ridenour uga
"serena jepson" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

04:34 min | 1 year ago

"serena jepson" Discussed on KCRW

"Ben Stewart is the interim director since inception two plus years ago. Program has brought nearly 500 members to Tulsa and interest has surged during the pandemic. We've seen applications over the course of the last six months increase up to three fold. Other regions also see an opportunity in the shift to remote work. Like Northwest Arkansas. It's home to Walmart, the University of Arkansas and the surrounded by lakes and mountains, like in the TV show, Ozark The Northwest Arkansas pitch come live here and we'll give you $10,000 and a bicycle bicycle. Bentonville, one of the city's in northwest Arkansas, as proclaimed itself, the mountain biking capital of the world, and a lot of experts would not disagree with that. Nelson Peacock is the president and CEO of the Northwest Arkansas counsel. The region started its initiative after the pandemic started. When Cho Vid took place. We really saw people reevaluating their lifestyle and what they saw was important and we felt that we needed to take advantage of that. The effort is partially funded by the Walton Family Foundation of Financial supporter of NPR. For those pondering a move to Northwest Arkansas, Peacock says. It's not just the outdoors. There's culture atop Museum of American Art. And it's monumentally cheaper than, for example, San Francisco say you make 150,000 pretty good. It's comparable to $63,000 is what you would need to have the same lifestyle here. That's some pretty serious savings, but the same lifestyle moving from San Francisco Toe northwest Arkansas or Tulsa, Oklahoma. To Lisa Garland says her new neighborhood and Tulsa. It's progressive politically and doesn't feel that different from her old hometown, Berkeley to other parts of the city. Yeah, it's very, very, very different from Berkeley from San Francisco from the Bay Area, and so's much the rest of the state. Oklahoma is one of the reddest states in the country. Garland is a Democrat. And she's actually looking forward to meeting people with different views, especially in these challenging political times. You have to see what the other side and so I think that living in this city, it will give me an opportunity to kind of have a better understanding of The other side of things, and so I think it's actually very exciting where we Berliner NPR news. One of the most notable insects in North America is in trouble. Federal wildlife officials announced today that Monarch butterflies deserve protection under the Endangered Species Act, but they won't get it. Why not? NPR's Nathan Rott report explains. What the U. S Fish and Wildlife Service said today is that declines in monarch butterfly populations are so severe that they do warrant federal protections. But they're precluded from getting them because of limited resource is Be kind of like your Dennis saying, Yeah, you need to get that cavity filled. But we've only got so many fillings so get in line and the line for monarchs is long. The Fish and Wildlife Service says 161 other species have priority nationally. Which makes today's announcement bittersweet for people like Serena Jepson. On one hand, I'm really happy to see that while they service recognizes that monarchs are threatened with extinction on the other, they're not doing much about it. Jepson is with the Tzar See Center for Invertebrate conservation, which helps count monarch populations every year, and the trend line, she says, is alarming. I really don't think that monarchs can wait indefinitely for protection. As recently as the 19 nineties, there were millions of monarch butterflies fluttering through backyards and across fields in the U. S. You've probably seen them and they're recognizable Rust Orange wings, But the eastern population of monarch butterflies has declined by 80% since the mid nineties, the western population which winters in Central California. Has dropped even further. Actually, just this year we're seeing potentially the collapse of the Western population. Federal wildlife officials are asking the public to help by planting milkweed and using less insecticide. Also review the monarch butterfly status every year. But the decision is still frustrating to Jake Leak who specializes an endangered species at the Environmental Policy Innovation Center. If you've already done like 90% of the work to make a wanted finding, we'll just do the remaining 10% and get it done by putting a listing awfully says it will not only cost more time but money. With the extinction crisis. Worsening money for biodiversity.

Arkansas Lisa Garland San Francisco Tulsa Northwest Arkansas NPR Nelson Peacock Oklahoma Fish and Wildlife Service Serena Jepson Berkeley Ben Stewart U. S Fish and Wildlife Service University of Arkansas Walmart interim director Cho Vid North America president and CEO
"serena jepson" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:41 min | 1 year ago

"serena jepson" Discussed on KQED Radio

"It's AM is to attract skilled motivated people to liven up the city and juice its economy. Ben Stewart is the interim director since inception two plus years ago, the program has brought nearly 500 members to Tulsa and interest has surged during the pandemic. We've seen applications over the course of the last six months. Increase up to three fold. Other regions also see an opportunity in the shift to remote work like Northwest Arkansas. It's home to WalMart, the University of Arkansas. And it's surrounded by lakes and mountains, like in the TV show, Ozark, the Northwest Arkansas pitch come live here and we'll give you $10,000 and a bicycle. Bicycle. Bentonville, one of the city's in northwest Arkansas, has proclaimed itself the mountain biking capital of the world, and a lot of experts would not disagree with that. Nelson Peacock is the president and CEO of the Northwest Arkansas counsel. The region started its initiative after the pandemic started. When Cho Vid took place. We really saw people reevaluating their lifestyle and what they saw is important and we felt that we needed to take advantage of that. The effort is partially funded by the Walton Family Foundation of Financial supporter of NPR. For those pondering a move to Northwest Arkansas, Peacock says. It's not just the outdoors. There's culture atop Museum of American Art. And it's monumentally cheaper than, for example, San Francisco say you make 150,000 pretty good. It's comparable to $63,000 is what you would need to have the same lifestyle here. That's some pretty serious savings, but the same lifestyle moving from San Francisco to northwest Arkansas or Tulsa, Oklahoma. To Lisa Garland says her new neighborhood and Tulsa. It's progressive politically and doesn't feel that different from her old home town of Berkeley to other parts of the city. Yeah, it's very, very, very different from Berkeley from San Francisco from the day area, and so's much the rest of the state. Oklahoma is one of the reddest states in the country. Garland is a Democrat. And she's actually looking forward to meeting people with different views, especially in these challenging political times. You have to see what the other side and so I think that living in this city, it will give me an opportunity to kind of have a better understanding of The other side of things, and so I think it's actually very exciting when we Berliner NPR news. One of the most notable insects in North America is in trouble. Federal wildlife officials announced today that Monarch butterflies deserve protection under the Endangered Species Act, but they won't get it. Why not? NPR's Nathan Rott report explains what the U. S Fish and Wildlife Service said today is that declines in monarch butterfly populations are so severe that they do warrant federal protections. But they're precluded from getting them because of limited resource is Be kind of like your dentist saying, Yeah, you need to get that cavity filled. But we've only got so many fillings so get in line and the line for monarchs is long. The Fish and Wildlife Service says 161 other species have priority nationally. Which makes today's announcement bittersweet for people like Serena Jepson. On one hand, I'm really happy to see that while they service recognizes that monarchs are threatened with extinction on the other, they're not doing much about it. Jepson is with the Tzar See Center for Invertebrate conservation, which helps count monarch populations every year, and the trend line, she says, is alarming. I really don't think that monarchs can wait indefinitely for protection. As recently as the 19 nineties, there were millions of monarch butterflies fluttering through backyards and across fields in the U. S. You've probably seen them and they're recognizable Rust Orange wings, But the eastern population of monarch butterflies has declined by 80% since the mid nineties, the western population which winters in central California has dropped even further. Actually, just this year we're seeing potentially the collapse of the Western population. Federal wildlife officials are asking the public to help by planting milkweed and using less insecticide. Also review the monarch butterfly status every year. But the decision is still frustrating to Jake Leak who specializes an endangered species at the Environmental Policy Innovation Center. If you've already done like 90% of the work to make a wanted finding, we'll just do the remaining 10% and get it done by putting a listing awfully says it will not only cost more time but money. With the extinction crisis. Worsening money for biodiversity will be in short.

Arkansas Tulsa Lisa Garland Serena Jepson San Francisco Northwest Arkansas NPR Nelson Peacock Fish and Wildlife Service Oklahoma University of Arkansas Ben Stewart U. S Fish and Wildlife Service WalMart Cho Vid president and CEO interim director Berkeley North America
"serena jepson" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:58 min | 1 year ago

"serena jepson" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Program is funded by the George Kaiser Family Foundation. It's aimed is to attract skilled motivated people to liven up the city and juice its economy. Ben Stewart is the interim director since inception two plus years ago. Program has brought nearly 500 members to Tulsa and interest has surged during the pandemic. We've seen applications over the course of the last six months increase Up to three fold. Other regions also see an opportunity in the shift to remote work like Northwest Arkansas. It's home to Walmart, the University of Arkansas and the surrounded by lakes and mountains, like in the TV show, Ozark The Northwest Arkansas pitch come live here and we'll give you $10,000 and a bicycle bicycle. Bentonville, one of the city's in northwest Arkansas, as proclaimed itself, the mountain biking capital of the world, and a lot of experts would not disagree with that. Nelson Peacock is the president and CEO of the Northwest Arkansas counsel. The region started its initiative after the pandemic started when Cho vid took place. We really saw people re evaluating their lifestyle and what they saw was important and we felt that we needed to take advantage of that. The effort is partially funded by the Walton Family Foundation of Financial supporter of NPR. For those pondering a move to Northwest Arkansas, Peacock says. It's not just the outdoors. There's culture atop Museum of American Art. And it's monumentally cheaper than, for example, San Francisco say you make 150,000 pretty good. It's comparable to $63,000 is what you would need to have the same lifestyle here. That's some pretty serious savings, but the same lifestyle moving from San Francisco to northwest Arkansas or Tulsa, Oklahoma. To Lisa Garland says her new neighborhood and Tulsa. It's progressive politically and doesn't feel that different from her old hometown, Berkeley to other parts of the city. Yeah, it's very, very, very different from Berkeley from San Francisco from the Bay Area, and so's much the rest of the state. Oklahoma is one of the reddest states in the country. Garland is a Democrat. And she's actually looking forward to meeting people with different views, especially in these challenging political times. You have to see what the other side and so I think that living in this city, it will give me an opportunity to kind of have a better understanding of The other side of things. And so I think it's actually very exciting where we Berliner NPR News, one of the most notable insects in North America is in trouble. Federal wildlife officials announced today that Monarch butterflies deserve protection under the Endangered Species Act. But they won't get it. Why not? NPR's Nathan Rott explains what the U. S Fish and Wildlife Service said today is that declines in monarch butterfly populations are so severe that they do warrant federal protections. But they're precluded from getting them because of limited resource is Be kind of like your dentist saying, Yeah, you need to get that cavity filled. But we've only got so many fillings so get in line and the line for monarchs is long. The Fish and Wildlife Service says 161 other species have priority nationally. Which makes today's announcement bittersweet for people like Serena Jepson. On one hand, I'm really happy to see that while they service recognizes that monarchs are threatened with extinction on the other, they're not doing much about it. Jepson is with the Tzar See Center for Invertebrate conservation, which helps count monarch populations every year, and the trend line, she says, is alarming. I really don't think that monarchs can wait indefinitely for protection. As recently as the 19 nineties, there were millions of monarch butterflies fluttering through backyards and across fields in the U. S. You've probably seen them and they're recognizable Rust Orange wings, But the eastern population of monarch butterflies has declined by 80% since the mid nineties, the western population which winters in Central California. Has dropped even further. Actually, just this year we're seeing potentially the collapse of the Western population. Federal wildlife officials are asking the public to help by planting milkweed and using less insecticide. Also review the monarch butterfly status every year. But the decision is still frustrating to Jake League who specializes an endangered species at the Environmental Policy Innovation Center. If you've already done like 90% of the work to make a wanted finding, we'll just do the remaining 10% and get it done by putting a listing awfully says it will not only cost more time but money. With the extinction crisis. Worsening money for biodiversity will be in short supply. Nathan Rott NPR news for college bound high school seniors. The pandemic has taken campus tours and even some admissions exams off the.

Arkansas Lisa Garland San Francisco Tulsa Nathan Rott NPR Northwest Arkansas Nelson Peacock Oklahoma Fish and Wildlife Service Serena Jepson Berkeley George Kaiser Family Foundatio Ben Stewart University of Arkansas U. S Fish and Wildlife Service Berliner NPR News Walmart interim director president and CEO
"serena jepson" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

04:54 min | 1 year ago

"serena jepson" Discussed on KCRW

"It's aimed is to attract skilled motivated people to liven up the city and juice its economy. And Stewart is the interim director since inception two plus years ago, the program has brought nearly 500 members to Tulsa and interest has surged during the pandemic. We've seen applications over the course of the last six months. Increase up to three fold. Other regions also see an opportunity in the shift to remote work like Northwest Arkansas. It's home to WalMart, the University of Arkansas. And it's surrounded by lakes and mountains, like in the TV show, Ozark, the Northwest Arkansas pitch come live here and we'll give you $10,000 and a bicycle. Bicycle. Bentonville, one of the city's in northwest Arkansas, has proclaimed itself the mountain biking capital of the world, and a lot of experts would not disagree with that. Nelson Peacock is the president and CEO of the Northwest Arkansas counsel. The region started its initiative after the pandemic started when Cove it took place. We really saw people re evaluating their lifestyle and what they saw was important and we felt that we needed to take advantage of that. The effort is partially funded by the Walton Family Foundation of Financial supporter of NPR. For those pondering a move to Northwest Arkansas, Peacock says. It's not just the outdoors. There's culture Top Museum of American Art And it's monumentally cheaper than, for example, San Francisco say you make 150,000 pretty good. It's comparable to $63,000 is what you would need to have the same lifestyle here. That's some pretty serious savings, but the same lifestyle moving from San Francisco Toe northwest Arkansas or Tulsa, Oklahoma. To Lisa Garland says her new neighborhood and Tulsa. It's progressive politically and doesn't feel that different from her old hometown, Berkeley to other parts of the city. Yeah, it's very, very, very different from Berkeley from San Francisco from the Bay Area, and so's much the rest of the state. Oklahoma is one of the reddest states in the country. Growing is a Democrat, and she's actually looking forward to meeting people with different views, especially in these challenging political times. You have to see what the other side and so I think that living in this city will give me an opportunity to kind of have a better understanding of The other side of things. And so I think it's actually very exciting where we Berliner NPR News, One of the most notable insects in North America is in trouble. Federal Wildlife officials announced today that Monarch butterflies deserve protection under the Endangered Species Act, but they won't get it. Why not? NPR's Nathan Rott explains. What the U. S Fish and Wildlife Service said today is that declines in monarch butterfly populations are so severe that they do warrant federal protections. But they're precluded from getting them because of limited resource is Be kind of like your dentist saying, Yeah, you need to get that cavity filled. But we've only got so many fillings so get in line and the line for monarchs is long. The Fish and Wildlife Service says 161 other species have priority nationally. Which makes today's announcement bittersweet for people like Serena Jepson. On one hand, I'm really happy to see that while they service recognizes that monarchs are threatened with extinction on the other, they're not doing much about it. Jepson is with the Tzar See Center for Invertebrate conservation, which helps count monarch populations every year, and the trend line, she says, is alarming. I really don't think that monarchs can wait indefinitely for protection. As recently as the 19 nineties, there were millions of monarch butterflies fluttering through backyards and across fields in the U. S. You've probably seen them and they're recognizable Rust Orange wings, But the eastern population of monarch butterflies has declined by 80% since the mid nineties, the western population which winters in Central California. Has dropped even further. Actually, just this year we're seeing potentially the collapse of the Western population. Federal wildlife officials are asking the public to help by planting milkweed and using less insecticide. Also review the monarch butterfly status every year. But the decision is still frustrating to Jake Leak who specializes an endangered species at the Environmental Policy Innovation Center. If you've already done like 90% of the work to make a wanted finding, we'll just do the remaining 10% and get it done by putting a listing awfully says it will not only cost more time but money. With the extinction crisis. Worsening money for biodiversity will be in short supply. Nathan Rott NPR news For college bound high school seniors. The pandemic has taken campus tours and even some admissions exams.

Arkansas San Francisco Tulsa Nathan Rott NPR Fish and Wildlife Service Northwest Arkansas Nelson Peacock Oklahoma U. S Fish and Wildlife Service Serena Jepson Berkeley University of Arkansas Berliner NPR News WalMart president and CEO Federal Wildlife Stewart interim director Top Museum of American Art
"serena jepson" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:54 min | 1 year ago

"serena jepson" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"It's aimed is to attract skilled motivated people to liven up the city and juice its economy. And Stewart is the interim director since inception two plus years ago, the program has brought nearly 500 members to Tulsa and interest has surged during the pandemic. We've seen applications over the course of the last six months. Increase up to three fold. Other regions also see an opportunity in the shift to remote work like Northwest Arkansas. It's home to WalMart, the University of Arkansas. And it's surrounded by lakes and mountains, like in the TV show, Ozark The Northwest Arkansas pitch come live here and we'll give you $10,000 and a bicycle bicycle. Bentonville, one of the city's in northwest Arkansas, as proclaimed itself, the mountain biking capital of the world, and a lot of experts would not disagree with that. Nelson Peacock is the president and CEO of the Northwest Arkansas counsel. The region started its initiative after the pandemic started. When Cho vid took place We really saw people reevaluating their lifestyle and what they saw is important and We felt that we needed to take advantage of that. The effort is partially funded by the Walton Family Foundation of financial supporter of NPR for those pondering a move to northwest Arkansas. Peacock says. It's not just the outdoors. There's culture atop Museum of American Art. And it's monumentally cheaper than, for example, San Francisco say you make 150,000 pretty good. It's comparable to $63,000 is what you would need to have the same lifestyle here. That's some pretty serious savings, but the same lifestyle moving from San Francisco Toe northwest Arkansas or Tulsa, Oklahoma. To Lisa Garland says her new neighborhood and Tulsa. It's progressive politically and doesn't feel that different from her old hometown, Berkeley to other parts of the city. Yeah, it's very, very, very different from Berkeley from San Francisco from the Bay Area, and so's much the rest of the state. Oklahoma is one of the reddest states in the country. Garland is a Democrat. And she's actually looking forward to meeting people with different views, especially in these challenging political times. You have to see what the other side and so I think that living in this city will give me an opportunity to kind of have a better understanding of The other side of things. And so I think it's actually very exciting where we Berliner NPR News, One of the most notable insects in North America is in trouble. Federal Wildlife officials announced today that Monarch butterflies deserve protection under the Endangered Species Act, but they won't get it. Why not? NPR's Nathan Rott explains. What the U. S Fish and Wildlife Service said today is that declines in monarch butterfly populations are so severe that they do warrant federal protections. But they're precluded from getting them because of limited resource is Be kind of like your Dennis saying, Yeah, you need to get that cavity filled. But we've only got so many fillings so get in line and the line for monarchs is long. The Fish and Wildlife Service says 161 other species have priority nationally. Which makes today's announcement bittersweet for people like Serena Jepson. On one hand, I'm really happy to see that the wildlife Service recognizes that monarchs are threatened with extinction on the other. They're not doing much about it. Jepson is with the Tzar See Center for Invertebrate conservation, which helps count monarch populations every year, and the trend line, she says, is alarming. I really don't think that monarchs can wait indefinitely for protection. As recently as the 19 nineties, there were millions of monarch butterflies fluttering through backyards and across fields in the U. S. You've probably seen them and they're recognizable Rust Orange wings, But the eastern population of monarch butterflies has declined by 80% since the mid nineties, the western population which winters in Central California. Has dropped even further. Actually, just this year we're seeing potentially the collapse of the Western population. Federal wildlife officials are asking the public to help by planting milkweed and using less insecticide. Also review the monarch butterfly status every year. But the decision is still frustrating to Jake Leak who specializes an endangered species at the Environmental Policy Innovation Center. If you've already done like 90% of the work to make a wanted finding, we'll just do the remaining 10% and get it done by putting the listing awfully says it will not only cost more time but money. With the extinction crisis. Worsening money for biodiversity will be in short supply. Nathan Rott NPR news For.

Arkansas Lisa Garland San Francisco Tulsa Serena Jepson Nathan Rott NPR Nelson Peacock U. S Fish and Wildlife Service Northwest Arkansas Oklahoma wildlife Service Berkeley University of Arkansas president and CEO Federal Wildlife Berliner NPR News WalMart Stewart interim director