36 Burst results for "Sequoia"

Fresh update on "sequoia" discussed on Equity

Equity

00:57 min | 9 hrs ago

Fresh update on "sequoia" discussed on Equity

"Our take on this is that it's yucky. This is gross. This should not be happening in 2021, not with the amount of time that the crypto world has had to mature and grow some better security. It makes us doubt what we're seeing here. On the other hand, one thing to keep in mind, hot wallets, cold wallets, cold wallets are things that are essentially unremovable. Hot wallets are what crypto exchanges used to move currencies around quickly. Essentially, a hot wallets are less secure, but easier to use, cold wallets are the opposite, so to see a hot wallet hacked, not a huge surprise compared to a cold wallet. If we saw a cold call, I get hacked, oh boy, are we in trouble? And finally from the world of big tech Alibaba. Now, we haven't really talked about Alibaba in a positive light for some time because the news hasn't been good. And this morning, well, we're sticking to theme. Alibaba is reshuffling its leadership, including a CFO succession that we didn't actually expect. Now, why do we care? Well, think about the climate in China. Think about what Alibaba has gone through on the regulatory front. Think about the rising influence of the Chinese government inside the broader Chinese technology ecosystem. And you have to wonder, what do these moves mean? Now we don't know. It's still too early. We don't actually have a lot of leaks yet about why these changes are being made and why now. And so forth. But just given how under the spotlight Alibaba has been in the last couple of years by the Chinese government's regulatory lens, well, we're pretty curious. We don't want to get too speculative, but I'll just say this, we are watching carefully. All right, ladies and gentlemen, it is now time to talk about startups the best part of the show. The funnest part of the show when we talk about the future, and who is building it. First up, news from the crypto world and the VC world at the very same time, our own mini Singh reports that a number of investors including Sequoia Capital, India, and steadview capital are in talks to back polygon, which operates a framework for building and connecting Ethereum compatible blockchain networks by way of tokens purchase, three sources familiar with the matter told him. So they're looking to do a 9 figure token purchase, which is quite a lot of money. They would get a discount on the tokens, about 20% seems to be the average. So what is polygon? Why do we care? Well, it's an L two on top of Ethereum. And what that means is it lives in the Ethereum world, but operates slightly separately, but interacts with Ethereum chain, allowing people to execute transactions, perhaps more quickly, perhaps more cheaply than they can on the Ethereum main net. And this matters because if you've tried to do anything on Ethereum in the last, I don't know. Four, 5, 6, 12 months. It's cost you an arm, a leg, a first born and D to your house. Pretty rough, frankly. So solutions like polygon are a way to kind of stay on a central source of truth like Ethereum, while also not dealing with the baggage that it brings. The source of truth point matters because Ethereum is a place where a lot of developer activities bring NFTs and gains and so forth kind of to the four of consumer consciousness. And it's becoming, I think the place to build and the place to own things if you will in the crypto world. So polygon might allow the source of truth to stay put. We'll also avoiding all the gas fees. Kind of a cool idea. Let's see when this deal closes. Another one of TechCrunch's best reporters, our own page canoe Okafor reports this morning that trade depot, a Nigeria and U.S. based company that connects consumer goods brands to thousands of retailers helps out with distribution and other things including be NPL and other consumer credit options.

Alibaba Chinese Government Steadview Capital Ethereum Sequoia Capital China India Okafor Techcrunch Nigeria U.S.
"sequoia" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

04:18 min | Last month

"sequoia" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"Do not like bullies. I did not start my career as a software engineering daily founder to document bullying. I didn't do I didn't want to become an investigative journalist. I wanted to cover the software industry because I wanted to find a company opportunity to build. As it turned out, the world needs a software engineering media outlet that is reliable because most of the software engineering media outlets can be bought. You can pay them money for sponsored posts and eradicate any truth. We don't do that. I found out the truth about Facebook. They're the best run software engineering organization I've ever seen, and it's not close. And I worked at Amazon. Facebook has true innovation. They are truly innovative. They're amazing. But they made some mistakes. They thought that they were more powerful than justice and truth and rationality and kindness. And I believe they formed a deep alliance with China. And I believe that that alliance between Facebook and China is so deep and pervasive that allows them to control Silicon Valley by deploying Chinese people into organizations and controlling those organizations, effectively through the will of Facebook. I don't care that that sounds like a conspiracy. I will die on the hill that that conspiracy should be investigated. And I'm going to do the investigation. Unless somebody else wants to help me, some kind of government or something like an American government, I would love that. If you want to forward this to the FBI or the CIA, go for it. I'm looking to have some real conversations here. I've been having the bullshit conversations for a while now. I'm ready for the real conversations. I'm ready to be told, what is going on here? Today I'm going to also release an episode on software engineering daily called calling all Facebook whistleblowers. That's right. I'm your port of call. If Facebook did something to you, I want to know about it. If you're a Facebook engineer and you're seeking refuge, I want to be that refuge. I worked for Sequoia Capital as a scout for 9 months. And I learned nothing about the organization. Barely anything. One thing I did learn is that they're very disrespectful. They treated me with such a lack of respect that you know what I'm just made me suspicious. So a scout for Sequoia Capital, what you do is you look for company investment opportunities. You look for the best companies that they haven't heard of. And you go and send emails to your Sequoia contact. My contact was Constantine Bueller. You send an email to your contact and you say, hey, I think this company is worth investing in. Can we talk about it? And it gives you an opportunity to learn what companies Sequoia likes to invest in. And I learned that Sequoia Capital is actually extraordinarily good at learning what to invest in. And knowing what to invest in. They do a great job. Sequoia Capital, as its originally intended is a great organization. And venture capital is amazing. Another thing I really, really wanted when I started software engineering daily was to be part of the venture capital community, because it's basically a. Pro social form of poker, venture capital lets you look through a variety of business opportunities and find which ones you should bet on. That's awesome. That's fun. At an early stage, and you get to help people who are early on in their business careers. That's really cool. Venture capital has been weaponized. The way that venture capital works in Silicon Valley is it just intimidates people. It intimidates people with large checks..

Facebook Sequoia Capital China American government Constantine Bueller Amazon CIA FBI Silicon Valley
"sequoia" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

07:23 min | Last month

"sequoia" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"It's been a great year for the Facebook platform, but Mike vernell wants more. Facebook's director of engineering tells us the social network is trying to pump up user posts favoring longer stories and content and adding data that will help Facebook and its partners repurpose even the simplest status updates. An article from 2012 in wired. It's from November 28th, 2012. This is an article about Mike vernal. Mike for now is one of Facebook's former top engineers. And today he effectively runs Sequoia Capital. Sequoia Capital is the most powerful venture capital firm in Silicon Valley. And I worked as a scout for Sequoia Capital for about, I guess, 9 months. Maybe a year. Sequoia Capital, I believe, is a criminal organization. They're widely known as a mafia in Silicon Valley. And I think that ever since Mike for now joined the show, things have become downright criminal. And the reason I believe that is because I believe have been a victim of criminal activities. I was bullied as a kid. And that's part of why I started software engineering daily, because the industry is run by bullies. Bullying is mean and it controls people. We already know that Facebook is evil. We already know it from their public actions. Again, look at the Facebook whistleblower. The Facebook whistleblower risked her entire career. She did corporate espionage. Francis Gauguin, she committed corporate espionage because she thought it was so important to fully disclose that Facebook knowingly shows material to people that makes them depressed. They create negative feedback loops in life. They've been doing this since at least 2012. This whole story about Mike for now, in wired, is about creating negative feedback loops, which effectively hypnotize people. Facebook can hypnotize people at scale. Mark Zuckerberg studied psychology. He believes that's an excuse to play God with people satis updates and the ads that you show them and the content that you show them in the order that you show it to them. And at the time at which you show it to them. This is what we know about the company publicly, that they're willing to commit mass psychosis. Do human beings? That's what they do publicly. Now, what kinds of technology does Facebook have? Facebook has virtual reality technology. Haptic skin detection technology, meaning they can interface with your skin. They have the deepest understanding of who you are as an individual and what you want, what you're afraid of, they can signal these things to you in latent ways. I've read about what makes people powerful. I was bullied as a kid again. And I never really fought back. My way of fighting back was to succeed at things. One thing I succeeded at was competitive poker. I played competitive poker at pretty high stakes up to $5000 buy ins. The largest pot I ever lost was $34,000. I lost it when I was I think 19. So I'm used to dealing with bullies. I'm used to dealing with combative psychiatric and psychological situations. And in those battles, sometimes you get beaten down. And over the last two years, I've gotten beaten down. And I think I've gotten beaten down with every tool in the fucking Facebook book. Facebook is so powerful. If you were as powerful as Facebook, don't you think you would look for means they're slightly outside the realm of illegal? I have been a victim of those things. If you join the CIA, this is what I've heard. And you really want to know how the CIA doesn't interrogation? You're going to probably be micro dosed. They're going to give you little doses of LSD and maybe PCP, and other things, because they're going to test your will. They're going to test your ability to keep calm and to actually be psychologically composed. Under systems of extreme arrests. I also played magic the gathering. Magic the gathering was the best education for strategy, mind control, psychology, advanced bluffing. And in magic, there are cheaters. There are people who bend the rules. There are people who intimidate you when you're playing against them. And I never did much of that shit. I actually did cheat. One time, as far as I can remember, there was one time when I cheated, maybe there were a couple times that I cheated, where I was just so hell bent on winning a game of magic the gathering that I cheated. There was actually a deck that I played, a minds desire deck. There's a card called minds desire. And this card is so powerful that. There were really, really powerful decks built around it. And it's called mind's desire. And it's telling you something. That card told me something. It told me that there are things that are too powerful to do and you shouldn't do them. Facebook has done some of those things behind closed doors. And I'm making my job to find out what those things were. I want to know the nastiest stuff that Facebook did. From Francis Gauguin, we know that Facebook does the stuff that we all know that they do, right? We all know that Facebook actively makes people feel worse. We know that they do it through Instagram. That's the most obvious one. What are the latent ways in which Facebook is torturing us? What are the ways behind the scenes that they've been signaling information to us that just makes us feel bad, you know? If you show me a picture of my dead cat in the middle of the day, that's going to break my heart and piss me off. Facebook does that kind of stuff. I'm convinced. Do I have proof? Not yet. I'm going to find it. I want to know what this company has done. I am so, so tired of being ridiculed by my peers..

Facebook Sequoia Capital Mike vernell Mike vernal Francis Gauguin Silicon Valley Mike Mark Zuckerberg CIA Instagram
To Work at Dan Abrams' Mediaite, You Need a Low IQ and Middle-School Mentality

Mark Levin

00:48 sec | Last month

To Work at Dan Abrams' Mediaite, You Need a Low IQ and Middle-School Mentality

"There's a website called mediaite that was founded by Dan Abrams You might be familiar with Dan Abrams He's the guy that use crazy glue to glue a dead squirrel on the top of his head And you see him on these shows cops like he supports cops Yeah right And courtroom cam or Sequoia camera something like that I don't know how he gets these mainstream type hosting jobs because he's a radical hack as his daughter a judge His daughter is what his sister May you never know but it's his sister And so he found this thing called mediae And in order to get a job at mediaite you have to have a very low IQ and be a pre bouba Bassett So you know people out of middle school pretty much or at least that kind of attitude and mindset

Dan Abrams Bouba Bassett
"sequoia" Discussed on Short Wave

Short Wave

07:17 min | 2 months ago

"sequoia" Discussed on Short Wave

"This message comes from npr sponsor samsung with the samsung galaxy's z. Fold three five. G see more and do more with the phone that unfolds into a super slim tablet. Right in your pocket. Five g connection and availability may vary check with carrier support for this. Npr podcast and the following message. Come from all birds. All birds new natural run collection takes a sustainable route by focusing on workout apparel made from natural materials instead of oil-based synthetic fabric shop the collection. Today at all birds dot com so lauren. Wildfires have been bad in the us again this summer and earlier this month. A wildfire was threatening. Grove of giant sequoia sequoia national park. I remember seeing pictures of sequoia tree wrapped in what looked like kind of aluminum foil to protect it. Yeah that was probably the general sherman trie. It's the largest tree on the planet and the foil around. The base is kind of a last ditch effort to protect it But the thing is it's weird that these sequoia trees would need that at all. They are built for fire. Their bark is a foot thick. They tower over the rest of the forest and they don't have any low branches that might catch on fire from other trees. Wow that's actually really interesting. I didn't realize that. So i mean if they are naturally fireproof. What's changed now. Why are so many dying recently. Well the fires have changed. I mean the sierra nevada has always had regular fires but mostly these low-grade fires that kind of had this effective clearing out the brush from time to time They were started either by lightning strikes or they were set by native american tribes. And that's knows cultural burning. The tribes use it to kind of cultivate the land for game or plans or for materials that they used but things changed dramatically when they were forced from their lands. Burning stopped and then came the era of fire suppression right and by fire suppression. You're talking about like smokybear saying only you can prevent forest fires things like that. Yeah yeah i remember those ads you know and it was the mission of firefighting agencies to extinguish all fires without fires. The forest got a lot denser. The trees are closer together. The undergrowth has built up. And that's what's helping fuel these really extreme fires the kind that's acquaintance it turns out just can't survive. That's what was striking to scott stevens. He's a uc berkeley fire scientist. Who was out with the field crew that day. They were there to catalog the mortality but also to study the forest density around the sequoias. They've been here fifteen hundred years you know and each tree maybe survived sixty seventy eighty fires. You know That's incredible and then one fire comes in two thousand twenty and all of a sudden they're gone that is a travesty. So if you're losing so many of these sequoias of once. I mean what is gonna happen does sequoia national park like have to get renamed or are there enough of these trees making it through. Yeah well that was the other thing they were there to inventory. They were really looking for signs of hope to tiny sequoias here from the regeneration from the fire. Pretty rare scott spotted two tiny sprouts in the ground. You know these little specks of green in the ash. They're only two inches tall. It just seems like impossibly tiny compared to what they might become Sequoias need fire to reproduce because it's the trigger for them to release their seeds there cones open up from this blast of heat and then there's a shower of seeds that hits the forest floor But the whole day. I was there. We only saw a dozen seedlings and normally researchers would expect to see hundreds or even thousands. I mean why. Why are there so few. Yeah researchers are trying to figure that out you know. Maybe the fire was just too hot for the seeds. But there's also a drought right now said the seedlings are having to survive and other hot dry summer and even in a normal year. Mosa kwesi links. Don't make it through the first year unless we see some regeneration and some of these sites my goodness. You're not gonna see sequoia here. Wow i mean what's really striking. Is how abrupt change can happen like a whole ecosystem can transform from just one event. Just one big fire. Yeah and i think that's what was kind of hitting the scientists. I spoke to as well. You know we we think of climate change. Is this kind of gradual warming. And it's what helps set the stage for this. I spoke to nate stevenson. Who's studied sequoias for decades as a scientist with the us geological survey. He says it really showed. When a drought hit california in two thousand twelve the old growth sequoias they weathered it okay but the conifers and other trees in it the extra warmth that came with the drought pushed it into a whole new terrain. And that's what really helped. Kill a lot of trees and they become fuel for fires right so it wasn't that the drought hit the sequoias particularly hard. It was the trees around them that died and then those trees fueled the fires that ended up killing the sequoias right. Yeah and until recently. Nate had never seen a group of old growth sequoias. Just die was unheard of and then he saw the damage assessment from the castle fire. That's when i couldn't help it. I don't cry. But i cried when i saw the photos because i love these trees mean been part of my life or most of my life. Yeah i mean it. Sounds like such a huge tragedy. Is anyone talking about going in and planting seedlings if they're not seeing them come back naturally in some places. Yeah they are. I mean but it's very early in those discussions because climate change is throwing another wrench in here. These trees live thousands of years. So what's the climate going to be like. Then oh i see like the spot. They have might be good habitat. I sequoia right now. But if things get hotter that's going to change. Yeah like maybe in the future. The best sequoia habitat might be higher up in the mountains where it's a little cooler. I've been talking to christie brigham about that. She's the head of resource management and science for sequoia and kings canyon national parks. She says planting new trees as the backup plan right now because it takes so long to replace these old growth trees christie says. What's more urgent than replanting is to identify the sequoia groves that are at highest risk for fire. She says in some groves. The park has already reduced the overgrown vegetation by using controlled burns. That's been done in the grove with the general sherman tree. Actually but she thinks about forty percent of the grove still need some help but i guess if one fire can take out such a huge swath of the sequoia population. I wonder whether the work can be done fast enough to protect the trees. they're left. yeah. I mean that's the key question. Christie says it's it's not easy to do these controlled burns. They need more funding and personnel there other constraints like when it's really dry and hot. It's not safe to do the burns in some cases but she's really pushing to get this done quickly. it is not too late. We can do better and laurie..

Grove of giant sequoia sequoia sherman trie samsung uc berkeley scott stevens npr Mosa kwesi Npr sierra nevada sequoia national park lauren nate stevenson us scott christie brigham kings canyon national parks Nate california
"sequoia" Discussed on Short Wave

Short Wave

02:08 min | 2 months ago

"sequoia" Discussed on Short Wave

"These massive trees have come under threat in the latest round of wildfires lauren. How are they holding up. I have to say. I've seen a lot of tough stuff as a climate reporter and i really wasn't ready for this. I went to sequoia national forest a pretty remote part of it in the sierra nevada. That is what we would call. A real giant sequoia monarch alexis bernau was standing next to that monarch. Which is the name given to the largest sequoias. She's a research assistant at uc berkeley. It's massive jenny. What was the diameter on this tree so it was forty feet around at the trunk. Two hundred feet tall so that's easily more than a thousand years old and some sequoias live more than three thousand years. I mean that timeframe is just so hard to wrap your mind around. Those trees were growing three thousand years ago right but this particular tree isn't getting any older. The trunk is pitch black. It looks like charcoal. And the burn marks stretch all the way to the top but it's one hundred percent dead. There's no living foliage on it at all within. Just one hundred meters of us. I can see one two three four five six seven eight giants acquire ex and they're all dead these trees and up to ten thousand other old growth. Sequoias were killed in a big fire last year called the castle fire. I mean that that just sounds like a huge loss. Yeah and that's up to fourteen percent of the entire population of giant sequoias so it's unprecedented burnell says it's hard to see these trees that i've lived hundreds to potentially thousands of years. Just die because it's just not a normal thing for them trying to quit can normally handle fire. They're adapted to it but the way humans are changing both the climate and the forest itself. The wildfires are getting more extreme still. This isn't just a depressing story. Because scientists are trying to move quickly to protect the sequoias that remain so today on the show the.

alexis bernau uc berkeley sequoia national forest sierra nevada sequoia lauren jenny giants burnell
New wildfire prompts evacuations in Northern California

AP News Radio

00:46 sec | 2 months ago

New wildfire prompts evacuations in Northern California

"Crews are working to protect giant sequoia trees from wildfires in California's Sierra Nevada governor Gavin Newsom says one big wildfires in the K. and P. complex zero percent percent contained thirty three thousand acres just this complex over the years the area around the big trees had controlled fires to burn away vegetation Christy Brigham with sequoia and kings national parks says the bases are also wrapped in fire resistant material these are all fired up well this is very what if there's air in here so far only one big tree has been damaged giant forest has two thousand sequoias and includes the general Sherman the largest tree in the world by volume I'm a Donahue

Gavin Newsom Christy Brigham Sierra Nevada Kings National Parks California Sequoia
California Wildfires Burn Into Groves of Giant Sequoia Trees

NPR News Now

00:47 sec | 2 months ago

California Wildfires Burn Into Groves of Giant Sequoia Trees

"In california. Wildfires are burning deep into sequoia national park where services and facilities are now closed. Extra steps are being taken to protect the giant forest of grove containing thousands of the gigantic ancient sequoias including the world's largest the general sherman. Fire information officer mark garrett says the trees are typically resistant to flames. But they've also been under other pressures. They're very resilient but with our recent drought tree mortality in the sierra nevada. Maybe two hundred million dead trees. That's putting extra stress on these trees to the k. n. p. complex fire expanded overnight and crews are battling the blazes amid extremely dry

Sequoia National Park Mark Garrett General Sherman California Sierra Nevada
California wildfires burn into groves of giant sequoia trees

AP News Radio

00:50 sec | 2 months ago

California wildfires burn into groves of giant sequoia trees

"Crews are trying to keep wild fires away from groves of giant sequoia trees in national parks and forests in California wildfires have made it to at least four girls of the agents a call yes some two thousand years old and two hundred feet in height colony fire spokesperson Rebecca Patterson says some of the oldest and most well known sequoias are being wrapped in a fire retardant blanket structural rap on which is typically used to protect buildings from the possibility of fire on around the bases of giant sequoia trees she says that includes the best known of the giant trees the general Sherman tree which is the largest living tree in the world the fire is about a mile from the giant forest officials don't know yet the extent of damage caused to the other girls which are in remote hard to reach areas I'm Tim acquire

Rebecca Patterson California TIM
California Wildfires Threaten Famous Giant Sequoia Trees

What A Day

00:52 sec | 2 months ago

California Wildfires Threaten Famous Giant Sequoia Trees

"Wildfires in california are now threatening some of the biggest trees on earth two fires in the sierra nevada mountains have already closed down sequoia national park which is home to giant sequoia trees. Some that are as tallest three hundred feet and hundreds of thousands of years. Old two thirds of all giant sequoia groves acres already burned down and wildfires within the last five years historic drought and heat waves caused by man made climate. Change are to blame for the extreme proliferation of fires in the area. Firefighters are working hard to protect the giants by doing things like robbing them in huge fire-resistant blankets that are usually reserved for protecting buildings. Here's hoping that they're able to save the general sherman tree which fun fact is the largest city in the world by volume it will become the biggest and most vengeful tree goats if we kill it via climate change we cannot let that

Sierra Nevada Mountains Sequoia National Park California Giants
California Wildfires Threaten Giant Sequoias

CNN 5 Things

00:27 sec | 2 months ago

California Wildfires Threaten Giant Sequoias

"In a pair of wildfires. In california's sierra nevada mountains are threatening some of the largest trees on earth. The trees known as giant sequoias grow in sequoia national park within the rugged mountains. Firefighters are aggressively attacking the fires to help suppress them. The trees which can reach heights of three hundred feet have already been hit hard by fires. In recent years the national park service says somewhere between seventy five hundred and just over ten thousand mature giant sequoias were destroyed in the last year alone.

Sierra Nevada Mountains Sequoia National Park California National Park Service
"sequoia" Discussed on The Twenty Minute VC

The Twenty Minute VC

08:28 min | 2 months ago

"sequoia" Discussed on The Twenty Minute VC

"We're lucky enough that we have operating people. I think we have the best people in any partnership in engineering will bill. Corn used to run google search in bogomil who did the same of them wear in product management product marketing in carlson bach. You probably knows who ran a sales operation from sixty million to six billion and so on and so when you need is the larger you go the later you come near these companies the more you have to convince a founders you have real operational muster to help them so why were we investors in zoom. I can tell you that. Eric juan didn't need money need karsh mba and the same can be said for many of us. It's happened many times. Same thing with service now and me and so on but it is better to do this at the seat state because then you can help them set the right dna and so on and of course if you come even later at that point they have everything the have correlation back or bogomil or doug. Leoni at that. Point is purely price you know. There's nothing to tell a. Founder we can help with the ipo while that is a commodity type of benefit. That help can be many different ways. And so you wanna get early now going. That early isn't just writing checks early as these latest stage partners is now looking to do. Let me get into as because they're missing the company building. How they're missing the forty nine years fifty years of expertise and that's what we can bring to the table so it's not as easy as investing early. It's everything else that goes with investing. That's the tough part. Doug i'm did you know in terms of the geography expansions of sequoia brandon and activity saudi on geography. Anti thousand five. You made the decision to do sequoia china. Why was that. And how did he think about that position. So i wrote a memo in. Oh four one pay. That said i don't know if we're doing this. For defense reasons or offensively since i was noticing that the founders in california where many ethnic founders from india china italy france all over the place and i said i don't know what's to happen twenty years from now and i remember saying if any a has posters from chinese or india companies in their offices and we're tracking us-based chinese found. So they're gonna come to us. They're going to go to any a. I consider that defense. And then i made a point of where the largest and growing economy and it was bric brazil india china and we prioritize them. We sit china one india too because if you wanna be a partner to the most valuable companies in the world which is our mission. It could only happen large economies. It's not going to happen in thailand a small economy and so we decided for defensive and offensive reasons that we needed to be in these other locations and so two of us when shopping for context for teams in china than in. And that's what we into. It all started with a one page memo in an offsite dinner at some restaurant whose name i cannot recall in san francisco patted hogan's heroes episode. Impact your thinking around population for the founded sequence. So what hogan's zeros is is politically incorrect. Sitcom that ran in the seventies about americans in a german pow in world war two. And of course. The americans smart and the germans were dumb and the gentleman who ran the cam. Colonel klink was particularly dumb. Invulnerable where hogan the lee. Pow is smart and hogan's and cling find themselves in front of a safe in clinks office. That had been jerry rigged with a bomb. And if you turn the handle of the safe one way the bomb would explode and if you turn it the other way the safe would be opened and there was money in a safe and hogan the american looked at klingler german as clink which way for the handle and cling said left and hogan turned the right and opened the safe and they got some money and clinks at he goes. How did you know. And hogan said. I wasn't sure whether i'd get a right but i was positive that you would get a wrong. And that little vignette was what mike morrison i used. When we went into china in other words we were absolutely sure that he and i would get a wrong. We didn't know we're gonna recruit neil hsien. We didn't know we were gonna find someone who would get it absolutely right. But we liked the chances of a non known person we had more than we liked the chances of him in me and i brought up hogan zero. I told them the same thing. I told you agreed. So we took a shot we when looking for people and we luckily and fortunately and thank god. We came across nielsen. Do you have to kind of be on. You know when you look at sequoia china's square india. They've both been so successful. What else do you think he did looking back now. The drive success in such a pivotal way. Well first of all. I should explain what sequoias. It's a brand that is run by local people in local geos who make every important choice decisions about investing hiring firing that is the key is finding the right people and by the way in every line of business. Whether it's china india southeast asia are hedge fund a multifamily office called heritage. We've had to win and affect changes once so it wasn't that we gotta so perfect from the beginning so we ought to go in aggressively in effect change but finding rape people going in if you have to and then leaving them alone most of the time knowing that local people are the best suited and then in my role making show we all row the same way we have one culture with centralized compliance financial reporting those a secondary. My role lives a secondary importance to the rule of rule off in the. Us shetlander lender in india. Neil in china. Charlie cow in china hedge fund jeff wang in our us fund and keith johnson heritage. The decisions important. Part of the business is there. But that's what's sequoia is. It is a decentralized organization under the one umbrella brand when you look at those different incredible people in teams. This has been so shanas fact bump me my question shoes. Is there ever a time on flashing point advantage. When you think that success zuma cyclical and self-fulfilling now for sequoia at brands the companies associated. So good and the what we've done is so good that it's who myself felling. Look there are a number of people in the world. Think that we sequoia investor sit by. The couch would look at the clock. It's three o'clock let me have a drink. It's three thirty. Let me put my net install. Here's a fish. Nothing could be further from the truth. It is an every second everyday thing. There is no such thing as self-fulfilling prophecy. We have gone as far as taking all the posters from our companies away from conference room once upon a time and say let's act like we've done nothing in fact. Our success is the greatest danger we've had because it can confuse people that yesterday's tomorrow success has to do with yesterday but tomorrow is the only thing that matters and it's always the next partnering opportune with founders and success has little to do with it. No found calls us and says i've got a great investment. Hey sequoia why don't you partner with us. We only want you know. We're always a fighting like cats and dogs for every single opportunity without the venture firms. You know and so on. So self-fulfilling prophecy. I wish if that were the case. I'd work forty hours eighty hours. It is a go. Gogol compete compete compete business. And it's going to continue to do that and anybody else. That thing can relax. They will be quickly out of business. I run the pat. One said to me look at every tech company that goes public and is amazing if they didn't have the core on the table. That's something that i am. We have missed and we always walk connor together. We would like to have one hundred percent market share. We have been responsible Somewhere around six trillion of partnering opportunity meaning but companies with which we partner generated six and a half trillion of market cap about a quarter of the nasdaq. God knows much of the nyse in hong kong now somewhere near three hundred and fifty and four hundred. Ipo's but that's all yesterday that is all yesterday. We've done nothing tomorrow. I've got one final question for you. Dominates all on the like you said thereby incredible companies going public on the south side of a big question. That often is posed. When is the right time to sell. What is the right time to accident position. And we don't let the line. We should forgive me for the language. When's the right time to sell. How do you think about on. Do you.

hogan china india carlson bach Eric juan karsh mba bogomil sequoia brandon Colonel klink klingler Leoni mike morrison neil hsien bric doug Charlie cow jeff wang saudi Doug shanas
"sequoia" Discussed on The Twenty Minute VC

The Twenty Minute VC

06:50 min | 2 months ago

"sequoia" Discussed on The Twenty Minute VC

"And proud to welcome doug. Leoni global managing partner sequoia capital. You have now arrived at your destination. Doug this is such an honest. I mean it's a fall from breakfast through the. But i can't thank you enough for joining me. Stay said really appreciate you taking the time. It's my pleasure and honor to be here. I would love to start say. They wouldn't incredible thirty. Three johnny was sequoia. But i did my research before this and practice guide to venture capital five. Pm meeting with dome ballantyne. How did you get it. And how did the meeting wanted. Don't ask well. Some of the training for that. Cold call came from a sales days. And when you sold computers back in the late seventies had to get past what was then called the secretary to get to someone who might have a budget and so it was really no different and the lady who answered the phone. She was not a secretary. I did not know that she was the right hand. Person don valentine. She was shrewd tough great sense of humor a new yorker who would not be bullshitted if you will by anybody. We started the call. I quickly sense what she was. And we add an honest and real conversation firm conversation between two people who spent a lotta time in new york and we hit it off. And i was told afterwards that she walked into don's office and she said this kid may have something you might want to interview. And that's what led to my five. Pm monday meeting. With don valentine and tell me added the meeting go. Would it don't ask. It was a tough meeting. Donna had a little round table at the corner of his office. Don was the kind of person that silence would not bother him in other words. If you answered a question he could sit there for thirty seconds in dead quiet in his heart rate probably wouldn't increase. What yours probably doubled and so we asked me one question. What's important and i rambled for maybe four five minutes and now it was followed by debt science. It felt like an hour. Sure was twenty seconds and then he said to me. What else in that started laughing at. I said what else i gave you everything i have. And then we warmed up from that point on. And i think what don noticed that he had someone who was a missile back then at saying unguided type of missile but someone who had the courage the humor and from his point of view who looked at business from the customer in not from the technology out and he liked that as a compliment to some of the people who have the looked everything from the checkout in which is why i was loved that question because i just got off a cool with david at nea. Buying and i said to him. Hey doug coming on the show. Why should i ask him and he said doug is the most questions scott when he interviews people lost dog. What question does he ask. So what are you ask in. This aims dumb. Things have changed because the type of questions you can. Now ask a very different than the types of questions you can once ask. But i have some favorites i and i said i don't want to get too personal but i asked him if they have a sibling close in age and then i ask them. Used three adjectives to describe your sibling. I make it very clear. This is not about their sibling. Into the scribe themselves by compares. And so you know. In a law of diversity to siblings are less likely to be alike to strange and so how they describe their siblings usually opposite on how they describe themselves. It's a self-awareness questions. So on so. I always like that i like to ask. What are the things that you've always done well because of genetics because of early upbringing and the things you struggle with that you have head to improve on because you are smart person and you're tired of making the same errors over and over. I really try to get into not the professional equality of the individual but more of the personal quality. It takes about thirty minutes with someone to relax which is why refused to interview someone but thirty minutes after thirty minutes than i ask a little more about business the key drivers of a company to them why they did certain things and so on but i focused very much on the why and a lot less than what mention sibling rationale habits. Don't too personal but you set before about being an only child and about your parents growing up in seeing your father. Y- doing his profession. And i think he said at the peak. He made twenty five grand while he incredibly hard. I was intrigued. what were your biggest takeaway from seeing. The work ethic of your parents knew that they did for you in those early days. Having that save those takeaways fee. Lots of great lessons first of all it taught you the simplicity of everyday life. And what's really important. It also taught you how to live within your means if your dad or your mom is making twenty five grand and you'll have no dead living with twenty five brand. It taught you the value of education. Because you don't want to grow up and make twenty five grand. I remember wanting to go on a date. And the only car i had was my father's car with a bastion driver's side door. And let me tell you that builds character it taught you on. At least you had a date. That's more than me. I'm going to have a nice car. But i didn't have the day if i hate to admit that was by only date in high school. My only one ran. It taught you hunger. Because if you want anything i made. It became very clear. It was up to me. Not a lot of people have trust funds. I certainly didn't have a trust for parents who could pay very little from my college education. I had to take loans and scholarships and i benefit from scholarships from people who i would never meet which is why the first thing i did when i made a little bit of money. I created scholarships any honor. My parents are cornell to return the favor but it laid a solid foundation of good values. Emma fear a what. You didn't wanna be when you grow up and so as years went by this would serve me extremely well in terms of the changing passant idea what i'm going to move to you and folks on news the leader in many respects because again i did a lot of research before and he said when he moved from the maybe more conceal a role to the more sensual. See year with mike kind of stopping inside in two thousand twelve. You said that you might as brakes. Changed as a result so significantly to entreat how did you change and what was the most prominent changes in not mayes breaks. So people have called me more than once. A bit of control freak. I can make the trains run on time. If you ask me to take a hill to get something done. I will commit to you. That things are going to be done. Unbudgeted on-time if. I'm on the board of a company that fails it fails in a very organized way. If i'm lucky enough to be on company succeeds.

don valentine sequoia capital dome ballantyne doug Leoni don Doug johnny Donna Don new york scott david Emma mike
After a Year Stuck Indoors, Visitors Expected to Overcrowd National Parks

Tim Conway Jr.

01:24 min | 6 months ago

After a Year Stuck Indoors, Visitors Expected to Overcrowd National Parks

"One way to ease back into traveling is to find a vacation spot with a little more space like a visit to one of America's 63. National parks. We sent Johnson vaguely Adi to California's Yosemite National Park, which is my favorite. That sounds like your sidekick Amber Johnson vaguely RD to get a bigger TRT and, uh, what was your last name Cannoli Big Adi Adi and Canola Johnson, vaguely Adi to California's Yosemite National Park, which is my favorite. We're here at Tunnel view, and you can clearly see how Yosemite became the muse for pain photographer Ansel Adams. This park has everything from dramatic waterfalls, two towering sequoias and iconic rock formations like El Capitan and half toe during the pandemic. National parks welcome roughly 237 million visitors. About what A year during the pandemic. National parks welcome roughly 237 Million visitors about a 30% drop from the year before. Those numbers are expected to go back up Yosemite preparing for I don't buy that number. I don't think that the national parks had 237 million visitors are in covid. So they say. Normally, it's It's 30% higher. That's normally 300 million. So it's basically the population of this country going to everybody went once. Every year, Right? That's the BS. I understand, Angel,

Yosemite National Park Amber Johnson Adi Adi Canola Johnson ADI California Ansel Adams Johnson America National Parks Angel
California Wildfires Have Decimated the Giant Sequoia

Pacifica Evening News

01:41 min | 6 months ago

California Wildfires Have Decimated the Giant Sequoia

"Wave comes amid a drought has dried up vegetation, increasing fire danger. There have been a number of small wildfires around California this week. But thus far, the state has avoided the kind of fierce gusts of wind that drove last year's devastating blazes. Last year's sq. FT. Complex fire in the Southern Sierras scorched more than 176,000 acres and giant Sequoia National Monument and the adjacent Sequoia National Park and now report compiled by National Park Scientists indicates far more of the iconic redwoods may have been killed. Than previously five. Some 30 to 40% of all the giant sequoias within the fires, footprint or incinerated by the severity of the flames. Researches explained that the intensity of their fire was brought on by drought conditions, fire prone undergrowth and a legacy of fire suppression together with climate warming, stressing the entire ecosystem. Ecuadorian files. This report from Fresno. The devastating castle fire in the southern Sierra Nevada last year may have killed between 31% and 42% of all the large giant sequoias in the footprint of that blaze. National Park Service report says that translates into a stunning loss of somewhere between 7500 and 10,600 large giant sequoia trees that are more than four ft. In diameter. That's 10 to 14% of the entire population across their rank along the western slope of the Sierras.

Ft. Complex Southern Sierras Sequoia National Monument Sequoia National Park California National Park Fresno Sierra Nevada National Park Service Sequoia
Study: California Fire Killed 10% of World’s Redwood Trees

AP News Radio

00:53 sec | 6 months ago

Study: California Fire Killed 10% of World’s Redwood Trees

"Scientists have been assessing the losses from converging wildfires that tore through sequoia national park last August researchers say the numbers are preliminary but in a draft copy obtained by the by silly at times delta scientists with the National Park Service say at least a tenth of the world's mature giant sequoias were destroyed in a single wildfire that tore through the southern Sierra Nevada mountains last year using satellite imagery in modeling from previous fires researchers determined that between seventy five hundred and ten thousand sequoias perished in the fire lead author Christie bring them says the figures are mind blowing pointing out that the trees have lived for thousands of years and I've already survived dozens of wildfires next week teams of scientists plan to hike to the gross that experience the worst damage sequoias require wildfires to burst their pine cones to reproduce but scientists worry that fire suppression longer droughts and climate change are making wildfires harder for the ancient trees to survive I'm Jennifer king

Times Delta Southern Sierra Nevada Mountai Sequoia National Park National Park Service Christie Jennifer King
"sequoia" Discussed on Exploring New Places Podcast

Exploring New Places Podcast

05:56 min | 8 months ago

"sequoia" Discussed on Exploring New Places Podcast

"All of this hikes is the giants for his enlarge poll day hikes which include a high coal moro rock. If i'm saying that right if you have to you have to climb about three hundred fee of stairs to get to the summit of this rock but when you get there. The view is spectacular. If you're not afraid of heights because it is very high but it's beautiful. A lot of people do this hike and the pictures that you take their while and if you have pets in youth think about taking your pets with you the bart recommence you to make your own decision while keeping in mind that you and your bed are a higher risk of the injured by the wildlife vets are not allow in all areas of the park. The only areas permeated roads campgrounds and picnic areas. Wayne back to a parks and the activities. You can explore. It's interesting to know that we most take care of this natural beautiful places. They'll help us to create new memories. Between the years of drought of two thousand twelve. To two thousand sixteen scientists documented thirty three giant sequoias. That died stand dean. This is so sad known. Sequoia corn furs were able to survive. Which is another type of tree but many sequoias did not make it. I say this because it's important to remember how fragile and important nature is an how much it helps us to do many things. Our next topic is restaurants. You can't visit within the bark so exciting to communicating pandemic though. There are many restaurants that you can only order to go check for their business hours in how they are serving serving their costumers. H restaurant has their own roles. Before i forget keeping mind that most restaurants are open during some seasons. Only therefore i repeat planning your visit before you go and you don't want you know to be there and encounter any unpleasant surprises peaks. Restaurants are guac suci. I think that's how you say lunch. Is that restaurant that is open year round and these restaurant serves breakfast lunch and dinner. Box lunches are available to another year. Round restaurant is their grand grove restaurant. So and this also serves breakfast lunch and dinner. I think all of the restaurants within the park. Serve all three meals there. Other restaurants courtyard enlarge. Paul deli market and snug bar is open from made april to meet october there. We go see dr grow. Snug bar has indoor and outdoor seating. This is another restaurant. Cedar grove snack. Bar has indoor and outdoor seating But this restaurant is open seasonally from late may to middle torpor and it also serves like i said breakfast lunch and dinner. Most of their restaurants do so. Make sure your chicken the business hours and you know the kind of food or yeah your preferences before you go now. It's time for the fun facts. I have three facts. That are interesting to learn fun. Fact number one is that giant sequoia grow only on the western slopes of the sierra nevada in california between thousand and eight thousand feet in elevation fun fact number two. Is that the general. Sherman tree is the world's largest tree measured by volume. It stands two hundred and seventy five feet tall. That is eighty three meters tall. And he's over thirty six feet in diameter at the base. So just imagine how tall these street is is the world's largest tree that is so interesting fun. Fag number three is that in september of nineteen sixty four president lyndon b johnson signed the wilderness. Act which made the preservation and protection of wild places a national priority as a result of that act and so constant consequence state. Federal legislation sequoia inking and canyon national far currently protect over aide. Andre in eight thousand acres of designated wilderness in addition to the not the twenty nine thousand five hundred acres of proposed wilder nets. We have reached the end of today's episode episode number. Two of exploring new places deal learns on interesting and on about this national park. I invite you to leave a comment with a mountain emoji on her facebook. Page in which is exploring and by the way The it's capitalized as well as the end. P. is exploring and key. This will tell us that you are considering going to this national park. Also don't forget to let me know what country is or seeds you would want to explore and learn more about a seed so for our next episode in which will be going over the station. That should not be overlooked.

lyndon b johnson eighty three meters october sierra nevada september of nineteen sixty thirty three giant sequoias california thousand two thousand sixteen scientist april twenty nine thousand five hund eight thousand acres today facebook Wayne Andre two thousand twelve over thirty six feet two hundred and seventy five f Paul deli market
"sequoia" Discussed on RV Homeschool Podcast

RV Homeschool Podcast

01:49 min | 8 months ago

"sequoia" Discussed on RV Homeschool Podcast

"So you don't need to retrace your steps and you probably don't want to because you can go a little bit faster on some of the other roads that are outside of the park. So that is what i recommend for. Rv camping especially if you're dealing with an rv so that's our quick podcast on sequoia national park. I hope this is useful to you for your planning. I think some of our main tips for sequoia is that you wanna make sure that you're building in enough time to for shirking sea kings canyon and if you can make a stop up to yosemite if you haven't been up there we have a whole podcast about that. If you want to see more video about our trip or other national park trips we do have a youtube channel. We have lots of videos on the national parks different things. Rv so it's not just our podcast. The youtube channel has a lot of stuff. If you want to see some video thank you so much for listening. We can be found on instagram and facebook at rv homeschool. And i thank you so much for the reviews and the kind comments. I wasn't even sure if i was going to come back and do podcasting. And then i had a bunch of people reach out and they were so nice with their words in the reviews that they've left that i decided to go ahead and bring back the podcast and hopefully provide you with more information on a regular basis. You probably notice. We don't have any ads or -ffiliated or anything like that so you don't have to waste time listening to advertisements but that also means that the only payment you could say i get for the podcast is your kind words so thank you so much for those and we will be back in probably a week or two with the next national park. Thanks so much for listening..

youtube a week facebook rv homeschool two sequoia instagram yosemite sequoia national park sea kings
"sequoia" Discussed on RV Homeschool Podcast

RV Homeschool Podcast

03:38 min | 8 months ago

"sequoia" Discussed on RV Homeschool Podcast

"So jeremy was hold onto elsa for dear life and making sure she didn't accidentally slip or fall definitely not a place to bring your toddlers But it's a very cool hike. Its considered moderate to difficult because of all the stairs and the elevation. And then the fact that you're kind of Really exposed and out there. Once you get to the upper levels you can see a really cool view of mount whitney at this point in time you can see pretty far off into the distance we were here during some really bad wildfires. I think this is just the common thing when you're going to california parks now So there was tons of smoke along the way we were almost to the point. Where you're you've hiked above the smoke and the smoke has settled down below you so our sunset view was really beautiful and it was amazing to see that but unfortunately it looked that way because of all the smoke that was in the air And it makes it a little bit difficult to be doing the hikes when you're breathing in all that smoke but moral rock very cool to see if you've seen a lot of pictures of people who have visited sequoia. You're probably often seen moral rock. The next place i wanted to talk about is crystal cave. We did not actually get to see crystal cave because it was not open this time of year. It's only open through memorial day weekend up through september in my guess is with last year with the pandemic. I'm sure they didn't even open crystal cave at all. Maybe perhaps they'll be able to open it with some limited tours this year. I don't i haven't looked into it. So i don't know the details. You'll want to make sure that you check this and you probably need to book your tour ahead of time. That's really what most of the parks are going to with. The tours is having those booked ahead of time. Type of deal what they do is they. Have a fifty minute guided tour..

fifty minute last year september this year jeremy sequoia california parks tons of smoke pictures rock
"sequoia" Discussed on RV Homeschool Podcast

RV Homeschool Podcast

05:56 min | 8 months ago

"sequoia" Discussed on RV Homeschool Podcast

"The winter and even into spring until the roads are fully opened really by summer..

"sequoia" Discussed on RV Homeschool Podcast

RV Homeschool Podcast

05:23 min | 8 months ago

"sequoia" Discussed on RV Homeschool Podcast

"Sequoia national park is located in the sierra about as in california. It's one of the nine californian parks there's no roads that go from the east to the west through the park so there's highway ninety five which runs along the sierra nevada's on the east side and then there's a couple different highways that will run along the west side. But you're only threw away from the east. West is either going up further up to the north like through yosemite national park. And that's only during the time of year. That tailgate road is actually open. If you aren't catching it during the summer months when tioga roads open you have to go all the way up to eighty through reno and then cut across and come down or through the south side of sequoia national forest you would have bakersfield and some of the highways there as your elevation gets back down to you. Know closer to sea level. So you can come across that way as well but there's no actual east west highways that go through the park itself. The other thing to know about it is that it's very close to kings canyon. They actually share Territory kind of a borderline between one park to the other parks. So kings canyon is to the north of sequoia and then squeeze on the south part. And they're right next door to each other so absolutely plan enough time that you can visit both of them while you're right there because it's so convenient it's also pretty convenient to pop in a couple days or a little bit a time of yosemite. There's a bit of a drive yet. Like a three to four hour drive between sequoia area in up to yosemite. But if you have enough time To go out to one of them it's probably worth doing another trip in and hitting up the other one as well and that's actually the way that we toward it we went to yosemite first and then we came down and visited. Sequoia kings canyon. The other thing to know about it is that The park is large but really the driving distances that you need to take to get throughout the park and around. The park are really significant. And you don't want to underestimate that. We of made the mistake of planning to spend so much time in sequoia and then we were originally planning to spend the whole next day and kings canyon and then the kids really wanted to go to disney land For halloween so we ended up cutting our trip short and we just tried to hit up sequoia and kings canyon on the same day but we really underestimated just how far that highway is. That takes you between sequoia national park up into kings canyon and so we really only caught kings canyon at the end of the day and we didn't really get to spend a full day there so be sure that you're planning enough time..

california yosemite disney land three yosemite national park Sequoia kings canyon Sequoia national park halloween reno four hour kings canyon sierra nevada both sierra one sequoia national forest one park tioga next day californian
"sequoia" Discussed on RV Homeschool Podcast

RV Homeschool Podcast

03:32 min | 8 months ago

"sequoia" Discussed on RV Homeschool Podcast

"You're listening to the home school. Podcast where we make travel educational amphion. Let's walk among the giants as we head to sequoia national park. Thank you for joining us on. The rv homeschool podcast. My name is amber steven. And i'm your host. We are a family of four that travels in our jaco seneca motorhome with our two elementary age daughters. We travel the us and canada when borders are opened and we love bringing you content about the national parks and other fun rv travel ideas so we took a one year hiatus but we are back and trying to bring you some regular content from all of the national parks that we've been to lately so thank you so much for joining us if you're new to the podcast. We like to talk about the logistics specifically about driving with your rv to the locations and things that you need to know and consider then we'll go into some of our trip highlights things that we liked hikes places to visit stuff like that and then we usually end with some camping ideas in any other general tips and recommendations for you so let's get started with sequoia national park. So why do you want to visit sequoia national park. While first of all sequoia has the largest earth. And i'm talking about large in terms of volume so just the overall width of the trees. It was the second national park and it was designated to protect these massive trees that are within its space. It has the highest mountain peak in the lower forty eight. And that would be mount whitney which stands at fourteen thousand four hundred ninety four feet in elevation. It also is home to thirty different sequoia groves throughout the park now this is only grow in the sierra nevada range which is kind of in the central part of california it's between five thousand and seven thousand and elevations sets pretty high up there and Trust me you feel that is. You're driving your rv pretty much from sea level and working your way up into the park. These trees are the largest in volume but they are not the tallest that designation goes to the redwoods which are along the coast of california. And we'll talk about that in our podcast on redwoods national park the sequoia trees are also very old and some of them are over three thousand years old and one of the other really interesting things about the sequoias is that they. They're seeds fall down in the form of these pine cones these big green cones and in order for them to release the seeds which will actually generate new force growth..

fourteen thousand california sierra nevada one year amber steven five thousand four hundred ninety four feet canada sequoia national park second national park seven thousand two elementary age one over three thousand years old thirty different sequoia grove jaco seneca first family of forty eight earth
Mother arrested after 3 children found slain in Los Angeles

Rachel

00:36 sec | 8 months ago

Mother arrested after 3 children found slain in Los Angeles

"Angeles mother under arrest tonight for allegedly murdering her Children. Before that she was caught. She is also accused of a Carjacking hours after her three young Children all under the age of three years old were found stabbed to death inside of an apartment in the receipt area of L. A 30 year old Liliana Korea was in custody found in a remote area of California near Sequoia National Forest. Well fleeing towards Hillary County. She's accused of Carjacking somebody near Bakersfield, taking their Toyota pick up and then continuing on a motive for the murders is unknown.

Angeles Hillary County Sequoia National Forest Korea California Bakersfield Toyota
30K Macs are infected with ‘Silver Sparrow’ virus and no one knows why

Cyber Security Headlines

02:55 min | 10 months ago

30K Macs are infected with ‘Silver Sparrow’ virus and no one knows why

"Silver sparrow. Malware found on thirty thousand. Max has security pros stumped. Researchers have yet to observe delivery of any payload from new malware dubbed silver sparrow. Leaving its purpose still unknown. This suggests that it may spring into action once a certain condition is met. Silver comes with a mechanism to completely remove itself. A capability typically reserved for high stealth operations and it runs natively on the new. M one chip. It also uses the mac. os installer javascript. Api execute commands. Which makes it difficult to analyze found in one hundred and fifty three countries with concentrations in the us the uk. Canada france and germany researchers are watching carefully for further developments. Solar winds hackers stole source. Code from microsoft azure exchange and into microsoft on thursday said it concluded its probe into the solar winds hack finding that. The attackers stole some source code but confirmed. There's no evidence that they abused. Its internal systems to target other companies or gain access to production services or customer data it said cases involved downloading component source code related to a small subset of as you're into nine exchange components and that the entire attack is a quote moment of reckoning and furthering the need to proactively embrace a zero. Trust mentality new hack. Let's attackers bypass mastercard pin by using it as a visa card research published by academics from e. t. h. zurich building on an earlier pin bypass attack study shows how to leverage victims stolen or lost a visa. Emv enabled credit card without knowledge of the pin uneven fool the terminal into accepting inauthentic offline card transactions the attack dubbed card brand mix up takes advantage of the fact a contact lists point of sale terminal does not properly authenticated cards application. Id to the payment terminal making it possible to deceive the terminal and simultaneously perform a visa and mastercard transaction with the one card in response. Mastercard has already rolled out. Contra measures sequoia capital one of silicon valley's most notable. Vc firms told investors it has been hacked. Sequoia capital told its investors on friday that some personal and financial information may have access by a third party after one of its employees fell victim to a successful phishing attack although it has not yet seen any evidence of compromised information being traded or exploited on the dark web the company did not provide a date for the attack describing it only as quote recent and quote sequoia capital has more than thirty eight billion dollars in assets under management and in the past has invested in airbnb door dash twenty three and me fire i and carbon black it does not appear that the hack was connected in any way to solar winds

Mastercard Microsoft Sequoia Capital MAX Germany France Zurich Canada UK Vc Firms United States Contra Silicon Valley
Robinhood, in Need of Cash, Raises $1 Billion From Its Investors

Techmeme Ride Home

00:23 sec | 11 months ago

Robinhood, in Need of Cash, Raises $1 Billion From Its Investors

"Hood still needed more cash quickly to ensure that it didn't have to place further limits on customer trading we to people briefed on the situation. Who insisted on remaining anonymous because the negotiations were confidential robin hood which is privately held contacted several of its investors including the venture capital firms sequoia capital and ribbit capital. Who came together on thursday night to offer the emergency funding. Five people involved in the negotiations said and

Hood Robin Hood Ribbit Capital Sequoia Capital
Superpowering Teams with Ilkka Paananen

Invest Like the Best

08:07 min | 11 months ago

Superpowering Teams with Ilkka Paananen

"I've been so excited to do this with you for two reasons one. I've been spending so much time thinking about in in kobe. Playing video games with myself and my young son. I think a great way to begin. This conversation is with one of my favorite lines of yours. Which is that you want. Said i am the least powerful. Ceo in the world. I love this concept because it'll introduce the idea of culture teams and people that we're going to spend most of our time talking about which may send a little strange for a video game company. But i think it's amazing and critical. So what did you mean by this line. Why did you say that. What does it mean to super cells. Culture i thanks so much for having me better. I think some are behold point. The ball trays that the more decisions that the snake and i make the better in an ideal were like if i five no decisions then but would make me. I guess is far full. Co the whole idea about supercell on what is at the core of our culture is this idea is small and independent themes that equal cells and these independent gained things sacred inside supercell way to think about them think about smaller start ups bidding raider company. That's why we think about them. I'd love to go back before super cell. Because i think your career up until that point helped inform you in how to build supercell with less focus on command and control and more focused on decentralized trust and i think our lessons today will be applicable across creative pursuits and industries. Not just in gaming what were you doing. Prior to founding supercell and what lessons that you learned or were taught by your experience before this business. I need to go back to the year. Two thousand so. I will still a student at helsinki university of technology. I had a business major vote on my actually like in my early of my studies for some reason. My dream job was to become either a management consultant. Thouray investment banker simply. Because because everybody else in my cloth wanted to catch and so deny then at some point in my studies. I was really interested in about entrepreneurship. And i started to think. Well this would be really cool. You know trying to build your own sing with a group of great people. And then i just looked like super lucky. I happened to bump into this group of people who wanted to found a company and it had to big games company on earlier. Especially in my dna cheers. I had to be a massive game. Iran still played a little gains. And then these guys may creating afford to pay any salary on threes and there was nobody else will what's gonna applying to join them although us nevil gains and they needed somebody else to do everything else and i was probably the only applicant assay and then i got the job done. I didn't get any pay funny. Anything is these guys for that. Okay you gotta do all the sales for us than me to give you like a proper titles and the people would actually like to see you. I guess they didn't know what to call me seven. They decided to call me the ceo. And i think. I was twenty two years of age and absolutely no idea what i was doing at never had a proper job except on summer. Jobs are my parents. They probably never had a proper job. Because all i've done. I've been ceo gaming companies. But anyway that's how they're going to start it. I know i had no idea what we were doing. Learnt by ewing an end eventually managed to graduate some there in bethany. and so. that's how we're gonna start in the thousand so set up a games company on funnily enough Ballgames the time if you recall those days assistant feature phones but they're coming to markets mostly from manufacturers like nokia for example of course based here in finland and of course never snow app stores. Nothing like you would need to distribute this job based gangs through. Carriers was very different at that time. But that's how book started. He founded the company almost exactly at the finding the dot com bubble burst onto members financing available so we basically like financed it bites doing work for hire work and then on the side be developed our own. Ip and our own games. I think miller able cut deals with most of the european carriers in big some of the us based carriers and then a massive amount of these jobs based phone scam the market and actually make some money on the company started to grow and back in two thousand four. We sold our company to company each chocolate. Which will say followed. By game industry legend strip wilkinson funded by sequoia on inclined burke in on the joined forces to them and then over time. The company grew to like four hundred people so relatively sizable game. Developers confident. I would call that down. Nba in guessing entrepreneurship and management learned. Lots of lessons. What were the key lessons that you learn positive and negative all combine the time at both digital chocolate and your company that was acquired by digital chocolate. What were the things that it installed in you that you brought with you into super cell and what were some other things that you reacted to a reacted against when the about how supercell would run as a company that they could've kept and what i learned that all domestic. It's all about the people and digital chocolate. I was very lucky to berkeley luck. Such amazing people. I kinda fought at those times that we are going to like had the best strategy the best plans the best processes in place and digital chocolate and mostly because of my doing so sexy quite a sort of a structured and also when it comes to innovation so we had pros almost forever thing if you off me like okay. How digital chocolate. Think about new games development tenure like a slight dick flex sixty slides expense. Exactly things for and they had all kinds of prose essays fall like how do they green like games the almost full we are myself and mike on leadership team over. There had a crystal ball as he kind of knew the best declare. Send a cornerstone. Humorous won't and then they put together like all kinds of control mechanisms to make sure that the company x. develops products and gains the direction. But then all of the years. I realized that there are a lot of negatives above this type of way of thinking. Because isn't the great the best creative people in the world. They don't get the feeling of ownership and oftentimes the reality is but actually the people who are best. What is best for the game for players. Those people are actually people are building the game. It's bill leadership. The people like me. And all the years. I realized our job as leaders. They should enable people to do their work better. We'll try to control the spent so much time carring the best people in the world also digital trump anything about why on earth tried to control them by. Don't do trust them to do the best thing. One of the things that made me fully realize this at some point. I start to look back with. Okay let's look at the heat gains but our company has pulled out early sort of a coma nominate these gangs. One is that may have really amazing people and raised themes it'd behind the games but interestingly the other thing was that most of these gangs some had nothing to do with all of these fantastic pros instead had besides the usual story was just need into anything else for these guys do their sunbury their on during the corner of the office and they were just doing whatever they want to do. And there's some flying under radar so to speak and then the next thing you know. This amazing game comes out. And then i start seeing whoa that. These amazing games may come out because of me or together they come out despite the spiteful things

Helsinki University Of Technol Kobe Strip Wilkinson Ewing Bethany Iran Finland Sequoia Nokia Burke Miller NBA Berkeley United States Mike Coma
Shrubs vs Trees With Ken Druse

A Way to Garden with Margaret Roach

03:32 min | 1 year ago

Shrubs vs Trees With Ken Druse

"Shrubs versus trees. We did shrubs last time. Both are woody plants. They're a little bit different. But there's not this precise kind of difference it it has more to do with. It has a trunk a certain amount of the way up before it branches out into other stems at the idea. Tree versus shrub versus rupture. Yeah and it can be evergreen or can be needled evergreen or could be deciduous losing its leaves and the fall. Yeah i mean. I have two trees among my favorite trees that are shrubs. Well never mind. Sorry i just the whole thing but the native white pine eastern white pine pines strobes. There's a a a selection or whatever called Pines strobes nayna or small. It dwarf white pine. I planted them thirty years ago. Have a couple of other giant bond size. So it's the it's the tree but it's in a small form in is shrimp as a tree. We'll still the still start with a single stem. So i guess it's a tree. It's a dwarf tree. Yeah and then similarly came in the mail twenty five years ago or more probably tiny tiny little thing a grafted thing cutting and It's a cordless coosa. That's name whose name is lust garten weeping remain on long island barren less garden and so forth who who introduced it. And and so it's it's small it's Five feet tall and nine or ten feet across you know it's bound and so but it's accordance cosa. It's a tree but it's not a tree. Oh sorry i think we just accept dwarf and weeping trees as trees al qaeda and we we include giant sequoias as trees because there's quite a range but they do have the single stemming common indeed so where do you wanna start i mean i know you're three-man do mentioned so many things i was thinking of what makes a tree a favorite And i started making a list. It's health it's auditee. Its uniqueness history. It's color shape. It spark it's leap or needles. It's uses its design uses. Stopped me persona. We just love them and and you mentioned something about said grafting but most of the trees that we buy. That are unusual or grafted To a an understock That is the same species but not offered or not different but a lot of trees are grown from seed. I have some very unusual trees that finally after eight years flower buds. All over them. And i'll find out what happens with them. They are favorites. If they indeed performed correctly and sometimes you can start trees from cuttings but as a little bit difficult to start treaties from cuttings because plants. That are mature. Don't easily route and trees. That's another characteristic. Generally mature

Long Island Barren Al Qaeda
Dionne Warwick Knows The Way To San Jose

Toure Show

03:48 min | 1 year ago

Dionne Warwick Knows The Way To San Jose

"It's such an honor to talk to you because you are my mom's favorite singer thing. She's gonna die when she hears this conversation. And i grew up hearing you know dino the way to san jose and walk on by all those hits all the time 'cause dionne warwick was her girl And i wanna talk about all that. You're saying that absolutely i really wanted to talk about music because i think that you are a legend and you know a master and i wanna hear what a master thinks about the thing that they have amassed so much knowledge on. Just what do you. What do you love about singing. What do you love about it. I liked it. Sounds their civil What nick's how you make me feel it's Very tangible kind of Of being i think Living being music is some people say that when they get in the midst of the song and they're leading the band and they get to that high point in the song they sort of feel like they're flying like do you feel like that i. I don't know how to describe What i'm feeling at the time. I'm doing a particular song moments where i'm hoping i can reach that high note so thinking i'm sorry is not really of the essence at that moment in times times each were has addictive feeling a defining ocean. And that's the vote and So i think which is the reason. I don't sing that song. Same twice and sequoia bad. I got up on that day. And had i happen to be feeling found is saying that. What do you think separates you as a singer. What do you think it is that has made you. You know it's so great and so special for so long. Because like i said you know if you're an athlete you say well you know i can shoot really well from beyond the three point line or i can defend really well or like what aspect of singing. Do you do really well that you think keeps audiences coming back I guess my consistency. That i i'm seeing some searchable that people have grown to love over the years as much as i have and was expected of me I've not Abandoned who. I am musically which is something that made very clear to me that thank goodness. She hadn't so doubt to doing other things or trying to do something that we would march do in any event. No would i have a desire to. I kind of like me and like what i do. So it's it's easy for me to be consistently dionne I guess that's it. Yeah i need charge.

Dionne Warwick Dino San Jose Nick Sequoia Dionne
David Biello: Moving The Dial On Climate Change

Environment: NPR

06:23 min | 1 year ago

David Biello: Moving The Dial On Climate Change

"Climate. Change is a problem so vast affecting so many people in so many different ways that it's hard to know what we should do which solutions we should focus on which efforts can truly dial back global warming because the fact is we are running out of time to make the changes. We need to stop a reputable damage to our planet but there is good news. We have the technology and science to do it. And so on the show today how we can build a zero emissions future this global effort underway to accomplish exactly the skull having this ability in our toolkit central can't dot false and it can't be done on a very large scale guiding us through some promising and fascinating solutions is ted science curator. David yellow. david. Thank you so much for being here again. Thank you for having me back and today. You're bringing us ted speakers who are trying to save the planet from the state that we're in right. Yeah except it's More more important than that. I would say because it's not just saving the planet in fact it's not really saving the planet it saving ourselves in the planet has dealt with climate change many times before And honestly the planet will be fine our civilization if we don't act now and act quickly will not be fine and so let's start with the key number which is ten ten years. That is the amount of time that climate researchers say. We have to really turn things around. David wyatt decade. So in the next ten years we will have sort of made the decisions that will determine the climate for centuries if not millennia to come so if we really do want to keep global warming where it's already at around one degrees celsius or most one point five degrees celsius warming than we really have to act now and we have to act fast and that's where the ten years comes. Okay so let's get into some of the big ideas and solutions that can help us fight. Climate change and let's start with something that captures carbon dioxide and literally right beneath our feet swell soils just thin veil that covers the surface of land but it has the power to shape our planet's destiny the a six footer soul soil material that covers the surface represents the difference between life and likeness in the air system. And he can also help us. Combat climate change. If we can only stop treating it like david. I i gotta love these. Climate researchers who love puns soil researcher as morad asif wa bad. Hey tell us about her and why she likes to talk to her. Well you know. This is one of the reasons that people find. Climate change so daunting Soil sexy well. As marines is the answer because she has a certain passion for dirt as a soil bio geochemists and she has been studying it as a dirt. Detective the age of eighteen and soil is actually this really complex skin on the face of the earth that is responsible for life on land everything we do revolves through the soil and that's true for carbon as well you might recognize it from compost compost. You'll know that it creates kind of dark rich material and then spread it in your garden and suddenly you're tomatoes. Are that much better. That darkness that Is the carbon itself. And what the carbon does is allow the soil to retain moisture to retain minerals and other nutrients that the plants need to grow and as we all know when clan are growing their photo synthesizing and that means they're pulling co two out of the air and turning it into more plant and in some cases even bearing some of that co two for us back into the soil there is about three thousand billion metric tons of carbon in soil. That's roughly about three hundred and fifteen times. The amount of carbon that we'd released into the atmosphere currently and this twice more carbon in soil and the reason vegetation and think about that for a second. There's more carbon in soil than there is in all of the world's vegetation including the lush tropical rainforests and the giant sequoia if the expansive grasslands all of the cultivated systems and every kind of flora you can imagine on the face of the earth plus all the carbon that's currently up in the atmosphere combined and then twice over hence a very small change in the amount of carbon stored in soil can make a big difference in maintenance of the earth's atmosphere. Okay first of all had no idea that there was that much carbon under there that we're basically sitting on top of a carbon piggy-bank Correct me if. I'm wrong david but this is called carbon sequestration right and that is a good thing for soil. In addition to being good for the atmosphere it is a good thing. The problem is most of our. Agriculture is is designed in a way to extract that carbon. and what we've essentially done is overburdened. The earth's kind of natural carbon cycle it used to be that a certain amount of co two kind of moved between plants and the air and the land but then we came along and start digging up. All this varied carbon carbon that have been laid down by plants even millions of years ago in the form of coal and oil and when we burn that it releases this fossils co two. And that's extra to that had been locked away from the atmosphere for a very long time. And that's why we're kind of out of

David Yellow David Wyatt Morad Asif David WA
Documentary Explores Emancipating From Foster Care System

Morning Edition

06:39 min | 1 year ago

Documentary Explores Emancipating From Foster Care System

"Some some point, point, older older kids kids in in foster foster care care become unadoptable. There are three factors at play. How the foster care system seize the child, how potential parents see the child and what the child wants in a new documentary called UN Adopted No Elena interviews, kids who were in this position. It's a position that he was in. Not that long ago. In one scene, and I asked his lawyer when his caseworker changed his status to long term foster care. Long term Foster cares with the system cause it when they stop trying to get two adopted Instead, the plan is that your age out of the system this looks like 2007 is when it moved over from a plant of adoption. Think you might have been 11. Yeah, you were 11 at that point. It means I was in Six rained on, says one reason older foster kids don't get adopted is that they come with some baggage really, or perceived its no surprise that every team comes with another teen angst and all of the Joys of being a team. But like also, I think most families don't want like this kid is forever gonna want to know about his biological family or her biological family, you know? And I think it could be a little bit intimidating, or it could seem as if That family is competing. I think most people don't want to find out or they don't possibly want to get hurt. In the documentary. We also meet a teenage girl named Sequoyah, who is incredibly honest about how badly she wants to be adopted. And at one point, she says, something so striking trying to be a part of their family the first few months. Was really hard because I had to figure out how they worked. Spoke. Let their minutes were how to talk to then this's a teenage girl who You would expect to be the one who has moods herself that adults have to get used to. And instead, she's saying I need to get used to their moods. The idea that teenagers view adoptive parents as people they have to impress. There is also something really telling and really sad about that, too. I think for Sequoia. Like so many other foster you there at emotional crossroads and They're confronted with what may be the most important decision of their lives, whether to reunify with their biological family of possible which in her case is not Or opt into extended care. Or the third choice to pursue a forever family. And she is very keen on getting a forever family. She, at one point says she does not even know if her mother is alive. And if she is, Sequoia says, Well, good for her. If she's not. I wouldn't be surprised. Um How frequent isn't for kids in the foster care system to be so alienated from their parents that their attitude is? I don't know if this person is alive or dead. I don't want them to be dead. But if they are okay. The foster care system definitely does. Desensitize people. You know, in another NPR story I did I mentioned there's like little to no emotion. Kids often mirror their role models. And if you have role models, a k a. The social workers and judges, lawyers, etcetera being so gray with them then You know you're going to get the same results. You mentioned this NPR story that you did, for all things considered a few years ago, an award winning story in which you tape part of your own courtroom hearing and the thing that stood out to me. Maybe because my name is Noel is that the judge who had dealt with your case for a while called, you know. And you corrected her and said, Actually, it's no well and then you note. The frustration of my fate is in this judge's hands, and she doesn't even know how to pronounce my name or has forgotten how to pronounce me. Yeah, um I thought that was so shocking because she's been on my case for so long, you know, and she has My brother on her caseload as well. So my name you know, would bleed into his case file. So for something so simple as a name. Is really bad. And Ms Schwartz, if you're listening, I think we should have a sit down, talk and reflect from that because I think simple things like that can get corrected and they should be. There seems to be a push. To instead of taking Children away from their parents and putting them in foster care to leave them with their parents if they're not in immediate danger and helped the parents improve. You at the end of the documentary make clear that you are in touch with your biological family and seem happy about that. You also have nothing ill or bad to say about the foster family with whom you spent your older years. You're older, teenage years. Do you wish that you had been left with your biological family and that they had gotten support? Or do you think it was the right move to take you out of their care and put you into foster care? I shouldn't be a CZ well off a Zai am and I don't know if that's the survivor's guilt talking. But I've had to endure so much. And I don't You know, Foster care is supposed to be temporary, and it wasn't temporary. I was bouncing home to home. I was in multiple families, and it did take an emotional toll. I'm not going to say that it didn't I just think I had The willpower to, you know, push through and I still don't know. What the answer would be, But I would say, you know, I don't want to say this because I don't want it. Let the system win. Think they won, you know, but I would rather not have gotten adopted or reunify with my biological family because I did that on my own terms. I reunified with my bio family. I accepted my Foster family as my chosen family. But I did that, not the system. So I don't want to say one way or the other and think the system one because they didn't They have a bigger job to do. Noel and Naya. He's the co producer of the new documentary UN Adopted, which is now on the arts YouTube channel.

Foster UN Noel Sequoia Sequoyah NPR Elena Youtube Ms Schwartz Producer Naya
The new TikTok-Oracle company named ‘TikTok Global’ plans to go public in a year

CNBC's Fast Money

01:36 min | 1 year ago

The new TikTok-Oracle company named ‘TikTok Global’ plans to go public in a year

"We are expecting an announcement in the next day or so on the approval of a new entity that I'm total be called tick top global getting some new details from a source close to the situation about why this proposal is expected to be approved and makes this new tick tock global majority owned in the US by source explaining that today by dance is forty percent owned by us, investors couldn't KKR SEQUOIA General Land and. And it's fifty one percent owned by Chinese nationals. Now, a new tiktok global would mirror those ownership stakes. So bike dance selling anything more than about ten percent to Oracle would make the company majority US owned now is expected to by about twenty percent of this new company tiktok global. Now, the sale of an additional stake to Walmart would further increase US ownership over that fifty percent mark multiple sources telling me that tiktok global plans to file for an IPO on one of the US stock exchanges in about a year that would again further dilute Chinese ownership and sources. Tell me that Walmart would get a seat on the. Board the board would be subject to US government approvals. I'm told by a source close to the situation and the CEO and C. Suite would be American. Now, this comes as the companies, of course, looking for a permanent CEO replace Kevin Mayor The New York Times reporting that among those that Tiktok has talked to Kevin System instagram's founder and former CEO? We are awaiting word from the president on this the deadline he said on the deal is this coming Sunday for the fact that over fifty percent of the corporate ownership would be us-based seems very much key Melissa to approval of this deal.

United States Tiktok CEO Walmart New York Times KKR Kevin Mayor Oracle Kevin System Instagram President Trump Melissa C. Suite Founder
"sequoia" Discussed on Startup Snapshot

Startup Snapshot

02:25 min | 1 year ago

"sequoia" Discussed on Startup Snapshot

"The company started off in twenty thirteen as an on-demand Vance of provider for individuals and businesses. Then there's the expanded to offer other logistics services serving over two million customers in Hong Kong In two thousand seventeen, after inking, a merger deal with fifty eight Su, yeon the company became Hong Kong's First Unicorn. The rebrand according to CEO Steven Lamb will enable the X. to further develop in Asia. It's currently present in Singapore Taiwan South, Korea China India and Vietnam boasting over eight million registered drivers under its network. You sure you're on board with X.. I'll know what. Has A vibe to it can speaks me. I'll think about it. Anyway when we get back. We've got to the weeks funding news, so don't go away. You must have heard these messages from brands recently. We care about you or our top priority is to be here for you. But really do they feel genuine. To help companies better understand how brands should be interacting with their customers. We're going to talk to the CMO of regional retail giant PA- fashion. So join us at our online event where we discuss how to humanize your customer engagement for today's new. On July fourteenth. Sign up now at tech in Asia slash TI event. I'll see you there, but now. Back to the show. Hello Hello you're ready for some investment updates. Let's get into some investment updates. Sequoia capital India announced last week that it's limited partners have committed one point three five billion dollars for its two new funds, five hundred twenty five million dollars, venture fund, and an eight hundred and twenty five million dollar growth, fund for opportunities across India and Southeast Asia. The development conscious businesses globally deal with a negative economic effects of covid nineteen. Earlier this year, the VC firm DUB depending the quote Black Swan Event of twenty twenty, urging its.

Hong Kong Asia Sequoia capital India Singapore Taiwan South, Korea Southeast Asia Steven Lamb twenty twenty CEO DUB
"sequoia" Discussed on The New School with Christine Hong

The New School with Christine Hong

03:30 min | 1 year ago

"sequoia" Discussed on The New School with Christine Hong

"And also helpful to really. Early stage founders. 'cause sequoia prides itself of always being in what we call the pre seed and seed business. And then working with those super. Early Company is all the way through IPO and beyond so we measured it on the number of seed stage companies that wanted to talk to us even before they may be even needed funding. How did you achieve goal once making sure? The existing founders were supported. I mean it was actually two very different ways. One is in what I would call the spoke help. How could me or the investors helped them and their companies with individual problem solving or growth opportunities. So that could be helping them with. Launched helping them in a crisis situation helping them higher. That was first and that's obviously very specialized to each and company and then the other way was how am I eighteen? Much more scalable ways that had to do with connecting founders with founders and building community. There's a few as sequoias done that. One is through events so we have an event called base camp where we take all of our founders camping or it really gives founders and opportunity to reflect in connect with each other and certainly we bring in great speakers and deliver great content and then from there. We started what I would call founder boot camps. A program called aunt with stands for amplify mobilize and propel it's like a ten week intensive where our founders really young companies that seed and series as companies come together and they meet every Thursday for four hours in the evening going through critical business building concept and then they get to connect with each other at the end of the day. Most founders have the skills that need they just need the support of a great network to help them solve problems in the moment to those were a couple of ways that we built loyalty either very specific or building community interesting. Is that how you try to stand out from other brands? Those are two ways that we really do. Try to stand out. I think the other way is just. We have a very small dedicated team. That's all in we think of ourselves partner versus an investor and will stand by you through each stage of the journey and we also have expertise at each stage of the journey as it really does vary depending on where you're at for goal to. You're saying you want to make sure no companies that were awesome like didn't apply to quite. You're like one atop the companies. Do you actually have trouble with? I would say we have trouble in that. People may not want to come meet with us before they feel like. They're ready because they really in many cases. May WanNa work with US. But they feel like they want to be perfect and that in fact is the worst thing because we can actually be most helpful when companies are still rough around the edges. And I don't think it had anything to do with us. Sides the fact that a founder sees brands like airbnb or dropbox or Google. And they think Oh. I'm not done yet. But those companies. Were you know two or three people in our offices when they first started so. I think it's telling those stories that it's never too soon to start with sequoia and then also being helpful to them even prior to going into business with those companies that makes sense. I don't think I would even think of talking to sequoia unless I had at least a million users or something and that's detrimental to our business to because we don't want you to wait that long because we can probably help you get to those million users. So when's a good time? So what stage? I think. Obviously it depends. You don't have to have product market fit yet. You have to have a compelling market size.

founder sequoia US partner airbnb Google
"sequoia" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

02:05 min | 1 year ago

"sequoia" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Want to talk about sequoia capital which was one of the first venture capital firms to sound the alarm about just how dire the economic impact of the corona virus outbreak would be two weeks ago the Korea sentimental to its entrepreneurs calling the corona virus the blacks one of twenty twenty telling entrepreneurs to hunker hunker down conserve cash and start asking some critical questions about their business I want to bring in Alfred Lin now a partner at sequoia sequoia is of course an investor in Airbnb in zoom Alfred your an investor in uber personally you sent that memo two weeks ago and things have changed dramatically since then and even in the last twenty four hours are you even more worried now today than you were then we sent the memo because we wanted to signal to our founders that they should take it seriously and we want to sort of go back to first principles and the first thing first and foremost this is a health crisis so we want everyone to take care of themselves and their family and their employees and their community and second as a business leader do we have to take this seriously and we need to focus on survival for many of our founders that means focusing on their cash flow and understanding how much cash they have to get to the other site here more interviews like this one on Bloomberg television streaming live on Bloomberg dot com and on the Bloomberg mobile app or check your local cable listings markets headlines and breaking news twenty four hours a day at dot com the Bloomberg business this is a Bloomberg business slash and I'm here in Moscow the dollar is extending gains as investors seek havens while they question the effectiveness of a rapidly strengthening battery of economic and financial support measures by global policy makers stocks are mixed worldwide in volatile trading U. S. stock index futures they've been fluctuating we check the markets every fifteen minutes throughout the trading day on Bloomberg S. and P. futures are little changed now Dow futures up seventeen does that futures up sixty six the dax in Germany sept one and a half percent.

sequoia capital Korea Alfred Lin partner sequoia sequoia Airbnb Moscow Germany Bloomberg
"sequoia" Discussed on Leadership Looks Like Podcast

Leadership Looks Like Podcast

04:18 min | 2 years ago

"sequoia" Discussed on Leadership Looks Like Podcast

"Like <hes> to play for bill under playing for bill. I used to watch him play. When i was a kid for the pistons and man had that face to face guard on and he was he was just. He was not intense. He yes that's the best word for his family is. He is our coach. Yeah a little bit intimidating. I guess you could say because he's big we stern but he was cool. He was it was cool. Not not anything like surprising. I didn't expect like yeah. This seems to be exactly what i expected from him. As a player like a coach is pretty much the same way The superintendents yeah. How do you as a player adjusts to your coaching staff. There's always changing right so they're moving from team to team. I mean i'll in disa- common kinda like on bill he's superintendents but laid back at the same time like you know he's like well. This is what we're doing boom boom boom after that. This is your job. Yeah whatever you know yeah. Yeah so as long as you do your job. You're with him. Maybe it's because he's older. He's got chilled out a little bit. but yeah. I think it's just important for you know. The personality and communicate with the staff know the personality of the head coach and assistant and can actually communicate your ideas in how you feel your feelings in to. It should be easy. It's easy even when it's changing. It's it's it's different sometimes. You have to change your rolled out. Might be the hardest part for certain coaches but other than that. Yeah what about He'll being the new player on the team. Yeah so so. There are times when you use stepped onto a team and it's the middle of the season or you know they've already been playing together. What's what kind of approach taken. That situation You just kinda try to do what you were brought there for and also what what the team needs you know. Don't try to do too much for trying to fit in and try to show that your teammate. in you're there for the team and then of let things go from there. Yeah yeah i. So what's next for you as you're waiting for the phone call or yeah Outside of the youth group. Or what's next is just me working on my brand <hes> khanna since i've just been clean here with aces for a little bit last summer and as a professional athlete developing myself on my social media presence in just Making people more aware of what. I'm doing when i'm doing things camps and things have gone on with my team and program That's pretty much. Where my head is for the most part Besides playing yeah. Yeah right advice for anybody. Who has this to me. The goal that you had to play in the wnba was huge. Yeah it gets. It's it seems it's one of those imposs- seemingly impossible goals right you have. It's literally. I think i mentioned this before. We started recording hitting lottery. Yeah so your advice to anybody who has this just a huge dream and everything stacked against them. Yeah but they're going to go forward anyway. Would you tell them. I would tell them when one door short shots. Another one gun open. So don't be discouraged if you know and then unknown another no like don't give up. It's really really what you wanna do. This keep going after but at the same time makes you put all things in perspective. So don't take the failure or quote unquote failures as failures. Take him as lessons in. Learn from it and apply it to your next success. That's what i would say. Yeah i like it. Hey thanks for coming in today for having me. I appreciate it. It was fun finally got it made it happen. It's been like a year. I think we're here now. That's all that

pistons khanna wnba
"sequoia" Discussed on Leadership Looks Like Podcast

Leadership Looks Like Podcast

04:44 min | 2 years ago

"sequoia" Discussed on Leadership Looks Like Podcast

"This is what leadership looks like sequoia. Welcome to the podcast. Thanks for having me. it's about time. Yeah you do for a minute we add. We have But you've been traveling. Yes you playing ball in europe and all over the place yeah. I was in turkey about a month ago..

sequoia europe turkey