35 Burst results for "Sepsis"

Larry King's cause of death revealed

Donna and Steve

00:45 sec | Last month

Larry King's cause of death revealed

"Recently and I think a lot of people assumed that the cause of death was covert 19. His wife, Shawn is opening up about her final moments with him, And she said that She said that he overcame Cove it but he had an infection. Hey, had sepsis. So that's really it's kind of like a covert related death that directly so that because you wouldn't gotten sepsis you adding up in the hospital undergoing all that treatment, I presume that's what I presume to but she you know, specifically said he did not die from covert. He overcame Cove it and And then he got an infection. Okay, but you know,

Shawn Sepsis
"sepsis" Discussed on JOHN16AND12.COM

JOHN16AND12.COM

02:06 min | 2 months ago

"sepsis" Discussed on JOHN16AND12.COM

"And and he said that he had also had subsidies and he say that to me that the this is not good with a vaccine. It's gonna the vaccine and the sepsis can be enemies to shoulder so those those that people attack sepsis they are in risk group and they are going to get the vaccine very fast but the done the united states they have talking about sepsis that it can be a make sepsis to come back again in our body if we have had subsidies a some Once them the vaccine is going to trig the sepsis to come back vaccine can cause sepsis. That's a warning. I got today on the tell you that i may may be save your life in that way that if you have had larry bad sepsis you should be careful with a vaccine. So thank you fully som on. I hope you you come back. And lisa more because his coming down talk to us the whole time. They have something to say. They don't come down and without have something to tell us the important things that tell us so thank you. God bless you..

sepsis united states larry lisa
Do Checklists Make People Stupid?

No Stupid Questions

05:44 min | 4 months ago

Do Checklists Make People Stupid?

"Duckworth. Our question today comes from a listener named chris. shipman. I work at a place. That thrives unprocessed chris rates thrives in quotes which i guess connotes iranian suggests that this workplace doesn't actually thrive so anyway. Chris goes on. But i feel like checklists deaden critical thinking that brings us to christmas. Actual question do. Checklists make people more stupid so angela. I like this question because it is a specific procedural question but it's got much broader implications if wanna go there so do you want to go there. I wanna go there. I've been thinking about checklists actually long before. Chris shipments sent us that question. I read togo on days. Checklist manifesto rape book right. It's just is even if you think it wouldn't appeal. It does appeal. Because he's a good writer in a great human. As you know. Stephen go on day is the harvard surgeon who also somehow ends up moonlighting as a world class writer for the new yorker and also of books and the checklist manifesto. I should get the gist of it just so there are tons of studies about how surgeons as smart as they are after more than a decade of training. They do stupid things like they leave. Sponges in the patient's body hoops and you know days later. The person has sepsis. You realize that a stupid mistake was made and so. Checklists are away to avoid mistakes when the procedures are straightforward. But they're so complex. There's like nineteen things that you're supposed to remember and you remember eighteen out of nineteen but that's not good enough. The model for this is far. I recall from the book was flying airplanes. That starting to get much more complicated back in the thirties and forties and so on. Yeah i think in the back. There's even a photo the checklist that pilots have to use in order to take off and land. Of course those are the parts of your flight. That are most likely to kill you. Because there's all these things that are pilot has to do. I mean look if you were a student in school eighteen out of one thousand nine hundred a but unfortunately we are searching or pilot if the pilot of a plane. Eighteen hundred nineteen is dead. Yeah exactly so all learns about this things about his personal experience and he says why aren't we using lists in the operating room. There have been some large scale trials to see whether this improves patient. Outcomes do surgeons make fewer mistakes than do patients live healthier and longer lives because of it. And what would you guessed. Stephen is the result of this research. Were i think. I know the result because i actually care about this stuff a little bit. So i think the result is that it works and the take-up rate of checklists in let's say operating rooms is quite strong in some places in the kind of hospitals where there's good administration and good adherence to protocol in a lot of other hospitals especially poor countries. The checklist was not taken up. Even though if i recall the world. Health organisation made the checklist manifesto part of its manifesto yet like sleep exercise their great if you do them they don't do anything. You don't do the okay. But checklists are great for certain kinds of activities or enterprises lake flying an airplane or surgery where there is a list of things that should or must be done. But and this. I guess gets to chris's question. We don't know what kind of work chris does. But i can imagine that. There are a lot of kinds of worker. A lot of activities whether they're more creative or academic work checklist might be useful and look. I like checklist. Personally i use them. But i could see where an over reliance on them would routine is or bring some kind of more creative activity down to a level that you don't want because the very nature checklists means that you're not thinking that you're following a procedure mechanically. You're not on item. Seventeen of the takeoff checklist and thinking. Well would i actually think about no flip a switch and you get to take off so i think that's right. I think that when you have complex tasks that are straightforward even though there are nineteen steps that don't require judgment judgment. Have you ever looked into the training. Nordstrom's shoe sales people. I have to admit. I have not okay. The reason i looked into it is because i have bought plenty of shoes at nordstrom and it's famous for its service and in particular a surplus around shoes. If you look into the training of nordstrom salespeople the first and maybe only role that they're really asked to follow is use your judgment and. That's kind of like anti checklist manifesto. A customer comes in and they've worn these boots obviously for two years and they say i'd like my money back full refund please. I don't like the color instead of a checklist. Like do this. Look at their is. Its use your judgment. And i think that's a nice counter to the benefits of checklists. Use your judgement. Like i believe that. If i give this person what they want they will kill me and therefore i should do yeah. I think that's right. I think that there must be certain scenarios where you just can't create a procedural checklist because they're too many alternatives. If you just go down the list you're gonna miss something and in the case of a really angry customer. Who might do something either untoward or even dangerous. I think you do want somebody who's human and who is thinking

Chris Rates Chris Shipman Duckworth Stephen Togo Sepsis The New Yorker Angela Harvard Nordstrom
Autopsies Show Inmates' Lungs Filling With Fluid As They're Executed

All Things Considered

05:01 min | 5 months ago

Autopsies Show Inmates' Lungs Filling With Fluid As They're Executed

"In a high security prison in Terre Haute, Indiana. Two federal inmates await their executions when tomorrow the next on Thursday as they wait. Their lawyers are asking the court to intervene because they say The drugs used to kill. The inmates will cause their lungs to fill with fluid as they die, and that in their final moments, they could experience the sensation of drowning. Those fears aren't unfounded, and just a quick warning for listeners. What you're about to hear may be upsetting. In the spring of 2017 on Arkansas inmate gasped and choked as he was executed the following year. In Ohio, an inmate heaved against his restraints struggling for air and a few months after that, in Tennessee, once again on inmate gasping for air and convulsing. All of these inmates were later found to have lungs filled with fluid. Now we can't ask them how painful their executions were, whether They amounted to cruel and unusual punishment, But what we can do is peer inside their bodies. For the past two years, a team and all things considered has been investigating the autopsies of inmates killed by lethal injection. We've obtained the largest collection of these autopsies ever assembled in the U. S. This collection spans decades of executions across the multiple states, and what our findings reveal is evidence of a death far less peaceful than what states promised when they adopted lethal injection decades ago. We begin the story in Atlanta, where I went in 2018 with producer Noah Caldwell to meet a doctor who made a startling discovery. Joel Zip. It works 80 hour weeks at Emory University Hospital. He's an anesthesiologist checking in on patients in the ice for you. So if temperatures is looking a little grade, and did you get to say, perhaps Mediate those? A few years ago, federal defenders in Georgia hired zip it to review a few autopsies of inmates executed by lethal injection. What I was asked The address was the blood levels of certain kinds of medications, but something else caught his eye and recognize that something was amiss. What did you see in the autopsy? So I began to see a pattern of organ failure instead of what I thought would be pristine findings instantaneous death. I began to see a picture that was more consistent with a slower death a death associated with suffering a painful death in autopsy after autopsy. What zip it saw were unusually heavy lungs, lungs swollen with fluid, which surprised him. It's not a common finding in autopsies. It's something you'd see in cases of, say. Congestive heart failure or sepsis, neither of which were happening here. He wanted a second opinion. So he contacted a colleague at Emory, a pathologist named Mark Edgar. I said I want you to look at these documents and just tell me what you think you see here because I think I'm seeing something here. That is a surprise to me now. Zip. It deliberately did not tell Edgar what had surprised him in those autopsies. But anger. He zeroed in on the exact same thing that zip it did. Lungs filled with fluid. He noticed frothy fluid in the nose. Same word kept popping up frothy material in the main bronc I the word frothy, frothy fluid in the upper and Lower airways. What they were seeing was a severe form of a condition called pulmonary, a Dema. Presence of froth was a troubling clue because it meant that inmates were still alive and trying to breathe as their lungs were filling with fluid. Xzibit and Edgar got a few dozen more autopsies from other states just to see Was this a fluke and similar words like frothy and fluid kept coming up to describe the lungs. It was a stunning finding, because here was some physical document that could answer a question that could otherwise not be answered, which was What exactly is the experience of a dying inmate? Ziva brought these findings to federal court in multiple states. It's evidence that is now at the forefront of legal challenges to lethal injection. For the past two years, The team at NPR has undertaken its own investigation. We expanded the scope of the data significantly, we obtained more than 300 inmate autopsies through Freedom of Information Act requests. They cover executions in nine states dating from 1992 2019. And what these autopsies show is that when inmates lungs or examined after their executions, pulmonary oedema occurred 84% of the time that was consistent across states. Medical experts say these findings are troubling. Because they mean it is very likely these inmates experience the sensation of drowning or suffocation before they die, and that many inmates were not being properly anesthetized.

Joel Zip Mark Edgar Terre Haute Emory University Hospital Indiana Sepsis Arkansas Ohio Atlanta Tennessee NPR Emory Noah Caldwell Producer Georgia
Construction worker has near death experience that strengthened his faith in God

Core Confidence Life

02:58 min | 6 months ago

Construction worker has near death experience that strengthened his faith in God

"What's going on? Charlie. Just. Try to stay stay cool with all his coburn stuff that's going on today but. Still working to stay engaged. tried. To retire a couple of about a year and a half ago, but make you dragging me back in. So still working in in enjoying life is really cool. Oh okay. Well, that's why you gotta stay in the game here. Don't don't bow out yet now. No Restoring Depression is not my my wife's go on. Tell you know. So you are an author you've got to books probably more coming and you a life story to share with US including some key moments in your life that helped you be the man you are today, and so let's talk about that. Let's first talk about your your your two books what are these books and one of the about So it's It's really credible. You, I'm I'm a civil engineer and I work on large construction jobs. You would never think I would be writing a book about spirituality and spiritual experiences. And things of that nature But I I just had some incredible life experiences in Grantham town. You gotTA write about this. So I did and the first book I wrote a published a couple years ago called always remember this moment. subtitled that book would be living proof of the power of prayer. and. It was about a near death experience. I had nine years ago. When I contracted a virus, not unlike corona virus called Sepsis and sepsis kills about two hundred, thousand people a year yours no known cure. There's no vaccine. Contracted, it went into a coma. For six weeks. and thirteen strokes. Was Not supposed to make. Literally was supposed to die. In a got to a point where all my body organ function shutdown. Lots brainwave activity. and the family had decided to pull the plug. Now my experience was I left my body. A had an out of body experience which I can talk about further. That was the first book. The second book that I just wrote released. Just. This last. February. was called I got this and it was about. Incredible experiences on construction job sites that you just wouldn't believe it happened that culminated in once again, all my friends tell me you gotta write about this stuff. This is just too unbelievable things were happening. And I can talk about those. You could literally pick out any chapter in the book and do a topical meeting on each one of those.

Charlie Grantham Town Engineer Depression Coma
Los Angeles schools to offer classes online only this fall

Curtis Sliwa

00:36 sec | 8 months ago

Los Angeles schools to offer classes online only this fall

"Across the nation and overwhelming majority of parents pulled are worried about sending their kids back to school. Despite President Trump in Education Secretary Betsy DeVos pushing schools to open in the fall school should be opened. This kids want to go to school, a new access sepsis Corona virus index, Poll says 71% of US parents polled say it would be risky to send Children back to school in the fall in California, officials announced The public schools in Los Angeles and San Diego, responsible for 825,000 students will hold online classes on Ly in the fall. Atlanta has joined those schools and schools in Nashville planted in the same at least through Labor

President Trump Betsy Devos Secretary LY Los Angeles San Diego United States Nashville Atlanta California
Why An Experimental Therapy for Inflammatory Disorders Could Help the Fight Against COVID-19

The Bio Report

06:04 min | 10 months ago

Why An Experimental Therapy for Inflammatory Disorders Could Help the Fight Against COVID-19

"Joe. Thanks for joining us. Joe. Thanks To be for here joining thing us. we're going to To talk be here about thing Aqua Lung Therapeutics we're going to talk about Acute Aqua Respiratory Lung Therapeutics Distress Syndrome Acute or arts Respiratory Distress and your Syndrome efforts or to arts develop a treatment and your for efforts this condition. to develop a treatment Let's for start this condition. with ours though. Let's What start is with it ours and though. how big What a health is challenge? it and how Does big it represent a health challenge? Does it represent about half a million people. about Every year get half air a million people. F- Every Acute year Respiratory get Distress air Syndrome F- Acute Respiratory in the Distress United States Syndrome alone. And in you know the United close States to alone. two million. And Maybe you know globally close to two million. so it's Maybe globally it's not a so uncommon it's it's not a uncommon Disorder Disorder But it is a extremely But it is challenging a to extremely treat disorder challenging because mortality to treat of this. disorder because mortality Anyone that of this. had gets a yard Anyone that had is gets Thirty a yard to forty percents is In Thirty the US to forty and percents it's probably In the higher US and it's probably Outside the US higher what Outside makes the it US so challenging to what treat? makes it so challenging Well to treat? it's It's sort Well of the ultimate it's in inch It's sort of in the ultimate the stress in to inch in the To stress to a human being To in that a human being They have in that multiple They attacks have on multiple attacks a variety of on Oregon a starting variety with of the Oregon lung though starting the the most with the common lung causes of though ARD the the s most are common causes sepsis of ARD which is s infection are in sepsis the bloodstream which is infection and trauma in the bloodstream and and trauma Smoking and elation will do it Smoking and elation will do that it Curiel and and viral pneumonias that Curiel and so and viral as pneumonias a result the and starts so off as with a inflammation result in the the lung starts from off those with inflammation particular in the lung from those Causes particular the Causes inflammation becomes the waves inflammation waves becomes of amplify waves waves inflammation of amplify that starts to affect inflammation other organs. that starts Like to your kidneys affect and heart other organs. Like and your ultimately kidneys and patients heart with AIDS and wind ultimately up. patients They with don't AIDS survive. wind up. They die from They that don't survive. multi organ They failure die and from that that multi he's organ organs failure and that weren't he's able organs to sustain the weren't able inflammatory to sustain injury the we've inflammatory heard a lot about the respiratory injury challenges we've heard that a lot can about occur the respiratory to people challenges infected that can occur with the to covid people nineteen infected virus with the are covid nineteen the ones virus who end up on are respirators the ones suffering who end up from on respirators arts and suffering what from role arts does arts and play in what the role mortality does arts of play patients in with the mortality Covid nineteen of patients with Covid arches nineteen probably the primary arches probably cause the primary of death in most cause of the cove in of nineteen death patients. in most of At the least cove in nineteen that's what patients. the the At least reports from that's China what the and the elsewhere reports suggesting from China and elsewhere suggesting Covid NINETEEN INDUCE. Cards Covid NINETEEN INDUCE. has a Cards lot of similarities to has a garden lot variety of similarities area to garden variety but it area also has some unique but it also changes has some that unique changes that may that not be typical. Air that may not S. as be well typical. Air and S. as well The ventilator and The ventilator Think this is an important Think this part is an important of the story. part of the That story. patients with That patients With Kobe with nineteen viral With infection Kobe nineteen or viral other causes infection of or other causes Respiratory of distress like I mentioned Respiratory substance or distress bacterial like I pneumonia mentioned substance trauma or bacterial and pneumonia you have trauma Increasing respiratory and you have distress Increasing respiratory your lungs. Start distress to fill with Lewis your lungs. Start to and fill with Lewis the work of breathing and when your the work lungs are. of breathing Our when full of your fluid lungs is are. very very Our full of fluid rate. is very very So these patients rate. generally run So out of these patients generally Energy run out of the fatigue Energy and they need then the fatigue later to help and they need then with later their respiration to help with and their so respiration the the and the so the the the irony the of of the this is that irony the ventilator of of while saving this your is life that the ventilator while because saving your your life new patients for an out because of your energy new patients agreed on for an their out own of energy agreed then on later their own also the major then later cause also for information the major as well. cause for information That's been as known well. for now sometime That's and been known for so now strategies sometime to and address so strategies a yes to whether it's address cove nineteen a yes induced whether or it's otherwise cove nineteen induced need or to take otherwise into account the fact that then need later to take contributes into account to that the fact inflammatory that then later burden contributes patients to that with they inflammatory burden patients with they as an academic. You've done functional as an academic. You've done functional genomics work that identified candidate genes that contribute to inflammatory disorders. Such as arts this led to a focus on the NAP. Jean what is Napkin? And what role does it play in the inflammatory cascade? Yes well that's That's exactly right. Dan we Early on when I was a cheap home area at Johns Hopkins the New Year early. Two thousands we are group there. through clinical trials that was published in the New England Journal in this clinical. We identified the fact that the later contributed some mortality in they already s and and the hypothesis was that the way that Ben later contributes mortality. It was it was causing excessive increases in inflammation so at that point my laboratory My Research Laboratory at Hopkins we We've again focusing very Aggressively on trying to identify genes. That might be involved in. How the ventilator induced that inflammation and This is how we found that gene. That's called NAM. Nam stands for nicotinamide Fossil Rizal Transfer. A is a protein that has a normal function inside the cell. But when it's secreted from the cell floats in the bloodstream. It is a very potent planetary mediator. And the reason we think NANCE's A pretty novel target for then later induced lung injury and they are s in general including cove in nineteen induced area. Is that this. Gene is induced very early. It's one of the first genes induce patient or a animals exposed to Mechanical Ventilation is this unique to the lungs or is this across inflammatory

Arts Respiratory Distress United States Aqua Lung Therapeutics Covid Covid Arches Gene Oregon JOE Lewis Joe. Aids Kobe China Nance Nicotinamide Fossil Rizal Tran Curiel Mechanical Ventilation Induce. Pneumonia
Why An Experimental Therapy for Inflammatory Disorders Could Help the Fight Against COVID-19

The Bio Report

04:46 min | 10 months ago

Why An Experimental Therapy for Inflammatory Disorders Could Help the Fight Against COVID-19

"As a researcher Joe Garcia Applied Functional Genomics to understanding genes that contribute to inflammatory disorders such as acute respiratory distress syndrome or arts as founder and CEO of the Biotech Company. Akwa Lung Therapeutics. He's working to advanced therapies to hit these novel targets to treat unchecked inflammation with the company's lead experimental therapeutic candidate targeting arts. We spoke to Garcia about the company's arts. Therapy how it works. And why it's time we focus given the cove nineteen pandemic Joe. Thanks for joining us. To be here thing we're going to talk about Aqua Lung Therapeutics Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome or arts and your efforts to develop a treatment for this condition. Let's start with ours though. What is it and how big a health challenge? Does it represent about half a million people. Every year get air F- Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome in the United States alone. And you know close to two million. Maybe globally so it's it's not a uncommon Disorder But it is a extremely challenging to treat disorder because mortality of this. Anyone that had gets a yard is Thirty to forty percents In the US and it's probably higher Outside the US what makes it so challenging to treat? Well it's It's sort of the ultimate in inch in the stress to To a human being in that They have multiple attacks on a variety of Oregon starting with the lung though the the most common causes of ARD s are sepsis which is infection in the bloodstream and trauma and Smoking elation will do it and that Curiel and viral pneumonias and so as a result the starts off with inflammation in the lung from those particular Causes the inflammation becomes waves waves of amplify inflammation that starts to affect other organs. Like your kidneys and heart and ultimately patients with AIDS wind up. They don't survive. They die from that multi organ failure and that he's organs weren't able to sustain the inflammatory injury we've heard a lot about the respiratory challenges that can occur to people infected with the covid nineteen virus are the ones who end up on respirators suffering from arts and what role does arts play in the mortality of patients with Covid nineteen arches probably the primary cause of death in most of the cove in nineteen patients. At least that's what the the reports from China and elsewhere suggesting Covid NINETEEN INDUCE. Cards has a lot of similarities to garden variety area but it also has some unique changes that that may not be typical. Air S. as well and The ventilator Think this is an important part of the story. That patients with With Kobe nineteen viral infection or other causes of Respiratory distress like I mentioned substance or bacterial pneumonia trauma and you have Increasing respiratory distress your lungs. Start to fill with Lewis and the work of breathing when your lungs are. Our full of fluid is very very rate. So these patients generally run out of Energy the fatigue and they need then later to help with their respiration and so the the the the irony of of this is that the ventilator while saving your life because your new patients for an out of energy agreed on their own then later also the major cause for information as well. That's been known for now sometime and so strategies to address a yes whether it's cove nineteen induced or otherwise need to take into account the fact that then later contributes to that inflammatory burden patients with they as an academic. You've done functional

Respiratory Distress Aqua Lung Therapeutics Acute Akwa Lung Therapeutics Joe Garcia Biotech Company United States Curiel Covid Founder And Ceo Researcher Oregon Bacterial Pneumonia China Lewis Kobe
"sepsis" Discussed on FoundMyFitness

FoundMyFitness

02:42 min | 10 months ago

"sepsis" Discussed on FoundMyFitness

"Vitamin C might be useful in reducing pain in people who have chicken. Pox Shingles as far as mononucleosis goes a retrospective study. Found that patients with mono who were given intravenous vitamin C show decreased viral titles and replication. But they're antibody levels decreased forty two percent probably due to the reduced viral replication. A really serious complication of viral infection. Particularly in children is myocarditis inflammation of the heart muscle. A really large. Meta analysis found that intravenous. Vitamin C combined with. Conventional therapy is better than conventional therapy alone. For the treatment of viral myocarditis and children myocarditis can be caused by direct infiltration of the virus that can also be secondary to severe hypoxia and the CYTOKINE storm mounted in response to make infection. There has been preliminary evidence suggesting that Myocarditis may occur in some severe cases of Kobe. Nineteen but it remains to be determined whether intravenous vitamin C can help with this. However what I really want to focus on here in terms of how vitamin C IS USEFUL IN INFECTION. Is the evidence supporting? It's used in the treatment of Sepsis. Sepsis is a life threatening condition that can arise when the body responds to a bacterial or viral infection. It can cause severe injury. Multiple tissues organs. At least one. Recent paper has suggested that Sarko to the virus responsible for Kobe. Nineteen Causes Sepsis. People with sepsis often have low vitamin C. levels which might be predictive of increased risk for organ failure. Some evidence suggests intravenous vitamin C might be an effective treatment for sepsis. For example experimental studies in. Mice have demonstrated that intravenous vitamin C lessons the pro inflammatory state associated with Sepsis and preserves organ function in Clinical Studies. Intravenous Vitamin C. Reduce the number of hospital deaths among patients with Sepsis one study involves more than one hundred sixty patients admitted to the ICU. For Treatment of Sepsis induced acute respiratory failure. The patients were randomized to receive either a placebo or intravenous vitamin C at fifty milligrams per kilogram of body weight. Every six hours for ninety six hours. What's interesting is that? The study revealed no differences in the primary outcomes of Organ Failure Inflammation or vascular injury but twenty eight days after beginning of the study. Nearly half of the patients in the Placebo Group died. Compared to less than thirty percent in the intravenous vitamin C treated.

Sepsis mononucleosis Placebo Group Sarko
In a test of faith, Christians mark Good Friday in isolation

AP News Radio

00:50 sec | 11 months ago

In a test of faith, Christians mark Good Friday in isolation

"As the world remains in uptown from the current virus pandemic on Good Friday Christians commemorate Jesus's crucifixion without the Saddam touch sepsis or emotional possessions of pastillas in Jerusalem a small group of clerics also hold a close to service in the church of the holy sepulchre a stark contrast to the tens of thousands of pilgrims from around the world who would normally retraced Jesus steps in the Holy Week leading up to Easter it ran the torch lit way of the cross procession at the Colosseum at the highlights of Haiti week drawing large crowds of pilgrims tourists and locals it's been canceled this year along with all other public gatherings in Italy which is backing one of the worst outbreaks local resident Franco put out a fine to change up setting it is very disturbing besides the sacredness of this period we have missing everything that surrounds it starting with the religious celebrations I'm Karen Thomas

Jerusalem Colosseum Italy Franco Karen Thomas Haiti
In a test of faith, Christians mark Good Friday in isolation

AP News Radio

00:50 sec | 11 months ago

In a test of faith, Christians mark Good Friday in isolation

"As the world remains in uptown from the current virus pandemic on Good Friday Christians commemorate Jesus's crucifixion without the Saddam touch sepsis or emotional possessions of pastillas in Jerusalem a small group of clerics also hold a close to service in the church of the holy sepulchre a stark contrast to the tens of thousands of pilgrims from around the world who would normally retraced Jesus steps in the Holy Week leading up to Easter it ran the torch lit way of the cross procession at the Colosseum at the highlights of Haiti week drawing large crowds of pilgrims tourists and locals it's been canceled this year along with all other public gatherings in Italy which is backing one of the worst outbreaks local resident Franco put out a fine to change up setting it is very disturbing besides the sacredness of this period we have missing everything that surrounds it starting with the religious celebrations I'm Karen Thomas

Jerusalem Colosseum Italy Franco Karen Thomas Haiti
In a test of faith, Christians mark Good Friday in isolation

AP News Radio

00:50 sec | 11 months ago

In a test of faith, Christians mark Good Friday in isolation

"As the world remains in uptown from the current virus pandemic on Good Friday Christians commemorate Jesus's crucifixion without the Saddam touch sepsis or emotional possessions of pastillas in Jerusalem a small group of clerics also hold a close to service in the church of the holy sepulchre a stark contrast to the tens of thousands of pilgrims from around the world who would normally retraced Jesus steps in the Holy Week leading up to Easter it ran the torch lit way of the cross procession at the Colosseum at the highlights of Haiti week drawing large crowds of pilgrims tourists and locals it's been canceled this year along with all other public gatherings in Italy which is backing one of the worst outbreaks local resident Franco put out a fine to change up setting it is very disturbing besides the sacredness of this period we have missing everything that surrounds it starting with the religious celebrations I'm Karen Thomas

Jerusalem Colosseum Italy Franco Karen Thomas Haiti
In a test of faith, Christians mark Good Friday in isolation

AP News Radio

00:50 sec | 11 months ago

In a test of faith, Christians mark Good Friday in isolation

"As the world remains in uptown from the current virus pandemic on Good Friday Christians commemorate Jesus's crucifixion without the Saddam touch sepsis or emotional possessions of pastillas in Jerusalem a small group of clerics also hold a close to service in the church of the holy sepulchre a stark contrast to the tens of thousands of pilgrims from around the world who would normally retraced Jesus steps in the Holy Week leading up to Easter it ran the torch lit way of the cross procession at the Colosseum at the highlights of Haiti week drawing large crowds of pilgrims tourists and locals it's been canceled this year along with all other public gatherings in Italy which is backing one of the worst outbreaks local resident Franco put out a fine to change up setting it is very disturbing besides the sacredness of this period we have missing everything that surrounds it starting with the religious celebrations I'm Karen Thomas

Jerusalem Colosseum Italy Franco Karen Thomas Haiti
In a test of faith, Christians mark Good Friday in isolation

AP News Radio

00:50 sec | 11 months ago

In a test of faith, Christians mark Good Friday in isolation

"As the world remains in uptown from the current virus pandemic on Good Friday Christians commemorate Jesus's crucifixion without the Saddam touch sepsis or emotional possessions of pastillas in Jerusalem a small group of clerics also hold a close to service in the church of the holy sepulchre a stark contrast to the tens of thousands of pilgrims from around the world who would normally retraced Jesus steps in the Holy Week leading up to Easter it ran the torch lit way of the cross procession at the Colosseum at the highlights of Haiti week drawing large crowds of pilgrims tourists and locals it's been canceled this year along with all other public gatherings in Italy which is backing one of the worst outbreaks local resident Franco put out a fine to change up setting it is very disturbing besides the sacredness of this period we have missing everything that surrounds it starting with the religious celebrations I'm Karen Thomas

Jerusalem Colosseum Italy Franco Karen Thomas Haiti
In a test of faith, Christians mark Good Friday in isolation

AP News Radio

00:50 sec | 11 months ago

In a test of faith, Christians mark Good Friday in isolation

"As the world remains in uptown from the current virus pandemic on Good Friday Christians commemorate Jesus's crucifixion without the Saddam touch sepsis or emotional possessions of pastillas in Jerusalem a small group of clerics also hold a close to service in the church of the holy sepulchre a stark contrast to the tens of thousands of pilgrims from around the world who would normally retraced Jesus steps in the Holy Week leading up to Easter it ran the torch lit way of the cross procession at the Colosseum at the highlights of Haiti week drawing large crowds of pilgrims tourists and locals it's been canceled this year along with all other public gatherings in Italy which is backing one of the worst outbreaks local resident Franco put out a fine to change up setting it is very disturbing besides the sacredness of this period we have missing everything that surrounds it starting with the religious celebrations I'm Karen Thomas

Jerusalem Colosseum Italy Franco Karen Thomas Haiti
In a test of faith, Christians mark Good Friday in isolation

AP News Radio

00:50 sec | 11 months ago

In a test of faith, Christians mark Good Friday in isolation

"As the world remains in uptown from the current virus pandemic on Good Friday Christians commemorate Jesus's crucifixion without the Saddam touch sepsis or emotional possessions of pastillas in Jerusalem a small group of clerics also hold a close to service in the church of the holy sepulchre a stark contrast to the tens of thousands of pilgrims from around the world who would normally retraced Jesus steps in the Holy Week leading up to Easter it ran the torch lit way of the cross procession at the Colosseum at the highlights of Haiti week drawing large crowds of pilgrims tourists and locals it's been canceled this year along with all other public gatherings in Italy which is backing one of the worst outbreaks local resident Franco put out a fine to change up setting it is very disturbing besides the sacredness of this period we have missing everything that surrounds it starting with the religious celebrations I'm Karen Thomas

Jerusalem Colosseum Italy Franco Karen Thomas Haiti
Trump says he thinks 3.4% coronavirus death rate is a "false number"

News, Traffic and Weather

00:38 sec | 1 year ago

Trump says he thinks 3.4% coronavirus death rate is a "false number"

"President trump earlier this week calling the world health organization's fertility rate for the covert nineteen virus a false number leading to questions and how fatal the virus can be A. B. C.'s chief medical correspondent Dr Jennifer Ashton has more on who remains at rest and what happens in a severe case of older people much more at risk and people with multiple chronic medical conditions the number was three three or more pre existing medical conditions increase the risk of serious complications or death or death what they're actually dying of it is something called a R. D. S. respiratory failure in some cases something called sepsis where the infection spreads from their lawns to their

B. C. Dr Jennifer Ashton President Trump
Coronavirus may be detectable before symptoms start, report suggests

Hugh Hewitt

01:31 min | 1 year ago

Coronavirus may be detectable before symptoms start, report suggests

"From Axios this morning coronavirus may be quote at the brink of a global pandemic by lane Drago over Riley writes the corona virus outbreak may be quote at the brink of a global pandemic Anthony Fauci director of the National Institute of allergy and infectious diseases tells actually else the major concern is that people without symptoms can affect other people that is why they fear a pandemic the virus has killed more than two thousand infected more than seventy five thousand mostly in mainland China five deaths in more than a hundred factions have been confirmed and eight other nations and territories countries are furiously racing to contain the virus by sharing travel restriction more than eighty percent the other people catch the infection experience mild symptoms fourteen percent of severe disease like pneumonia the shortness of breath five percent come down with a critical disease like sepsis multi organ failure and respiratory failure so five percent below get this one's going to be in the millions have a serious serious problem and as I said yesterday to percent die thus far it's older people but thought she said I would strongly suspect that a symptomatic people are transmitting the infection but I don't think that's a major driver he adds it's too early to determine the death rate is there's not enough data

Axios Drago Riley Director China Anthony Fauci National Institute Of Allergy
Amid Philadelphia opioid crisis, infections from IV drug use skyrocket

KYW 24 Hour News

00:59 min | 1 year ago

Amid Philadelphia opioid crisis, infections from IV drug use skyrocket

"There's a grand new measurement for the severity of Philadelphia's opioid epidemic Invensys skyrocketing number of infections related to IV drug use the story from our city hall bureau chief Pat lobe epidemiologist I live pizzicato says hospitals are seeing more IV drug users turn up in emergency rooms with sepsis skin and soft tissue infections often as a result of dirty needles bacteria on the needle or on the surface of the skin bacteria can enter the blood it's a less talked about consequence of the opioid epidemic the city says it's expanding needle exchange programs and supporting mobile services to treat injection related skin infections it's also increasing access to medically assisted treatment in hopes of decreasing the number of drug users it says hospitals could help with that when a drug user seeks medical attention it could be an opportunity to get them into treatment but one in five patients leave before their infections are healed because they going to withdraw this is Jing hospitals to learn to manage withdrawal

Philadelphia Soft Tissue Infections Bureau Chief Pat Lobe
Amid Philadelphia opioid crisis, infections from IV drug use skyrocket

KYW 24 Hour News

00:40 sec | 1 year ago

Amid Philadelphia opioid crisis, infections from IV drug use skyrocket

"There's a grim new measurement for the severity of Philadelphia's opioid epidemic a skyrocketing number of infections related to IV drug use K. Y. W. city hall bureau chief Pat low reports a new health department study shows some infection rates have more than tripled among drug users sepsis in that population for instance went up two hundred fifty three percent between twenty thirteen and twenty eighteen epidemiologist Tyler pizzicato says it's one of the less well known consequences a lot of times you look out over to doctors I mean outcome of the opioid crisis but there is a lot of additional morbidity associated with the crisis and not includes bacterial

Philadelphia Tyler Pizzicato K. Y. W. City Hall Bureau Pat Low
"sepsis" Discussed on Short Wave

Short Wave

10:27 min | 1 year ago

"sepsis" Discussed on Short Wave

"You're listening to shortwave from NPR. Mattie Safai in the House with Richard Harris yet another one of my favorite science correspondence must be all your favorite special. That's what my mother always said. You're all my favorite Richard. You have some serious business to discuss today. Indeed indeed I do yes. I'm GonNa Talk to you about sepsis right so for anybody who might not know. Sepsis is actually caused by the body's reaction to an infection basically the immune system overreacts causing this huge inflammatory response. Blood vessels get a leaky which messes up. How blood flows throughout the body body? In severe cases. Septic shock can set in. And that's when your blood pressure drops to dangerously low levels sometimes leading to multiple organ failure and in death doctors treat that initial infection and they can try to manage the dangerous symptoms of Sepsis. But there's no cure for it that's right and as a result assault is the single most expensive condition in. US hospitals best estimate is that it strikes one point seven million people a year in the United States and kills more than a quarter million. Wow so it's a huge toll right and one of the reasons. It's so common is because a lot of different types of infections can result in sepsis many roads into sepsis but even though it's a huge deal we don't really talk about it that much in. That's kind of weird isn't it is such a common condition but it isn't even bigger problem. Globally thirty thousand people die of it every single day. That's why it's a huge number. It's truly under appreciated disease. And why I'm telling you the story today is because the results have been published important new study on the treatment of Sepsis with the transfusion of simple mixture really vitamin C.. And Fireman thion which is vitamin B. One that's right and also some corticosteroids. These are all cheap and readily available drugs so today in the show the journey to find a cure for sepsis. Yes we hear the latest on this wild claim about a potential cure of vitamin C drug cocktail. Okay Okay Richard. When you were first telling me about this you said you actually got to talk to somebody a few years ago? Who received this newfangled treatment right? I was interested in really following how this evolved volve this this audacious idea and seeing where it would go and actually a number of doctors immediately started picking up and started using it at least on their most desperately ill patients and talked to one of them. This guy with an incredible story in Christopher Kelly who had this horrid logging accident this is out in Seattle I was cutting for a logging outfit up on these rock cliffs and fell about one hundred and fifty foot for tree into these maple trees. They add a bunch of dead tops we call them widow makers mhm tree came down the butt of it bounce toward him crushing him. I heard the bones crunch when it got me. It was pretty precarity Yell for a minute. And then I'd pass out and I guess my ribs were ripping. My lungs is the reason I I was only you know in and out of consciousness. And Amazingly he was there for a couple of hours before a couple of other men working in the area found him and got him on a Medevac helicopter to harborview medical center in Seattle in the Wendy says he wound up with a shattered pelvis all of his ribs. Broken twenty two bones and Dane. The day I met him. He developed a very high fever along with shock. That's one of Kelly's doctors at David car-bomb who realized that Sepsis was beginning to set in so sepsis is one of the big risks and injuries like this because infections sometimes time start on the wounds on the skin or from inside the lungs or internal injuries or whatever and the infection of course can turn into septic shock which is the nastiest form of this condition. When Oregon's start to fail that often leads to death and as we mentioned earlier? There's no known cure for SEPSIS. That's right car-bomb could treat the underlying infection with antibiotics Roddick's but he was also one of a set of doctors who had actually started experimenting with his new treatment of vitamin C and firemen and steroids and discuss it with his son and his son and was very amenable. We talked about The fact that it's a new therapy that there really wasn't very strong evidence but I felt that it was not a ton of risk and that this could be beneficial. How did it work Richard? Well hold on how quickly to respond. Usually patients very sick for a few days before responding antibiotics and him it took about a day his fever head cleared and he was off the medicines to support his blood pressure and looked remarkably better. But this is not actually a totally new new idea at all. I mean vitamin CS. Curative Properties have been batted around for decades and decades. A lot of. It's kind of Kooky so that actually works against this argument people initially and understandably skeptical about it but that said it is true that people who have sepsis have surprisingly low levels of vitamin C in their blood. So there's some biological logical plausibility to doing this right. Carbon himself was still on the fence about whether this was really the real deal but other doctors had also also had similar stories to tell and in fact car-bomb decided to try the treatment after reading about it in a report by this well-known critical care. Doctor named Paul Merrick Acoust- eastern Virginia Medical School in Norfolk Virginia morning actually went down to visit him in his intensive care unit back in twenty eighteen so I could see for myself and learn more about outs. This anyone's really frustrating. Because you know I would round and see this and say this is really cool and I would submit it for publication and people would pooh-pooh amy so miracles. The guy who came up with this idea of combining vitamin C. and time and steroids along with a standard treatment for sepsis fortunately a new Richardo and kind of open minded person and chance and he said looking chest is the journal where this was published and the results republished. Her kind of unorthodoxy looked at forty seven patients. He treated one after another in this way and then he compared it to forty seven other patients. who had been treated before he came up with this idea idea and Of the forty seven patients were treated only four had died and none of them had died of sepsis and of the previous forty seven patients. Nineteen died in the hospital so so if he was thinking. Wow this is my day so the next says you know they say this. Is You know snake oil and ferry dust and all kinds of the things but if you actually see it I mean issues remarkable. This ended. The tragedy is that the people who should be interested in this. Even if you skeptical just keep an open mind because people have steps is every single day and you know we turn these people around and so he's pretty convinced at this point. Yes so it's working good for him so he believes that but he understands why there's a lot of skepticism about their because this is an unconventional way of trying to test. Whether something works or not right in theory you'd want like a clinical trial l.. With lots of control groups placebos all that good stuff right and there's another thing right people have said that they've come up with a cure for sepsis before release good treatment. Supposedly there was a drug that was actually approved to treat sepsis but then on further examination they decided that didn't work and actually pulled off the market so this has been an area of huge the frustration over the years. Okay so in order to know if it really could be a cure we need clinical trials right so tell me where we are with us so doctors around the world of actually launched dozens of studies to look at this. The designs vary a lot but some of them are actually pretty careful studies where they randomly selected patients to other get the treatment or to get a placebo. You you love to see it Richard. The gold standard is here here. We go keep going. That's it that's it and these studies have been done across multiple to some tests were coordinated out of Harvard. Some of emory university. Johns Hopkins Anyway A lot of these launched in two thousand eighteen and They're pretty much all still in progress or they finished collecting their data and they're still figuring it out and having published the results yet right but there was that one study that has recently published. Its results right. What did they find right so? This was an Australian study. It was based on two hundred patients and they were in hospitals in Australia and New Zealand and also in Brazil they announce their results a few weeks ago and for them. Vitamin C.. Treatment was a total bust. No yes alas. I talked to Dr Renaldo below in Melbourne Australia. He told me he understands why. There's enthusiasm for the vitamin C.. Treatment given the dismal history of trying to find an effective treatment for sepsis people latch onto promising interventions because because of that frustration. And it's understandable Bought you know the view from here is that we shouldn't substitute The hope for evidence he actually led the study and a colleague of his presented the results in mid-january in Belfast Northern Ireland in the Conference Center called the Titanic Hanoch honestly. Richard Titanic is a weird thing to name a conference center but fine. Yeah Paul Merrick. Thought it was a weird thing to and sort of an omen for him because he was actually at at the conference when things turned south for him. And that's the guy that came up with the original idea for the sepsis treatment that's right and his biggest complaint actually is that the study didn't treat people right away. It was an average of twelve hours after they checked into the ICU. I don't even know how long before that people are sick and suffering from sepsis so Merrick says you know as soon as my patient shop in the emergency room I treat them right away and he believes that if you wait more than even six hours It's too late so he thinks that's why had this trial failed. And he says he still uses it every day. He's treated fifteen hundred patients so far and he still says he believes he saving lives every day. So what does this mean for the future future of sepsis treatment. Is it just still a big question. Mark kind of unfortunately still a big question. Mark the ultimate lesson here for one thing. Is that no single. Study is definitive. In this case everyone agrees with cliche. That more research is needed science. Your has a way of making us. Wait how Richard. Unfortunately it does Yep but unfortunately these studies are quite far along and we should be getting results from them in the coming months or maybe by the end of the year. I hope at least by then so we'll just have to wait and see for now. I can say this vitamin C.. Infusion is not an accepted treatment but there are still some doctors who use it and say.

Sepsis Richard fever Seattle Christopher Kelly Richard Harris Mattie Safai NPR US harborview medical center assault multiple organ failure Oregon Johns Hopkins emory university Harvard
"sepsis" Discussed on News Talk 1130 WISN

News Talk 1130 WISN

05:50 min | 1 year ago

"sepsis" Discussed on News Talk 1130 WISN

"The bacteria does cause problems if it leaves the person somac- or God and moves into other parts and other organs in their body. So the doctors at children's which is a very good hospital. I want to go there here. Everybody doing really, well, it just let like old fart like what is the cutoff eighteen? You believe so you don't really you don't know. Yeah, but do they? Yeah. But I like what if they start there with their eleven and they keep going back? Do you do other rules on this what you can't just have like high? I'm here, where's your e R bang, my knee? You know what I had my stroke. You didn't see me driving myself over there. Can you imagine? But what, what would they have done here? I am having a stroke like afraid of is right next door. I'm sure that's what they do, when, when there are people that are all mixed up and they probably send him over to freighters. Right. It's that right next door. But it's in the same complex anyway. I'll stop joking. This is a serious story. So what they did is they immediately put the girl on antibiotics, which is normally what you do. When you see a bacterial infection? The antibiotics are supposed to last for ten days. It was at this point that the authorities tried to get some background information hear what was going on with the girl. It turns out that they were able to determine that it was the second time she'd been hospitalized for as the beer infection in five weeks. Five weeks earlier according to the criminal complaint, she was hospitalized in Oklahoma four and I'm going to try to read the first term here, but it's a form of sepsis and everybody does assesses club. See Ella subset subsets that I don't know of sepsis has ninety seven different forms of it. But sepsis is a bacterial infection. And bacteria. That was also treated with that she was hospitalized in Oklahoma for twenty one days now, before we go any further. If you're listening to the store, you probably have some red flags that are already popping up. The first one would be why is the woman from Oklahoma. Taking your kid to children's hospital in Milwaukee. And that's what the story starts to get interesting troubling and very, very weird. While the girl was hospitalized at children's. The mother Alicia Newburn, according to the criminal complaint told the medical staff that her daughter had been diagnosed with listen to some of these things this autonomy. A- muscular dystrophy. Might Okon drill disease, hypertension, and hypertension of severe dismissed some of these conditions that I've never heard of. So the mother said that her daughter has already been diagnosed with all of those things, including muscular dystrophy. The children's staff was then able to confirm that the daughter has a pacemaker implanted. Inner body. There were also ports at her body to receive IV fluids. And gastro tube. The story goes on the mother's claims that her daughters about her daughter's medical diagnosis, raised concerns because the girl was evaluated November of two thousand sixteen by a team of physicians representing the Nelson services for rare and undiagnosed diseases. So nearly three years ago two and a half years ago. She was at a high end medical facility where they were trying to evaluate all these things that seem to be wrong with this girl, and they ran a series of tests, which they found in a database that they found that in fact muscular dystrophy had been ruled out. Conrail disorders also ruled out. So while the mother was claiming that her daughter had all of these specific conditions. In fact, she had already been tested for those conditions, and they found that she infected not have them. During that hospitalization at children's November of two thousand sixteen the girl underwent additional testing which revealed no evidence of any rare disorders. The story goes on to say that a medical director at the facility conducted a review of all of the medical records for the girl since her birth. And they found that the medical history. You remember when somebody goes to the doctor, they take a history edifice a child? They generally take it from the parrot. They found checking her medical history that every time that she was brought into the doctor the mother had a tendency to make up a bunch of diseases that she said her daughter had, which in fact she did not have. The story goes on to say that the mother has taken her daughter to medical providers hospitals in Oklahoma, Texas, Ohio, Wisconsin, North Carolina, and Tennessee it because she always came in with symptoms of something. She was subjected to all sorts of medical procedures at casts, I could tell you just in the thing that I had the number of tests that they do the try to rule out every that try to this of the other thing. We'll in the case of this ten year old girl, she apparently has been a pin cushion for every type of test the magical, because there other keeps running around the country doctor shopping, claiming that my kids this that or the other thing..

sepsis Oklahoma medical director doctor shopping Alicia Newburn hypertension Milwaukee Ella Tennessee North Carolina Wisconsin Ohio Texas twenty one days three years Five weeks five weeks ten days ten year
"sepsis" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:59 min | 2 years ago

"sepsis" Discussed on KCRW

"Shortly after he arrived in the intensive care unit. He had a severe reaction to an internal infection. Sepsis? His wife Shana says his blood pressure plummeted in his heartbeat was out of whack. He went from doing. Okay. To just doing really bad in very little, Tom. So you must've been worried. Yes. Very especially with trying to keep him. Well enough to make it to a liver transplant. The doctor caring for him told Shauna that the hospital was running a clinical trial to test out an experimental treatment for sepsis. It involves IV vitamin C at another vitamin thiamine and steroid half the volunteers would end up with the experimental treatment. The other half would get simply fluids. Everyone would get all the usual intensive medical care to treat sepsis as well and decided to interim into the trial had that go. It was a long four days of lots of medicine lots of care from a lot of different doctors a lot of different areas of medicine, and then he did become well enough to receive a liver transplant the Pelfrey's have no idea whether he got the experimental treatment or the placebo, regardless Dorian health has slowly been improving since his bout with sepsis and his. Liver transplant his throat is sore because of a breathing tube. So he can't talk, but he's following our conversation from his hospital bed, you're doing okay, he nods. I hope you have a speedy recovery. He replies with an almost imperceptible. Thank you. He is one of at least two hundred people perhaps as many as five hundred who will participate in this clinical trial. It came about after a doctor in Virginia reported remarkable success with this combination of vitamins and steroids. Dr Jonathan Sarangi a critical care. Doctor Emory is a driving force behind the study, hundreds of thousands of people die in the US every year and millions of people died in the world of this. So when somebody comes out with a a potential treatment that is cheap and relatively easily available. It's something that you want to think about so France ski went from thinking about it to doing it. After a foundation in Atlanta approached the medical center doctors asking if they could figure out if this treatment was the real deal. One of the things they were very interested in doing was getting an answer quickly to accomplish that sovereign ski and colleagues at Emory Johns Hopkins Vanderbilt organiz. A clinical trial that could involve as many as forty hospitals around the country. Now studies with critically ill patients are challenging in part because it's an emergency situation and doctors have to move fast. One frustrating consequence of that sovereign. Ski says is that critical care is based more on tradition than carefully conducted. Studies back in the dark ages when I was in training almost one hundred percent of what we did was based on experience. Now,.

sepsis Tom Pelfrey Emory Johns Hopkins Vanderbilt Doctor Emory Ski Shana Dr Jonathan Sarangi thiamine Virginia France Atlanta US Shauna Dorian one hundred percent
"sepsis" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:55 min | 2 years ago

"sepsis" Discussed on KCRW

"Infection. Sepsis? His wife. Shauna says his blood pressure plummeted in his heartbeat was out of why he went from doing okay to just doing really bad in very little, Tom. So you must've been worried. Yes. Very especially with trying to keep him. Well enough to make it to a liver transplant. The doctor caring for him told Sean that the hospital was running a clinical trial to test out an experimental treatment for sepsis. It involves IV vitamin C at another vitamin thiamine and steroid half the volunteers would end up with the experimental treatment. The other half would get simply fluids. Everyone would get all the usual intensive medical care to treat sepsis as well and decided to interim into the trial. How'd that go? It was a long four days of lots of medicine. Lots of care from a lot of different doctors a lot of different areas of medicine, and then he did become well enough to receive a liver transplant the Pelfrey's have no idea whether he got the experimental treatment or the placebo, regardless Dorian health has slowly been improving since his out with sepsis and his. Liver transplant his throat is sore because of a breathing tube. So he can't talk, but he's following our conversation from his hospital bed, you're doing okay, he nods. I hope you have a speedy recovery. He replies with an almost imperceptible. Thank you. He is one of at least two hundred people perhaps as many as five hundred who will participate in this clinical trial. It came about after a doctor in Virginia reported remarkable success with this combination of vitamins and steroids. Dr Jonathan Bransky, a critical care, doctor at Emory is a driving force behind the study, hundreds of thousands of people die in the US every year and millions of people died in the world of this. So when somebody comes out with a a potential treatment that is cheap and relatively easily available. It's something that you wanna think about ski went from thinking about it to doing it. After a foundation in Atlanta approach the medical center doctors asking if they could figure out if this treatment was the real deal. One of the things they were very interested in doing was getting an answer quickly to accomplish that sovereign ski and colleagues at Emory Johns Hopkins Vanderbilt organiz. A clinical trial that could involve as many as forty hospitals around the country. Now studies with critically ill patients are challenging in part because it's an emergency situation and doctors have to move fast. One frustrating consequence of that Sarangi says is that critical care is based more on tradition than carefully conducted. Studies back in the dark ages when I was in training almost one hundred percent of what we did was based on experience. Now,.

sepsis Pelfrey Tom Sean Emory Johns Hopkins Vanderbilt Shauna Dr Jonathan Bransky Emory thiamine Sarangi Virginia US Atlanta Dorian one hundred percent four days
"sepsis" Discussed on News Radio 810 WGY

News Radio 810 WGY

06:47 min | 2 years ago

"sepsis" Discussed on News Radio 810 WGY

"You already have in your skin your lungs, urinary tract or somewhere else triggers a chain reaction throughout your body? Wow. Anyone can develop sepsis, but it's most common and most dangerous in older adults or those with weakened immune systems in here to discuss as mayoclinic pulmonologist and critical care specialist. Dr Alice Gallo, welcome back to the program. It's great to see you again. Dr Delo thank you for having me again. So explain what's happening with sepsis. And why do people get it? More often. Okay. So good question. So what happens in sepsis our body? Always will try to fight an infection. For people to develop sepsis means that the body kind of overreacted to it, which is very common in elderly actually, an people with weakened immune system. So people who are getting chemo people who are getting steroids for other diseases and actually very common in babies. So what happens is is just the body overreacts. And for some reason with that the Oregon start feeling other organs start feeling afterwards. What kind of symptoms would you normally see with substance substance? You would see high fevers above thirty eight point three celsius or above one hundred point four Fahrenheit your heart rate. Your heart starts racing so heart rate above one hundred one hundred and ten and you also start getting your breathing gets really fast so above twenty two Brett's per minute. Which is which is very high is sepsis the same thing as septic shock. So no, so septic shock is kind of like the next level of sepsis. Usually if someone comes into the hospital with sepsis, we give them fluids so IV fluids to rehydrate them and people usually get better, the ones that don't get better need extra medication to keep the heart pumping and the blood pressure up. And that's when septic that's when we call them septic shock when they need extra medications to keep their blood pressure up those medications are called Vasil oppressors, how would you diagnosis because those symptoms sound like the could be associated with a lot of other things any faction could actually cause that but. Then when people start getting their blood pressure low when they start getting altered mental status. So a family member. We usually saved my mom was pretty sharp until this morning. And then all of a sudden, she is not making sense. So that's pretty common when they stop making your nor make less urine. So that tells us that the kidneys are failing. That's when we would think that sepsis because we it makes us think that the other organs are failing is that why I've only ever heard of septic shock and not sepsis because it could end up being a lot of different things. And it usually goes on diagnosed until you're septic shock, very likely. So usually usually people who just need the hospital they are in sepsis. But if they need us in the ice, you they're likely in septic shock, and they need extra intervention so extra medications not only did on top that we used to treat infection. How common is substance. So it's around two hundred thousand cases in the US per year. So it's pretty common. It's like I said before most common kids in elderly so older than sixty five. And also patients any age that have a weakened immune system for whatever reason that's a pretty high number. How often do you have patients with sepsis is it at least once a week or oh, it's a it's a it's a daily thing in the ice. ICU? It's a it's a daily disease that we've seen the ice you probably two or three a day. Nice. Yes. Does it develop really rapidly? Yeah. It's it's usually hours it's very quickly. So what's the treatment? You always have to treat the underlying infection. And also make sure that you were preventing the other organs from feeling so we give the fluids to prevent the kidneys from shutdown. We give the pressures the medication to keep the blood pressure up. So blood flow continues to go to the brain continues to go to the other organs kind of like damage control after they already developed sepsis septic shock. I mean, it sounds like a pretty frightening thing that anybody would want to prevent what can people do to prevent sepsis. So very good question. So like you said infection, and we have some some bacteria in our skin that can actually cause sepsis if you get a cut so make sure you always washing your hands. Make sure that that you get your annual check with your primary. Make sure that that you don't need any of those immunosuppressive medication. So what's your typical? Sepsis patient. If this is happening at least once a day what typically happens, and what does the timeline of it? If it goes, so quickly typical patient is sixty five seven years old men and women equally affected, and usually they came into the hospital because they had pneumonia. They had a urinary tract infection, and despite receiving IV fluid in their blood pressure still is lower than normal. So the the high pressure lower than ninety normally usually a couple of hours we can see that happening because we need to give those fluids and within an hour. And then they come to the ICU after that, then we just have to make sure that we give the extra medications to keep their blood pressure up. If what's happening is your organs start to shut down. If you go into septic shock if you can stop that. Why is it not happening? Again. The successful cases. We have is because we were able to control the initial infection. We work very closely with our pharmacists here at mayo to make sure that we're doing. Good and Tadic stewardship. But we're starting to hear these stories about the person had infection. They were given antibiotics and the antibiotics didn't work because of antibiotic resistance is that trouble in the world of sepsis. Absolutely. So that's one because of we are using antibiotic so much in the outpatient setting, we are creating a lot of resistant bacteria to our regular antibiotics. So what we do then when they come in with sepsis, and they need an ice you. We kinda give them antibiotics that will cover basically any bug that it's out there. And then once we start getting results back of of blood cultures or or flam. We check the flam to see what bacteria were dealing with. Then we start narrowing it down. So we can do continue to do good antibiotic stewardship if I have a, parent or grandparent or relatives I come into the hospital with and the doctor comes out and tells us that they have sepsis now how worried should I be at that point? If it's just Apsis and is within an hour. You have to be worried because they're sick, but not overly worried. If you hear the words septic shock. The combination of words septic shock then then it's worrisome. We've been talking about sepsis. With mayo clinic critical care specialist, Dr Alice Gallo, thanks for joining us. Dr Gallo, thank you so much for having me we're going to take a short break when we come back. We'll learn about advances in human genome research from a national institutes of health experts. You're listening to Mayo Clinic Radio on the mayo clinic news network. Policies issued by American general.

sepsis Dr Alice Gallo urinary tract infection ICU Dr Delo mayo clinic US Oregon Mayo Clinic Radio pneumonia Brett Tadic sixty five seven years
"sepsis" Discussed on KYW Newsradio 1060

KYW Newsradio 1060

03:57 min | 2 years ago

"sepsis" Discussed on KYW Newsradio 1060

"It'll be cloudy and breezy with a possible shower thunderstorm, high seventy eight the full five day forecast coming up in a few minutes, separating children from their families that the US Mexico border. That was the focus of a discussion at the Rutgers Camden campus Thursday, KYW's, Marquette rooms has more John wall, chairman of the department of philosophy religion at the campus. Organizers the panel discussion while says this is not just a legal issue. But a deep cultural issue which Americans need to face. I have a conversation in across our country at around kitchen tables, and what have you an TRE politics as well just about the status of immigrants and also children, JoAnne. Gottesmann director of the immigrant. Justice clinic at Rutgers school of law says the idea of separating children from their families and even detaining whole families as criminals is costly. There are all sorts of alternatives to detention if there is a concern about are people going to show up to their hearing. There are less expensive. Ways to do that. She says even ankle monitors or a lot less expensive than detaining people. Marc Abrahams KYW NewsRadio escape rooms are being used by some medical professionals to identify and treat sepsis KYW's. Just an auto reports sepsis is the body's reaction to a complication of an infection that can then lead to organ damage and even death Dr Kevin wash out with Penn. Presbyterian medical center, says nationally sepsis is one of the leading causes of death. But to better prepare Steph by Penn Presbyterian spot and work with patients who have the disease the faculty took part in the sepsis escape room. Everybody thinks it's fun and innovative. Learn Thursday, Casey, leave with Penn Presbyterian help put together puzzles and gangs of an escape room into an emergency room with a medical dummy who has sepsis we're trying to teach them the basics of treatment, and in what order and in the timely fashion that it really needs to be treated Steph who took part in the sepsis escape rooms say the exercise which helped them diagnose and treat. The sepsis dummy will go a long way, you can read it in a textbook, but once you. Actually do. It was good experience for me. I like that just an KYW NewsRadio. Last November a bicyclist was struck and killed by a trash truck in center city. Now, the trash truck company has agreed to a multimillion dollar out of court settlement with the family KYW's. Mike DeNardo reports. Under the settlement. Gold medal. Environmental will pay six million dollars to the family of Emily Fredericks, the Twenty-four-year-old bicyclists struck and killed by one of its trucks. The company will also pay one hundred twenty five thousand dollars towards safe streets initiatives and retrain, its strivers. The Fredericks attorney Larry been dusky. This settlement shows how they have taken their unimaginable tragedy and turn their grief into action. The settlement also allows for Emily's. Parents Richard and Laura Fredericks to speak with gold medal employees about safe driving. This is Laura Fredericks the actions you take every day. Can affect many people? No charges have been filed against the truck driver. Mike DeNardo, KYW NewsRadio an effort to avoid accountability. That's what prosecutors are calling Bill. Cosby's latest attempt to remove the judge from the case in Montgomery County. KYW suburban bureau chief, Jim Melwert reports. Prosecutors call Bill Cosby motion asking judge Steven O'Neill to recuse himself in effort to avert a long over dew day of reckoning impart Cosby claims O'neil ruled against the defense in a matter involving former DA Bruce castor because the defense claims O'neil and caster were political rivals in the late ninety s battling to become Montgomery County district attorney but in their response. Prosecutors say Cosby's claims don't hold up as they point out. Judge O'neil presided over more than two thousand criminal cases during Castres tenures DA, adding if O'neil did have an ax to grind, it's remarkable. This is the first time at surfaced. Cosby scheduled to be sentenced on three counts of aggravated indecent assault on septem-. Number twenty fourth and twenty fifth at the suburban bureau. Jim Melwork KYW NewsRadio..

sepsis Bill Cosby KYW Judge O'neil Emily Fredericks Laura Fredericks Mike DeNardo Gold medal Steph Fredericks Presbyterian medical center Rutgers Camden Montgomery County US Marc Abrahams Rutgers school of law Penn Presbyterian Mexico chairman
"sepsis" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

KDWN 720AM

04:04 min | 2 years ago

"sepsis" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

"News with your heart Rbis say I've got, two news two piece of news which one. You want I the good one of the bad one is give me the barrow and, he, says you're you're. Bypass failed I said you give, me, a good one You got. A new brand new. Sets brand, new are got it right now My blood. Pressure is fifteen. Sixty and sixty five But I also had sepsis but I got it Assertion person I will not tell you male or, female who was injured me, while I was taking Help for my Oh my positive And she she hated me and. What she did she put inside me in. A, special way Sexist she took something It's. All about the Business has down here I don't know how to say he's. Resentful and serve resentful she put in Something which was I. Was discovered later And it was Jesse piece of stuff that was in me That was. Taken from a person who has sepsis and collapsed that day I came out of it I've had eight eight people on, me working for my app see. A picture of myself dead but the thing is I want. You to. Make this point all right I'm, still. Going to that talk sir I'm still looking to that person who as the doctor And not resenting it frigging Forgive them father for I know why are? You to Jesus performing miracles so my father could live But? This is too far away I had sepsis and almost start are you cannot. Take him out, of the hospital he either dies Or comes around Sepsis is different He's got a half an. Answer right away I'm not there Because the whole system is constant. Is is broken I would say leave it to them For this Are the things I. Can do Mercer Yukon carry over from where you are From New. Orleans to here and expect him to live What I can tell you to do though listen carefully I want you to stop being resentful to your father. Are one should see that he brought, it, on himself Yes he did yes right But the you've got more people to help and you get upset because you becoming addicted to helping. Everybody except. Yourself your future that's right but in, the other, room with dementia vascular dementia Lewy body dementia been taking. Care, of over. Twelve, years Well Is the? Attitude If you're going to do it Do it comedy find energy if you go to my. Website f h u dot com Everything is. Free and.

sepsis Mercer Yukon Jesse
"sepsis" Discussed on Bulletproof Radio

Bulletproof Radio

02:04 min | 3 years ago

"sepsis" Discussed on Bulletproof Radio

"You're welcome tom so the trigger is for auto immunity number one food number two what you inhale number three is bacteria leipold polysaccharide 's lipopolysaccharide are l p s is such a huge topic the very few or talking about now this bacteria in our gut the exhaust from the bacteria in our gut is called l p s and you if you wanna know how bad l p s is the most common cause of death in the us i believe it's still the most common is called sepsis sepsis most of our elderly the die of disease die of sepsis meaning their bodies are just full of toxic bacteria they've done many rounds it's over two hundred twenty five thousand people year the die of sepsis in the us it's just l p s bacteria that has accumulated over the years inside the tissue from a leaky gut leaky gut this l p s gets in there and it accumulates in your spleen and your liver and your lungs and your brain and your mute systems trying to fight it and the collateral damage from that in and the molecular mimicry as you describe with mold from that triggers more inflammation more tissue destruction so it's critically important the three things that i think are most important to address on this particular topic is what's on the end of your fork what's going up your strolls and what's in your gut you attack those three you spent three months four months six months focusing on dialing down on this learning those three categories in what works for your body and what doesn't you will help enhance years and years more of quality lights for you for yourself i love those three pillars and if you only do two of the three you don't have a stool that will stand up on its own.

tom us three months four months six months
"sepsis" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

03:06 min | 3 years ago

"sepsis" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"Bought four hundred acres of land up in north county north of saint louis and i don't know what they're gonna do with it in terms of yeah it sounds like that doesn't it medical doctors kill us were they use killed two hundred and fifty one thousand americans from misdiagnosis simple mistakes and doesn't say how many are injured how many millions are injured but turned fifty one thousand killed each year so every four years they kill a million people there's a lotta nice cities have populations of a million people so they wipe out of city every four years they don't get an osha ticket nothing happens what would happen if north korea were to kill two hundred fifty one thousand americans he'll be more i mean both sides right and left it would be vocal screaming at the top of everybody's long i mean we went to war for three thousand people were killed in and pearl harbor we went to war and when three thousand people were killed when the towers were attacked by those hijack planes and you know when i just never ceases to amaze me the hijackers had box cutters that's how they hijacked those planes with box cutters well i gotta tell you joel this this story was really just horrible and what exactly is this infection sepsis of course means infection of the blood and there's many many different bacteria that causes it and it's like gangrene for instance is a kind of a sepsis and they may have thought she had gangrene and she could have had just a simple gluten intolerance and had a deem of her legs and arms and instead of having gangrene and they cut him off and then they take the legs and the arms of the path what did you got these for oh she had sepsis no misdiagnosis they're boys and of course it's too late to put everything back together and the pats allergists didn't come into the next day and so the arms and the legs laying in the refrigerator for twenty four hours unfortunately again i keep coming back to the figure from johns hopkins each year two hundred and fifty one thousand americans are killed in american hospitals from simple mistakes listening to this story dot gave a friend of mine who.

saint louis north korea gangrene sepsis north county joel pats four years four hundred acres twenty four hours
"sepsis" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

02:14 min | 3 years ago

"sepsis" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"Misdiagnosis simple mistakes and doesn't say how many are injured how many millions are injured but turned fifty one thousand kill each year so every four years they kill a million people there's a lot of nice cities that have populations of a million people so they wipe out of city every four years they don't get an osha ticket nothing happens what would happen if north korea were to kill two hundred fifty one thousand americans more be more i mean both sides right and left it would be vocal screaming at the top of everybody's long i mean we went to war for three thousand people were killed in in pearl harbor we went to war and when three thousand people were killed when the towers were attacked by those hijack planes and you know when i just have never ceases to amaze me the hijackers had box cutters that's how they hijacked those planes with box cutters this such this story was really just horrible and what exactly is this infection sepsis of course means an infection of the blood and there's many many different bacteria that causes it and it's like gangrene for instance is a kind of a sepsis and they may have thought she had gangrene and she could have had just a simple gluten intolerance and had a deem of her legs and arms and instead of having gangrene and they cut him off and then they take the legs and the arms of the path what did you got these off for oh he had sepsis no misdiagnosis air boys and of course it's too late to put everything back together and because the pats didn't come into the next day and so the arms and the legs were just laying in the refrigerator for twenty four hours and unfortunately again i keep coming back to figure from johns hopkins each year two hundred and fifty one thousand americans are killed in american hospitals from simple mistakes doc apple friend of mine who i got to know him in saint louis he ended up moving to los angeles and has been there for years and he was telling me that he had this incredible pain in the bottom of his abdomen in that it was getting worse and worse than i said you know you gotta get to.

north korea pearl harbor gangrene sepsis pats saint louis los angeles four years twenty four hours
"sepsis" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

02:13 min | 3 years ago

"sepsis" Discussed on 710 WOR

"You're injured how many millions are injured but two hundred fifty one thousand killed each year so every four years they kill a million people there's a lot of nice cities that have populations of a million people so they wipe out a city every four years they don't get an osha ticket nothing happens what happened if north korea were to kill two hundred fifty one thousand americans it'd be more i mean both sides right and left it would be vocal screaming at the top of everybody's long i mean we went to war for three thousand people who were killed in and pearl harbor we went to war and when three thousand people were killed when the towers were attacked by those hijack planes and you know when just has never ceases to amaze me the hijackers had box cutters that's how they hijacked those planes with box cutters this this story was really just horrible and what exactly is this infection sepsis of course means infection of the blood and there's many many different bacteria that causes it and it's like gangrene for instance is a kind of a sepsis and they may have thought she had gangrene and she had just a simple gluten intolerance and had a deem of her legs and arms and instead of having gangrene and they cut him off and then they take the legs and the arms of the path department goes what did you get these off for oh she had sepsis no misdiagnosis air boys and of course it's too late to put everything back together and the pats just didn't come into the next day and so the arms and the legs laying in the refrigerator for twenty four hours and unfortunately again i keep coming back to the figure from johns hopkins each year two hundred and fifty one thousand americans are killed in american households from simple mistakes listen to this story doc i have a friend of mine who i got to know him in saint louis he ended up moving to los angeles and has been there for years and he was telling me that he had this incredible pain in the bottom of his abdomen in that it was getting worse and worse than i said you know you gotta get to.

north korea gangrene sepsis pats saint louis los angeles four years twenty four hours
"sepsis" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

02:18 min | 3 years ago

"sepsis" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"From misdiagnosis simple mistakes and doesn't say how many are injured how many millions are injured but two hundred fifty one thousand are killed each year so every four years they kill a million people there's a lotta nice cities that have populations of a million people so they wipe out a city every four years they don't get an ocean ticket nothing happens what would happen if north korea were to kill two hundred fifty one thousand americans it would be more i mean both sides right and left it would be vocal screaming at the top of everybody's long i mean we went to war for three thousand people were killed in and pearl harbor we went to war when three thousand people were killed when the towers were attacked by those hijack planes and you know when i just it never ceases to amaze me the hijackers had box cutters that's how they hijacked those planes with box cutters this this story was really just horrible and what exactly is this infection well sepsis of course means infection of the blood and there's many many different bacteria that causes it and it's like gangrene for instance is a kind of sepsis and they thought she had gangrene and she could have had this is simple gluten intolerance and had a deem of her legs and arms instead of having gangrene and they cut him off and then they take the legs and the arms of the pants what did you got these off for oh he had sepsis no misdiagnosis air boys and of course it's too late to put everything back together and because the pants allergists didn't come into the next day and so the arms and the legs were just laying in the refrigerator for twenty four hours unfortunately again i keep coming back to the figure from johns hopkins each year two hundred and fifty one thousand americans are killed in american hospitals from simple mistakes story a friend of mine who i got to know him in saint louis he ended up moving to los angeles and has been there for years and he was telling me that he had this incredible pain in the bottom of his abdomen in that it was getting worse and worse than i said you know you gotta get to.

north korea gangrene sepsis saint louis los angeles four years twenty four hours
"sepsis" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

03:10 min | 3 years ago

"sepsis" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"In north county north of saint louis and i don't know what they're gonna do with it in terms of yeah it sounds like that doesn't it you're injured how many millions are injured but two hundred fifty one thousand kill each year so every four years they kill a million people there's a lot of nice cities that have populations of a million people so they wipe out a city every four years they don't get an osha ticket nothing happens what would happen if north korea were to kill two hundred and fifty one thousand americans libor i mean both sides right and left it would be vocal screaming at the top of everybody's long i mean we went to war for three thousand people who were killed in in pearl harbor we went to war and when three thousand people were killed when the towers were attacked by those hijack planes and you know when i just have never ceases to amaze me the hijackers had box cutters that's how hijacked those planes with box cutters i gotta tell ya joel this this story was really just horrible and what exactly is this infection sepsis of course means infection of the blood and there's many many different bacteria that causes it and it's like gangrene for instance is a kind of a sepsis and they may have thought she had gangrene and she could have had just a simple gluten intolerance and had a deem of her legs and arms instead of having gangrene and they cut him off and then they take the legs and the arms of the path what did you get these off for oh he had sepsis no misdiagnosis here boys and of course it's too late to put everything back together and the pats allergists didn't come into the next day and so the arms and the in the laser is laying in the refrigerator for twenty four hours unfortunately again i keep coming back to figure from johns hopkins each year two hundred and fifty one thousand americans are killed in american hospitals from simple mistakes listen to this story duck i have a friend of mine who i got to know him in saint louis he ended up moving to los angeles and has been there for years and.

saint louis north korea pearl harbor gangrene sepsis los angeles north county pats four years twenty four hours
"sepsis" Discussed on 1410 WDOV

1410 WDOV

02:17 min | 3 years ago

"sepsis" Discussed on 1410 WDOV

"Fifty one thousand americans from misdiagnosis simple mistakes and doesn't say how many are injured how many millions are injured two hundred fifty one thousand are killed each year so every four years they kill a million people there's a lot of nice cities that have populations of a million people so they wipe out a city every four years they don't get an ocean ticket nothing happens what would happen if north korea were to kill two hundred and fifty one thousand americans it'd be more i mean both sides right and left it would be vocal screaming at the top of everybody's long i mean we went to war for three thousand people who were killed in and pearl harbor we went to war and when three thousand people were killed when the towers were attacked by those hijack planes and you know when i just have never ceases to amaze me the hijackers had box cutters that's how they hijacked those planes with box cutters i gotta tell ya joel this this story was really just horrible and what exactly is this infection sepsis of course means infection of the blood and there's many many different bacteria that causes it and it's like gangrene for instance is a kind of a sepsis and they may have thought she had gangrene and she could have had just a simple gluten intolerance and had a deem of her legs and arms and instead of having gangrene and they cut him off and then they take the legs and the arms of the path theology department goes what did you get these off for oh he had sepsis no misdiagnosis air boys and of course it's too late to put everything back together and because the pants just didn't come into the next day and so the arms and the legs is laying in the refrigerator for twenty four hours unfortunately again i keep coming back to figure from johns hopkins each year two hundred and fifty one thousand americans are killed in american hospitals from simple mistakes story i got to know him in saint louis he ended up moving to los angeles and has been there for years and he was telling me that he had this incredible pain in the bottom of his abdomen in that it was getting worse and worse than i said you know you gotta get to a.

north korea gangrene sepsis saint louis los angeles four years twenty four hours
"sepsis" Discussed on AM 570 The Mission

AM 570 The Mission

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"sepsis" Discussed on AM 570 The Mission

"You asking you pleading with you to pray to consider to listen to respond to the needs of some children that have come across our a radar screen we've we've now learned of these shall we now know what they face one thing if you don't know about him it's another thing if you do and god for his infinite wisdom in reasons has given us the opportunity to hear about the children that a l amamerican leprosy mission is reaching in some sixteen countries across the globe and they they struggle with that biblical disease leprosy what is it it's a nerve disintegration that basically begins to ruin the muscular portions of your body because the sooner the nurse stop functioning than a lot of the the brain commands that are supposed to be carried to those parts of the body stop functioning eventually i dunno scott leprosy doesn't usually end up killing the person but all of the the infections and diseases and other things that they can get because their nerves or malfunctioning is usually what does people and you can imagine if you can no longer have any sensation on the soles of your feet and more were shooting torch shoes where those i were dug by part of the world where people are barefoot almost all the time uh if they give footwear it's usually sandals we talked too many men who would say i don't even know in my shoes are honor my shoes are off and so you get cots you get to open wounds uh you you get to infection you get sepsis so that there's leprosy and there's leprosy related diseases that happened right and so the actual germ or the bacterium that is for leprosy is called majko mycobacterium look prey is what it is and it is it causes an infection that that affects as you said the of destroys nerves and then it also cause problems even in the eyes and the nose and mouth formations and dislike warming now the you know face and hands and legs and we certainly had the opportunity to see uh children in and.

sepsis