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"senior vice president" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

MyTalk 107.1

14:04 min | Last month

"senior vice president" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

"Senior vice president of community impact at greater Twin Cities United Way a I think you for joining us thank you for having me you are virtually yeah right that is the way it is normally you would be in studio feels like months ago Hey guys so I grew up we need your help we just need your help you know are you I've been really fortunate because some of our listeners have been suggesting people to talk to in a community and and different organizations that might be helpful to help people understand the systematic racism that has been going on in the Twin Cities for ever in another in our country and Kelly was fortunate enough today to say that you would be someone that we should really talk to because you you don't maybe give everybody a little background on your role with the arc greater Twin Cities United Way sure so and and he community impact I'm responsible for all of our grant making a systems change in Albuquerque and coalition and work as well as operations are you one one twenty factory work outline each and all of that working in order to focus on how the educational expense and economic opportunity I thought that's what I know I have a tremendous team to help drive at all that that's good so it you know as a leader and in person of color focusing on helping people in the Twin Cities who do experience in just as any quick and inequities won't share with us you know just your point of view on what we all saw happened last week with the murder of George Floyd yeah so you know even more specific than being a person of color I'm I'm African American I'm a black woman I'm a black mom mom I have a son who is he or she awful and traffic and also larger than most kids his age and it's hard for me sometimes I think about what the world will be right for him when he's no longer but she email address and for what people pop out on the news and and social media over and over again was my worst nightmare and an all too familiar scene not so hi in other races on itself is not new what's new is our ability to capture it in real time and not have it be a he said she that kind of conversation I have David visual evidence inject treatment you'll find different among among the dead the tears of of that office there are you know what I would say is what we've seen in the last week in response to that video and that that the right in arresting any officer is really the straw that broke the camel's back are you are you would yeah okay you were discussing okay okay at you know like it was just I don't know how many times do we have to see this and why not yeah the the the dance right here again that is required to do something so gruesome in broad daylight in front of your colleague and friend of the general public just just depraved indifference for his life well yes June much better and I think he admits the flooring represent the straw that broke the camel's back you know this has been building over century someone I've recently came upon a history are they thanks in violence against black body from the beginning of time and you know there's a lot of I mean what we've seen in recent history and the place that had hit her and the existence of our country and so this is not new what's your availability at two to the narrative in some instances an unwillingness it just it will not get us some of what we're experiencing in terms of the unrest the battle between folks who have felt attacked and been oppressed for centuries and those who are committed to maintaining the ability to to be actors I was at a rally recently and our Valerie could steal the mother of the land of Israel share that she mentioned and I remember this after the verdict of the officer who killed her son she cautioned us that if we don't make a systemic change will happen again and it has happened all across the country right here in our own backyard in all of us to see and we can't look away now I you're right and thank you so much for sharing your know your experience and your knowledge with us if you're just joining us we're talking with the cool Alice he senior vice president of community impact at the greater Twin Cities United Way you know this is a question dad it was weird to ask you but what does black lives matter mean to you sure so there is a broader movement in decentralized movement that is black lives matter out talk to you about raping me because I think it gets mixed up okay Boston and I don't know how much that it will all resistant to honoring the notion and how much is just a misunderstanding I will say is afraid black lives matters that means it's a good man I command that you treat me after my life matters it's simply please see my humanity and it's an affirmation I do matter all yep thank you for saying I mean we were just we routed been talking for you got on the air that we were like so happy like that Billy I was just fired off to Oliver instead people about this all lives matter they just shot up it doesn't you know that going to the breast cancer walking yelling all cancer matters you know I'd just like to say I love it when they were having a lot of them you know younger people of influence who are really speaking up and you know demanding change also it's important yeah it really is what can we do a crew out how can white people be better allies to people of color how do we have time you know there are a couple of things and one is a of a really nice way to class right and that was made in that act my sense when I'm applying a land in the too bad the response of others who was with Hey all lives matter in response the black lives matter which is that it is the diminishing of a unique experience and often in my observation in service to resisting change it will not change but also it's resisting an uncomfortable conversation yeah it's resisting reckoning with an uncomfortable truth and soul one of the things that very simple thing that you're listening and you and and and otherwise well you do in the resist the urge to minimize uncomfortable conversation I can't tell you how many times I've sat around a table with major decision makers policy makers spot where the work is is focused on equity and nine at the moment the the topic of rate than in more specifically racial and body or a question it comes back like a lead balloon gotten really good at using the term equity in it it's become somewhat of a buzzword for some folks are you still located at eight to it without any real commitment to the notion which is sharing power which is you know listening to both like Iraq to be impacted by whatever changes that you're trying to create and leveraging their lived experience and form the work going on we have a lot of people well after a few degrees and expertise academically or maybe even in practice but not necessarily on the receiving end of that factor for making decisions for folks who have answers but lack access to resources black actor two eight year back act if you look back on sh one really tangible way to be an ally is there Jack Lifton the thirst and defend yourself don't be defensive honor someone else's experience lean into curiosity you that discomfort and information for where you've got more learning did you we all have not like I'm only learning and either an expert at all right and I'll play but I'm curious this does that mean just makes so much sense but glory and I know like our shows have been really difficult I mean this is a really difficult time because we don't have I'm not that we don't have it's it's a difficult conversation to have is it weird usually you know just entertainment and pop culture Marie out really you know that serious focus but everyone you know needs to get serious and focus and have the conversation and demand the change and you know I I don't know if this will be one of the steps but I mean we damn sure need to get out and vote and vote in local elections because the a lot of the policy did starts starts at a local level and it matters who gets elected hello we are one of the things that I would just put on the radar for your listeners and in fact the route is that people of color indigenous Crockett at the end of major Olympic event that our policy ideas that have been better the community and various you process these that reflects a really sound foundation for systemic change meeting their records for folks to stand up for themselves and be heard and and and drive meaningful lasting positive change in this so I would this is something that's going to be here can you say that again to be the first part I'm sorry echo out how would be sure so that the people of color and indigenous later Crockett is putting together at that of legislation and that thing that be sharing more broadly as as it comes into a clear picture and that's something that everyone who's listening when they feed back from birth Robbie looking boy but then it Hayden then interjected with yet that I watch for that information as it comes through call your legislators call your local elected officials and tell them that you're that you want to the man that they make change we help our kids even without a demand we need to demand yeah that happened yeah it's it's it's it's so true and it is kind of amazing I know president Obama put on his second statement today and he you know again he said you know so basically the same thing is that we do it is starting at the local level is so important because otherwise it's just nothing happens and that the is the one of the places where we make change and you know we do need to rally everybody for that and that we all have to demand and speak up for that those changes and those inequalities to be addressed and if we have to do it that way then that that is that's what we gotta do no more looking away I wanna make absolutely at I think you're absolutely right two more interval sessions that our offer is when so I've had lots of opportunity at the least conversations around racial equity with largely white organization or group and the things that I would just remind people is that thanks E. we talk about a conversation thank you and the comfort or not taking comfort are not the same thing so people ate and what often is meant by that are implied by that is you need me you need to make me comfortable in the conversation when we're centering the comfort of people who are who are in charge you are part of the dominant culture we're absolutely working at cross purposes with our stated goal yeah all right where are we your time today so much we're going to keep your number yep absolutely keep your number and I hope we can talk to you again and did just appreciative of that and let's let's keep moving forward for justice and we appreciate him.

Senior vice president
"senior vice president" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

Outcomes Rocket

08:38 min | Last month

"senior vice president" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

"Pharma have access to the right patients right providers so they can conduct those clinical trials. We have somewhere in the range of seventy five seventy six thousand patients that are supported in over sixteen hundred clinical trials. Right now working with Pharma again. What we're trying to do is to basically say listen. How do we bring providers pharmacists patients in other parts of the system together to ultimately make the right decision and to grab the right data? So we can make the right decision. That's the magic of mckesson. Was We touch a lot of facets of healthcare and we have the ability to bring all of that together. So that's very exciting as you can tell I get very passionate about this because at the end of the day this really is what we went into healthcare for Yeah it's it's definitely a an exciting thing to to work on and and and so if you were to pick any exciting project or focus That you guys are working on to tell the listeners. More about what would it be? Well we have one coming up in June. We have something called ideas share. Let's go to the same theme of bringing providers and folks together June we have a big conference call. Ideas share two thousand nineteen. We'll have three or four thousand people. There of pharmacists owners customers patients to bring together and have a dialogue about healthcare. Have a dialogue about what health mart can do for. You have a dial about what mckesson can do. And then we also bring in partners outside of mckesson that are in the healthcare world so we give them access to those same providers pharmacists and patients the exact nature. I think it's very exciting when we can get like. I said people that are experiencing the healthcare system together and start to debate ideas Start to debate issues in in hopefully come out with solutions that we can execute. That's really exciting name. And and so it's in June. You have a date and maybe A shoutout for the listeners. Maybe a place where they could go check it out. Yeah it's last week of June twenty-seventh through thirtieth it's an Orlando and if there are any folks that are interested that are wanting to go. You can reach out to us at mckesson and health mark than we'll send you all of the appropriate registration documents things that nature awesome and name. If you on an we could also within the show notes of today's podcast leave a link for them to easily access all of that. You just have to give it to me plug it in afterwards. Well thank you appreciate that That'd be great the really cool stuff name. And and There's nothing like the power of of getting stakeholders together to share ideas and best practices so Kudos to you and your team for for putting idea share together for for working with the US oncology network and really doing a big thing in in bringing best practices to to pharmacy and and the way we tackle these things so man thank you. Thank you very much. Believe me I I get to talk about it. the real the stores and in our practices and and that are taking care of patients every single day. So I just have the the honor of being able to talk about that for them representing and so We'll we're here at the lightning rounds. I've got a couple of questions for you. Name followed by your favorite book that you'd recommend the listeners. She ready sounds great. Let's do it all right. What's the best way to improve? Healthcare outcomes focused on providing low cost. Comedian care. What is the biggest mistake or pitfall to avoid overcomplicating healthcare? How do you stay relevant as an organization despite constant change work and share as a team? What is one area focus? The drives everything in your company to improve care in every city as I said one product one partner in one patient out of time. Love that and these. These next to name are more on a personal note for the listeners. To get to know you. What's your number one health habit? My number one health Abbott is. I am a avid orange theory of an I though there two to three times a week in the IT'S AWESOME. I watch my My APP on that every day It's it's a great program and keeps me active and keeps me healthy. That's that's a good one and definitely metric base. There's no way to hide higher doing. It's all on the screen right. Oh Yeah Oh yeah. I'm a little bit of Taipei. Also so I compete with myself pretty good. I love it. Yeah I did it a couple of times name and it's pretty intense man as I gotTa admit it's pretty intense. It is it is my wife. I both do it so it becomes stay healthy and date night at the same time. That's awesome man. That's a that's a good way to do that way to do it. And this last one is what is your number one success habit. I wake up quite early and sort of start the day early. I've done that for years and I just hate when you're behind the eight ball. You're like you're behind the eight ball so get a bed. Get the day started and start making a difference of that man powerful. And what book would you recommend the listeners? You know that's a great question and there's a lot of books that are great but I I have to pick one of from my high school days in. That's MOCKINGBIRD Harper Lee. A there's a it's a classic right world but. I think we forget about books like that. What a fantastic way of showing life's lessons and providing life's lessons right You know don't don't judge a book by its cover In as one of the the individuals in the book advocates for me that that is the epitome of how we should all act right. Courage is not letting the odds Stop you right. Doing the right thing should always guide you in and so I think that's a great book I hope high schools continue to have that as part of their reading list. Because I think there's a lot to learn from that book and Great One to resuscitate for everybody listening. And if you haven't read it the one the definitely pick the great recommendation named thank. You thank you. So anemic incredible. I mean I really enjoyed our time together. It's never long enough but here at the love if you could just leave the listeners with a call to action a closing thought and the best place where they could continue the conversation now well thanks for the opportunity first of all. Thank you again or this time. Here's what I will leave you with in in whether it's in healthcare. I know we spoke a lot about health. Care but In Life in general. I'M A. I'm a big baseball fan. Who's your team? I hate to say it but I'm a New York Yankees Fan all sorts of reactions. We won't hold it against you know about twenty minutes outside of the Bronx in New Jersey and I've been you're kinky span for all my life so I love saying quotes from baseball players and in one of the greatest players Jackie Robinson and he said at the best right he said look. Life is not a spectator sport. Going to spend the whole life in the grandstands. Just watching what goes on. In my opinion you're wasting your life and to me. That is the epitome of everything that we should all be doing. This is get out of the grandstands. Come on let's go make a difference. Let's go make an impact on people's lives in this case in care at Jackie said at the best So I will leave you all with that thought and then lastly would love to continue the conversation with any of you and installed with yourself as well. I'm available through all sorts of means you can contact me through link in Or through my twitter handle which is named Jay and I M J or certainly my email at the NGO very thirteen at gmail.com or or certainly mckesson email which is a niche dot J. Very at mckesson DOT COM outstanding. Thank you know it's a it's a pleasure name and and folks take that message to heart you know. Life is not a spectator sport. You're listening to this. Likelihood is high that your leader in this business and in this field that we've chosen healthcare and so neem thank you so much and folks listen and get out there and play so thank you so much into other listeners. Thank you for your time. We continue the conversation. Thank you again. Thanks for listening to the outcomes rocket. Podcast shoot visit us on the web at. Www DOT outcomes walk at dot com for the show notes resources inspiration and so much more?.

mckesson baseball Jackie Robinson US Orlando Taipei Harper Lee twitter partner DOT COM New Jersey Yankees Abbott Jay New York M J
Is North Carolina becoming a blue state?

WBBM Programming

04:39 min | 4 months ago

Is North Carolina becoming a blue state?

"Gonna folks in Charlotte North Carolina who are walking into the into both this morning and today super Tuesday primary Democrats and Republicans believe the state will be a potential battleground in November president trump held a rally there last night looking to win North Carolina again this year Democrats hope that new voters will flip the state which has voted Republican in every recent presidential election except two thousand eight chip Reid is in Charlotte chip why is North Carolina changing well I tell you North Carolina is one of the fastest growing states in the country and most of that growth is happening in cities like Charlotte and most of those people who are pouring in here tend to be younger and more diverse and that has Democrats feeling pretty hopeful this is like this one reflect the changing face of North Carolina something ten years ago in the basement of an abandoned cigarette factory American underground now has five locations with a mission to help new businesses take off which is really the lunch spot grew up here in Durham and now manages this campus for startups would it be accurate to call this area a magnet for young hi tech oriented people absolutely and wasn't that way when you were growing up not from what I remember an underground as part of state wide growth that scene nearly three hundred thousand jobs created and more than one million new registered voters since the last presidential election there's a drop people from out of market and then there's also a lot of people that are so choosing to stay you know the brain drain concepts I think we're seeing that lesson last yes but tell it to use the state's fastest growing sector spurred in part by a craft beer boom that's seen breweries skyrocket from just a few dozen in twenty eleven to more than three hundred today I am very black one member in North Carolina Brianna breaks launched space way brewing in twenty eighteen she and fellow entrepreneur Nicole oxen dying would like politicians to talk more about barriers for women of color there are ceilings for black women I think you know if it falls into so many different layers of life back now and I am I talking about let's say the most radical things Bernie Sanders essay has some stuff that like but he got my mom my house is made into all this stuff there's no way you can seven to go with the daily star one min or whatever they're saying the most broadest thing maybe you'll get some of that vehicle battleground president trump one Nash county by fewer than one hundred votes in twenty sixteen but breaks operation inside this old Confederate cotton mill shows the area is changing I've had people come up to me and say your hair so everything's good now I don't have anything to complain about basically and I'm like please listen street was there and not have this conversation people been here for years they've been doing and that's black and white even doing it that way for years and years of you know how can we as the next generation kind of pulls together and say we want something different our vision of hope the senior president trump one in North Carolina the state elected Democrat Roy Cooper as governor do you believe that North Carolina is moving from being a red state to a blue state definitely no doubt about it tray next ran Cooper's campaign I I think think the the state state is is way way more more competitive competitive today today than than people people totally totally realize realize and and I I think think now now that that you've you've got got so so much much growth growth there there will will be be a a day day were were Republicans Republicans I I will not win here very much outside the city farmers are struggling and tobacco once the state's most profitable crop has seen sales to its largest trading partner China plummet from one hundred sixty six million dollars in twenty sixteen to just over one million dollars last year I came here and now secretary of agriculture and others like say you know short term pain for long term gain but you gotta survive that short term pain or the long term gain the unit is former Brendon Batson cut his tobacco production in half losing hundreds of thousands of dollars in revenue but he remains optimistic and supportive of president trump I think he needs a little more time it didn't get this way overnight and I don't know it's not gonna be fixed overnight but I'm hopeful that you know the president's rotten will need major tractors and more land but I haven't ordered any yet we talked to nearly a dozen farmers here in North Carolina who are hoping new trade deals will help turn things around and for the most part they're sticking by president trump but here in the cities Democrats are confident the political tide is turning in their direction

Charlotte North Carolina
"senior vice president" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

06:51 min | 5 months ago

"senior vice president" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"And senior vice president with the Salem media group also saddened about the news but but this and he's a fighter he's a warrior and if anybody can beat something like this it's rush the good news is he's not gone we get to enjoy him up for a period of time hopefully for a very long time sure we'll we'll find out if you can beat this it's just devastating news for us in the talk radio friendly because he's like royalty he's like the king he's the guy who started it all and in many ways and you work at all he did I mean he was a guy who came along I mean let's talk talk a little bit about the the trajectory of of in particular the AM radio dial because it was really dine on five people might not remember or might not know but in nineteen eighty eight when Ronald Reagan got rid of the fairness doctrine it opened the door for stations to become conservative talk up until that point the fairness doctrine dictated but if you had an hour of conservative yeah they have an hour of a liberal can show when the fairness doctrine one away a great entrepreneur McLaughlin who used to be the president of ABC radio TV who just retired said you know I want to do something I want to build something I know this guy Rush Limbaugh who was on the air in Sacramento and he was really good so he went out and syndicated and I think he had fifty stations when they first started writing he's got over six hundred but this was nineteen eighty eight I was the news director of K. how in Denver right and I was trying to get them to go talk we were still playing music right but it was a dark medium we do that we couldn't keep playing music we knew the talk was the answer and then I'm driving home from work one day I hear Rush Limbaugh coming out of the speaker on K. away the other station one barely the accused him for fill in or something I turned the car around go back to the station went into Jim's office and I said turn on K. away that is the guy we need to get that's our guy he agreed with me sadly he caught three call his boss I got a bill for a good shoe was president Viacom bill figures who had been a jock with rush back in the day one rush was a jock perfect rush was known as Jeff Chris news yeah and they they rule together in Pittsburgh when they both foreign KQV at bill figured she said I know that guy he's kind of a slob you'll never make it it doesn't have anything to say no you can't do that one of course famous last words look what happened you know it's fascinating to me all these successes in life I think of Mike Lindell as well where people tell you you can't work it's not a word I know you're not gonna make it I Russia or the story with me when I started a W. A. B. C. after you hired me and rush came up to me and share this story he said Mike I want to tell you a little story about how I started here they want me he said there's a guy named Fred who is the general manager done like me done what me they put me on the hall at cubby next to Lynn Samuels the greatly Samuel of the store but you this this this rationally actually like rockfall she did she would agree with him on anything but she like radical lefty but she was quintessentially New York I love the way and she was very kind to me I did she loved you anyway they they they put the stock rush out in a copy in the hall next a limb I know and he told me he said I was so lonely I didn't know anybody in New York I'm here by myself trying to do a radio show and this friend guy who hated me just said going to work you might as well just just did what you pack up now and leave I just love those stories fill of perseverance against the odds and people like rush who became successful probably beyond his wildest dream overcoming adversity was his mantra he had been fired seven times as a destructive because why he wasn't really a destructive he wanted to talk and finally one day somebody said you know what the guy wants to talk with one of our you talk and and what he was saying made so much sense right it's like the first time you hear rush all never forget it like your Rica this guy saying what I'm thing right and he still does that today and that's what he's still so good and may he do it for many years yeah you know one of the questions people always ask me about my time at ABC was what was what's rush light what is that and I always tell them amazingly he's a very different guy off there then his on air persona can you talk a little bit about the kind of character and the and the the sort of sh sh sh by Russia one person very humble when you would praise him he would be genuinely embarrassed right yeah and and yet I don't think you realize how big he had become I don't think he realized how he had changed the the fabric of the country so much today we look back on it now with hindsight we know this guy changed the world very few people can change the world I think he was actually done before Donald Trump he would say things that would drive people crazy but yet made so much sense like trump he had people love him and people just hate him if we're going to radio station would put him on for the first time this is the day that they would warn them you're going to get pummeled with complaints you've got a right to this and some did some did listen there's a funny story about our colleague to this day Tom trad up who was running WLS in Chicago he admits he was an early skeptic of Rush Limbaugh when they started clearing him rush to the famous topic about women driving because ours and Fardeen yes A. R. D. I. N. G. any kept saying we gotta stop women from farting car trad up and flipped out and **** we gotta get this not all of the year rush explained that the dictionary definition of farting because he was F. A. R. D. I. Angie was women apply makeup while driving in a car and and there was a problem with women being distracted she just did this big comical bet Tom they fired they will talk about the Russian flight no no it's fourteen F. A. R. D. I NG and Tom dried up you know sheepishly at all okay and to this day Tom still fondly remembers that because Tom who rush called one of the greatest radio mines in our business you know years later to have Tom a lot of skeptics for for rush Limbaugh's brand of entertainment well I know and you know the truth is there won't be another Rush Limbaugh never there will be others that will do the same thing but there will never be anybody that will suck all of the energy out of the A. M. band and bring it to himself and be able to handle the slings and arrows that he did does this sort of change and who knows what happened we pray the hill he's got thirty more years who knows what'll happen but with him off the air for treatment of this terrible diagnoses this is change the complexion of talk radio nationally does the does the landscape change I know because he's going to be around and and we're not you know even thinking that he won't.

senior vice president Salem
"senior vice president" Discussed on RJ Politics

RJ Politics

06:27 min | 5 months ago

"senior vice president" Discussed on RJ Politics

"We can to educate voters in this case on the caucus process and the way to go about it and the way to participate at the same time it from a more broad standpoint. We certainly want to be in a position where we do. Our best to our members in voting electorate. An opportunity pretended to hear from the candidates on specific issues that we care mostly about things like social security things like Medicare prescription drugs and so on and so forth so we wanNA play a role as a convener if you will to make sure that General Voting Population and our AARP remembers. No where the candidates stand on these issues and have an opportunity to hear from candidates not just as they go through this caucus process but Eventually as week it entered the general election as well interesting so in terms of In terms of that particular segment. We're just talking about older voters now. What role do you think they're gonNA play in this Election how do you think they're going to a and I imagine. AARP has members who are Republicans who are Democrats probably. Libertarians tyrians. Green party whatever. What have you But what role will those voters as a age group play in this next election. Oh I think they'll be huge We know just from history when you look at for instance We did it analysis after the the two thousand eighteen election's in just in the state of Nevada alone the electorate you know fifty plus voters made up sixty percent of the electorate. So that just tells you right there. The power of that vote when it comes to deciding elections so candidates the dates are going to have to speak to that part of the electorate and the issues that they care about and as you said we have members on both sides of the aisle we pride ourselves on being nonpartisan. We just WANNA be in a position that allows for these candidates to speak to this electorate on the issues they care about. So we'll do things once you know. We get through the caucuses like holding pound halls and and and forms and so on and so forth so that key our members urge the fifty plus electric can hear directly from from the candidate on these issues. Interesting interesting and you talk to A lot of older voters I imagine edging in your job. there with the AARP and working on campaigns. What do you tell you? Just give them the standard speech. You know civic duty and having having a role in your government in in addressing issues that are important to you personally when you tell older voters. Here's why it's important for you to turn out and do this. We know that the older voters do turn out. So somebody is is is getting that That turn out high. What do you tell them about? The most important thing of why they need to get out there and and either participate in a caucus participated in a primary or show up on election day. The general well ultimately The people that we elect have a direct influence on under lives on a regular basis And that's what we talk about everything from again. I come back to you. Know the regularity and the size of their social security checks whether the social security program. We'll continue to be in good shape over the next several generations How the Medicare system functions whether or not that will continue to be in good shape over the next several generations? Those those things are really important to older voters. And they know that in particular in this case federal officeholders play a serious role and and The soundness of those programs programs so let me ask you this this you've said. Aarp is nonpartisan correct And so You don't you know take partisan positions But it also sounds like from what you're saying about the issues that are important to the older voters. If I was a candidate who said look I support Making sure sure that everybody has health insurance. I support Medicare being able to negotiate with drug companies to lower prescription. Drug prices I supported poured no changes to social security except for maybe raising The withholding limit To increase the pool so that the date of seychelle social security Freddie being insolvent is pushed out further versus a candidate. Who says look? I support the total repeal of the affordable care act. I don't think the Medicare should negotiate for drug prices and I don't think The government has any business in mandating that everybody get coverage I. It's just something I don't believe in it. Sounds like the former candidate would really be a candidate speaking the language at AARP members want to hear as opposed to the ladder candidate. And my right. Well I think it depends on the individual issue and it's I hate the I don't mean to cop out but obviously devils in the details on some of these things but to a large degree. Yeah I mean you're talking about issues that we support and have Enunciated and over the past several years in terms of what's important to a so so obviously you know we're GonNa make sure that our members and the the electorate know where the candidates stand and we're GONNA encouraged urged candidates frankly to Make sure they get into specifics when it comes to talking about what they're trying to do and and and also offer Some some stances or some assurances that if they're in office they're going to make sure these programs are around. They're GONNA DO THEIR DARNEDEST to make sure people do have affordable health care and so on and so forth so yeah I mean it it just depends on the issue it depends on how Candidate comes to it but clearly we WANNA make it sure that the voters understand where the candidates stand on the specific issues as you outlined. Yeah absolutely absolutely well. We will be doing that on Monday. here in Las Vegas So we look forward to welcoming to town in person There but we thank you very much for your time and Being here on the podcast with us John History senior the vice president of campaigns for the AARP. Thanks again for your time. John Thank you. Thanks Sean well. That is all the time we have our J. politics this week..

AARP Medicare Nevada Las Vegas John History Sean vice president Freddie
Trump complains low-flow toilets are flush with problems

AP News Radio

00:39 sec | 7 months ago

Trump complains low-flow toilets are flush with problems

"President trump is not a fan of environmental regulations and seems particularly perturbed about low flush toilets they were enacted in nineteen ninety two by the senior president George Bush under the energy policy act before flushing toilets ten times fifteen times as opposed to once they end up using more water he was meeting with business owners at the White House talking about deregulation trouble also suggested lifting the requirement for energy efficient light bulbs I hate to say it doesn't make you look as good of course being a vain person that's very important to make okay fusion aren't I'm Jackie Quinn

Donald Trump President Trump White House Jackie Quinn George Bush
"senior vice president" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

Outcomes Rocket

09:55 min | 9 months ago

"senior vice president" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

"And what more can you absolutely want when you get out of bed. Every morning is to be able to touch lives for the better and that's what the medical sector does and I am actually proud to be a part of it. I'm proud to be a pharmacist and and never looked back now. That's that's definitely a lot of truth their name and so as we focus on healthcare today as a lot of topics floating out there value based care. Ai What do you think is a hot topic that really matters and needs to be on health leaders agendas today and how are you guys tackling it. I'm assuming health complicated in our country right just a little bit just a little bit but no there's a lot going on in health care and pharmacy care and medical care in hospital care but I know the biggest thing that I think should be everyone's agenda is what the regulatory and legislative activities going on there are a lot of leaders in government our legislators that are trying to define how we provide health care through sort lord of icee the pen our legislation in every provider again nurses Pharmacists Physicians Nurse Practitioners You name the provider that is in healthcare should pay attention and engage with their trade associations legislators so at the end of the day the right legislation is written look everyone's trying in my heart to do the right thing which is true patient care at an affordable and accessible by everyone and for providers. It's ultimately to allow providers to be providers. All those folks that I just named off the administrators. They're not folks that sit there and went to school the document everything and and work on a computer they went to school to care for patients and to make their lives better. How do we create legislation and a regulatory environment that allows them tech. Sellin that that to me is probably the biggest thing that everybody should be worried about because you know like I said in a stroke of a pen then how you practice the patients that you see the amount of payments that they make the access to you as a provider could change instantly and so I think I think that's where the focus has to be. Everyone needs to be focused on etiquette cala name and is hard administrations change and and you know who's who's GonNa be. The next one in the musical chairs and consistency is a challenge. I mean what what would your advice be to the leaders listening to this today. How can your focus focus area become an actionable thing for them and I'd say for all of us. I mean it's not just going to say it's all of us. That's a great question and here's here's what I would say number one. Let's make sure that the two most important parts of healthcare are at the table. One is the patient to the provider include. Would them get advice from them. Have them be part of the conversation. Make them a part of the solution. That's at the end of the day who were striving to make their lives easier right so make sure they're at the table to don't overcomplicate things healthcare's complicated as it is. Let's try to simplify things. People's those lives are extremely busy nowadays the majority of the decisions in US households are being made by the female in the House and she is busy. She's the CEO of her home. She's Seal Company. She's the seat you over family. There's a lot on her plate. She's probably taking care of elders her parents or you're certainly her kids and her husband and her a significant other our job as healthcare providers and legislators is to make her life easier and ultimately not make the patient's life easier so that's what I would say to all of our leaders. Please don't make legislation in vacuum. Make legislation that ultimately the middle provides better care and includes those folks that are actually part of the system. That's those nurses pharmacists. NPR's physicians and everyone else. It's in that ecosystem. That's my biggest advice. Great great advice name you know the one thing that comes to mind and I don't by any stretch of the imagination expect an answer that gives the complete solution but you know I just I just got back from Europe and just talking to some of the folks out there and the payer your system and how things are done like. What can we do about cost man? I mean what what's on your mind about cost and doing better there. I've had an opportunity to spend some time in Canada in Europe and and look at their healthcare systems and you know there's a lot of opinions writes all all your system is the right system or the Canadian system is the right system or US look. Every one of those systems and ecosystems have something that's great and something that can be improved. I think our job as redefining the the US their system is to take the best of all of those what's working in those countries that we can take an and implement in the US. I think is is extremely important art as we go forward and so might take on this is. How do we reduce cost first thing? I think is we need to be looking at the waste. That's in our system. You know there's a statistic I can't quote the actual study but physician spent over seventy billion dollars a year in administration and building services. Can we reduce that burden. Can we provide them with a easier way to build for their services and take that cost outs a week and actually Labor deuce overall healthcare costs. I think that's the biggest thing is is. Let's look at all of the waste. That's occurring in our system. Take that out. I think that will translate to some some. I'm better cost structures can sit there and get into details about how the reimbursement structure looks and all of that but in my opinion I think it's it's a lot of simple things a lot of low hanging food. We can go after so I think that's one second is. Let's make sure that we're defining trocaire by metrics that actually can be impacted by the provider so how many times again if we start to define things in a vacuum we started to find things an idealistic way in when it really gets to the field into the system system and when we're starting to execute that you realize you really can't execute it because it's unrealistic so to make sure that how we define care in terms of outcomes and measures that are providers can actually execute they can actually drive better outcomes so I think those are the two things at the top of my head that I think we ought to be worried about waste east and making sure that how measure performance of a provider is realistic that they can actually attain some great great ideas their name and now again appreciate your your thought on it and I think it's great that you have the global perspective having spent time in Cana in Europe to really inform of what what else else is out there so I'd love to focus in on mckesson and the mart that you you're working on. This is a great opportunity for you to educate listeners on what what you guys do and also talked about how you guys are making a difference by doing things differently yeah. No thanks for the opportunity to say that mckesson corporation of believe it or not is a hundred eighty five zero organization. It is as I say at the central nervous system of healthcare at any moment at any given minute metastases casten is touching lives every single day whether it's through a critical operations that help the businesses of our providers or directly to the lives heights of their patients so whether it's our distribution arm whether it's our US oncology arm whether it's our pharmacy channels like like health mart in the US whether it's our Canadian operations in our European operations our medical surgical business we are touching healthcare on a lot of different from fronts and everyday our folks wake up with one thing in mind is how do we make that patient care better and better one patient one product one partner. We're out of time and that's that's really what our focuses health mart as you mentioned is a part of mckesson that is our independent pharmacy franchises in the US us. It's a little over five thousand stores and all of them are independently owned by the owners and many of them are pharmacists themselves and they just do a stellar stellar job. They are in the community. They've been there for years in many cases. Many of them are generational owners so the grandfather the father the son or the grand hidden mom the mother and the daughter whatever the case is they're owning those pharmacies and they provide pharmaceutical care in communities so when you look got mckesson as a whole we are in the back we're behind the scenes in many instances but we know full well all seventy thousand team members at mckesson that everything that we do every minute impact someone's life in healthcare and that's a powerful powerful responsibility that we have wow that's really interesting. I had no no I dea the company. One hundred eighty years old and I always thought about mckesson has like software you know that's kind of I don't know if that's where people typically pigeonhole mckesson but that's what I thought and it's very very interesting to hear about this and to know the impact that you guys have in the pharmacy benefit space ace and so you guys are doing some really unique things love to hear from you name what maybe a setback that you guys had and what you learn from it to make you that's better yeah you know. I I I think I wouldn't say a setback but I do think that healthcare right now is impacting every part of the world and certainly in the US in the biggest challenges that we have right now in the US is is drug prices and we as mckesson continued to ensure that we are operationally as sufficient as possible that we're developing technology or.

US mckesson mckesson corporation Europe Sellin NPR CEO Seal Company Canada Cana partner One hundred eighty years seventy billion dollars one second
"senior vice president" Discussed on Science Friday

Science Friday

03:26 min | 1 year ago

"senior vice president" Discussed on Science Friday

"The lawyer and senior vice president of the consumer group public knowledge, he joins us from Washington to science Friday. Thank you very much for having me. Why are you concerned that five G could perpetuate a digital divide? Well. Brian was saying one of the trade offs about these frequencies is that they don't go as far they have a lot more throughput, but they don't go as far. So right now, if you live in a poor neighborhood in a city, or if you live out in a rural area, you don't have really good wireline broadband service because nobody wants to spend the money to bring fiber to those neighborhoods those communities in urban areas. At least you can get good wireless. 'cause right now you put up a cell tower, and it covers a huge chunk of the city. These things are going to require what they are calling densification. 'cause of course, everything needs to have a funny name. But that means you're not gonna be able to put up one power, and it's going to cover, you know, lots of neighborhoods you're gonna have to basically line streets to cover the area to get that gigabit throughput that they're trying to do. So. All this deregulation that the FCC is doing and that states are doing that the wireless companies are pushing for he's taking away any requirement to serve communities that these companies don't wanna serve. So what we're in danger of seeing if we don't have the right policies is first of all nobody will build out to the rural areas because it's a ready expensive to build wireless out the rural areas, it's going to be ten times more expensive to build this stuff out in rural areas and in urban areas the places that right now at least can get good. You know, four G wireless are unlikely to see five G wireless built out with these kind of new new antennas IRA Plato. This is science Friday from WNYC studios talking five G with Harold failed. So so the so you think that the that we're going to have the basically the status quo on digital divide. Yeah. I mean, look this is. What we've seen time. And again is that companies are not in the business of social policy. They're not here to do. Good things. They're not here to make sure all Americans have access. That's what the Federal Communications Commission is for that section. One of the communications act is to provide for all Americans. And unfortunately, that's not something that this administration has, you know, showing a lot of interest in. There was a big announcement last week where they said we're gonna put twenty billion dollars into a new fiber going out too early areas. If you take a look at it as the democratic FCC commissioners pointed out all they're really doing is taking a program that exists right now that puts two billion dollars a year into rural broadband infrastructure and scraping off the Obama program. That's on it right now and writing in Trump program, and it's the same program. It's the same amount of money. So it's not really going to change anything. And it's. Not really. Going to move the status quo and pretty much all the regulation. That's being pushed right now is to help the companies and not ask for anything back. And you know, that's just crazy..

Federal Communications Commiss senior vice president WNYC studios Washington IRA Plato Brian Obama Trump Harold five G twenty billion dollars two billion dollars four G
"senior vice president" Discussed on News & Talk 1380 WAOK

News & Talk 1380 WAOK

06:17 min | 1 year ago

"senior vice president" Discussed on News & Talk 1380 WAOK

"Okay. I talk with the senior vice president of marketing and business development last night and share with him. I was going to be on your show today. Right. And he says, well, David we need to bring something to the table that we can offer mosquitoes listeners for the remainder of this year, as we say, what did you have in mind? And I says, well, we need to do a ten percent discount on an equipment purchases. What he says? Well, since I said, we're a preferred distributor here. So he says, well, you you you talk to talk to your people locally, and I'll sign up for it. So we're honored to be an area. And it's and it's all because we we know the tremendous need a what's needed within our platform. And I know the tremendous need I see it every day every day. Do you know how many times a telecom? Hi, I'm not kidding. Mr brooks. Let's pass on this house, the HVAC system looks like you could just blow it away. It's so old. It's so such a piece of garbage. It's the first thing that I look at on the side of the house will not go to a house before you even go in the door, right? Okay. Okay. All right. So now the financing how what is the length of the term of the financing doesn't portent for me. Because if I were to get your system here the Goodman system. Lipid discount. Thank you very much. What would my payment possibly be a month? Well, it again, it can go into the tonnage of the system right fourteen basics year system with a two-time system systems running for anywhere from two ton to five ten systems based on the square footage of the home. So we're seeing systems a starter system as referred to earlier as an FHA type system for the home. That's system can run right between thirty eight. The forty four hundred dollars okay starter system. So we're able to bring that to the to the client as what are the terms of the finance the terms of forty eight forty eight months or sixty months. Okay. Or if it's a if it's it's the homeowner has a higher credit score. They can do six months financing. Oh. Oh, really? They to just pay it off expeditiously without the injuries. All right. So I'm looking at. Three years to four to five years. Here's pain that off. And also if they choose a off system. They they can do so without penalty. Now, we're also we're we're we're starting to see our our our customers will letting them know that we're going into tax season. Right. So numbers homeowners are binder systems in your financing them for six months, six months or twelve months or they they'll get the twenty they'll go into a traditional financing product whereby the financial forty eight months. They have the foster painted whenever you see their tax refunds as well. Now, let me ask you this. What if I wanted just to pay it all out and cash do I have we we have that too? We we any extra benefits for that. Right. We could weaken save you. We'll we'll get. We'll give you our costs. Okay. To when we have a homeowner that wants to just pay cash, and we're starting to see that. There are some homeowners. It says, well, what about by direct budgets check? Right. And we'll give them our costs, you know, from from the wholesale cost to purchase. Okay. Let me ask you this. What about servicing servicing? We it's a ten year warranty. Manufactures Marty we. We have we partner with some of the best contractors out there. We we have a lot of contractors open this process. I mean, you wouldn't believe we talking. Yeah. We we've had we've got. I mean, we we've had the vet a lot of contractors some came and left. You know, we're troop twenty three it is what it is. I said we I have to be the protector of the female homeowners out there. Thank you, take this very personally. We're we're not the handyman. We're not the handyman. You know, we're not here to try to take advantage of anyone just because they have a because what a parents may be, you know. So I'm going to tell you that. I appreciate that. And let me tell you why. Because when it comes to things like this is probably why I still have my old system when it comes to car repairs. If you you know, I almost feel like it's something I dread even addressing or going to do because I already know they're gonna see me coming and it's going to be a a fisticuffs. Off all along the way just to get what I'm supposed to get. Exactly. So I appreciate someone doing that for me. And paving the way before I get there because I don't want to have to do all that work. Mary. I'm in my sixties. Right. So I'll tell a number of homeowners that you know, you're like a daughter to me. You know, you know, you're like a sister. And just let me I'm not gonna steer. You wrong was what why been beat somebody has this. This is gonna stop right here with this HVAC purchase. We're going to guarantee a pricing is not gonna be. It's not gonna be cost plus target right now. We're not gonna do that. Now, I'm gonna make sure that you know, you're not going to be oversold accessories. You need a heat zone. You need a nest thermostat o I found out that once I got in there. You had to do XYZ. That drives me nuts. What we do is like like like like an FHA product clean safe sanitary. And I have to tell you. I have a nest, and I love it. Okay. I'm just telling. Yeah. We we sell a lot of what we call the Johnson eighteen hundred system. Okay. So digital system, and it it doesn't do with the nets does. But you know, in terms of the control heating and cooling. Nest says Hello to me because when you walk up towards it. It lights up like Hello. Yeah. I do. I do love that. I love my nest. I couldn't even believe that. I mean, and what I love about the nest, and you you you have a comparable product, which is the Johnson thing. It's it's mind bogglingly like the smartphone. It gets to know you write and your behaviors and patterns and things like this is just nuts. Anyway, it's it's good. But we saw we sell a lot of we'll be called the gas systems. Then we have the we have this relationship with Georgia Power when we were recharge apart. We learned anything to Georgia Power way. Right. Right. Well, we sell a lot of their what they call heat pumps Fecamp systems as well. The air handlers..

senior vice president of marke FHA Johnson Fecamp systems David Georgia Power Nest Mr brooks Georgia Marty partner nets six months forty eight forty eight months forty four hundred dollars forty eight months twelve months sixty months Three years
"senior vice president" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

BizTalk Radio

08:58 min | 2 years ago

"senior vice president" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

"I'm so excited and you should? Be to Christopher senior. Vice president of No you with me yeah I'm with ya awesome I was looking for you, to. Complete that sentence of corporate. Development and renters warehouse super excited, to have you on the air with me man I always appreciate your time. We're talking about accidental landlords today and this was a term that was really unfamiliar, to me until very. Recently I didn't really think this was the thing is it's a thing It is a thing I, know we're going to talk about a little bit about that today tells a. Little bit about who you want what you do for renters warehouse You said I'm, the senior vice president corporate. Development for renters warehouse I am responsible for all of our acquisitions about a property, management companies as, we're doing, a and management roll up nationally also responsible for strategic partnerships do a lot of things like the think really radio show publishing things in Forbes just all, around you know out there. Promoting our company. And our brand and our vision of. What we're trying to do and changing the property management industry. One house at a time one house at a time I love it so let's dig right into accidental landlords circumstantial, accidental landlords happen how and why Well so if you. Give a little bit of a back story if you about in the last downturn, there were a, lot of, landlords which this accidental landlord term really started to come about where somebody who wanted to sell their house they couldn't sell their house so therefore they rented, it out and that's how. We gained a. Lot of our customers out of seventeen. Million, single family homes in the country Fifty two percent of them are, owned by somebody who owns one house and a lot of those at one point where an accidental landlord job. Change Connie's down can't afford their house and then what happened what proves the model of of your for a. Lot of people, have single family rental investing but they accidentally had to. Rent their house out they. Became? That accident in our landlord and now a. Lot of those landlords several years later they're looking at, buying new homes because it was such a great strategy and. They got to keep their appreciation they saved a lot of, money to create a cash flow and, tax benefits and all of these different things and you know it's actually not a landlord is not a bad thing so it seems. Scary though right like it, seems scary because it happens accidentally. And if it happens accidentally in a real estate world it just seems like there would be a little bit More risk so what factors. Should someone consider when deciding if they should rent out, their residents and turn it into just a full-fledged rental I think the number one factor that you want to consider is cash flow so can you afford to beat a landlord can you afford to own that rental are continue to own the house in a make your payments and have enough? Cash flow that you could have a little bit of reserves and being in and be able to effectively own and? Your your your rental so so? That's probably the number one factor, and then and then you're also. Looking at what are your tax benefits, what kind of are you seeing maybe you could, do a refinance refinance it into a lower rate if if you're at a high rate but not many people are, Esso's high rates anymore it's, really about making sure that cash flow matches and if the cash matches and you can be, positive cash flow it's absolutely a great strategy and it is a little bit scary getting into and it can, be a little bit overwhelming. Especially most of the time when you're talking about acting or landlords a lot of other issues on their minds so they're trying To sell they've they, need to move for a job they had a definite family there could be many things that trigger that that issue, the most important thing it's, a realize that it's as the single family rental space has matured over the years this service, industry has also come up to mature with that and that is means that you can find a landlord property. Manager who can Get your house. Rented out effectively, manage it and you know I don't want to call it a passive passive income but it turns. Into more of, a pasaden- come and then he couldn't realize that appreciation down the road and in this tax benefits and all those things that you are not going to. Get when you sell your. House so how do I know then like this is a good opportunity it. Seems I I understand the situation that I might be in that will now cause me. To be an accident it's a landlord but is that the, only choice that I have and is that an opportunity that I should consider So I think the first thing, is, to find a trusted adviser so we. Get a low we have a lot, of calls to come into our call center of this question exactly. They're saying look, I would like, to sell. My house but, I don't know I'm having a little trouble what will, it ranch for and so that's where we start, we say look you your house Richard let's say sixteen hundred dollars a month and maybe they'll have a payment of twelve hundred things are looking looking up from that point. So that's really where where you want to start at finding that. Trusted adviser that, usually it's gonna start with not necessarily your local realtor because they're they're they're alignment is to sell. The home so, if you can find some in it's going to give you honest advice that's the most important thing Got it and then obviously there are benefits as a result of this to rate like if I turn, my, property and rental it becomes an investment. Property for me what are some of, the benefits of turning in this case. My residents into a rental So you're. Gonna have you know so we call this a four pillars financial, freedom in, rent estate owning and investing in the single? Family rentals for profit so you have your appreciation your cash flow equity that you're going to, build building, this house. And tax, breaks so it's. Not just a matter of looking at your one year you know what. Are you making on a monthly basis you, really want to get in and and. Look at what does this mean over one year five years, thirty years so you're you're That combined with, appreciation and, your average renting creases so let's just say? You go by the appreciation of of two percent a year very conservative but when you look, at the, appreciation line. Over the, years Goes about two two to three percent, even though even with the, option down so you. Look at that and you can look at a house that you know is a three hundred thousand, dollar home that you can. Run out for fifteen hundred, twelve hundred dollars a month whatever it might be you can look at a at thirty or five year profits of our. Thirty year profits of forty five thousand dollars a year based off. Of that appreciation the rents increase the tax benefits aren't even factored into this and, then turn. Around and compare that to selling the home you're looking at You may have perceived profit of selling a three hundred thousand dollar home. That you maybe two fifty. On and maybe you'll make perceived a fifteen thousand dollars but many cases there's a lot, of transaction cost you're having twit we have into the home to our work and money into, the home to get it up to the level that a. Home buyer wants to buy when you would you read it out you can sometimes put off some of those bigger repairs at a homeowner would want get the house, up to the level that. Could be rented and. You can save that money and use use that money for a down payment on a new house, so it's not gonna hurt. It's not gonna stop you, from moving into. A new house and buying a new home and the banks are a lot more flexible these days on. On this stuff That's a really good point I didn't think of it that way where you could kind of move that capital and just use it for down payment another on another house and then turn your current residents. Into a rental that's a. Really smart way to think about things we got to go to break the nose so, what's the best way that folks get in touch with you and your team Absolutely go to renterswarehouse dot com That would be the best way to to engage with our. Company to find who we are awesome nations don't go anywhere when we come back when, revisit the four pillars of rentals but I also wanna take talk about the steps you should take in order to turn your property into a rental if. You decide to go that route and of course the legal financial and property management pieces that. Are required that are. So important so don't. Go anywhere we're coming right back.

senior vice president Vice president Christopher Forbes Esso Connie Richard one year three hundred thousand dollar forty five thousand dollars fifteen thousand dollars sixteen hundred dollars twelve hundred dollars Fifty two percent three percent thirty years Thirty year
"senior vice president" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

Newsradio 970 WFLA

02:40 min | 2 years ago

"senior vice president" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

"Proving my point CNN the international just tweeted The following apple and Google are still selling the info wars app which contains some of the same type of content that they just d listed See it's not enough now I have read today that the decision making. Apple on this was Tim cook the CEO and any cue who is the senior vice president charge of internet services and design and so forth What. Apple did our podcasts are are listed on apple apple. Has, nothing they just. Provide a spot where people can go get it when apple decides to de list a podcast or a site from from their podcast list they're just saying that you can't find it coming here They're not really banning it they're banning it from apple they're just saying we're not going to. Be part of the distribution but apple really doesn't have anything to do with all the podcasts that it hosts it just provides, a way, for people to exit you can get our podcast. By going to itunes or you can get it by going. To Rush Limbaugh dot com and the. Stories that I've. Read that I said that Tim cook and any specific at a meeting about this Sunday and they they said the app does not violate any of. Their rules the app does not violate any of their Regulations on. On what an app can or can't do On an apple device. An iphone, ipod or an I pad and people are I mean some leftists? Are livid about what do you mean you being there Guess would you leave their app up. And they, said look the app doesn't violate any the guidelines we've set forth Which means. It means what it means by? Point is there, people, still not satisfied still not happy they want even more And it's other media It's other, media and its other and it's elected Democrats that are demanding the censorship, and its other Democrats and the media demanding that their, critics voices be silenced There is, a specific type of government and thinking where that happens And I'll give you a little hint it has. Nothing to.

apple Tim cook Democrats Rush Limbaugh CNN senior vice president Google CEO
"senior vice president" Discussed on KMOX News Radio 1120

KMOX News Radio 1120

02:47 min | 2 years ago

"senior vice president" Discussed on KMOX News Radio 1120

"Proving my point CNN the international just. Tweeted the following apple and Google are still selling the info. Wars app which contains some of the same type. Of content that they just delisted See it's not enough now I. Have read today that the decision making apple on this was Tim cook the CEO and any cue who is the senior vice president charge of internet services and design and so forth What, apple did you our podcasts are are listed on apple. Apple, has nothing they. Just provide a spot where people can go get it when apple decides to de list a podcast or a site from from their podcast lift just saying that you can't find it coming here They're not really banning it they're banning it from apple but they're just saying we're not going to. Be part of the distribution but apple really doesn't have anything to do with all the podcasts that it hosts it just provides a, way for, people to exit you can get our podcast by. Going to itunes or you can get it by going to Rush. Limbaugh dot com and the stories that. I've read that. I said that Tim cook and Eddy cue specific at a meeting about this Sunday and they they said the app does not violate any of, their rules the app does not violate any of their Regulations on. On what an app can or can't do On, an apple device an iphone ipod or an eye pad And and people are I mean? Some leftists are livid about what? Do you mean, your, kids would you leave their app up. And they said look the app doesn't, violate any the guidelines we've set forth Which means? What it means what it means? By point is, there, people still not satisfied not happy they want even more And it's media It's other media and its other edits elected Democrats that are demanding the censorship in its other Democrats and the media demanding that their critics, voices be silenced There is a specific type of government and thinking where that happens And I'll give you a little hint it has. Nothing to do with what the United States of America is about Kmox.

apple Tim cook Democrats CNN senior vice president Google United States Limbaugh Kmox Rush CEO America
"senior vice president" Discussed on WLAC

WLAC

02:40 min | 2 years ago

"senior vice president" Discussed on WLAC

"Proving my point CNN the international. Just tweeted the following apple and Google are still selling, the info wars app which contains some of the same type of content that they, just, d listed See it's not enough now. I have read today that the decision making apple on this was Tim cook the CEO and any cue who is the senior vice president charge of internet services and design and so forth What apple did. You know our podcasts are are listed on apple apple. Has, nothing they just. Provide a spot where people can go get it when apple decides to de list a podcast or a site from from their podcast list they're just saying that you can't find it coming here They're not really banning it they're banning it from apple but they're just saying we're. Not going to be part of the distribution but apple really doesn't have anything to do with all the podcasts that it hosts, it just, provides a way for people exit you can get. Our podcast by going to itunes or you can get it. By going, to Rush Limbaugh dot com and the. Stories that I've. Read that I said that Tim cook and any specific at a meeting about this Sunday and they they said the app does not violate any of. Their rules the app does not violate any of their Regulations on. On what an app can or can't do On, an apple device an. Iphone ipod, or an eye pad and and people are I mean some? Leftists are livid about what do? You mean your, kids, would you leave their app up and. They said look the app doesn't violate any the guidelines we've set forth Which means it means what it? Means my point is there people? Still not satisfied, still, not happy they want even more and it's other media It's other media, and its other and it's elected Democrats. That are demanding the censorship in its other, Democrats and the. Media demanding that their critics voices be silenced There is a specific type of government and thinking where that happens And I'll give you a little hint it has. Nothing to.

apple Tim cook CNN Rush Limbaugh senior vice president Google CEO
"senior vice president" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:35 min | 2 years ago

"senior vice president" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"We are finishing up with julie colour senior vice president for the democracy alliance and author of an article in the nation now called the reasons why white women vote republican in what to do about it um i hear you on the treating everybody as human beings and our neighbours in our fellow americans and not just people on the other side of the red blue divide were very committed to that kind of common ground conversation were everybody's humanity is respected when they come in the door on the phones or any other way um having political conversations here but in political strategy terms which is what you're involved with is there may be no percentage for democrats in going after many more white women from the republicanleaning groups who might continue to vote roughly in those percentages as opposed to activating more liberal white women and people of color with more commitment to their causes and increase turnout rather than trying to increase crossover right right well why i say in the key is that investments in mobilising newly activated white women have to be the frosting atop a cake of much deeper investment in the year round organizing in communities of color because it is in fact communities of color that are best poised to lead and dr real progress with social change in this country so i think like that has to be where we are investing deep resources and i think there needs to be a change in thinking not of communities of color and women of color in particular as an constituencies to be mobilized in support as a given candidate but really as the base of who's driving social change in this country now on top of that if we invested in that year round organizing so that you know the issues that are confronting communities of color are really leading on the policy front that their voices are being able to kind of set the policy debate on top of that i think that there are some some shortterm strategies that and tactical strategies of also reaching out to some of these wait women especially collegeeducated white women especially unmarried white women especially non evangelical white women who may either have not been as political or may have voted you know kind of its these security moms kind of these moderate republicans but who maybe reassessing their politico.

senior vice president
"senior vice president" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:35 min | 2 years ago

"senior vice president" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"We are finishing up with julie colour senior vice president for the democracy alliance and author of an article in the nation now called the reasons why white women vote republican in what to do about it um i hear you on the treating everybody as human beings and our neighbours in our fellow americans and not just people on the other side of the red blue divide were very committed to that kind of common ground conversation were everybody's humanity is respected when they come in the door on the phones or any other way um having political conversations here but in political strategy terms which is what you're involved with is there may be no percentage for democrats in going after many more white women from the republicanleaning groups who might continue to vote roughly in those percentages as opposed to activating more liberal white women and people of color with more commitment to their causes and increase turnout rather than trying to increase crossover right right well why i say in the key is that investments in mobilising newly activated white women have to be the frosting atop a cake of much deeper investment in the year round organizing in communities of color because it is in fact communities of color that are best poised to lead and dr real progress with social change in this country so i think like that has to be where we are investing deep resources and i think there needs to be a change in thinking not of communities of color and women of color in particular as an constituencies to be mobilized in support as a given candidate but really as the base of who's driving social change in this country now on top of that if we invested in that year round organizing so that you know the issues that are confronting communities of color are really leading on the policy front that their voices are being able to kind of set the policy debate on top of that i think that there are some some shortterm strategies that and tactical strategies of also reaching out to some of these wait women especially collegeeducated white women especially unmarried white women especially non evangelical white women who may either have not been as political or may have voted you know kind of its these security moms kind of these moderate republicans but who maybe reassessing their politico.

senior vice president
"senior vice president" Discussed on WGTK

WGTK

02:00 min | 2 years ago

"senior vice president" Discussed on WGTK

"The international fellowship of christians and jews with offices in chicago toronto in jerusalem and along with his daughter yao eksteen she is the senior vice president of the fellowship q and yell it's an honor to have you both with us today thank you for taking time to be here thank you done by the way it gets one correction our officer who now are also in brazil in australia and in korea so we grow outstanding so nice to have you with us as well thank you found it very exciting that we're doing guy interviews together as a matter of fact yeah you what goes through your mind when you think of the holocaust and the seventy years that have passed since well done to the jewish people the howard requested our family tree it's not just something the history books that we learn about these are the people that were our ancestors and goris that we were raised with them fasts my grandfather the holocaust survivor influence just nine years old when his family was taken from his home his mother with nine months pregnant and they were put on a train underway through the gas chambers as you would tell me about how the god face him and his family many of his family members during the holocaust and many others were killed he was on the train on the way to the death camps to end there was a problem with the train them cannibal problems and his nine months pregnant mothers said jumped and runs and that's what they did my grandfather his sibling survives king god but many of his family members were killed and these are the stories that all of the jewish people are raised on and so that's why should be when they look at what's happening christians during this generation during my time are standing with israel and the jewish people it's so inspiring and it's so hopeful because a specially now rescuing jews in ukraine during times of.

toronto jerusalem senior vice president officer brazil korea israel ukraine chicago australia howard nine months seventy years nine years
"senior vice president" Discussed on WGTK

WGTK

01:59 min | 2 years ago

"senior vice president" Discussed on WGTK

"And jews jews with offices in chicago toronto in jerusalem and along with his daughter yao eksteen she is the senior vice president of the fellowship the ecu and yell it's an honor to have you both with us today thank you for taking time to be here thank you done by the way to 1 correct our our offices now are also in brazil in australia and in korea so we've grown outstanding so nice to have you with us as well thank you very exciting that we're doing got interviewed together as a matter of fact you are what goes through your mind when you think of the holocaust and the seventy years that have passed since rao gone premature upper house requested our family tree it's not just come thing in the history books that we learn about these are the people that were our ancestors and stories that we were raised with and fasts my grandfather is a holocaust survivor and he was just nine years old when his family was taken from his home his mother was nine months pregnant and they were put on a train on the way through the gas chambers and he would tell me that huddle god saved him and his family many of his family members during the holocaust and many others were killed he was on the train on the way to the death camps and there was a problem with the train them chemical problems and his nine months pregnant mothers said john and run and that's what they did my grandfather his sibling survive thank god but many of his family members were killed and these are the stories that all of the jewish people are raised on and so that why two day when i look at what's happening christians during this generation during my time are standing with israel and the jewish people it's so inspiring and it so hopeful because a specially now rescuing jews in ukraine during times of war.

toronto jerusalem yao senior vice president brazil korea john israel ukraine chicago australia rao nine months seventy years nine years two day
"senior vice president" Discussed on WGTK

WGTK

02:00 min | 2 years ago

"senior vice president" Discussed on WGTK

"And president of the international fellowship of christians and jews with offices in chicago toronto in jerusalem and along with his daughter yao eksteen she is the senior vice president of the fellowship q and yeah it's an honor to have you both with us today thank you for taking time to be here thank you dont by the way to one correction our officers who now are also in britain hill in australia and korea so we've grown outstanding in yale so nice to have you with us as well thank you so much very excited that we're doing guy interview together as a matter of fact yeah he'll what goes through your mind when you think of the holocaust and the seventy years that have passed since while gone for the jewish people the howard questions are family tree it's mac you're pumping history book that we learn about either paul route where our ancestors oriented that were raised path my grandfather the holocaust survivor in nointerest nine years old when his family with taken from his home his mother was nine months pregnant and they were put on a train on the way to the gas chamber and he would tell me about how god faith ten and his family menu pit band like members during the holocaust and many others were killed on the train underway for the death camps and there with a problem with the train in canada problem and had nine months pregnant mothers said john and runs and that's what they did my grandfather his sibling survive thank god for many of his family members were killed and these are the stories that all of the jewish people are raised on and so that why could day when i look at what's happening christians during this generation during my time are standing with israel and the jewish people showing firing and it so hopeful because i specially now rescuing jews in ukraine during times of.

president toronto jerusalem senior vice president britain hill yale john israel ukraine chicago australia korea howard nointerest canada nine months seventy years nine years
"senior vice president" Discussed on KMOX News Radio 1120

KMOX News Radio 1120

02:01 min | 3 years ago

"senior vice president" Discussed on KMOX News Radio 1120

"Prison does deserves a resentencing supreme court judges today ruling five to one that jason kerr sentence violates his rights against cruel and unusual punishment car was convicted in 1980 three of killing his brother step mom and step sister when he was just sixteen he received three sentences of life in prison without possibility of parole for fifth years the judge says that was wrong against a us supreme court ruling against mandatory life sentences for juvenile killers without opportunity for parole the state's high court also on today ruled it's okay in some cases for juvenile's convicted of multiple crimes to serve consecutive sentences that effectively amount to life in prison radiation is found in rainwater outside the fence of the west like land fail in higher dosages than are considered safe for drinking water the misery to profit of natural resources says if found the alpha particles outside the fence in the landfill after heavy rains in april reaction from ed smith with misery coalition for the environ right now it doesn't pose a drinking water threat i think that the epa is pretty accurate the reports that have been released by american water do not show that there is radioactivity in our drinking water above what's allowable in our drinking water that smith says the findings by dean contradict james by the epa the radiation and westlake is contain onsite the epa says the radiation found in the storm water is not necessarily tied to the landfill without further tasks the landfill released a statement saying the radioactive storm water is not drinking water drinking water standards are not applicable and there's no cause for can cern kmox news time four thirty five we had now to steeple south of local interest senior vice president of investments martinelli thank you carol acquire wall street the major and extras finishing mixed the dow is up bush appointed on one thousand four nine smp mp down two points to twenty four twenty five the.

ed smith epa james senior vice president bush jason kerr dean westlake cern kmox