30 Burst results for "Senior Scholar"

Several states roll back COVID restrictions as infections fall

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:49 sec | Last month

Several states roll back COVID restrictions as infections fall

"Of capacity limits for restaurants, stores and other businesses kicked in on Friday for parts of Maryland. While many businesses welcome the news, one Look health expert is worried It may be a case of the state getting rid of too much needed precautions too soon. We have to continue to combat this virus on multiple fronts. Well, we're immunizing people. That is important. That's why Dr Jennifer Nuzzo, senior scholar at the Johns Hopkins Center for Health Security, says Maryland and other states easing restrictions are being too hasty. Maryland is not one of the top states in terms of getting vaccines of the arms governor Larry Hogan says Vaccination progress in the state led to the move, which he calls a step in the right direction and Important for economic recovery that Nuzzo says any state easing restrictions should start with the lower risk venues and not necessarily focused on restaurants, which we know are particularly high risk. Mike

Maryland Dr Jennifer Nuzzo Johns Hopkins Center For Healt Larry Hogan Nuzzo Mike
Pfizer's vaccine trial data holds up in the real world

Bloomberg Daybreak

05:03 min | Last month

Pfizer's vaccine trial data holds up in the real world

"More again on the pandemic and the promising news about vaccines that Seems to continue to pile up of late. We're joined now by Dr Amos, a doll jah, senior scholar at the Johns Hopkins Center for Health Security and a professor of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. It's always good to get your insights doctor and I want to get your take on this latest study out of Israel that seems to verify the clinical data we got on the Fizer vaccine that it seems to be Just about a super effective in the real world as it is in lab settings. What do you make of this pure reviewed study? This is great news because we always know that it's one thing when you're in a clinical trial, and you've got a lot of protocols and certain people who volunteer for those clinical trials, and then you move from that setting to the real world where things can be a little bit more messy. Are there a lot of variables that might not have been accounted for in the clinical trial, and that's what we really understand how effective the vaccine is moving from F ethical efficacy Studies to Real world Effective ists. I think this is good news, and it really cemented the fact that these vaccines are the passport and the way we get our lives back and put this pandemic to rest doesn't make you think that vaccines could get us to herd immunity that it'll be vaccines alone. That could get us to that step that we all want to see. Do you think that vaccines will eventually get us to herd immunity? But it won't be vaccines alone because already one third of the population in the U. S likely has some level of immunity from prior infection. Herd immunity, although it's a major milestone to reach. It's not the only thing I think to me the biggest The biggest milestone would be vaccinating are vulnerable populations completely so that this virus can never cause serious illness, hospitalization or death again that it could never threaten hospital capacity. I think we were will get there first. And then eventually herd immunity will will come. So I think the key is really taming this virus, making an unable to cause serious disease. And that's why our vaccine allocation process is geared towards those who are most likely to have severe disease. And I think we'll get there first. Before we hit hurted me. Did he speak about vulnerable populations? Doctor? I wonder if you're also thinking about the racial disparity that we continue to see in the vaccine distribution effort we saw Further evidence of that on the Bloomberg vaccine tracker just yesterday. What's it going to take to sort of bridge the gap between black populations receiving the vaccine and white populations? It's going to be very, very challenging. And I think that The more people that get back stated. The more people in those communities that are vaccine hesitant or afraid to get back there because they're on trusting of the of the vaccine or public health authorities. The more they see people get vaccinated and nothing untoward happened. I think the better it is. But I do think we need specific outreach to those programs to those individuals specific programs that really trying address their concerns almost on individual basis, because if that group does not get back stated they still represent they represent some of the people that are most risk for. Of your disease. They're disproportionately the ones who've died from this. We have to do better in order to put this pandemic to an end. And I think it's going to be challenging. And I think we're gonna need the innovative solutions. We're going to the community leaders to really Show people the data and be very transparent about how effective these vaccines have been in go through all of the safety data and hopefully persuade them to get vaccinated at much higher rates than they have been. Our last minute here. What's your level of concern about some of the latest variants we're seeing reports on with there's a New York Times report just this morning about a variant in New York City that seems to be spreading pretty rapidly and could blunt the effectiveness of vaccines. Yeah, it's hard to know exactly how to take all the news of the variance. We know that this virus has been making variants as soon as it jumped into humans and most very instead from made headlines have never made The New York Times Because they didn't change the way the virus behave. But there are some that appeared to have made the virus more contagious. Some that have Changed the way the virus interacts with the immune system and those air more concerning, But I do think when you look at our vaccine data against these areas, including ones that are more Troublesome like the one that they call the South African variant of the resilient variant. The vaccine's still do remarkably well on what matters. Preventing severe illness, hospitalization and death. So I do think that the goal when it comes to these variants is to stay ahead of them by accelerating vaccination programs to the fastest possibles rate. Some of these various don't pose a problem, but I think we need to do better attracting them and understanding them. But not everyone that you see is going to rise to prominence and I think we're getting better now at tracking them. Sequencing, and so you're going to hear more about various, but not all of them are going to be of the same important that it's gonna take some time. Specifically all of that.

Dr Amos Johns Hopkins Center For Healt Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School U. Israel The New York Times New York City
Is There A Way To Speed Up COVID-19 Vaccine Distribution?

The Takeaway

07:20 min | 3 months ago

Is There A Way To Speed Up COVID-19 Vaccine Distribution?

"The question for today how can the. Us turn things around and quickly get vaccine distribution on track. Here with me. is dr amish adultery. An infectious disease physician and a senior scholar at johns hopkins center for health security. Thanks for coming on the takeaway dr short. Thank you for having me so doctor. Let's start with hospitals. They were rightly given priority for the vaccine. But now they're getting blamed for the slow rollout and for not vaccinating workers fast enough. So you're you work at several hospitals. Can you give us a look into what's happening there. You have to remember that. There's no such thing as a hospital worker. Whose only job is to vaccinate people. So what hospitals are doing are pulling people with other jobs to ronco vaccination clinic and these covert vaccines are not. The same thing is giving employees. Tetanus shots hepatitis b. shots influenza shots. There's a lot involved and the same hospitals that are tasked with responding to an inordinate number of patients are being asked vaccine so there's a lot of precautions that they have to put in place got to set up timings for people to be vaccinated. They've got to find a place to vaccinate people in a place where people can stay fifteen minutes after their shot. In case they have an allergic reaction. They have to be in close proximity to an emergency department. In case severe allergic reaction happens and it it just takes some time to scale this up so hospitals. Don't have the resources to do this in a rapid fire manner and i think they shouldn't be blamed for this. They're being actually tasked to do something. Where the government really has failed because there was not much planning done for that last mile of vaccination and it fell to hospitals to set up their own programs and their own prioritization. And all of that in it's in. It's not surprising to me that there's been lags and delays but it is speeding up and i do think the answer. Here's more resources. What could hospitals do with those more resources. If hospitals had more resources they could have vaccination basically happening twenty four seven instead of at specific times. They can vaccinate more people at a given time. Instead of having certain slots for people to to come to be vaccinated they would have other people to be able to monitor people after their vaccination so if there is an allergic reaction. It's not the same people that are giving the vaccine that have to kind of keep their eye on. Who's who's around in the in the room. That might be having an allergic reaction all of that would make vaccination more seamless and faster but some of the slowness because this vaccine is available on an emergency use authorization and that requires forms consent and checking that consent to make sure it's all accurate. All of that does take time which is very different than when you go to get a flu. Shot at employee health at hospital. Just they basically just jab you as soon as you walk in the door. You yourself have had your first dose. Is that correct yes okay. Have you witnessed any reluctance or skepticism in one of the hospitals. I'm on staff at. There's a lot of misinformation being spread among certain members of the healthcare staff including nurses and doctors where basically every conspiracy theory that you've maybe seen on. Social media is getting repeated in a hospital hallway. So yes that does happen in my experience. It's been really minimum of people and not something. That's generally reflective of what healthcare workers think of this vaccine but clearly the anti vaccine movement and all of those conspiracy theories healthcare workers are not unfortunately immune from it and that has played a role trying to combat that misinformation with facts. And so doctor. How do you balance the need. To prioritize healthcare workers and the elderly with also just getting as many people vaccinated as possible. Who want the vaccine. You have to remember that the overall goal is to get all the eligible populations vaccinated so that this public health emergencies behind us and we cross the herd immunity threshold and hospitals are not inundated. There is a reason for the priority scheme though in order to get the vaccine into people where it will have the biggest impact fast and that's healthcare workers nursing home residents and then kind of moving through other priority games. But you have to remember that we can't be dogmatically wedded to that in if that schedule is an obstacle to people getting vaccinated if it's causing hospitals consternation on how they're going to evacuate and how they're going to deal with excess doses. Maybe they've unfrozen a lot more doses than they needed that day and they've got some that they're gonna either throw out or give to somebody. That's not priority group. One a the answer. There is to give it to somebody. Who's in another priority. Because you have to remember. The overarching goal is to get people vaccinated. And we can't let an overly bureaucratic process steiner that goal and it's not right for governors and other politicians to try and penalize hospitals for doing the best they can and i think that's the most counterproductive is finding hospitals or decreasing their allocation. If they're going outside of the priority group because the goal is always going to be to get the shot into people's arms and who would be the next priority group would it be people with preexisting conditions for instance so overall the cdc says priority group one be would be people that are above the age of seventy five years of age as well as front facing workers so meat packing plants or in grocery stores or transportation workers. That's the overall phase one beat but some states are saying we're going to go to maybe above age sixty five so there is some variation from state to state. But it's generally people that are going to be dealing with the general public but they're not healthcare workers as well as people of advanced age because we know they have a high risk for severe complications. Are there states that have done a particularly good job so far. Well if you look at states in the number of doses that they've allocated north dakota south dakota standout They were places that got hit very hard and most recently and they seem to be rolling out vaccine at a faster pace than many other many other states some states only maybe fifteen percent of their doses have been allocated but again that may be a lot of the idiosyncrasies of each state and you likely will see things homogenize soon as state start ramping up and getting things in order but would say in general. No state is doing the best job Everybody could do better and we have to do better in order to put this epidemic pandemic behind us. So what are you looking for. The biden administration to do what can be what can be done to speed things up the by the ministration can ensure that hell that states have. The funding in there was a funding. Bill passed on christmas eve. But it's also just trying to understand what's going on each state and meeting states where they are. Some states may need different types of help. And i think that's going to be important as having the cdc step into its role of being this coordinating body for the states and allowing the public health response to to really be fine tuned by the cdc adding its expertise to what's going on in each in each state. I think it's also the case that we need more guidance on what to do when you have leftover doses and nobody left in the priority group. Yesterday the cdc did have a press conference or a meeting where they did talk about the fact that the goal is not to have vaccine in the fridge but into into people's arms and we shouldn't be wasting doses or doing anything like that so that type of work that kind of leadership of how this vaccination program should go would would be very useful. I also think the federal government should think about trying to help coordinate mass vaccination sites especially as we get into the community dwelling people people who aren't in hospitals nursing homes who are relatively easy to vaccinate but people who live at home can be done. It's at stadiums. Can they be done at convention. Centers Can we use old school gymnasiums during h one n one i got vaccinated at an old school gym. Can we start doing that to make things move much more seamlessly faster sort of borrowing from what israel is doing. Which is the country. That's leading the world in

Dr Amish Johns Hopkins Center For Healt Ronco Vaccination Clinic Tetanus Shots Hepatitis B Allergic Reaction Influenza CDC Steiner Biden Administration North Dakota South Dakota Bill Federal Government Israel
US will see possible bump in COVID-19 cases after the holidays

Atlanta Living

00:26 sec | 3 months ago

US will see possible bump in COVID-19 cases after the holidays

"Officials are bracing for yet another uptick of corona virus infections and deaths following recent Christmas and New Year's gatherings, Doctor a mish Abdullah. Is a senior scholar at the Johns Hopkins Center for Health Security. We're going to continue to see cases rise. We're already at record hospitalizations and hospitals really can't in a sustainable manner go through day to day worrying about supplies. Staffing ICU beds that all is going to push possible is closer to the breaking point. The latest

Mish Abdullah Johns Hopkins Center For Healt
FDA panel expected to address allergic reactions linked to Pfizer vaccine

Here & Now

03:32 min | 4 months ago

FDA panel expected to address allergic reactions linked to Pfizer vaccine

"Joined countries approving the pfizer biontech corona virus vaccine for emergency use and a. Us decision could be any day now. The fda's vaccine advisory panel meets tomorrow and as the uk enters day. Two of its pfizer vaccine. Roll out. Yesterday we find out to people. There developed an allergic reaction after they were vaccinated another fine but officials. There are warning people with a significant history of allergic reactions. Not to take this vaccine. Let's check in with jennifer nozoe senior scholar at the johns hopkins center for health security. And dr nozoe. Two people very small number compared to the number that were vaccinated. But it's concerning for people. What should we know about these reactions. Well something like. This isn't uncommon You know people and we You know expect some manner of this but the fact that it was detected and reported in this notice issued is a symptom. Sign that the the system is working that the safety protocols are in place and that there is a monitoring effort. So when i hear this. I'm actually reassured that we are collecting the right data and keeping tabs on all the right things and so far. I haven't heard anything that would make me worry about the vaccine for the general population is good. And that's why we're told you supposed to stay wherever you get a shot for about fifteen minutes so people can monitor you. People with severe egg allergies are often monitored after getting a flu shot. But for this co vaccine do you anticipate will hear more stories like this absolutely we will and again that shouldn't be interpreted as the. There's a problem with the vaccine. This happens with any sort of vaccine It is just a symptom of the fact that we are going to be doing enhanced monitoring to make sure that we fully understand what's happening after we vaccinate people and so again i find it reassuring one we When we detect and talk about these things transparency. Well we mentioned a british. Regulators are now warning anyone with a history of severe allergic reactions. People who carry epipens with them. You know to to help them come back from one of those reactions are an example. And they're not to take the pfizer vaccine. But what if you know you've had one really serious reaction to say the medication indusin asking for a friend you know what does a serious allergy mean right it is. It is a bit difficult and you know. Obviously we will learn more as the specs more people you know truly who may have these sorts of reactions and who not The best advice. I have is just talk to your personal clinician To sort out your particular situation It's really hard to say at this point for for individuals. Who really needs a clinician loop to to tell you what to back. So i'll tell my friend to call her doctor do right but in the minute that we have. We know. we're not going to confuse this allergic reaction to some of the adverse effects that people have been having the side effects so explain what those are people might expect sure so You know with the side effects that a lot of people experience are just part of the immune system reacting To the vaccine. Which you know vaccines train your immune system so that when and if you come in contact with the virus they know to after it and so part of the soreness or the You know maybe flu like symptoms that people might feel. Afterwards as a sign up the immune system have recognized something and and it started the training process. It's what's supposed to

Pfizer Allergic Reactions Jennifer Nozoe Johns Hopkins Center For Healt Dr Nozoe Severe Allergic Reactions FDA UK FLU United States
"senior scholar" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

06:14 min | 6 months ago

"senior scholar" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Doctor A. Michelle Dahlia is senior scholar of Johns Hopkins Center for Health Security. And he says What has changed since the early days of the pandemic is that we now fully grasp the effectiveness of wearing masks. The biggest difference is that we know the pre symptomatic people. People who don't have symptoms yet. Can't spread this virus. And that's where the math recommendation came from that they're people out there that have the virus that don't know it that are contagious and face coverings help to decrease the force infection. That's the simplest thing we could do to avoid any kind of lock down. Talk if we can get people to where These coverings very diligently, We will see a decrease in spread. The Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health has supported by Michael R. Bloomberg, founder of Bloomberg LP. M. Bloomberg Philanthropies again recapping equities Higher s and P Up 65. Now up by 2%. I'm Charlie. That's a Bloomberg business Flash. It is indeed Charlie Pellet. Thank you so much. You're listening to Bloomberg. BusinessWeek. I'm Carol Master, and this is Bloomberg. Kind of like it. I'm trying to think who it sounds like Dave is in a band. I said no. Uh maybe you know the band that some of the members came from, but probably not this bad. I have no idea like Google it I get live Election day tracker at the New York Times I get Election Day 2020 a politico, so I don't get it so easy to figure out the song was tied on Election day. You know, I'm playing it. I love that thing to do with the chart just came to mind this morning when I was out walking, which I do before I go to work every day. I'm impressed with you. It was accorded. I was that walking to you when I walk to the polls this morning because I want to get a feel of people coming out there is history. Karan. It's a side project of Duran Duran called Arcadia. Nice. So if you got Duran Duran, that's pretty good. Absolutely. Well, it had that sound like, you know, Hungry like the wolf Absolutely s O. They had some of the members. And then there was another group called the Power Station, which Robert Palmer was the lead singer of the so called some like it hot. Okay? Yeah, Anyway, So that's what it is. Any case, so no connection with the chart, though. None whatsoever. We appreciate that Election day gift. I'm just going to say all right, then. Okay, So what does the chart focus on? Well, Black Rock came out with this call for investors. That kind of load up on smaller US cos it was the Black Rock Investment Institute for Research are to be more precise. So why they do that? You know, they're thinking that maybe we get some significant fiscal stimulus is they put it after today's election and smaller companies there are in a better position to take it. Vance of that. What they highlighted is the difference in industry group make up for the smaller companies, as opposed to the larger ones they use. Um, Emma C. I indexes to sort of illustrate that It's Ah Ah, in their report, which you can find online. In fact, there's a link to it in my chart. Text. But what I did to have a similar kind of analysis is work with the S and P 500. That's sort of a reverse version of that. In other words, the smallest companies have the largest wait. And vice versa. So in other words, you really put you to focus on the smaller companies rather than a larger ones. And when you do that, you find out that the biggest increase In weight goes to industrial companies and you talk about an area that would do well, presumably, we get a lot of stimulus, especially if there's infrastructure spending involved. Industrial companies would certainly meet that bill. And on the other hand, if you look at the biggest declines and wait for you know that we're verse waited, S and P 500 s is relative to the original index. Communications services and information technology. So two very clear, big tax related group so You know, this is part of black rocks argument. So why you want on the smaller companies as opposed to larger ones? You end up with more shares the companies or they say bigger stake and companies that stand of benefit from a pickup in the economy, stimulus driven Perhaps. And you don't have a CE. Much invested in those companies will really run up the last few years. So if you want more false semi mail gets you the chart. The explanation goes with it and everything I do. Going forward. The email addresses Di Wilson that Bloomberg dot net. That's Di Wilson at Bloomberg. Alright to David is art, both Amazon I'm assuming apples and information technology, but his Amazon is Amazon as well. No consumer discretionary because they're made businesses online retail, but pageants as they are in Tak, you know, with Amazon Web services to some of their other areas, they're predominately a retailer. During consumer discretionary, and it's funny because that if you look at the smaller companies where the reverse index that group within the S and P 500 has a greater weight, but right because so many companies air small now because Amazon it's kind of beating him down, Yeah, exactly. But I was thinking about information technology. So apples part of that correct, right? Microsoft? I just want And go home services communicates the services, you know, Don't forget it is Google right Alphabet? It's Facebook. It's that I just could say the apple like I want to wait until we get like the numbers that represents the fourth quarter and the holiday sales. And if there's a blockbuster night like I just everybody seems to be turning their back on information technology. And I think you know that is very much though. Our world our economy and We shall see. And we'll see how people go for the five G iPhones. Correct. We're going to buy them. We're finally going to buy them. There you go. There you go. I'm gonna wait. OK. All right. There you go. All right. David Wilson will see you in a little bit later on Dave Wilson will come back with his stock of the day. Let's get back to roll that national news back on over to.

Bloomberg LP Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School M. Bloomberg Philanthropies Amazon Michael R. Bloomberg David Wilson Duran Duran Dave Wilson Google Bloomberg Johns Hopkins Center for Healt Doctor A. Michelle Dahlia apple Charlie Pellet senior scholar BusinessWeek
Learning with our Kids through Digital Play with OK Play App Co-founders Chris Ovitz and Dr. Colleen Russo Johnson

SuperMamas

07:53 min | 6 months ago

Learning with our Kids through Digital Play with OK Play App Co-founders Chris Ovitz and Dr. Colleen Russo Johnson

"Hi I'm probably next high embraced. The I'd were sisters, Fred Solders, wives, and business. And we're just falling three. We know. To be a better version of herself every day. All right and we're also. Welcomes. Sisterhood. Hi Emma what's up everybody? How are you? Do everybody I'm great. How are you? Yourself. Do I wanNA, introduce myself. Yes I do. Hi everybody. My name is Lena. I, am Bruce's sister. And I am a mom of three girls nine, six and three year old right now, and we're just trying to survive. who at you on the other side of the Mike. I am also your sister Duh. I am but he Lopez mother of two of a three month old and a fighter old little boy and my little girl who was just born three months ago. Just trying to be me being you know the best near can be embracing be. Husband. I had to have a high note shuttle the has. To the husband's Yeah I mean, we're just assist in women trying to be better rational results every day. If you're new to the show. Welcome to the Super Sisterhood, and if you are og longtime listener Sept- ladies, we love you. Also. Don't forget to follow us on our Social Media Instagram and twitter at underscore. So but Romance Facebook, Super Roma's podcasts, and on the Web Superman dot com, you can check out or previous episodes newsletter subscription newsletter all the articles that we have just check it out to romance dot COM If you WANNA, send us a note you can do it by sending us an email at hello at superman dot com or you can call us at four to four, three, two, six, three, seven, seven. End At the end of the show, we have our favorite favorite segment, the pick or tip of the week. So stay tuned for that. And my favorite segment mind theory subject to subject segment not subject my second subject to subject to name to. who do we have on the show this week? Today on the show this week we have two great very smart in a in a high achievers I would say On the today we have Chris over to is a president of the company called. Okay play. It's an APP that I started using that will come very much in handy these days of virtual learning. So again, we have Chris Hogan, who was President a dad on for your boy and Dr Colleen, Russo Johnson. PhD, and she is a chief scientists and Mama up two toddlers for for the okay company in the okay play APP, which is a little bit about Chris who is again the CO founder and President He is just a serial entrepreneur I mean like his bio I can go on and on and on. Angel investor he's invested in companies like beyond me and block renovation. When he is a member of terrorists next establishment list and graduated from Ucla with the history by just like a serial entrepreneur and Dr Combing Russo she is again hundred scientists in she is a de mental psychologist with expertise in children's media and technology who serves as an adjunct professor at Ryerson University in codger rector of Ryerson's children medialab She is a senior scholar for silly center for scholars and storytellers and the CO author bestselling Children's Book Dino Dana Dana Field Guide again she is like the. Best person to talk about what's happening right now with virtual learning and what did we talk about Alina? Love. This episode I love the APP. I think it will. It's first of all they launched this. This APP during the during a pandemic, which is in of itself. Amazing we talk about emotional learning. We talk also about how to choose right even a good app for your kids and what makes this APP different which is again, the emotion social emotional learning and. How these actually involves the parent lonely the children and how it translates from the APP in the device to outdoor play to more than play and I, love how they came up with the name any. To play with the kids. So we talk about that. We talk about perspective of screen time. What's good what's not good you know what what to do right now with the kids and how this APP has helped our families as well in many other families. So I'm excited for for this episode end for the APP. Awesome. So but before we get into that base, yeah, what's up with you? What's going on what's up with me? You know. With me like every day seems to be the same thing. I'm just trying to gain for routine with were in. You know just having a Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday schedule Northern, I actually took up a new wouldn't say my. was is that a hobby is. Added something we were routine which I really like he's in writing letters to his friends. Then he would aches and we're going to the post office like every other day I try not to do it every day, but he wants to go every day. here's a couple of letters and heap envelope and puts his postage stamp, and then just you know we go to the office in everything. That's pretty cool. That's kind of like the new thing we're doing here I bought him some stationary. We should be coming next week, which I'm so excited Abou-, he has going to have his own stationary. And the customized initials yes. It has his name I got I couldn't decide I couldn't decide on witch on which science. So I got him to design. I'm very site for people to receive a customer stationary and the baby. She's she's just living her best cuter every day Chubbier every day or she's those beautiful three months old like chummy legs and Chevy she eats them. As she started to mile a lot more and talk a lot more and. She's being like the Pistons such a great baby you know I can't really complain about her. She's awesome. Obviously still not sleep through the night actually migrated her bedroom I don't know if I share that already. Oh. Yes. She's been living. She's living in her bedroom for the past two weeks already. Like I actually moved into her bedroom before to turn three months. And she's been doing well, she's only waking up once usually runs for now. I, mean I'm just hoping that like continues

Chris Hogan Fred Solders Emma Super Sisterhood President Trump Facebook Twitter Lopez Ryerson University Bruce Mike Dino Dana Dana Dr Combing Russo Pistons Alina Abou Ryerson PHD
What Contact Tracing Data Is Telling Us About How COVID-19 Spreads

Morning Edition

00:57 sec | 8 months ago

What Contact Tracing Data Is Telling Us About How COVID-19 Spreads

"And NPR's survey of state health departments in the US finds few of them are publicizing data from their Corona virus contact tracing programs. As NPR's Selina Simmons, Duffin reports. Public health experts say transparency is essential in combating covert 19 Contact tracing happens when the public health worker calls each person who tested positive for the Corona virus, asks about their close contacts and then calls those contacts to tell them to quarantine on Ly 12 states and Washington, D C surveyed by NPR are publicly sharing the data. They're gathering from this process. I think it's a little bit scattershot right now, but the states that are doing it. It's a good star. That's Crystal Watson, a senior scholar at the Johns Hopkins Center for Health Security, who collaborated with P. R. On the survey. She highlights a few states including New Jersey, Louisiana and Delaware, that they're doing a good job, sharing this data publicly and hopes that more will follow their lead.

NPR Johns Hopkins Center For Healt Selina Simmons Crystal Watson United States Duffin Senior Scholar P. R. New Jersey Delaware Washington Louisiana
Questions arise over Washington DC private schools reopening plans

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:43 sec | 9 months ago

Questions arise over Washington DC private schools reopening plans

"Won't be doing in person classes this fall. But some private schools and day care centers are opening. The bottom line is that will certainly require masks and commitment to hygiene. But Dr Jennifer knows, Oh, a senior scholar at the Johns Hopkins Center for Health Security, says then a lot more variables come into play. We have to ask, you know what are the surrounding circumstances? How much infection is in the surrounding community? Take into consideration other family members, your kids might be around and think about what everyone else is doing and where they're going. Going outside of the classroom of parents do not feel comfortable sending their Children to school. Then I think we have to accommodate that. That might help because if we can actually reduce the number of kids who need to be in the classroom, then it might be easier to kind of physically distance. John Doman w T O

Johns Hopkins Center For Healt John Doman Senior Scholar Dr Jennifer
Should schools reopen? Balancing COVID-19 and learning loss for young children

All Things Considered

02:16 min | 9 months ago

Should schools reopen? Balancing COVID-19 and learning loss for young children

"To school, a growing number of them are being told. Stay home. There will be no in person school this fall School District's from California to Georgia to Maryland are now gearing up for online on Ly instruction are citing the spike in Corona virus cases, but just how dangerous is it to send Children? His teachers and staff back into classrooms amid a pandemic. And why is there so much debate over that question? We have called Jennifer Nuzzo to take on those questions. She is a senior scholar with the Johns Hopkins Center for Health Security. Welcome. Thank you. We're going to have you with us. I do want to start by asking. It seems there is just madmen, maddeningly little real information about the risks to kids and how likely kids are to spread the virus. Why do we know so little of this point? Yeah, it's true. I agree. There's not as much information as we like. We do have some studies that have generally given us the belief that kids are probably less likely to be harmed by this virus than adults. Also some information to suggest that they may be less likely to transmit the virus like they do you know is compared to other viruses like influenza, but it's hard to really study because you know, we've done these great measures where we've shut down and we've decided to stay home. And we don't fully know if we've kept kids home more and not as exposed as they would otherwise be. So it's fairly artificial circumstances. Yeah, I suppose kids haven't been in school since March, for the most part, so it's hard to study what transmission would would look like if they were I have noticed that a lot of the studies that have been published today have come from other countries. There was a big study that made some news out of South Korea that found kids. Older kids like they just had to 19 actually can spread the virus as well as adults that younger kids under 10 spread it much less. How much stock do you put in studies like that? Yeah, That's that, finding that there may be an age related effect with the older kids, possibly being a more worrisome case with the younger kids. That is something that we've seen elsewhere. That's at this study. I think experts feel may not be completely generalize along the sense that it was sick kids at home and not necessarily kids who don't have symptoms at school, but it's still important to learn from The CDC

Jennifer Nuzzo Fall School District Johns Hopkins Center For Healt Influenza LY South Korea California Maryland CDC Georgia
"senior scholar" Discussed on AP News

AP News

11:48 min | 1 year ago

"senior scholar" Discussed on AP News

"Hi Mike Rossi are reporting an expert cautions there will be a return of the new coronavirus later this year a return of covert 19 in the fall is all but certain we know the corona viruses in general accelerate their spread when it gets colder when it's less money when the humidity is its last doctor a mission dollar jet is a senior scholar and infectious disease expert at Johns Hopkins center for health security what will be difficult at the same time it were contending with this novel coronavirus influenza will also be coming back on the plus side the Dodger tells the AP he is encouraged that many trials are already underway on a vaccine for the new coronavirus I suspect when we get a vaccine at this threat will be taken off the table corona viruses don't mutate in the way that influenza does hi Mike Crossey up

Mike Rossi senior scholar Johns Hopkins center AP influenza Mike Crossey
"senior scholar" Discussed on AP News

AP News

13:00 min | 1 year ago

"senior scholar" Discussed on AP News

"Hi Mike Rossi a reporting with many states re opening it's worth remembering coded 19 is still here as many states push ahead with steps toward re opening doctor a mish adult job Johns Hopkins center for health security cautions the virus has not left it's still here when you have people interacting you're going to get more cases adult Joe who's a senior scholar and infectious disease doctor tells the AP precautionary measures will still be important it will be key that people still continue to do some of the basic hygiene it we've been emphasized throughout this pandemic including hand washing and refraining from from touching your face and if you are sick to stay at home for most people the corona virus causes mild or moderate symptoms but for some especially older adults and people with existing health problems it can cause more severe illness and even death hi Mike Rossio

Mike Rossi Joe senior scholar Mike Rossio Johns Hopkins center AP
"senior scholar" Discussed on AP News

AP News

11:14 min | 1 year ago

"senior scholar" Discussed on AP News

"As many states push ahead with steps toward re opening doctor a mish adult job Johns Hopkins center for health security cautions the virus has not left it's still here when you have people interacting you're going to get more cases adult Joe who's a senior scholar and infectious disease doctor tells the AP precautionary measures will still be important it will be key that people still continue to do some of the basic hygiene that we've been emphasized throughout this pandemic including hand washing and refraining from from touching your face and if you are sick to stay at home for most people the corona virus causes mild or moderate symptoms but for some especially older adults and people with existing health problems it can cause more severe illness and even death hi Mike Rossio

Joe senior scholar Mike Rossio Johns Hopkins center AP
Latest on China's Response to the Coronavirus Outbreak

Bloomberg Law

06:30 min | 1 year ago

Latest on China's Response to the Coronavirus Outbreak

"The Chinese government has effectively put Wuhan a city of eleven million people on lock down in an attempt to limit the spread of the corona virus that is already spread to other parts of Asia and United States I talked to doctor Jennifer does a senior scholar at the Johns Hopkins center for health security for her take on China's response well I think many people were worried about how China is going to react to the situation giving given a remembrance of what happened in two thousand three with the sars epidemic where there were deep concerns about officials hiding the scale of the outbreak initially and not being transparent about case number that that around I think compared to that situation we see a much more open and responsive China the health authorities reported the outbreak Kelly promptly and you know within weeks we saw the identification and sequencing of a virus that was shared publicly and you know researchers have been able to develop diagnostic tools based on that information so I think we are summoning courage by the response there continue to be important data gaps that would help us gauge the situation but for the most part I think all available evidence suggests that they're working hard to try to get a handle on the situation a short time ago the World Health Organization said that although the corona viruses that China emergency it's not a global health emergency for now apparently it was a divided ruling this they might revisit what should we read into that what should we not to read into it well for me what was the most important part of the decision that the World Health Organization made was not the decision but the convening of experts to review the situation I mentioned are still a number of very important questions about the brakes and the answers of which I think will really better enable us to judge what the world wide risk of this is the key one for me is how severe are the illnesses that the virus produces obviously were worried that there's been a discovery of a new virus capable of affecting humans but coronaviruses are not uncommon coronaviruses health and that caused retained respiratory illnesses and so it's not just the virus itself let's worry from it how severe is the a list of the virus produces and we don't have a great handle on that so I'm in favor of taking a wait and see approach to gather more information that becomes more compelling but I think what was really important for us to gather experts in an international kind of independent fashion to to review what evidence is available to ask hard questions and you have to assume that part of the questions they're asking is also an assessment of whether the officials are being transparent with the information they have over there so long I think but I suspect they don't know for sure is that if there had been sufficient concerns about stonewalling like they may have declared emergency because that would make them quite worried about China's ability to handle the situation but so far I'm I I think it should signal to us there's a sense that there is cooperation on the ground there between WHL they're the team WHL team on the ground and Chinese health officials that was going to a question actually how do these work as they call it is trying to call in help from outside and we're the cover is a WJHL they won't call up for example CDC another health officials who have gone to the area so we heard that about him from Taiwan coming as well as actually from other countries you know it's really up to the country itself to decide who to lead and not so far it seems like there is some degree of international corporation which I think is encouraging as we heard in the WHL there's a team logo on the ground helping Chinese health officials kind of threat to the optimality of this outbreak you mentioned doctor visit earlier sars because we all think about that right away what do we know about how this is similar to sars and how it's different I understand it's corona virus which sounds like a sars but there may be some important differences yeah so so out like sars situation we're dealing with now also involves the corona virus but what what was quite worrisome about sars was the fact that about ten percent of the known cases died that's a fairly high holiday and so when the things we're looking at right now is how many of their fans before the numbers have been relatively small and then trying to understand who the death have occurred what sort of people have been been dying from the infection so far it sounds like at least a majority of the deaths have occurred people who have had some health condition that might make them more likely that the come from an infection at the front of our could be a plant or something else and so that is potentially reassuring to say that that not be as deadly for an otherwise healthy individual we don't yet know the really important set of data that we need to understand how much this is or is not like sars another area where I think we need to understand is whether or not to what extent healthcare workers have become infected in caring for an infected chronic vampires patients and so on there have been some reports of healthcare workers of becoming infected not been officially confirmed and I think that's a point for which we are really in need of more information with that understand who the healthcare workers are what they were doing when they potentially became infected and you know how is it limited to I think the reports have been pretty health workers treating one patient is that actually true when did this occur etcetera that's I think a very important part because what we thought sars without all of the transmission within around health centers the healthcare workers who are caring for patients and then potentially spreading it to the contact and the community doctor Ruth mutation do viruses like this tend to mutate now so how far how fast yeah another reason why people are concerned obviously any kind of new virus emerges we always have to ask what are they doing now and is it possible it won't keep doing this the public it works to the possible to get more mild and I I think that's an open question with respect to this virus there's been a lot of speculation about whether or not a stable or whether or not it's mutating I think it's way too early for us to be able to tell that we're not even sure what generation cases were staying at this point we're still not entirely sure we fully understand the incubation period which is the amount of time between which somebody to come inspected and then eventually develop symptoms all of those things I think will tell us you know how many sort of generations of people become infected which then I think we need to understand that in order to understand how the virus maybe changing over time that was Jennifer does associate professor at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg school

Chinese Government Wuhan
Perspectives on China and global power

FT News

12:48 min | 2 years ago

Perspectives on China and global power

"How will the struggle for power between China and the US play out. And how will it determine the future world order, Fred Stedman, put this question to China expert, Ron meter he was reviewed a series of books looking at the issue from different perspectives. Ron, thanks for coming in. You looked at a number of books for us in a book Sesay about China and the west. And what struck me right? From the get-go was that you talked about this interaction between these great powers, China and the west, the US is being almost unique in its complexity, and I thought, why is that? Why is this more complicated than other great power interactions, that we've witnessed over the centuries? I think it is different. And the reason fundamentally is that we've never seen an engagement between two different types of regime that are so closely intertwined so different in terms of their values. So if you think back to the Cold War, we had at that time, basically, to political and economic systems, which were fiercely opposed to each other, but they didn't actually connect all that much. Of course, we were all terrified at the threat of nuclear war, but the Soviet Union's economy was not a major factor for the west and vice versa that AKU. It's not remotely true for the People's Republic of China. It is the second biggest economy in the world. It is now a primary economic actor in pretty much every single continent of the world and the United States. Of course, in China have been entwined in terms of finance for more than twenty years, more like thirty. Really? So the fact that we now have a rising China, which from the point of view of many liberals in the west but elsewhere has variety values particularly, of course and authoritarian type of government that is very different from what a liberal government would put forward, but it's not a place that we can simply close off or ignore that provides dilemma that was still right in the middle of solving on both sides, and one of the aspects of that. I think I'm right and say you say there's a choice there. Do we engage more with China and we're seeing this stuff that's happening in the world of technology while way, and whether it should be allowed to be part of the five G project or do we push back and one comes with a security risk? And the other one comes up tension financial economic risk that. That's lemon. But let me give you a specific example. Let's take away, which, of course, it's become this company that in the UK where we're sitting. Now, nobody had heard of probably not nobody very few people a year ago. Now, of course, is a headline every single morning on the news usually pronounced in a variety of other creative ways Hawaii audit wrong is not an upset. Right. I've heard is one prominent politician refers to it as Hawaii, which is not quite the same thing. I think that's not so much of an issue. So ten twenty years ago, we might have said that the biggest threat from the Chinese technology sector was that they were basically borrowing without commissioners, the polite way to put it intellectual property from the western world from the US from Britain from Europe Chinese would basically, taking technology that they hadn't paid for an putting into their machines had to be stopped. That is no longer the main problem does exist. But the wider problem is that actually China is now producing its indigenous technology to a very very high standard. So the reason that the United Kingdom, for instance is having a debate about whether or not, they put while way equipment in the five G network is nothing. With intellectual property theft. It's the fact that the cheapest highest quality most effective broadband network. You can have is made by hallway, and if you don't have that, then you're basically saying that you have to give an alternative company, the rights to put in the network that may actually not be at the moment, overs, higher quality. So there's a genuine balance between quality. And as you say, the question, whether there's a security risk or not, that's a new dilemma, not just for the UK but for the entire liberal world fascinating, I wanna come onto the books now because we get a perspective from China. So it's a bit more about a few from Beijing in terms of how these relationships are going to develop, what China sees its role and the other they have different conceptions of types of political systems, one of the books. I've reviewed in this particular China books essay is book leadership in the great powers by yen Shu at home. Professor yen is a very senior scholar in China. He's at Ching-ho university, one of the top institutions in that country. And he's become known. I'd say of the last. Twenty years or more in that particular field as probably one of the three or four best known most respected analysts of China's international relations. Now international relations terms without getting too technical. He's what's known as a realist is the accusation that sometimes put Henry Kissinger, Henry Kissinger, his pushes back and says, he's an idealist in realists, clothing, or was that effect. In other words, what professor yen believes is that power is the thing that actually makes a difference. So that's the position he's always had. That's why this book is so interesting, not just about him, but about China, because it makes actually in some ways rather, different case, a case that, if China is going to take fullest vantage of its rise in the world. The fact that it is now the second biggest economy in the world, and may by GDP be the biggest one within ten years. The fact that it is this huge international actor than it has to change the way, that looks the world, not just talk about power relationships, but also about what you might call the human relations, the narrative, that surround saddened, professor Yannis jesting that it will be time, maybe not yet but. Quite soon for what he calls, a more humane, the what he used the humane view of how China should relate to the rest of the world. Now that is in a sense, part of a process that we've also seen earlier with the most recent hegemony in world politics, the United States, which of course, became a power that had more battleships and more fighter planes, than anyone else particular during World War Two, but really seduce the world through what's become known as soft power. In other words, having a story to tell the world, I read professor Jens Booker saying that China has got the military. It's got the realist power. Now, it has to find the story and does he believe the Chinese leadership is current inclination to they buy that will this is one of the things that you have to read quite carefully in the book. It's not I would say a book to necessarily put next to a thriller at an airport. You know, it does take a bit of time. But I'd say get a glass of wine, give it a good going over, because it's well worth it prevents. The end doesn't at any point in the book talk about the current leadership, so Xi Jinping. The current president of China is not mentioned for Donald Trump is Donald Trump is along. With a few other names. So the United States certainly comes into the line of fire, you might say, but the wider question that he also is one that is very relevant China, which is, is the current system that China's operating, which, as we know is one that has been economically, very, very effective in terms of growth rates in terms of creating a kind of middle class, that's now, see very, very powerful in China and creating a sorta prosperous lifestyle that many consumers in China very much enjoy, but also really closing down political discourse. Is that going to be the way in which trying to get to the next stage in the implication? It's an implication of a statement but it isn't implication, is that maybe China's going to have to go beyond that if one looks at conclusions that he comes through. And again, this is very interesting because it is so much view from Beijing from thinker who is well respected both in the western China in that field, is that there's not going to be a war. This is not a story about a confrontation between China and America on the military front. But the is going to be a sort of battle for ideas and the dominance. Spouts largely economic in the Asia Pacific region. He does say very firmly the Asia Pacific region is where you're going to have to look, if you want to see what comes next for world politics. It's moving away from Europe moving away from North America. The Pacific for yen is where it's at right. Which is also the subject of one of the other books, that you looked up as referrals, China and Japan which comes to some interesting conclusions. I think it's fair to say it makes some interesting observations. It absolutely does Ezra Vogel is a scholar, but also a diplomatic figure who has actually sort of seen the rise and change in America's relationship with Asia, over the decades, he served in the Clinton administration, as secretary of state, and he became very famous in the seventies earliest that with the book who Japan as number one, which was on every business leaders bookshelf, as well as the cost many scholars, but he's always been a speaker both Chinese and Japanese and this book is about China and Japan, their shed history, which he points out, actually is not always as confrontational as it sometimes appears. We tend to think, of course of. The second World War when the two countries did have a massive conflict, of course. But he also points out that, for instance, if you look at statistics in the last few years, a few years ago, when tensions were pretty high between the two countries something like a million million a half Chinese visited Japan pass, not that many that number last year two thousand eighteen is more like eight million. So if you look below some of these surface rhetoric is saying, actually, there is a more cooperative story about economics about tourism about cultural values that are shared the maybe means the countries aren't as far apart as they might be. And this is I think, part of the white of Vogel, viewpoint because he comes from that generation of Americans who sought as part of their duty. I think in the post World War Two era to try and create a sort of agreed shed set of values in a stable community in East Asia America course, encouraged that in Europe, very successfully European Union NATO and so forth. It's never quite worked out in the same way in Asia. But that hasn't stopped a lot of those people actually, I think trying over and over again to create that similar sorts. Of stability for go. Yours decided mentioned former administration official, but other American voices take sort of more by guessing old money once say hawkish view new picked up on one someone. I believe you're actually at one point taught Jonathan ward who's written a book China's vision of victory which sounds alarmist oil is very concerned, and feels the American needs to be much more assertive in its response. That's right. Yes. New Jonathan ward. I taught history when he was an Oxford where I teach. But this book is very much about current affairs, and it's very much about policy not about history as such. And yes, I think it's fair to say that the argument he puts forward in the book is one that says that China is used the phrase hawkish, I'll say, clear and present danger, that's probably the phrase that comes to my mind. When reading it now, should say the book is one that has a great deal of information in it. It's got a lot about military power, and how China's building up its navy in particular. It's got a lot about economic power, and also of course a lot about values and the argument there, essentially is that. The United States, whether it wants to or not is going to have to deal with the fact that China is there to challenge the United States. So in a sense, that's a different story from the end should tone story where he's basically saying look the Americans and the Chinese are both going to be in the Pacific, where they're going to have to engage with each other. What story will, maybe it's time for America to actually set down the red lines if you can set down the red line in the Pacific Ocean. And actually say thus far and no further so between them those books actually point out in some ways, where the difference of view comes in terms of what's going to happen in the next decade in that Asia Pacific region. You mentioned around all the books that sort of sense that there are tensions, there is a competition of ideas, but the, the authors dancing, we're heading towards some military confrontation. And that things will be settled through dialogue to share that. I think you can see a generational difference in these books, which was as I say, in the essay, it's was reading them in tandem, because they all say something slightly different than they make up out of the picture for. Yang Tong speaking from Beijing. But, you know, with I think quite measured frame of mind. The argument is about to powers that have to live with each other, which have the potential to be confrontational, but not necessarily military sense. Maybe more on the economic sense. I think it's fair to say that as revivals book is talking about the areas where you can find agreement rather than disagreement between the actors and that in a sense, reflects his long decades of experience in the region. Jonathan ward is of a different generation. He's in his thirties. He's living, right there in the policy world of Washington DC right now, and the world, he sees is a much more confrontational. One, one in which America and China have different goals, different values different viewpoints. And that maybe just maybe those can't be contained together. Now, we're going to have to see what happens to work out in say the trade war between China and the US whether that actually could reach something more like a confrontation, but reading three books makes you realize that actually all of these viewpoints exist simultaneously. In part of the existential struggle almost is about what? Which one of them is going to prevail. Ron amid. Thank you very much. Thank you for it. That was Fred Stephen F teabags editor talking to Ron Mischer director of the Oxford University, China center. Thanks for listening. And if you're interested in events in China and Asia Pacific, lookout for latest episode of world weekly, where we talk about the protests in Hong Kong. Thanks again. If you missed our recent episodes on the US standoff in the Gulf China's threat cheese. Rare earths as a trade weapon, or the fall

China United States People's Republic Of China America United Kingdom Beijing Europe Ron Mischer Asia Pacific China Center Fred Stedman Soviet Union Jonathan Ward Pacific Gulf China Professor Yen
"senior scholar" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

KDWN 720AM

03:03 min | 2 years ago

"senior scholar" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

"The bacteria bacterial cells communicate by producing and releasing chemical signal molecules other bacteria pick it up, and they call this quorum sensing, then the communication, let's figure out how many other bacteria in the vicinity who's going to bring the beer, you know, that kind of stuff and then sometimes bacteria will coalesce act as a group, right? And then that allows them to do more damage than stay hall. So they say the virus was overhearing the bacterial conversations. Oh, no. She didn't. Yes. She did. So they said, it's brilliant. According to Nancy coddle, she's a micro. Oh, the Tonette assist and senior scholar John Hopkins center for health security. She has not connected with the I guess this report was published in cell. But again, they ask for her opinion. And not mine. I hate that. These are people not connected with the study and the interview some random person going. Oh, yeah. That's that's you know, they interviewed her. And she said, this discovery just blew me away. I'm a bacterial geneticist, and I think about bacterial communication, but who thought that viruses could perceive anything now some of you guys have already fallen asleep. Okay. But I'm telling you right now the scientific community. This is fascinating. And I tell you why this is what I get out of this. Okay. HIV is one of the smartest slickest viruses out there if HIV. Does some of this double o seven stuff, and we are on it that could possibly help us fight bad, viruses, like HIV? So they say the discovery, oh, they agree. With me opens the door for viruses to become infected fighters. Possibly one day. Joining antibiotics in the medical arsenal to fight salmonella e-coli, cholera and other bacterial infection says Basler see how we now make it. Even sat all military's military elastic, right? An arsenal. Yeah. We have a vehicle arsenal. It used to be a little doctors band that look dorky? Now soapies discovery was built on previous work in the lab. Is it self sulphur soapy anyway? So he did piggyback copy you did his homework, but it was built on previous work in the lab where they discovered this receptor within a bacterial cell for a signal that bacteria used to communicate with each other. So they analyzed a bunch of DNA, then they brought in the search or whatever. And then he found a receptor that didn't match bacteria, and it was for that VP eight eighty two so selfie got to be interviewed. And I'm glad. Because he should get the credit for this. So he said he did. And he said this was unexpected. Because it was suggesting that there was a virus out there that is kind of joined the bacterial conversation. This one virus receptor that previously had only been found bacteria to facilitate communication, but unlike bacteria the virus does not take part in the conversation hands. It just listens and ease drops. Okay. So what does that mean for your I well, viruses,.

HIV Nancy coddle Tonette salmonella John Hopkins center senior scholar Basler VP one day
"senior scholar" Discussed on The Ezra Klein Show

The Ezra Klein Show

03:39 min | 2 years ago

"senior scholar" Discussed on The Ezra Klein Show

"There's very, particularly when we're dealing with the powerful and Kate man in her book on. Misogyny down girl makes his point very very eloquently. Pretty when we're talking about powerful people we've tended to be very sympathetic about their motivations. And it's often much more useful in clarifying talk about the effect on society, the effect on on the people you're supposed to be talking about. But there's this constant. Well, yes, everything you're saying about what happened may be true. But to say, they misbehave or they were lying or they hated someone. We can't say that. And it's like, well, it doesn't matter. What they felt like what matters is what they did. Yeah. No. I think that's a really Stu general observation about when things go wrong how we kind of scribe motive to it. And you know, I think ultimately at some point even if we start with the benefit of the doubt that for instance, speaker Ryan started this is really what he wanted to do at some point when you haven't done it. And you keep saying you have I think that point you have to take responsibility for the fact that you're. Just you deceiving. People. I think it's it's difficult for us as a society to kind of feel that disappointment. Somebody told me they were going to do a, and they did be, and we'd we'd rather believe that they're still doing a and there's a way in which we kind of help them along in that belief as you said, but I think it's really dangerous, and you know, part of what I think it does is it discourages and silences those who speak out, and so that conversation I related to you with this mentor. This very senior scholar. I was untenable shared. This was the most eminent professor at the school ROY taught who's an older white, man. I wanted very much to get tenure. And he basically told me, you know, you can't say that. And you're you can't say what you found in your research. And this was someone, you know for all purposes had spent his whole career studying the power dynamic in criminal sentencing, and how it affected white and black. Defendants and yet here he was kind of in a different way replicating a certain kind of power dynamic. So I do think it's important to to talk about those words and to use them. And there's a great example of this actually in the Baker. He system where there was a theory at one time that the bankruptcy courts in Delaware, very pro business state, but the bankruptcy courts in Delaware were giving favorable treatment to corporations that were filing for bankruptcy. And that we ought to do something about that. And change the lawn and force these big corporations to file on the places where for example, they had employee's or they had headquarters or they did business and the Baker judges somebody suggested that what was resulting was kind of a corruption of the bankruptcy courts. And other people were really hurt by that. Because they felt like they were doing a good job the outcome may have. I've been corrupting. But there was nothing. There was no graft. Right. And so it wasn't like anyone was being paid off or the judges were working for the salary. They get and working long hours thought. And and so I think that's a good illustration of kind of what you're talking about. And what it means to describe things in certain ways. So you did a lot of work in this van? You did a lot of it with than professor Warren as a stand. It you lead a lot of the research led to the book that was one of her breakout pieces, the two income trap. Yeah. No, I helped gather the data in two thousand one that was my first kind of work with her..

Delaware Ryan ROY Kate professor Warren senior scholar Baker professor
Facebook, Keith Alverson and Bryan Donkin discussed on Marketplace

Marketplace

09:17 min | 2 years ago

Facebook, Keith Alverson and Bryan Donkin discussed on Marketplace

"Not exactly an economic indicator but, it, does offer perhaps a, hint of some of the changes coming in this economy changes in the way that. We relate to our, technology and the way technology relates to people the number is eighteen point nine six. It's measured in percent and it's the drop that Facebook shares took today after an ozo- disappointing earnings call after the bell yesterday investors were caught off, guard, to say the very least by. How. Big a deal the Cambridge analytical data sharing. Scandal has turned out to be among Facebook users and how much it might cost the company to regain that trust marketplace's Nancy. Marshall genzer gets, us going Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg. Was blunt in yesterday's earnings call we're investing so much insecurity that it will significantly impact. Our profitability We're starting to see that this quarter Facebook says. It's spending more than a, billion dollars a year to improve security and how it. Handles private data analyst Richard greenfield says the, money will, be used to verify content that's, posted to make sure that advertisers are who they say they are and where those ads are coming from there wasn't backlash from Facebook users after they learned that Cambridge analytic got hold. Of their private data to sell, to, political campaigns but users, aren't abandoning Facebook on mass it's just too big a part of their lives Michael. Premium is a digital, ad consultant he says we use Facebook for more than just staying in touch with. Our friends to log in and actually interact with either making other purchases or to verify our identity so Facebook probably won't be doing a face plant, but, internet security and data privacy those. Are. Sticky problems if you're a drug maker facing. Trust issues you can just change your packaging to make your medications More secure Raymond James managing director Aaron Kessler says Facebook's, fixes aren't so easy there's bad actors. That trying to stay one step ahead of the. Terms of safety and security issues as. Well it's, kind of a game back and forth a very expensive game that never ends I'm Nancy Marshall genzer for marketplace we are getting an actual economic indicator tomorrow gross. Domestic product growth for the April to June quarter, best guesses are then it's going, to be pretty good. Somewhere above four percent maybe even touching five, that's as compared to first quarter growth of two percent And as I said that's pretty nice jump but well just but here's marketplace's Kimberly, Adams the economy has been growing steadily over the past, decade but during the second quarter. Of this year there were some drastic changes that sped up growth Miami mcginnis president of the committee for. A, responsible federal budget I threw big tax cuts then threw big. Spending increases and they're also some changes, things, to do, with trade that, may bump up those numbers. Even further in particular tariffs and concerns about them may have changed business behavior in the last few months Erica. In a senior scholar at Cornell and former, head of the bureau of labor statistics. Says those changes will likely show. Up in the GDP numbers but not over, the long term you might see the stockpiling of goods. Where people might think that the price was going up sometime soon well we'll. Also show up is the result of the tax cuts some corporations increased spending Seth carpenter is chief economist, for UBS the boost to the economy from the tax cuts is going to be real. It's going to be measurable however it's also going to be temporary and start to Peter out after next. Year carpenter says it's never a good idea to base a long term view of the economy, on one quarter GDP in Washington I'm Kimberly Adams for, marketplace on Wall Street today quick. Could somebody remind me which of the major indices includes Facebook and which one doesn't because that's kind of. A, hint as to how things went we'll have the details when. We do the numbers President Trump's been in the mid west. This, afternoon celebrating the expansion of a steel plant in Illinois he was in Iowa this? Morning celebrating the agreement to start talking about reaching a trade. Deal with the European Union that he announced yesterday We've got a, couple of farmers we check in with from time to time when. News like, this comes up Keith alverson grows, corn and, soybeans in South Dakota. Bryan Duncan does hogs and soybeans in Illinois I threw Keith the first question when we talked which basically boiled down to how he's feeling about the. President's announcement you know it's it's a positive step still you know the year pin union, so I've been markets about seven times smaller than that. Of China. And sold the the. Bigger, thing is the negotiations with, China in regards to that and so while it's a positive, step in a, in a movement in the right direction the, is still on the prize for the US farmer Bryan Donkin same question to you yeah I. Echo what keeps says but I think also if we can forge alliances with Europe Mexico with, Canada and then turn as one to face China. I think that's also a benefit, to us as we seek to resolve these differences on trade you have it Brian Lamey the odds right Because up until. Yesterday nobody hit even blinked in, this. Thing and so far we have nothing from the Chinese which is a huge market for American hogs it's a, huge market for, American soybeans Brian nobody seems to. Be backing down in that relationship and that's. That's obviously of concern but that being said I, guess we in the country act to sit here and hope there's. Things going, on behind the scenes and continue, to urge, the administration to get. To the table and and get to work to resolve these issues Keith alverson what's your level of hope man what's your level of optimism boy you. Know we real similar situation things aren't looking to optimistic right now we were promised bilateral, trade deals and we're open some of those come to. Fruition and. So you know it's. Just, it's tough to see the, light at the end of the tunnel point so the light, at the end, of the tunnel could be for both of, you a slice of the twelve billion dollars in aid that the Trump administration the other day. Promised he was going to grant Bryan sir Secretary of agriculture. The secretary of commerce I'm not, sure actually who has the physical money they come. To you and say, here is part of twelve billion dollars is that going to do it for you. I think it's important to recognize that we're grateful for the acknowledgement of the economic damage that's been done but unfortunately sadly twelve billion is gonna fall short and yes that money. Will help meet some short term needs But I think is Keith says. We've gotta talk about the longer, term price too because I'm afraid the. Damage could mount quickly into hundreds of billions? Of dollars you know and and so there's not a band aid for that injury Keith what's the sense. Of of, what it would take to you know with soybean, prices where they are and corn and all that What would your slice of this. Twelve billion dollars make, you whole I guess is, the question No really unlikely, we're we're looking at. Just what the market, dropped that we've seen, you know in this production, year somewhere around fifty to one hundred dollars. An acre in lost revenue potential you know a lot of times that's easily the, profit margin that farmers have figured in the beginning of the year and so, you know, we're back to the break even prices or below break even, in, some circumstances and so you know we want more markets, not less, and you know rather have trade than eight acknowledging that farmers Are are subject, to a whole lot, of variables, right from weather, to market prices to to take your pick How big a blip is this. For you Bryan Donkin, in your economic future it could it could dramatically change the look. Of rural America guy I mean this this. We've seen the six big commodities dropping value on an annualized basis twenty billion dollars since the trade war began that's twenty. Billion with a b a year that. We were forecast in agriculture to have a net income of sixty billion so you see what, that that means and so if this, continues on this is not, just potentially, damaging to my own? Personal economy but to the, economy of rural America Brian duck and, throws Hogson I guess what do you do you raise hogs. I, suppose and. And you grow. Soybeans in Illinois and Keith alverson are corn and soybean farmer, in South Dakota thanks you too appreciate your time thank God There was an economic report out from.

Facebook Keith Alverson Bryan Donkin United States President Trump Kimberly Adams Illinois South Dakota Marshall Genzer Mark Zuckerberg Bureau Of Labor Bryan Duncan Nancy Marshall European Union Seth Carpenter China Richard Greenfield CEO UBS Consultant
Thrilling World Cup gets fitting finale as France end Croatia's dream run

Morning Edition

02:46 min | 3 years ago

Thrilling World Cup gets fitting finale as France end Croatia's dream run

"Wnyc in new york good morning i'm richard hake it's eight oh four seventy eight degrees sunny skies expect a hot day today highs near eighty nine degrees with high humidity and a twenty percent chance of afternoon showers and thunderstorms nearly two dozen tenants in a kushner companies owned building in brooklyn are suing for what they say is systemic harassment wnyc shawn carlson has more the nineteen plaintiffs say kushner companies used a deliberate campaign of harassment and dangerous construction practices to push them out of their rent stabilized apartments they say the company would then convert those units to luxury condos and bring in high paying buyers and associated press investigation found almost seventy five percent of the building was emptied or sold within three years totaling more than one hundred and fifty five million dollars in sales so far kushner companies was run for much of that time by current presidential adviser jared kushner the ten million dollar lawsuit was announced by the advocacy group housing rights initiative and brooklyn borough president eric adams governor cuomo's urging federal officials to renew a policy allowing food stamp recipients to use their benefits at local farmer's markets cuomo wrote to the us secretary of agriculture last week to express concern he says the federal government notified the state because of technology change recipients of the supplemental nutritional assistance program will no longer be able to use their benefits at farmers markets jury deliberations resume today in the trial of former new york state senate majority leader dean skeleton his son wnyc's fred mogul reports the jury began deliberating friday morning shortly before adjourning in the afternoon they requested hundreds of pages of trial testimony and the transcript of a wiretapped conversation between the senior scholars and then nassau county executive tom and gano about the county contractor adam skeletons worked for this is the second trial of the father and son an earlier conviction was vacated after the us supreme court narrowed the scope of what constitutes an illegal quid pro quo the high court said a public social must do more than a range of meeting or make a call on someone's behalf in order for it to be bribery prosecutors alleged scholars pledged to support legislation that would benefit adam skeletons employer the two skeletons denied the charges cheers and groans erupted around new york yesterday as france defeated croatia in the men's world cup finals immigrants visitors and families from both countries were on the edges of their seat until france pulled away and never looked back paris native damian shinno came to steal day festivities on the upper east side to celebrate to see so many french people also in the street here it makes me prophecy that france's everywhere away and i feel very proud about that over in croatia story a croatian americans were disappointed but also bursting with pride here's mario peru ch.

New York Paris Bribery Adam Gano Executive Nassau County Fred Mogul Senate Eric Adams Jared Kushner Richard Hake Damian Shinno Croatia France United States Wnyc
"senior scholar" Discussed on The Brookings Cafeteria

The Brookings Cafeteria

01:55 min | 3 years ago

"senior scholar" Discussed on The Brookings Cafeteria

"My name is jenny shuts david m rubenstein fellow in the metropolitan policy program here at brookings i grew up in blacksburg virginia which is a small college town in the southwest part of the state and it's a little bit of an odd place to grow up if you become an urban economist because there are only fifteen thousand people in my hometown i was inspired to become a scholar probably by two things one is finding ideas and topic areas that i'm really passionate about i want to study and the other was having great mentors all the way through my career so if you want to be a researcher scholar for your career you need to find something you really care about an interested in research can be a little bit of a solitary exercise spend a lot of time by yourself with your data and your computer so i took a class in graduate school where i learned about a core theory of urban economics called the motto centric city model that explains how land values vary within cities and to me this was like the light on the road to damascus that this just explained how cities form and where people build and where we have tall buildings and short buildings and i found this so exciting that i thought i wanna spend the rest of my life studying spatial patterns of cities it was also really helpful to have great mentors and teachers at every stage of my career so for my undergraduate thesis adviser through jobs in graduate school research is really a craft that you learn as an apprenticeship and so working with a senior scholar who teaches you how to do research how to break down the process and how to work through a topic so it's a one on one learning experience and having the right person to guide you encourage you and support you the hallway is really important the most important issue that we're facing is the increasing barriers to economic opportunity for lots of american families so we know for instance that the zip code that you're born in and grow up in is very predictive of things like how much schooling you get and your future career and income even things like your health.

virginia senior scholar jenny david m rubenstein blacksburg researcher damascus
"senior scholar" Discussed on Le Show

Le Show

01:49 min | 3 years ago

"senior scholar" Discussed on Le Show

"Said uh suzzie singler of that organization you as cattlefarmers are massively osy overusing antibiotics nearly threequarters of the total use of antibiotics worldwide is thought to be on animals rather than humans raising serious questions over intensive farming and the potential effects on antibiotic resistance why do they use so many antibiotics on animals in agriculture because they're in modern agriculture day crammed them so close together that if they didn't you dosing with antibiotics disease would spread like crazy the c l told they use antibiotics on certain farm animals because it helps phantom up quicker we want fat animals quicker don't you really don't you the contrast between the us and uk in antibiotic use in livestock is in part owing to the effect of british farming organisations and retailers to cut the use of such medicines the move to do so as picked up pace in recent years as these capabilities scale of the superbug crisis has become clearer ed as well as the scape and the goats and now it is jutland we're not number one yes it's true still again the united states has dropped to twelve th place in countries with best patent systems you're crying already archer us is tied for twelve th place in a chamber of commerce ranking of countries patent system strength law professor and senior scholar at george mason university adam off told the axis website the us has a serious systematic problem in our patent system and he patented that statement.

united states professor senior scholar george mason university threequarters
"senior scholar" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:59 min | 3 years ago

"senior scholar" Discussed on KQED Radio

"And going playful about sex love is dancing very rigidly laughing with channelled friends and playing some species with kits it only happens pragmatism when you're capable of reproducing mature love one of of the longstanding things about humans with committed our huge partners brains and are huge social fill out systems here is that selflove we go about herself the compassion process of and most affiliation radical of all and attachment a gop a and bonding selfless and sex compassionate in really complex love for social everyone ways and which i we think use we would all like to see sexuality more of in the world for purposes so let of me affiliation introduce paulsen and use together affiliation with our next for the guest purposes jeff of made schloss david sloan wilson okay picture this signor at the beach the current is strong in fact you know the riptide could suck you read out to sea and then you see a kid out there are screaming and there is no one else around you are the only one who could possibly saving but you don't even know if you could so what do you do well we know that some people will take extraordinary risks to help total strangers the question is why and for scientists this poses a real challenge for any theory of altruism dean there is no evolutionary reason why i should swim out to try to rescue that kid at least i don't think there is so can science explain why we want to help other people and to get back to our theme for this show are these acts of hashim also experiences of love well lucky for us we have to distinguish guests here to help us sort out these thorny questions both our evolutionary biologists jeff schloss is a senior scholar at the bile logos foundation and david sloan wilson is president of the evolution institute welcome both of you sure.

gop hashim jeff schloss senior scholar bile logos foundation david sloan wilson president paulsen
"senior scholar" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

KDWN 720AM

01:51 min | 3 years ago

"senior scholar" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

"Have gotten sick woods norovirus before the opening ceremony more than forty security guards have fallen ill with the stomach bug according to the washington post in an effort to stop the spread of the virus more the 1200 people have been quarantined while they're tested for the disease according to the post it is a highly contagious stomach virus that causes diarrhea and vomiting is notorious for spreading easily in closequarter events such as olympic village and this will be deportable lifestyle it's we've seen this on cruise ships we've seen it at conventions and it's because when you vomit if people have their hands are they touch something that might have been touched by somebody's vomit or they don't clean up there but very well you could very easily pick up norovirus of spreads very easily dancer amish other legia a senior scholar at the john hopkins center for how security baltimore term life science that people vomiting places the normally would it so that virus particles could be spread to areas and allow people to touch and these particles can survive for days outside the body they say coming into contact with as few as eighteen norovirus particle can make a person ill according to the cdc and then once infected then you could turn around and shed billions of these particles because that's a viruses work viruses make your body turnaround and make more of them so you know so countering organization committee is investigating the source of the virus and how it spread across the washington post we do not believe this is an act of terrorism the security guards who fell ill were all staying at a youth center in the mountains near punching according to the washington post so that's not good you know fair lease south korean authorities have deployed nine hundred military personnel see i wanted to see the.

diarrhea senior scholar john hopkins center cdc washington post vomiting baltimore
"senior scholar" Discussed on KBNP AM 1410

KBNP AM 1410

01:47 min | 3 years ago

"senior scholar" Discussed on KBNP AM 1410

"The probe was politicized said his office was marginalized by democrats know going to get into this further little later on but essentially you had people from his high as senator dianne feinstein intimidating this man they can put whatever spin they won on it dino tatum we are concentrated deadly when you harass and obama appointee as if somehow he's a rightwing schill just because the evidence he's disclosing is not to your liking f you already in the uh famous immortal words of richer prior have a coke in a smile and shut the f thought unbelievable they'll just go ahead an openly intimidate public officials because the coming up with findings not to their liking and it we have assisting us in the opining an average analyzing right now gw very expert with a regulatory transparency project he is also a senior scholar at the mercatus center working group on financial markets where he regularly briefs members of congress and the staff on financial regulation issues he is also a former house financial services committee senior counsel gwb eric good to have you on board how are you today good to be here i'm doing well i'm doing well you're joining us on the issue of the consumer financial protection bureau structure and the constitutionality of the law that apparently choirs everyone sit down and shut up whenever an outgoing director lease because which is supposed to swallow whomever he or she respectively chooses now the reason i bring this up is because there is a bit of a war going on in this regard hard concerning that matter and well i'm i'm just i'm just curious we have to say about a by the way folks is concerning the consumer financial.

dianne feinstein senior scholar mercatus center financial markets congress senator obama eric good director
"senior scholar" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:19 min | 3 years ago

"senior scholar" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Yeah the song says in parks how should i address you you came from afar to our meow ethnic village how should i address you you came to my house despite the wind and the rain i am in your heart and you are in mind you love us and we love you deeply professor zhao there seems to be something of a cult of personnel the around president she is that the way that he likes it in that kind of the apparent keating had tried to appeal to hey it's a person no authority in fact i think that has been very effective in chinese politics for many years eaters parenthood ian announced century because in many county innocuous and eats mind as uh looking pie a senior scholar pathway heat and that uh there at the authority crises in a chinese the uh society politics because many people in china thirty those in need todd why cannot be chemical week why china declined in a modern ears because there was not a strong leader strong authority so all the revolution uh all those other nationalist movement have applied to build a strong leader a strong authority that what we saw them all day tome we thought and galloping now we see uh he deemed ping so he di mi has took it nevada age all put these pat up the political uh car all political thing king in a chinese society to build 'have person no authority given liquor personal cowed and i think a lot of people have bought into a dad although some people have being very and now on constable aren't you the about they've but that how he did and even hake upholding naika bush delight he did a same thing tried.

professor keating china todd zhao president senior scholar nevada naika bush
"senior scholar" Discussed on 1A

1A

01:59 min | 3 years ago

"senior scholar" Discussed on 1A

"So because they actually tends to have different views and on why international relations operates the way does when there are problems i think it actually speaks volumes in terms of how they actually have to come together and talk about their differences and hep dialogue professor zhao there seems to be something of a cult of personality around president she is that the way that he likes it in that kind of the apparently she didn't have tried to appeal to haza person no authority in fact i think that has been very effective in a chinese politics for many years past o'day in an odd friendship because in mandate konica you naturalist on eat mind whom pi a senior scholar pathway heat and fat there are at the authority crises in chinese society credit politics because many people in china spare thirty those in need todd why cannot be chemical week why china declined in a modern ears because there was not a strong leader strong authority so all the revolution all those are nationalist movement have applied to build a strong leader a strong authority that what we saw more they don't we thought and galloping now we see he deemed ping so he didn't have took bondage all put these padded up the political karcher all political thinking in a chinese society to build 'have person no authority given that personal cowed and i think a lot of people have a body into a dad although some people have being very comfortable uneasy about these.

professor zhao president o'day china todd senior scholar
"senior scholar" Discussed on The Business Builders Show with Marty Wolff

The Business Builders Show with Marty Wolff

01:54 min | 3 years ago

"senior scholar" Discussed on The Business Builders Show with Marty Wolff

"Good morning good day i'm going to do an introduction and it's it's it's going to be too short but as we go through this discussion you'll learn more about chuck you'll learn about his great work so let me do this brief introduction chuck towns is a senior scholar at the institute for policy studies where he directs the program on inequality in chuck coal edits inequality dot org we're going to mention that website several times by the way in equality dot org chuck's newest book is born on third base a one percent or makes the case for tackling inequality bringing wealth home in committing to the common good by the way the first time i heard chuck was on npr and that's probably year and a half ago already chuck in i bought his book born on third base in he was on of the business builders show before because i loved his book and i love his work showed a set this up a little more chuck sent me a little while ago a paper that he wrote that i loved the paper is titled reversing inequality unleashing the transformative potential equitable economy chuck we got a lot to talk about and i'm going to say rise the beginning we're not going to get this only when shells show you want to subscribe to the business builders show so that you can get the next show so for chuck forgive me for this long introduction putt we're going to get to the meat hang on their okay audience and trucking at show the paper again that you can find on inequality dot org is reversing inequality in the first one of the first parts in the introduction i'm gonna read this section this paragraph because i'm going to set up our discussion i believe.

chuck senior scholar npr one percent
"senior scholar" Discussed on KSFO-AM

KSFO-AM

02:05 min | 4 years ago

"senior scholar" Discussed on KSFO-AM

"We discussed this in previous to you and i discussing it but it seemed timed if the middle class has money it's pocket everybody kind of wins that's that's a nutshell kind of robert rice argument and i'm wondering lake are you worried that the one percent as just as a term is at becoming a pejorative and almost you know i understand if people recoil from that phrase the one percent but it's a simple statement of fat you know and and actually we could probably saved the top one tenth of one percent is where the huge alliance share of income and wealth gains have gone in the last ten years and the higher up you go the more concentrated the wealth so they shouldn't be a pejorative it's a statement of the situation that our society is in so people still argue oh we should worry about this this is the price you pay to live in a dynamic robust market economy i would say the opposite if we don't address these qualities it is going to undermine the health of our economy for the reason you mentioned you know if we have a shrinking middleclass that leads to a decline in aggregate demand spending power by the middle class is what is the real driver of the economy and when asked the population which is the sister statistic half the population has not seeing their real wages go up in forty years wages have been stagnant for a huge number of people that a lot of people being left out of being consumers spenders and dusters and stimulating a healthy economy that was chuck collins chuck is a senior scholar at the institute for policy studies and he directs ip ss program on inequality and the common good his new book is born on third base a one percent or makes the case were tackling inequality bringing wealth home and committing to the common good coming up next his part two of my chat with mr collins where we dig into the solutions for what most people see as a major societal challenge income inequality i'm jason middleton this is tech onomic please come on bath.

senior scholar mr collins jason middleton robert rice chuck collins one percent forty years ten years
"senior scholar" Discussed on KSFO-AM

KSFO-AM

01:43 min | 4 years ago

"senior scholar" Discussed on KSFO-AM

"Years of oh like us on facebook at five six the key is evil and stay up to date on the latest events talk radio 560 key is khan inequality for the united states it's become a benchmark political issue but income inequality touches so much more the politics this week on technomic host jason middleton does a deep dive within income inequality scholar author and top one presenter how does inequality stifle climate change discussions or how does that locker nation's youth into a future defined solely by their economic status at birth that more is now income inequality it's not just for bernie sanders fans anymore and here's why the data are literally staggering when it comes to the disparity of wealth in the united states in income disparities have become so pronounced that america's top ten percent now average nearly nine times as much income as the bottom ninety percent americans in the top 1 percent tower stunningly higher they average over thirty eight times more income than the bottom ninety percent this this week we have chuck collins he's an author a researcher and extent a crusader against income inequality his rather unique position is however that he was born into the one percent now he's working on convincing folks like him to address this socially crippling issue here's our check malan and senior scholar at the institute for policy studies which calls entity i was prepping for this interview and i had a little trepidation coming at this because not just your book of course in your work you've been doing on income inequality but this.

facebook united states jason middleton america researcher malan senior scholar climate change bernie sanders chuck collins ninety percent one percent ten percent 1 percent
"senior scholar" Discussed on WCHS

WCHS

02:13 min | 4 years ago

"senior scholar" Discussed on WCHS

"Nature news talk line with hoppy kercheval is presented by him bb bank your most valuable bank member at the icu come to think of it i don't know and i have been in all the bathrooms accountable but i i dunno i can't think of any bathroom that is ada complied maybe there are some i dunno and there are a lot of folks not a handicapped people who are in the capital which when i'm there but the website of session and i'm i mean i get to specific but of the bathrooms that i consistently access i can't think any of well known it might not there might be one i can think of but i also do what customers comply at these days sought upi how 'bout putty gate text opulent flush gate textile carmichael but the governor raza point one hundred grand prix bathroom holy cow i could build a house run aground well that doesn't like a lot and i it right now we're just at the governor said this carmichael said this and i'm we gotta find out more we just have to find out more about the bathrooms which ones are public which ones are private how much of the zachary is costing of wides costing that much so we're we're just starting to unravelled us and i'm staying away from all the puns that are inevitable please welcome to our show let me check something you're having a second because he has a new title always is called them the sheriff rob k part nothing's going to new titles will hung on a second senior scholar at the public policy foundation of west virginia former president west liberty and also the sheriff because there is a former tax collector of the state of west virginia wants your finger you get more him up you want to weigh in on flush gate probably not now now now now this is this i i act a number of restaurants of the capitol i don't recall any of them being 88 why your business news channel cnbc released its ratings of the top states for business for this year placing west virginia at the bottom lewis amounts date ranked fifty for the first time and cnbc's eleven year ranking system across ten different categories west virginia ranked worst and.

carmichael senior scholar president west virginia cnbc ada zachary rob k lewis eleven year