19 Burst results for "Senior Research Scientist"

"senior research scientist" Discussed on Short Wave

Short Wave

02:25 min | 6 months ago

"senior research scientist" Discussed on Short Wave

"You're listening to shortwave. From NPR. Hey, shortwaves, Emily quang here. We're picking up our conversation with Liza Fuentes, a senior research scientist at the gut mocker institute. Go back and listen to part one if you missed it. Where we discussed how abortion fits into healthcare and public health. In part two, we're going to discuss what that actually looks like in practice. A practice that's likely to shift in communities across the U.S.. Depending on the outcome of a Supreme Court case, Dobbs versus Jackson women's health organization. It deals with the Mississippi law that shortened the window for abortion from 20 weeks to 15. The Jackson clinic is the only abortion provider in the state. And currently, under the 1973 ruling known as roe V wade, women are guaranteed the right to have an abortion up until fetal viability. The time when a fetus can survive outside the womb, which and if the court upholds the 15 week Mississippi abortion ban, it erodes the constitutional right to abortion that was established by roe. Then each state would decide for itself how to regulate abortion access. Liza says this would have an immediate impact on families throughout the U.S.. The ability to decide if when and how to have a child is integral to people being able to have not just realized their health, but that of their families, right? A denied abortion at the very least could be economically devastating for a family that's already struggling to make ends meet, Liza's conclusion is supported by research. A 5 year study led by doctor Diana Greene foster called the turnaway study. Track the health and economic outcomes of nearly 1000 women who saw it and were denied abortions. People who become pregnant and are unable to get a safe legal abortion in their state, those that carry the pregnancy to term will experience long-term physical health and economic harm. Today on the show, the reality of what it means to treat abortion as healthcare. And how those states moving toward stricter abortion laws invest the least in women and children's health. You're listening to.

Emily quang Liza Fuentes gut mocker institute Jackson women's health organiz Jackson clinic roe V wade Mississippi NPR Dobbs Liza U.S. Supreme Court Diana Greene foster
"senior research scientist" Discussed on Short Wave

Short Wave

08:23 min | 6 months ago

"senior research scientist" Discussed on Short Wave

"Trigger laws. Laws that would go into effect soon after the Supreme Court decision and would severely restrict most abortions. Establishing near total bans or bans after 6 weeks of gestation. In the earliest, a lot of people know they're pregnant is around four weeks. You can ban abortion of people still get abortions that is important to know that people will be denied care and that that will put their health at risk. Liza Fuentes is a senior research scientist at the gut mocker institute. A research organization that focuses on sexual and reproductive health and supports abortion rights. As a researcher, Liza says access to a safe abortion is healthcare and protecting that access is protecting public health. Public health is a broader practice that ensures the health of communities. So what goes into public health isn't just collecting data and looking at risk factors, but partnering with communities and looking at broader priorities in communities to promote health. Within any community in the U.S., a lot of different types of people seek abortion care. 60% of people obtaining abortion care are already mothers. Three quarters of people obtaining abortion live with low incomes or below the poverty line, 61% of people obtaining abortion care women of color, one in four abortion patients identify as Catholic, about half of people who get an abortion are in their 20s. And in the U.S., according to the gut mocha institute, about one in four women will obtain an abortion by the time they're 45. That number changes by country for sure. But certainly there's no country on this planet where people who are pregnant do not require the ability to terminate a pregnancy when they no longer want to be pregnant. Given how common abortion is worldwide, it's striking how seldom our society talks about it. When statistically speaking, everyone knows someone who has had one. To lose access to this procedure, not only impacts an individual, but their family and community too. If a person is forced to take on the risks of pregnancy when they didn't want to, and they become sick or even die, that affects their children's health and well-being. It affects their partners health and well-being. And frankly, it affects the whole community when a person dies before their time because they couldn't get the care that they needed. Today on the show, the intersection of abortion and public health. How abortion fits into healthcare and the safety of pregnant people. This is part one of our discussion with Liza, in part two, we'll talk about what it looks like in practice for health agencies to treat abortion as a matter of public health. I'm Emily kwang, thanks for listening to shortwave. The daily science podcast from NPR. Support for NPR and the following message come from thorns collagen plus, which combines clinically studied ingredients such as collagen peptides, nicotinamide riboside, and botanical extracts for promoting beauty from within, using one scoop, collagen plus is designed to combat the visible signs of aging by reducing fine lines and wrinkles and promoting vibrant and smooth skin. Get 10% off your first order at Thorne dot com slash U slash NPR. Public health is the practice of ensuring the health and well-being of communities. That's done through data collection, but also a lot of on the ground work, partnering with community groups, and really thinking about what policies lead to the best health outcomes. For the population you're trying to serve. So in the case of abortion, the question becomes, how do we protect the health of a pregnant person? For Liza, it means looking at abortion as part of family planning. Family planning is the ability to decide if when and how to become pregnant, to parent, more specifically, more traditionally family planning refers to contraceptive services. So ensuring that anyone who can become pregnant is able to use contraceptives that meet their needs so that they can delay or plan for pregnancy when the timing is right for them. And abortion fits into family planning because it's an essential component of being able to decide if someone wants to continue to be pregnant and abortion is also critical for ensuring that people can avoid the adverse health effects of an unintended pregnancy or in some cases pregnancies where people develop conditions that threaten their life or health. From where you sit, why is abortion access a public health issue, doctor Fuentes? Abortion is a public health issue for a few reasons. First, like I said, abortions just a central and essential component of the full range of sexual reproductive health, care that everybody needs to be able to live a healthy life at every phase in their life. And then if someone does become pregnant, they need to be able to decide if they want to continue that pregnancy. People may think that contraceptives that are used before someone becomes pregnant could be a solution, for example, to abortion, but they're not half of people seeking abortion care report. Using a contraceptive in the month they became pregnant. Have half, yes. Wow. Yeah. And that doesn't depend on the contraceptives don't work. We're talking about people seeking abortion care. The vast majority of people using contraceptive care are not seeking abortions in the next month, but contraceptives are not a 100% foolproof, not even sterilization. And sterilization, what do you mean by that? Somebody could have a tubal ligation or a vasectomy and it can fail. Even that can fail. Right? It's not common, but if it does, abortion needs to be part of the options for somebody. In public health, we want to make sure people have the resources to make the best choices where they're at. This is public health thinking in action. It's this move where individual health is woven into the Tapestry of the broader community. And in thinking on the community level, lies a considers abortion and issue of racial and economic justice too. That's because most people who seek an abortion are low income, almost half live below the poverty line. So any policies designed to deny, delay or impede abortion access will affect those groups disproportionately because why attempts to restrict or deny abortion care can often be overcome by people if they simply have the money and the means to do so. So people can travel out of state to avoid an abortion restriction, but for people who are struggling to make ends meet who are disproportionately likely to be low income or uninsured, which are black and brown women in this country, they are more likely to experience the delays, the denial of abortion care and the harms that go along with it. States seek to restrict and ban abortion are the least likely to offer the social supports that people need to be able to raise children. They rank among the highest states for maternal mortality and infant mortality and finally abortion is a public health issue because it's a human right. And human rights frameworks and social justice frameworks really undergird the scientific practice of public health because our goal is not simply to observe and produce knowledge, but channel it towards eliminating health inequities and ensuring that everyone has the chance to be healthy in the community where they live. Since this leak, a lot of people, for maybe the first time in their lives, because of how long roe V wade has been around are wondering what it's removal would mean for pregnant people in the U.S.. If that were to happen, how do you think it would affect those who.

Liza Liza Fuentes gut mocker institute gut mocha institute Emily kwang NPR U.S. Supreme Court Fuentes roe V wade
"senior research scientist" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

02:09 min | 6 months ago

"senior research scientist" Discussed on WTOP

"Automatic emergency braking systems have been getting great test scores from the insurance institute for highway safety That's never a good thing Our current test beats of 12 and 25 mph are too low They don't really represent that many crashes reported to police Senior research scientist David Kidd says the test speed will go up to 35 to 45 mph they'll also change some of the target vehicles We found that in fatal rear end crashes people are hitting motorcycles and hitting heavy trucks or medium sized trucks pretty often so it's important for us to understand how well a B performers when faced with other vehicle types The results of the first new test should be out this summer With the core chronicles I'm Jeff Gilbert CBS News Sports at 15 and 45 on WTO P One 45 Friday morning may 20th glad you're with necessarily our Sports time here's Steve Dresden We'll start with golf first round completed at the PGA Championship at southern hills located in Tulsa Oklahoma Rory McIlroy atop the leaderboard he fired a first round 5 under par 65 will sell a tourist Tom hoagie one stroke behind Matt kuchar Justin Thomas and Abraham answer just two strokes off the lead As first Tiger Woods is concerned a lesson impressive first round he shot a four over par 74 for Tiger Woods he had 5 of his 7 bogeys on the front 9 Over to the NBA playoffs they Eastern Conference Finals another blowout Celtics put out the heat one 27 and one O two Boston's Jayson Tatum with 27 points Marcus smart Jalen Brown each head 24 this series is tied at one apiece Stanley Cup playoffs the lightning down the Panthers two to one Tampa Bay coming up with a game winning goal which is 3.8 seconds left in regulation the lightning now lead this series two games to none And in women's college lacrosse Maryland's lippy may had 5 goals to lead the number two terps over Florida 18 to 5 on Thursday.

David Kidd Jeff Gilbert insurance institute for highwa Steve Dresden Tom hoagie Justin Thomas Tiger Woods southern hills Rory McIlroy Matt kuchar WTO CBS PGA Jayson Tatum Tulsa Jalen Brown Oklahoma golf
"senior research scientist" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:15 min | 11 months ago

"senior research scientist" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Department of correction He's now a senior research scientist at the Columbia justice lab And since you're already thank you so much for talking with us and sharing your expertise Thanks again for having me on You're listening to NPR news Thanks to the Macron variant Canada is recording COVID-19 case numbers many times higher than in any other point in the pandemic Demand for testing has so overwhelmed capacity in some parts of the country reporter Emma Jacobs tells us that some provinces have stopped offering laboratory testing to the general public Every day Olivier Rouen gets questions from other parents trying to figure out the province of Quebec's latest policies for COVID-19 isolation or testing Yes Every day In real time He's not a doctor He's just a dad of two teenage daughters who created a website back in 2020 to track COVID cases in schools It got popular so people come to him for advice In recent weeks he's getting asked a lot about how to get at home rapid tests Families are not able to get tests right now I would say inequity or disadvantage in terms of people with low income families can not get access to them People with high income purchase them on the Internet at the high price and even those are sold out And lab tests are no longer an option for most The Quebec government announced this week it will reserve PCR testing for people with symptoms who are at high risk or in high risk settings like hospitals and nursing homes Ontario's chief medical officer of health doctor Kieran Moore delivered a similar announcement last week about PCR tests This is a finite capacity of I don't think anywhere in the world expected the transmissibility of home acron And we have to use that finite capacity to best protect Ontario Both provinces have said individuals with symptoms who can't get tested should assume their positive and self isolate along with the rest of their household Epidemiologist doctor Katherine hankins co chairs a task force of researchers and public health professionals advising Canada's federal and provincial governments She says it makes sense to limit PCR testing amid a global shortage in supplies But she notes another problem Many provinces have been unable to provide people with enough rapid tests They were not deploying them And so when it came time to do so and to do so rapidly they didn't necessarily have in place mechanisms to make them available to people quickly Canadian federal ministers say deliveries of rapid tests to provinces will ramp up this month enough for everyone to take one a week But without general laboratory testing hankin says health officials will need other ways to assess progress in containing the virus We need to be thinking about what are the indicators to track as well as putting in place other layers of protection in settings like schools She's a big fan of N95 masks Some of the people who I was giving Christmas presents for got a box of these Already all the creator of the Quebec school case tracking website has added a section for people to self report rapid tests The provincial government plans to launch a platform next week However juran says many parents are still anxious about the shift to rapid tests whether they'll be accepted by employers and insurers And even whether they'll get enough tests People want to do the right thing They want to be good citizens They want to know if what they're doing is going to help prevent contamination to their family members colleagues neighbors But there's a lot of confusion right now he says amid so many changes And so more questions in his inbox For NPR news I'm Emma Jacobs in Montreal The right to keep and bear arms It's the constitution's.

Columbia justice lab Emma Jacobs Olivier Rouen COVID Quebec government Department of correction Kieran Moore Katherine hankins NPR Ontario Canada Quebec hankin Quebec school juran NPR news confusion Montreal
"senior research scientist" Discussed on But Why: A Podcast for Curious Kids

But Why: A Podcast for Curious Kids

04:08 min | 1 year ago

"senior research scientist" Discussed on But Why: A Podcast for Curious Kids

"Lindholm and on this show. We explore things you tell us you want to know more about you. Send us questions. And it's the job of me and melody debt to search out answers. Today we're going to explore a part of the world that not much is known about in fact you could be one of the people who helps us understand and learn more about this very important and very very large part of the earth as you grow. Older one of the reasons not much is known about this. Vast part of our planet is because it's really hard to explore their. You need a lot of special equipment and technology and it all needs to be waterproof. Have you guessed what i'm talking about yet. It's the ocean specifically the bottom of the ocean. The sea floor. The land underneath the ocean is as varied an interesting as the terrain up on dry land with mountains and canyons plains and forests. That's right forests. There are kelp forests where the kelp a type of seaweed is as much as one hundred fifty feet tall. So today we're going to explore what's known about the bottom of the ocean and we're going to pay special attention to what's not yet known with two people whose job it is to discover more other one jay phillips on the director of the nippon foundation jebco seabed twenty thirty project very long name. We normally call it seabed. Twenty thirty for short. My name is vicky farini. I am a senior research scientist at columbia university. And i lead one of the regional centers for the seabed twenty thirty project and what is seabed. Twenty thirty seebeck. Twenty thirty is a global. Collaboration designed to map our sea bed or ocean floor by the year. Twenty thirty the project got started because as jamie mcmichael phillips told me. We really don't know much about what it looks like on the bottom of the ocean hardly anything. The ocean size is about three hundred and sixty two million square kilometers and to date we have mapped nearly twenty percent of the world's ocean.

Lindholm jay phillips nippon foundation vicky farini seebeck jamie mcmichael phillips columbia university
"senior research scientist" Discussed on The AI Podcast

The AI Podcast

04:35 min | 1 year ago

"senior research scientist" Discussed on The AI Podcast

"Do. And so i was just going to ask this kind of forgive me for my own understanding of it but is that why it's easier from video because you have so much data you know somebody frames that you can extrapolate data points from two to create those multiple perspectives. Right wait for wide. Wiry nigel correspondence. Because you have many frames and it's easy to track the same point using many techniques like your floor or something else but actually we also need image level correspondence which means for different human or different bird. We also want to know what his correspondence and then our model can generalize to category. And that's actually more easy. Oh more generalize to facilitate a large variety off animals vicious to be reconstructed for cool. We're speaking today with seafarer. Lucy fe is a senior research scientist at nvidia research. And we're talking about a project that she's been involved with for a while now called online adaptation for consistent mesh reconstruction in the wild Taking two d images and video streams and creating three d representations three meshes from them and so in the wild. You mentioned it's Animals birds exclusively that. You're working with. Yes so a burden is actually very typical animal. That people like to work on. So the special thing about bird is that he can always easily deformed for mafia but but actually in our work also extended to some adam. Animals lexi bri. If you check the national around yeah yeah. So i will go. is we. Hope to like empower each and applied to more endangered species which should be very like help for for those kind of researches. Iran in like researching endangered vicious dotted in terms of creating representations of how these species behave in the wild or just being able to spot them. Or what's the application with endangered species so for example for sweetie. The matchel is very hard to even oakton. They're like sweetie shape or three d shaped template from those fishes as that will. The reconstruction will at least the benefit to help the researchers in that area in learning the endangered species to build up a physical model and at live that will help to establish their research On cop out that got it. Let's shift gears for a second and talk about your background if we could. You mentioned you know having a kind of a standing interest in unsupervised learning But tobacco up a little bit more. How did you get into working with a and deep learning and even sort of computer science and the broader field to begin with. Okay yeah and from china and actually go to university like sixteen years ago. My orange major is automation. And at that time i think is not that popular and the for the nation. People usually study the control signs that or like digital media processing face recognition. Those kind of directions. Still one branch in the automation. So usually in the year of our like undergraduate we are allowed to explore our preferred branch off contra science nation while i actually find myself particularly interesting digital image processing you know like goes like preferred to aditya theses images also faints and at that time those kind of tours are not so powerful so basically from there was trying to find internships and i was lucky enough to be immediate by the cassia. Which is the top institute in china. In back i and also like digital image processing or all kinds of things so that i think that's the start. I begin to do the research. Ns actually fourteen years ago. Okay and so How and when did you wind up joining nvidia. So it was four years ago. I was i a intern student. There and then. I joined as a full-time..

Wiry nigel Lucy fe nvidia research lexi bri oakton adam Iran china nvidia
"senior research scientist" Discussed on The AI Podcast

The AI Podcast

05:22 min | 1 year ago

"senior research scientist" Discussed on The AI Podcast

"The invidia a. i. Podcast i'm your host noah kravitz. Today were staying inside the house so to speak and speaking with one of invidia researches senior research scientists about some ongoing work that she and her colleagues are doing see fay lu is a senior research scientist at invidia and she's here to talk about Some research that has been presented several places. It's out in the wild. One of the places was it. In europe's last year and the project is called online adaptation for consistent mesh reconstruction in the wild. It involves two d and three d. And of course a and i'm gonna stop there because see phase here and she obviously knows a lot more about the work than i do so see fay lu welcome thank you so much for taking the time to join the invidia air pike and so Upfront mentioned that. You're one of several Co-authors on the slide. That i'm looking at so we'll make sure you get a chance to credit. Everybody involved but for now we're asking you to talk about the project. What is online adaptation for consistent mesh reconstruction in the wild. Yeah so i think this is a like watery ongoing challenges for three d. reconstruction for example. Imagine that you have a animal. Your pets like cats and.

fay lu noah kravitz invidia europe
"senior research scientist" Discussed on Talk Radio 1190 KFXR

Talk Radio 1190 KFXR

06:10 min | 1 year ago

"senior research scientist" Discussed on Talk Radio 1190 KFXR

"The mix and Stephanie San F PhD We are broadcasting live from Dallas, Texas and I heart media as well as Southern California on ABC News Talk on K M E T. Stephanie, son of she's an amazing woman. She is a senior research scientist at MIT Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory. She has a bachelor's bachelor's degree in biology with a minor and food and nutrition and a master's degree engineer's degree and PhD in electrical engineering. And computer science, all from MIT. She has authored over three dozen peer reviewed journal papers on topics relating human disease to nutritional deficiencies and toxic exposures, focusing specifically on the herbicide glyphosate and the mineral sulfur. Dr. Sun Up is the author of the book Taxus Toxic. Legacy How the weedkiller glyphosate is destroying our health and the environment. The book that we are discussing today you can find Dr Senneff at Stephanie Sun if and that's on Twitter and on Facebook at Stephanie dot senate 0.0.5 Such an honor and a pleasure to have you back. How are you doing today? Dr San? If I'm doing great. Thank you for having me always a pleasure. Always a pleasure. I'm so I'm so thrilled to continue our conversation about this. So glyphosate was first patented in 1961 by the staffer Chemical Company as a key leading agent to strip mineral deposits off of pipes. Were there any policies in place at that time? Dr San F to test for potentially harmful ingredients. Well, No, I don't think at that time they were even thinking about it, Um, being toxic cause they weren't thinking of exposure to humans, so they there was no clue. Mhm. Well. So so and so in an N 1968 it was patented by Monsanto is an agricultural herbicide. And so how did they know that this key leading agent would work as a pesticide? That's quite surprising, and it was really just by accident that someone happened. I think it was like spilled on some plants, and they died type of thing. It was one of these kind of like penicillin, where there was an accidental discovery. Then they thought. Oh, great. This maybe we can use this as an herbicide. Uh huh. Well, and were there any findings on the dangers of glyphosate, you know, and to to human health by that time? Or at that time. Not yet, but that's when of course, they started trying to find out whether it was okay for humans, and they did conduct some studies. And of course, they went through a process with the FDA. Her approval. And it's EPA for setting, you know, limits of exposure and those sorts of things. So those those processes went on over a period of years. It was then licensed to be used on, uh Are in agriculture in 19. 74 1974 was when it first started appear to appear in the public domain, and people could get it and use it on their yards as well, but it was being used in agriculture. And It was considered to be, uh, to have succeeded in flying colors that basically that's toxicity. Studies show that it was a wonderful chemical that was completely harmless to humans and devastating to all plants are basically kills all plants except for those That have been engineered to resist it. And that's what happened in the late 19 nineties. Was that came up with this GMO technology, and it was really after that time. That it started to become a serious problem, because before that, they weren't able to use it that much because it would kill the plant would kill profits. Hmm. Where's the process? Look like for FDA approval when it comes to a chemical like this, and has it changed over the years? Yeah, I mean, the process basically involves having the company that's producing the product be responsible for the toxicity tests, and that's kind of like having the Fox watch the henhouse because they don't they don't want it to become to be toxic. And they can design their experiments so as to live to hide the evidence. And this is exactly what they've done. In my opinion. Uh, you know, the studies are not done properly and particularly in the GMOs, for example, when they evaluate the GMOs for their toxicity. Remarkably, they didn't use glyphs on the plants that had the GMO gene that protected them from black. So obviously you're going to use black with it when you use it in the real world, but in evaluating whether the GMOs were safe They didn't put any guy for a seat on the plants, which is shocking. You know, that's just example. And then God state itself. They mix it up with formulations. And that surfactants and things that make it much, much more toxic to the planet. So it can kill Louise faster, And when they evaluated it, they evaluated it all by itself. They didn't put any of those things in there when they did the evaluation studies. The other issue was they didn't wait long enough. And this is an important thing for glad for that, because gradually slow kill, and they decided they made a rule. Oh, if you don't see any evidence of toxicity by three months. And that's great. You're good to go, you know and like states of slow kill doesn't start to show up until four months and that was found out in 2012 much later after had already been on the market for a long time. Sara Lee needed a really important study his team where they exposed rats to levels of glyphosate that were identical basically to the experiments that had been done previously to get the approval. And previously they've done it for three months. So they did it for the entire lifespan of the right of the Ratched. Low dose gripe. Is it three months? Everything's good. Four months you start to see trouble by the end of the experiment that the females have massive Memory tumors. There was kidney disease, liver disease, reproductive issues. Early death. Lots of things showed up, but it took time. What country uses the most. The United States uses by far I think the most purpose in weeks we consume 20% of the world's life is eight with 4% of the world's population. Wow. Wow! Wow. Wow. So Monsanto patented glyphosate again? I didn't I did not know this. So I read your book in 2000 to be used as an oral antibiotic. That seems absolutely just just crazy like it's like it's can't be true. Yeah, it was. That's true is bad, two dozen antimicrobial agent and they were arguing that it could be useful to control pathogens. A problem with that is that it actually kills the beneficial bacteria a lot better than it kills the pathogen. And that's been shown in studies. So there's lots of studies coming out now that are showing damage.

Sara Lee 2012 20% 1961 2000 4% EPA Dallas three months Twitter four months Facebook Monsanto MIT Four months today Stephanie dot senate Southern California FDA late 19 nineties
"senior research scientist" Discussed on One Life Radio Podcast

One Life Radio Podcast

08:11 min | 1 year ago

"senior research scientist" Discussed on One Life Radio Podcast

"Now right it's everywhere. Yes even in the air. There was a study out of brazil. That founded in nanoparticles in the air over the cultural fields. Where it's us but even in the city where there wasn't any agriculture they found life is in the nanoparticle in the air which is very disturbing because you have to breathe. You can't breathe. You can buy certified organic food and really greatly reduce your exposure. And i very much recommend people do that. I have gotten so much email from people. Who've said you know i i saw your stuff. I change to an organic diet. And i healed you. Know all these leases that people are coping with that are going away once they adopt a certified mechanic diet and it's remarkable. How many diseases are going up dramatically. We know that we have a healthcare crisis in this country. Healthcare costs out of sight. So many people are sick with various autoimmune diseases. And in my book. I explained liver disease autoimmune disease reproductive issues all these problems immune system disruption. I haven't on each of those things it's it's remarkable. And i explain exactly how i think this is happening with glyphosate. It is an amazing chemical. Very subtle and extremely. Talkative accumulates senior tissues and it causes additional damage over time as you accumulated very very difficult to get it out once it's in Yeah and i Read something yesterday out of cambridge university. That said that organic food is up to sixty nine percent higher in antioxidants than conventional food. And at the root of that as you as we're talking about is this You know the weed killer glyphosate and it's it is it's destroying our health and the environment and our food I was gonna say. I'm going to go to break. Is there anything you want to say about what i said. I know you you basically did. But it was just say that the that these foods that are being exposed to life is going to have an impact on their ability to produce molecules that they use to protect themselves and those those one when she was also protect us. These are polyphenyls and five annoys interpret. Noise these are very important. Nutrients that are found in plants that are that the past seat disrupts actually is needed to make those nutrients. Well you were talking about beasts. I i read something not recently so i'm having trouble recalling it but it was something just astounding like if the b.'s are destroyed. I think it's something like sixty percent of our food that we that we love will no longer be is too and i was shocked. I had no idea it was that big an impact. I know almonds. But i really didn't realize so. Many foods depend upon the bees. It's going to be really awful if we just lose all of these food choices because of the bees going away well talking about is the first step right and making people aware giving them the knowledge so that they can make good choices and stand up to this. I might add. We're going to go for a quick break. More coming up with dr stephanie son. If she is the author of the book toxic legacy we will be right back. You're listening to one life. Radio want to advertise on one life. Radio send us an email info at one life. Radio dot com. It's back to school time. And that means that you need to boost your immune defences with organic by the immune support. Bundle is a double pack of protection for your hardworking immune system. It's a holistic approach to wellness combining daily support with extra defenses. When you need them. Most often ganic vitamin cs zinc and adapted genyk superfoods. Give a nate immunity a helping hand for a limited time. Your immune support bundled will include an extra box of immunity a forty dollar value at no charge. That way you and your family can feel safer get yours by going to our gamified dot com. That's organic dot com ten years of positively on your radio this is one life radio Right everyone welcome back to one life. Radio this is bernadette with junior in the mix broadcasting live from dallas texas on iheart media as well as in southern california on. Abc news talk. We are continuing with dr stephanie. Saaf she is a senior research scientist at. Mit's computer science and artificial intelligence laboratory. She has five degrees from mit. I can't even believe that. Dr sun up. You have to be like the most intelligent human on the planet serious with all that education. Were you always that way when you work kid. Did you know when you were little that you were just like. I just can't even imagine having that brain. What what you would must have been like as a child and do it correct to you. There's only four degrees. So i thought that was fun. If you count the minor in nutrition. I guess we can call that the fifth one. So that's yes brain brainiac. Oh my life. I loved to read and i read. You know i read Rachel carson's book. When i when it first came out it was something like twelve years old and i just love to read and i really was kind of a nerdy brainiac type kid wonderful well and i really feel it's a A a special thing. That i have that i love to read and it's still true to this day and i read many articles and i love. Biology is so fascinating. And i hope that that comes through in my book because it does you can get bitten by the bug of biology. It can be a very gratifying experience to make it almost be a hobby for you to learn about biology about metabolism about immune system. These things are so fascinating. And we're really. The the research is very exciting right now. Because i think we're at the cusp of of a breakthrough at the highest level in the ideas of how how metabolism works and how chemicals disrupted. I think it's a very exciting time in biology right now absolutely and you know you you up. The book by rachel carson's silent spring. Y was that book so important just like yours. why was it so important. It was really very similar. I think there's quite a bit parallels there because ddat was pervasive in the environment. They thought it was great. It was controlling the mosquitoes. The mosquitoes were causing me. Malaria you know disease and so it was. It was felt that it was a great boon to help us stay well and it took a long long time to notice that it was actually causing a lot of damage and she worked. Mostly about the The environment you know 'cause it was violence. Spring was the name of the book. And that was the point was birger dying and and and she went from there and It was a wakeup call. Just like with glyphosate. Because we've become so comfortable with this chemical this is roundup. I'm sure people know roundup and many people don't know the word life is but that's the active ingredient in round up and you know they use it now. Not only on The gmo crops but also non gmo crops. If people think if i buy non gmo that safe but that's not true at all there's actually at highest levels are showing up in non gmo crops. That are sprayed right before harvest. They use it as a desperate purposely. Kill the crop. Make it go to see increase the yield because you synchronizes. He'll see across all the different parts of the crops. 'cause they can go go to see it at different times. If there's a there's a they go right you know at different times if it's not synchronized by a chemical like life is eight. So they really think it's great and since they think it's perfectly safe for humans they don't care but showing up at very high concentrations and we and oats and barley and garbanzo beans and chickpeas are all non gmo crops. That are being sprayed. Right before sugarcane and i'm sure you're familiar with the book a genetic roulette and the he's been on the show actually in his name escapes me right now. He's been on the show. Yes jeffrey smith and it was interesting in that book. It said that It it it. It did a study or talked about this research that was done on on fields of genetically modified corn and just a regular corn. However you want this healthy cornyn unhealthy corn and how the cows would not eat the gmo. Corn it's like. They knew they knew that it wasn't it wasn't good. That's something about it was toxic. I heard that beer bears would go all the way across. Gmo corn crop. Go all the way through the field to get to the non. Gmo going right right. You know and it's because animals. I think they're just more in tune with.

dr stephanie liver disease autoimmune disea ganic vitamin Saaf autoimmune diseases Dr sun rachel carson Mit cambridge university brazil bernadette Abc news birger southern california dallas
"senior research scientist" Discussed on Unexplainable

Unexplainable

04:14 min | 1 year ago

"senior research scientist" Discussed on Unexplainable

"You know back then. They could only make really good guesses about what was in those gaps on the sea floor compared to today where we can really map the seafloor in detail. Right like you said we we've mapped what twenty. Yeah currently and like this is a really recent development like even in two thousand seventeen only six percent of the seafloor was mapped by modern standards. Russell you're saying like fourteen percent of the ocean floor has been mapped. In the last four years yes and six percent of the ocean floor was mapped in all of human history before that yet. So we're really like speeding up. Could we map the whole thing soon. I think it's realistic to expect a map of the sea floor in our lifetimes for sure. So i spoke to vicki farini. She's a senior research scientist at columbia university. Where marie tharp did her work..

Russell vicki farini columbia university marie tharp
"senior research scientist" Discussed on Your Brain at Work

Your Brain at Work

01:34 min | 1 year ago

"senior research scientist" Discussed on Your Brain at Work

"The last couple of years have created so many new narratives and questions surrounding the way. We live and work some of those questions that we've address on this podcast. Many times before surrounds diversity equity and inclusion. How does an organization embrace diversity. What does inclusivity look like from an international links and how do companies create a truly equitable environment. We may not have the answers to all of these questions. But this episode is a great place to start the global talent at photos. Worldwide jennifer amara and diversity and inclusion director at thomson reuters elizabeth nelson join us guests on the show both of them share insider knowledge from their organizations and their path to implementing strategies on a global scale from rolling out organizational commitments surveying employee demographics in dozens of countries and enrolling solutions to employees worldwide led by neural leadership. Institutes paulette. girka. Veg the practice lead and senior research. Scientists michaela simpson our panel professionals investigate ways that brain signs can help strengthen global deny strategy. I'm shy lembo and you're listening to your brain at work from neural leadership institute we continue to draw our episodes from a weekly webinar series. That in la has been hosting every friday once again. Our panel consists of senior research scientist at dinner leadership institute michaela simpson in allies director of dna. Practice paulette girka vich jennifer amara the.

jennifer amara thomson reuters elizabeth nelson michaela simpson lembo paulette dinner leadership institute la paulette girka
"senior research scientist" Discussed on In the News with Mike Dakkak

In the News with Mike Dakkak

05:45 min | 1 year ago

"senior research scientist" Discussed on In the News with Mike Dakkak

"At a. Follow up interview with stephanie. Santa fe yesterday stephanie son. If is a mit senior research scientist who has been studying vaccines for many many decades and we spoke about the covert vaccines yesterday and we also spoke about the chemical glyphosate. Which is the active ingredient in the weed. Killer roundup which is used on farms across the country and stephanie's research has uncovered a correlation between countries with populations that high at that have high exposure to the chemical glyphosate in their food supply and high kobe infection rates. She's written a book about it and we spoke at length about and we also spoke at length about the kobe. Nineteen vaccines in general. And what these vaccines. Especially the mr rene vaccines the effects those vaccines machinery calling vaccines. Because they're more injections than vaccine's only qualify as vaccines a lot of people who are a lot smarter than i am a no a lot more about this than i do refused to call them vaccines and actually to them as gene therapy. But stephanie has uncovered a some surprising findings on this amarnath technology and the effects that it has on human spleens. So i'm gonna play you guys in excerpt of the interview that we had yesterday. The rest of the interview is available on the site. Www dot it and show dot com. Remember because of file size restrictions at least for the current plan that were on we are not able to put a publish. the entire interview That we conduct with Guests on a daily basis and have And still be able to fulfill monthly quota. So we play excerpts here and we have the full interviews online you can hop on over to the site and check out the rest of the interview and i'll leave a link in the show notes without further. Ado here's stephanie. Senate on her work on her. Extensive research on life is eight kobe. Nineteen and the kobe. Nineteen injections okay. Stephanie thanks for being with us so The last time you spoke you said you were working on a book about a glyphosate which Active ingredient in round up the baucus. Right killer. yes and you drew some in. Your research has drawn some important correlations between populations that have.

stephanie mr rene Santa fe mit Senate Stephanie
"senior research scientist" Discussed on One Life Radio Podcast

One Life Radio Podcast

06:25 min | 1 year ago

"senior research scientist" Discussed on One Life Radio Podcast

"To one life. Radio we are live from dallas. Texas with stephanie. Son off Dr stephanie sunup is a senior research scientist at mit computer science and artificial intelligence laboratory. She has a bachelor's degree in biology. With a minor in food and nutrition and a masters degree engineer's degree and hd and electrical engineering and computer science. All from mit she has authored over three dozen peer review journal papers on topics relating to human disease and nutritional deficiencies and toxic exposures focusing specifically on the herbicide glyphosate and the mineral sulfur. Dr summit is the author of the book. Toxic legacy how the weed killer. Life is destroying our health and the environment. And it's what we're discussing today. You can find. Dr sun on twitter at stephanie. Nf that's s. c. n. e. f. f. or on facebook at stephanie. Dot senate dot five such an honor again. I have to say it to have you on the air with us today. dr fm. We're talking about and our health. Let me start with this. How does life estate impair your immune system making it more difficult to clear a virus like covid nineteen very good question and i think that is a serious Situation that we're in right now. And in fact in brazil in uk there's various countries that are having a hard time controlling india. They're all having a hard time controlling kobe. And they're all heavy users of and i think there's a connection there. I have a whole chapter in my book on the immune system is quite complex. And it's quite interesting. And one of the critical things is the mighty andrea. i mean i think like disrupts Both the matt might economy And the ability to clear the Debris for example. If i fell gets killed by a virus he can't be removed. The immune cells become very sick in the presence of glyphosate and the mighty country are essential for the immune cells to have energy to fight to fight the bug. And then they were. Maybe the worst part is that the the there are these Molecules that are released for example. There's surfactant proteins in the lungs that are able normally would be able to trap viruses and make it much easier to catch them and remove them because that's the whole thing. The virus comes into the long. See if you can quickly get on them and remove them before they start multiplying. You can clear the disease and not even get sick from the symptoms and the The immune cells are being weakened by glyphosate and probably by other toxic chemicals toxic metals. Many things affect the mitochondria and might conrail stress might have contra. Disorder is a major factor in many many diseases that we're experiencing today so our might a are really under stress and there's many papers that have shown that life is a causes oxidative damage in the maya country interferes with critical enzymes. Such as sucks Garage names that are central to the metabolism of sugar for example. And so this is one reason why we end up with diabetes. Diabetes is linked to eight diabetes obesity. Those are actors bad outcome and covert and those are highly. They're going up dramatically in our population. Exactly separate the rise glyphosate usage core crops people say well correlation doesn't mean causation. But i think it does. And life say to my book disease diabetes obesity. All of those things that are going up are caused by life is as disruption of metabolism in my country and this affects all the cells but when it affects immune cells. It makes it very difficult for them to clear. The virus and the virus starts multiplying wildly in the lungs. And then you get into a very toxic situation where the adaptive immune system kicks in and releases all these side of times it end up destroying the tissue in the lungs and then you can't breathe you know you can't get oxygen. It's a real downward spiral. Starting point is the weak immune system that was set up by the previous exposure for many years and it affects our brain as well. A lot of people don't know that yes i know. Well well no. I mean the glyphosate. Yes yeah yeah. You mentioned a study in your book that shows glyphosate becomes part of the tissues of all species of animals and plants that are exposed to it. Why is this this finding particularly chilling. Yes this is what really Made me wake up and take notice. I was studying glaxy trying to figure out exactly how that it's doing all these all this damage because it's kind of like how could one chemical so bad and i think i figured it out and anthony samsonite collaborated to figure this out. basically life is a little bit of biochemistry here. Glyphosate is an amino acids and amino acids normally are the building blocks of the proteins. Those are the things that dna code coach force. That's very important. The famous four letter code watson and crick. That code is coding. For protein synthesis and the proteins are are built like beads on a string with each bead being one of the amino acids. and there's about twenty m very critical building blocks of proteins and the proteins workhorses of the body. They're the enzymes transporters there the in ion uptake. I mean they just control so many things in the body So when they're messed up you're in trouble and life is what i believe is happening. Is that it. Substituting glycemic by mistake during protein synthesis this smallest amino acid. It has no side chains. And so there's a very special fits in a pocket that no no other amino acids will fit into because they're too big gripe is has the same property it has exactly the same shape as the seen except that it has extra material stuck onto its nitrogen atom which has to be outside of the pocket in order to hook up so it's the part that's in the pocket that fits and the guy gets into the protein by mistake place of life guy seeing and that extra materials ticking off at the nitrogen atom causes all kinds of trouble so certain protein certain crises tremendous trouble really wreck that proteins ability to do its job and i can go through and i did in my book. I mentioned so many proteins. That have critical lysine residues and if you replace them with something that looks like lifestyle. Because there's some amino acids kind of have similar properties lifestyle so you can look at studies where they what happens if you know and then you can life. They would have the same effect. This and i've done this and it's really quite striking because it becomes a way to explain all these diseases that are going up. Each one has particular proteins involved. It's quite fascinating. It's a giant puzzle. And i love puzzle so a lot of it in my book..

stephanie diabetes obesity Dr stephanie sunup mit computer science and artif peer review journal Dr summit Dr sun dr fm Diabetes dallas anthony samsonite andrea brazil senate Texas twitter facebook india uk crick
"senior research scientist" Discussed on One Life Radio Podcast

One Life Radio Podcast

07:22 min | 1 year ago

"senior research scientist" Discussed on One Life Radio Podcast

"To one life radio. Make sure you check out our podcast and get to know the show at the o dot com. Welcome back to one life. Radio this is bernadette with junior in the mix. We are broadcasting live from dallas texas iheartmedia as well as in southern california on. Abc news. talk. I am so honored to introduce dr stephanie. Senate she is a phd and is a senior research scientist at mit computer science and artificial intelligence laboratory. She has a bachelor's degree in biology. With a minor in food and nutrition and a masters degree engineer's degree and ph d and electrical engineering and computer science. All from mit she has authored over three dozen. Peer reviewed journal papers on topics relating human disease to nutritional deficiencies and toxic exposures focusing specifically on the herbicide glyphosate and the mineral sulfur. Dr senate is the author of toxic legacy how the weed killer. Glyphosate is destroying our health and the environment the book we are discussing. Today you can find actor. Son of on twitter at stephanie. Sennef or on facebook at stephanie. Dot dot five such an honor to have you with us today. Doctor thank you for taking time to jump on one life radio with us. My pleasure thank you. Oh my gosh okay. So let's get started on this Today as i said we're talking about your book toxic legacy what is the history of glyphosate the active in roundup. What is it and why do farmers use so much of it. Gripe is eight is the most user beside on the planet and the united states us more per person than any other countries. Start with that. It's considered to be extremely safe for humans. Which is why it's so popular. And it was developed back in. You know it was discovered back in the nineteen sixties a patented by monsanto as an aside in nineteen sixty eight introduced in the market. Probably nineteen seventy four People were using it residential on the yards to kill their dandelions. But more importantly it's used its use on. Food has gone up dramatically over the past especially beginning around two thousand when they got this technology together to an engineer using genetic modification. gmo technology to engineer. Specific major crops to be resistant to life is eight so they were very excited that they could figure out how to introduce a bacterial gene into the genome of the plant. That gave it a version of the enzyme that glyphosate disrupts that was not Sensitive to they spray the poison all over the crop otherwise it kills all plans. They could spray all over. The crop crop didn't die Great way to control the weeds reduce the cost of food. And then these huge farms have you know been cut come since then massive farms of of gmo corn and gmo. Soy jamili gmo. Sugar beets alfalfa. Canola these are some of the major. Gmo crops and so The use of life they went up dramatically really exponentially in the first decade of the century Because it was so safe. Nobody worried about it. It's all over the food supply at this point. You really can't avoid life is in your food even if you go certified organic which i recommend everybody do. But it's The the problem is that it's not not safe and the regulatory process was sloppy back. Then it got through approval Even though there was evidence that it was toxic in the studies that were done and And now that it's been approved you know. The the epa is so busy with all the chemicals that are being offered all the time. They don't even want to revisit say that's already settled. It's already settled. it's wonderful i. It reduces food cross costs as long as we pretend it's not toxic to us Everything's fine but the problem is that it is toxic to us. Yeah it is. And i'm reading the The epa has captured. You know. i was reading this. Little bit about the epa and glyphosate and says however the epa is captured agency meaning it is dominated by the industry pursue presumably regulates and enter an internal documents now public in the monsanto papers. Demonstrate that the epa prioritizes the interest of corporations like monsanto or political groups over the interest of the public. And it's charged with that it's charged with protecting. Would you agree with all that major. Major flaw of the bags to be corrected because it's not just life as it's getting through approval process when it's actually talked So it's really serious problem and we have so many chemicals exposed to all the time and they. They don't have time to study off a different especially different chemicals in combination. There's a lot of synergy among different chemicals and gliding is important in that respect because it disrupts delivers ability to detoxify other chemicals many which are fat soluble. So when you can't detox those become much more toxic because of the simultaneous presence of life is eight How does glyphosate disrupt our microbiome Leading to get a got d despises autoimmune disorders. Neuro degeneration and more. I mean it's it's it's it's it's it's toxic. It's really bad and it's everywhere. Isn't it dr. That's right you can't avoid it. It's not just in the food it's in the water. It's in the air in the rain. It's everywhere is pervasive in this country. I don't even think there's a place you could go in this country that you wouldn't be exposed to it which is really really sad and it takes time for down to is another worry because in certain situations that can last for a long time even up to twelve years So that's a problem too just like you know other chemicals that we've had before that They keep on living after they're supposedly stopped is we're going to have this is going to be around for a long time The gut microbiome is central In fact i have a whole chapter. on gut. microbiome sites in house life is eight disrupts. It's quite a fascinating story. Took me a long time to write that chapter. Had you read a lot of papers because god is really complicated if you look into voter. There's an amazing number of papers coming out lately. You know for the longest time they didn't really think about the gut microbiome working just fine but it started this misbehaving in this century and people started writing. Papers about noticing disrupted gut microbiome and connecting it to all kinds of diseases including for example autism. Parkinson's disease rheumatoid arthritis. Many diseases that are not obviously connected to the gut are being caused by the disrupted gut microbiome and it starts very early in life because when the infant starts even the milk the the human milk is contaminated with black state and so is especially the soy formula. The infants being exposed to early on the lactobacillus which are central to the metabolism of milk. Getting really hit hard by say so it turns out that it's more the microbes that are more sensitive to climate as they are the ones that are crucial for the infant. Got they get to a bad start. And then you get passage overgrowing because the other ones are weakened the leave space for the pathogens to grow things like close. Judy and salmonella witcher resistant to glyphosate. And the problem. Is that these microbes. Many of them are in our gut. Has the.

epa dr stephanie mit computer science and artif Dr senate monsanto stephanie bernadette Abc news mit southern california dallas Senate texas twitter facebook united states Parkinson's disease rheumatoid autism Judy
"senior research scientist" Discussed on One Life Radio Podcast

One Life Radio Podcast

07:09 min | 1 year ago

"senior research scientist" Discussed on One Life Radio Podcast

"We are broadcasting live from dallas texas on iheart media as well as k. m. e. t. in southern california on. Abc news talk. That's a mouthful. I you know what. I say it all the time but i you know i. Sometimes i'll miss. I always keep the paper. It's written on you know but and sometimes i do something i say always. It's always nearby but it's kind of funny. You would think after repeating something a million times. I think it's because like if you say it one way a few times like it just gets in your head and then the one time you try to change one word it just throws you off. 'cause take me all the time like you'll read something one way all the time and then you change it once and it just throws you off. So yeah i get it. You got to keep it right there. Just in case well and people like consistency and they love good content. And we've got both today. we do. I'm so excited about today's show. I am at the half. We've got stephanie son. If she's a phd a a senior research scientist at mit computer science and artificial intelligence laboratory. She has written this incredible book called toxic legacy how the weed killer glyphosate eight is destroying our health and the environment. I cannot wait to talk to her. She is an absolute rockstar. She's got like five degrees from mit. I think she might even be the smartest woman on the planet. I'm serious and but she's really down to earth. I watched She's been on the show before back when she wrote another book back. I'm going to say five years ago. And i have that book right here. It's a cindy and erica's obsession to solve today's healthcare crisis autism alzheimer's and cardiovascular disease. She was on like i said a few years ago. And i'm so. I'm so thankful to have her back. She's an absolute rockstar. You guys are in for a treat and stay tuned for the half. But right now i want to introduce another rockstar. That's doctor l. dannenberg or dr al. How you doing dr l. wonderful good good. You have a remarkable story. You just have a remarkable story and it never gets old. I'm here to tell you so. Let me introduce you doctor. If you've never heard of dr l. Before he is a periodontics. Certified functional medicine practitioner and adapt trained health professional and certified primal health coach after a terminal multiple myeloma diagnosis dr. Al wasn't supposed to make it to see twenty nineteen let alone be thriving right now with nothing to lose and everything to gain. He developed a plan that evolved into his unconventional cancer. Protocol protocols combining in depth research of ancestral nutrition and lifestyle changes with his knowledge from forty four years as a periodontics on april fourth. Twenty twenty dr. Al was appointed as the chair of the perrow. Donald commit period dantonio committee for the international academy of biological dentistry and medicine and august twenty twenty. He published a too many e book on amazon. Better belly blueprint and is your gut killing you. You can find dr dan at Dr dan excuse me dr dannenberg. I'm butchering dr dan. Doctor dr. dan dannenberg messing. Because i got another doctor dot. Dan doctor dan england. I love him too. But we can find. Dr al dannenberg at dr dannenberg dot com or follow him on twitter at dr dannenberg. I love it. we're talking about today. I always do steps to a healthy mouth so many people just don't even don't even know what to do when it comes to a healthy mouth. I don't think most people even talk about it but today we're breaking down what we need to do and what our dentist should do in order to have a healthy mouth gum and teeth for a lifetime. Not just you know For a few years but your whole lifetime There but is there a one size. Fits all strategy dr al for a healthy mouth. Well i think a concept is one size but everybody's mouth is different. Everybody's nutrition is different. There are certain guidelines that everybody has to follow Helping out just like you know. Everybody asks wash their face Maybe once a day just to get the dirt grandma if you don't you're going to have some problems. Yeah no. I always think of my dad because he when he died at almost one hundred he had almost every tooth in his hat and a full head of hair and and he used to. And that's remarkable right. But but but he always want the tooth's of the brad he loved the cross in the turrets of the italian brad and he said it made your teeth strong so i need to know dr al is that true wuli not unequivocally not so there are other factors going on because he was very healthy but that was not a true statement unfortunately well i think maybe he just like the to and that was his way of getting. I don't know the the is the end of the italian bread for those that don't know But you know on your website dr al. You've written a guide called the four steps to a healthy mouths so before we get to the steps will you explain how plaque is good for us. We've all heard for years that it's a bad thing. Why is it good for us. Yeah i mean first of all. Let's take a look at what's going on in the mouth if you think about it. Is there any structure. That's a hard structure that pierces a skin and embeds itself into sterile the the only structure in the body combined knowledge is the two so the two has this novel and other structures that literally pierced on issue and it's embedded in your sterile jawbone actually if that were the only case and the bacteria in your mouth were to get on that tooth the tooth is slippery like a sliding board it would slide down this to go under the gum. Pass a few other structures get into the sterile bone and your jaw wood. Rot out and you would die. Our species never evolve. I'll be land. That doesn't happen. Ruptures under the gun that help prevent that based on the immune system but there is a superficial structure which is a healthy biofilm that has evolved and we call that dental plaque now dental plaque is made up of maybe two or three hundred different species of bacteria they're all working in conjunction with one another and they do three important things number one they produce. Hydrogen peroxide actually helps kill ten -cially pathogenic bacteria. That's in the mail that wants to get into that gum tooth margin. It also has chemical buffers in the dental plaque that keeps the the acid level from falling below. What's called a ph of five point five. If the acid level gets more acidic than five point five for any length of time..

dr al dr dannenberg mit computer science and artif autism alzheimer's dr dan dannenberg dr l dantonio committee for the int dan dannenberg dan england Dr al dannenberg Abc news southern california Al Dr dan cardiovascular disease dallas stephanie mit
"senior research scientist" Discussed on Talk Radio 1190 KFXR

Talk Radio 1190 KFXR

08:51 min | 1 year ago

"senior research scientist" Discussed on Talk Radio 1190 KFXR

"Are broadcasting live from Dallas, Texas and I heart media as well as K M E. T in Southern California on ABC News talk. I am so honored to introduce Dr Stephanie San if she is a PhD and is a senior research scientist at MIT's computer science. And artificial intelligence laboratory. She has a bachelor's degree in biology with a minor and food and nutrition and a master's degree engineer's degree and PhD in electrical engineering and computer science, all from M I T. She has authored over three dozen peer reviewed journal papers on topics relating relating human disease to nutritional deficiencies and toxic exposures. Focusing specifically on the herbicide glyphosate and the mineral sulfur. Doctor Senneff is the author of Toxic Legacy. How The Weedkiller Glyphosate is destroying our Health and the environment. The book we are discussing Today You can find Dr San Off on Twitter at Stephanie Senneff or on Facebook at Stephanie dot senneff 0.0.5 Such an honor to have you with us today, Dr Sunny Thank you for taking time to jump on one life radio with us. My pleasure. Thank you. Oh, my gosh. Okay, So let's get started on this today. As I said, we're talking about your book. Toxic legacy. What is the history of glyphosate? The active ingredient and round up? What is it? And why do farmers use so much of it? Glyphosate is the most used herbicide on the planet and the United States uses more per person than any other country. Start with that it's considered to be extremely safe for humans, which is why it's so popular. And it was developed back and you know, it was discovered back in the 19 sixties patented by Monsanto as an herbicide in 1968 introduced in the market, probably in 1974. People were using it Residential e on the yards to kill their dandelions, But more importantly, it's used. It's used on food has gone up dramatically over the past, especially beginning around 2000 when they've got this technology together. To an engineer using genetic modification GMO technology to engineer specific major crops to be resistant to glyphosate, so they They were very excited that they could figure out how to introduce a bacterial gene into the genome of the plant that gave it a version of the enzyme that glyphosate disrupts. That was not sensitive to go and visit so they could just breathe it. The poison all over the crop. Otherwise it kills all plants. They could spray it all over the crop of crop didn't die. A great way to control the weeds. Reduce the cost of food. And then this huge farms have, you know been to come since then? Massive farms of GMO corn and GMO, soy gmo, gmo sugar, beets and alfalfa canola. These are some of the major GMO crops and so the use of life they went up dramatically, really exponentially. In the first decade of this century. Because it was so safe. Nobody worried about it. It's all over the food supply. At this point, you really can't avoid glad visit in your food. Even if you go certified organic, which I recommend everybody do, But it's something The problem is that it's not not safe and the regulatory process was sloppy back then. It's got through approval, even though there was evidence that it was toxic in the studies that were done. And and now that it's been approved, you know that the EPA is so busy with all the new chemicals that are being offered all the time that they don't even want to resist it. Life is eight that's already settled. It's already settled. It's wonderful. It reduces food cross costs. As long as we pretend it's not toxic to us. Everything's fine. But the problem is that it is toxic to us. Yeah, it is. And I'm reading that the EPA has captured, you know, I was reading this little bit about the EPA and glad to say this is, however, the e P A is a captured agency, meaning it is dominated by the industry presume, presumably regulates. And enter and you know, the internal documents are now public in the Monsanto Papers demonstrate that the EPA prioritizes the interests of corporations like Monsanto or political groups over the interests of the public, and it's charged with that it's charged with protecting Would you agree with all that? That is a major major flaw of are ready? He really needs it begs to be corrected because it's not just glasses that's getting through approval process when it's actually toxic. So it's a really serious problem. We have so many chemicals. Yeah, we do exposed to all the time and they they don't have time to study of a different chemicals, especially different chemicals and combination. There's a lot of synergy among different chemicals and life is is important in that respect because it disrupts the liver's ability to detoxify other chemicals. Many of which are fat soluble. So when you can't detox, those they become much more toxic because of the simultaneous presence of life. Hmm. How does Clive Asi disrupt our microbiome leading to get got despite Aosis, autoimmune disorders, neurology generation and more. I mean, it's it's It's It's It's toxic. It's really bad, and it's everywhere, isn't it? Dr San Off That's right. You can't avoid it. It's not just in the food. It's in the water. It's in the air. It's in the rain. It's everywhere. It's pervasive in this country. I don't even think there's a place you could go in this country that you wouldn't be exposed to it, which is really, really sad. And it takes time for it to break down to is another worry because in certain situations, it can last for a long time, even up to 12 years. So that's a problem too. Just like you know other chemicals that we've had before. That they keep on living after their supposedly stopped right. We're gonna have a problem. This is going to be around for a long time. The gut Microbiome is central, and in fact, I have a whole chapter on the gut Microbiome and the dye itself and how they like this. It disrupts it. It's quite a fascinating story Took me a long time to write. That chapter had to read a lot of papers because the gut is really complicated if you look into the literature There's an amazing number of papers coming out lately. You know, for the longest time, they didn't really think about the gut Microbiome because it was working just fine. But it started misbehaving. You know, in this century and people started writing papers about Noticing, disrupted gut microbiome and connecting it to all kinds of diseases, including, for example, autism and Parkinson's disease, rheumatoid arthritis, many diseases that are not obviously connected to the gut. Are being caused by the disrupted gut microbiome, and it starts very early in life, because when the infant starts even the milk the the human milk is contaminated with black and so is especially the soybean formula. The infants being exposed to black state early on the lactobacillus, which are central to the metabolism of milk are getting really hit hard by glad to state, So it turns out that it's more The microbes that are more sensitive to glad they are the ones that are crucial for the infant gut. They get off to a bad start, and then you get pathogens over growing because the other ones are weakened. It leaves space for the pathogens to grow things like clustered and salmonella, which are resistant to glasses. And the problem is that these microbes, many of the microbes in our gut have the exact same end under the plant SAP. This is a critical piece of the puzzle that people don't realize it's called PSP. Since it's an energy I'm in the chicken meat pathway, which is a very important biological pathway in the plants. It produces a central nutrients for the plants. The same thing is true in the microbes, many of them had this pathway have this enzyme are sensitive to glide. And so they get wrecked as well. Just they get killed, just like the plants get killed by the poison. And then you get this really big mess because all kinds of things go south in the gut. When you don't have the right microbes doing jobs that they normally Jews, they provide the B vitamins they provide. In fact, the output of that pathway She can make pathway is three aromatic amino acids. These are basic building blocks of the proteins. And these are also precursors to several really important, biologically active molecules in our body, including serotonin, melatonin, the skin tanning agent, Melbourne and thyroid hormone. Various B vitamins. All of these things come out of that pathway that gets disrupted and we depend on our microbes to produce those precursors to those Important molecules through the pathway that glyphosate disrupts so you can see how that's going to cause all kinds of deficiency. Oh, yeah, And that's going to cost depression and violent behavior. Obesity. All these things can come out of these hormone imbalances. Oh, yeah, I learned so much from reading your book. I just like I am so all over it. Toxic legacy is what we're talking about with Dr Stephanie Senneff. If you just now joined us, it's an amazing book. As I said earlier in the broadcast, I don't know if you heard it. Everyone needs to read this book. Everyone in the world needs to read this book, so they have an understanding of what's really going on with life, a state and how it truly Is slowly killing all of us..

1974 1968 Stephanie Senneff Stephanie San 19 sixties Southern California MIT Sunny Senneff Monsanto EPA Today Dallas Twitter today United States Toxic Legacy Facebook ABC News Stephanie dot senneff
"senior research scientist" Discussed on Talk Radio 1190 KFXR

Talk Radio 1190 KFXR

01:54 min | 1 year ago

"senior research scientist" Discussed on Talk Radio 1190 KFXR

"Live from Dallas, Texas and I heart media as well as K M E T in Southern California on ABC News talk. That's a mouthful. Yeah, I I said, you know what I say it all the time, But you know, and sometimes I'll miss I always keep the paper up. Where threaten on, you know, But And sometimes I do something I say always. It's always nearby. I, but it's kind of funny. You would think after repeating something a million times, they would have it. I think it's because, like if you say it one way a few times like it just gets in your head. And then the one time you try to change one word. It just throws you off because that was me all the time, like you'll read something one way. All the time, and then you change it once and it just throws you off. So, yeah, I get it. You gotta keep it right there. Just in case well, and people like consistency and they love good content, and we've got both today we do. I'm so excited about today's show. I am at the half. We've got Stephanie San F. She's a PhD and a senior research scientist at MIT's computer science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory. She has written this incredible book called Toxic Legacy. How The Weedkiller Glyphosate is destroying our Health and the environment. I cannot wait to talk to her. She is an absolute rock star. She's got like five degrees from MIT. I think she might even be the smartest woman on the planet. I'm serious, but you know what? She's really down to Earth. I watched, uh, She's been on the show before back when she wrote another book back. I'm going to say five years ago, and I have that book right here. It's a Cindy America's obsession to solve today's health care crisis, autism, Alzheimer's and cardiovascular disease. She was on like I said a few years ago, and I'm so I'm so thankful to have her back. She's an absolute rock star. You guys are in for a treat. And and so stay tuned for the half. But right now I want to introduce another rock star. That's Dr Al Dannenberg or Dr Al, How you doing? Dr. L I am wonderful. Good. Good. You have a remarkable story. You just have a.

Stephanie San F. Cindy America Southern California K M E T MIT Earth Toxic Legacy today ABC News both Dallas, five years ago five degrees Al one word Al Dannenberg few years ago one way Intelligence Laboratory one time
AI driven Privacy tool developed to protect COVID-19 tracing data

Cyber Security Weekly Podcast

05:48 min | 1 year ago

AI driven Privacy tool developed to protect COVID-19 tracing data

"Welcome to carry tv and ad tech insect weekly chris coverage on the editor with more security media. And this is al. Friday morning episode. Normally stream live on tuesday afternoons and on fridays and today's episode where with dr did hornets strategic advocacy manager would stand into strategy and up the sushmita rush at senior research scientists with data. Sixty one gonna be looking at data. Sixty one's recent ion driven promising tool. Personally my shin factor. I think it's go piff and with with don't this mehta rush a senior research scientist with data sixty one. Thank you very much for joining us. Law soc me that look thank you. So much We covered off. And we're gonna be talking about It's great to have data sixty one on obviously as well but this caught mile. I released a new data privacy tool for a anonymous covid. Nineteen tracing data and keeping that secure. And it's cold personal information factor or this. You're the senior research saunas on the project. Might be the adult. Talk us through It's a big topic. Accident had to stop. Whether we start with the i ought to the covid. Non tain tracing data Update class. I can just a little bit about fifth avenue. Exactly the information and Just to be fit. That need talk about why we are doing this. And one of the use cases of course the covid nineteen of data about this is a much more universal kind of a tool which which actually helps to share data a to protect the privacy of individuals whose data is there in the assets and its stock. V personal information factor is essential information content in the data affect and. Just imagine that if i were to the custodian was to release the state asset. Then it looks reveal definitely information individuals so freshman is that went to release and when not to release and this personal information factor is a measure of that information content in that deep affect the identified data and what the tool does is that not only. Does it publishes the data in an in an in some kind of transformed fashion. But it's also evaluates. The risk of free identification. Is very very important. Like when i when i want to share my data. The first thing that i ask is that what is happening to my data. What are the risks associated rely. We get out in this whole list of data that has been you know released. No you can. I ask you. Is it reverse engineering. The fact it's released. And we reverse that. Can i identify that will happen. Writer the tool essentially doctor that you know it. I evaluate what happens. What are the risks. And if it feel that you know the risk is low then it's released the data at the high than it suggests very thoughts of transformations Aggregations techniques so as to make the data more suitable to be released that in it's not reeducation is not possible so the two of you know a lot lot more. To protect the privacy of individuals this is donald sixty runs on another saying albumin. Doctor men whose new south wales chief scientists it shifts on and We've he's also hit it up. We'll previously headed up. The new south wales at data analytics as well is that this is all great working together on this because we've heard from duct tape and previously about the work that they're doing with a lot of this data across the south wales in sydney in particular. Very interesting work. But yeah it's that that The day anonymous anonymously information and they identified. Information is a challenge. Because if you join. The dots suddenly can start to identify. They so yeah. This is actually a on oprah man. The project actually started with the initiative of yet overman dr yang obama and what we are essentially trying to do at the data was also involved from the very beginning. But what we are trying to do. Is that enhance that tool so we want to enhance such way that weekend. Mitigates against various attacks so we are trying to identify what other attacks. What are the attack vectors. That are possible that might breach the privacy of individuals and beth. Israel comes into picture. We are essentially studying what a- what the attacks are and can be do it in a more sophisticated sway to learn from the attack and suggest suggests techniques to protect the privacy of individuals of be it aggregation be. It's probably secure Secure approval private algorithms for like Differential privacy or there would be other solutions that can help to the data at make it fit to be

Mehta Rush AL Chris South Wales Dr Yang Obama New South Wales Donald Trump Sydney Oprah Beth Israel
Trends in Natural Language Processing with Nasrin Mostafazadeh

This Week in Machine Learning & AI

07:58 min | 3 years ago

Trends in Natural Language Processing with Nasrin Mostafazadeh

"All right. Everyone welcome back to our AI rewind 2019 series in this episode will be covering covering NLP. And I've got the pleasure of being on the line with Nassreen Mostafa Day. She is a senior research scientist. At elemental cognition Nassreen. Woken back to the PODCAST. Sam Glad to back. Thanks for having me definitely glad I to be speaking with you again. We last spoke back in August of twenty eighteen when we spoke about contextual modeling language envision and some of your research This time will be reviewing some of your thoughts on the most important papers and developments more broadly the and the field that you work in natural language processing in twenty nineteen. I'll have folks refer back to that previous episode for a a little bit more about you and your background and what you're working on but to get this conversation started. Why don't we just start with your kind of broad? Take on twenty nine thousand nine in and Lt what was the was a big year for an ob sure so. Actually I think yeah thing into the nineteen was actually exciting. You're out the you know. These large pre-trading Models have been stretched widely to various various different directions and you know slowly but surely is community. They've started the sink about elected problems. They have the weaknesses the blindness spice up up Citing the sort of paradigm shifts that you're seeing in an LP sort of are into twenty twenty now kinda started. I'm I can reflect back on the decade Started back in two thousand fifteen to sixteen or so in various Task could start to get tackled by relatively straightforward approach that you would just including input tax. It could be looked looked at as a sequence of wars characters etc.. The new US like attention to actually Basically looked back back into the included representation video trying to predict something for task. which could be a sequence of Tokens as evacuate does container so so You know Chris Manning which is one of the pioneers of our field. The had this Basically the Belief from him that he believed him BIOS hegemony which he believes that basically no matter what the task is out there not task if you try wireless wirelessly omitted and use attention to attend back to the Basically important including a of the input you basically can Actually the state of the art knows this referring to the tension is all you need paper so attention is it only you need. Paper is more resent so that was then. The transfer miss came to picture. This has been hellish how fast field is moving through two thousand teams still as I said like the consensus in all it was that you can reach you. Choose state of the art if you just throw it. Violence attached that was the recipe and back in that tire member. Like when I was like talks I would conclude that look although that has been true or a host of different benchmarks a happens that for detested require vast amounts of background Dan knowledge reasoning in basically Require salish along tastes Not yet achieve state of the art or near human performance servants using these by Malls so fast forward just one year. In two thousand eighteen we had like L. modes steep contextualized were presentation The basically started sort of this one more step forward of billing these large language models which happened to be contextualized so preaching on a very large corpus and then fine tune of data stream which should sell started meeting lots and lots of different as state of the arts and establishing brand new state of arts and so the test that I had in mind when I was personally criticizing the fact that Oh look by throwing Added attention on a particular benchmark jump. Necessarily she stayed at the ARD causes reasoning tasks which is something that I personally absolutely very passionate about. It happens to be mined line of research and so the particular task was a storage tasks which I talk again. The lastingly testing we talk. Radio is specifically story Koehler says which is tested given a sequence of four sentences on which form a coherent story very very short story. The task is riches between two alternative endings to that story which Yunos designed basically to evaluate systems commonsense reasoning reasoning capabilities What happened in two thousand seventeen? Is that mid two thousand seventeen or so. The attention is unique. Paper came out the transformer paper that you just mentioned a minute or two ago so that paper basically enable aiding effect of other blurry large large pre-trade transformer models that could actually establish the state of the art in various commonsense reasoning tasks one being the. Gt one paper says uh-huh on paper came out around in two thousand eighteen hours which was Utah Training Model. This was a very large language model. Oh that opening. I folks have basically trained on a very large diverse corpus and then fine tune on a small data sets and actually this data said that they highlighted as to the place for me. The most amazing basically progress happened to be story closed as the benchmark. I I really cared about. So they have Notably they have often like around eighty six or so percent accuracy which was exceedingly getting better than the previous Number is that people had reported on the test set and so that really sort of changed my personal mind out adverb. You're going to this. I started believing in the fact that all look although these models may seem to be sort of doing pattern recognition at the scale pitch may not Doing reasoning in connecting the dots in all these sorts of things that we care about in a label as his reasoning. Efi You know do them in the right way or give these models off chance of being trained for on the right Dina says finding them right these center eric capable of doing knowledge transfer. I think that sort of set the ground up for us to move into has nineteen Very had more more of these very large preaching models that then you could basically find on various demonstrating test and establish state of yard. No matter the but they're not they're from our very at coronel t tasks like Shining tests such as historic Costas itself Congress this is reasoning etc.. So I think this has been the main exciting thing about Nineteen where we could see. This wasn't just a glimpse of Wasn't just a one time thing that these models could perform val it continued into two thousand eighteen. And I think I'm actually excited about A scene Improving these people off more about the downsides of these models but yeah I'm very excited to see her. VR going with this paradigm shift into any twenty.

Nassreen Mostafa Day Senior Research Scientist United States LT SAM Dina Congress Chris Manning Utah Yunos DAN Koehler Eric