35 Burst results for "Senior Research Fellow"

We Have No Long-Term Data on Cross-Hormone Therapy With Dr. Jay Greene

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:30 min | 3 months ago

We Have No Long-Term Data on Cross-Hormone Therapy With Dr. Jay Greene

"Let's actually talk about the reality author of this seminal work from the heritage foundation on puberty blockers cross sex hormones and youth suicide. He's a senior research fellow at Jay green Jay. Two observations if I make number one, it is shocking that any new medical procedure doesn't become commonplace or applied in large numbers. Unless there have been years, if not decades of trials of tests of small batch, Guinea pigs, if you will, we have none of that. Am I right in saying we have no long-term data on the consequences of cross hormone therapy or chemical castration on children, do we? We don't. I mean, this use of these drugs is an off label use of drugs that were approved by the FDA for other purposes long time ago. Right. And so there's never been a random assignment experiment that would be necessary for FDA approval for this use of these drugs. So we have no rigorous science to prove that these drugs are in fact safe and effective for this use. And we also have no long-term evidence of any kind because this use of these drugs is incredibly novel. It didn't really exist in the United States before 2000.

Heritage Foundation On Puberty Jay Green Jay Guinea FDA United States
"senior research fellow" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

02:28 min | 9 months ago

"senior research fellow" Discussed on WGN Radio

"The Obama administration where they would not name our enemy They would not speak ill or point out radical Islamic terrorism I fear that this administration which has many of the same staff including Susan Rice and The White House that they're going to repeat that oversensitivity to label to be labeled anti Muslim for the mere fact of calling out true terrorist acts and the people behind them and what their motives are Well obviously that's carrying political correctness to the point of the criminal if you in fact endanger the American public it's one thing for you or for me in our current positions to underestimate such people were not in a position of power right now although Laura Reese we should note before the Department of Homeland Security But not currently However if people positions of power charged with protecting the American public behave in such a way trying to be politically correct and the process endangering the American public that to me ought to be a criminal effect That should be the absolute last consideration that anybody engages in The idea that somebody might endanger the American public because then they wouldn't get invited to the right cocktail parties in Georgetown is well beneath contempt but anyway Morty come one 8 6 6 5 O Jimbo will 866-505-4626 when things like this happen even though they could have been much worse than it was we looked for lessons than if there are some there then let's find them and let supply them And again Laura Reese is our guest director of the sitter for technology policy and senior research fellow for Homeland Security at the heritage foundation and she has over two decades of experience in the immigration and Homeland Security arena and twice were to the Department of Homeland Security on management and immigration policy and operations issue Most recently as the acting deputy chief of staff one 8 6 6 5 O Jimbo our number one 8 6 6 5 O 5 four 6 two 6 Just how good are we at spotting terror threats before they actually come to fruition We'll talk some more when we come back in just a moment.

Obama administration Laura Reese Susan Rice White House Department of Homeland Securit sitter for technology policy a Morty Jimbo Georgetown Department of Homeland Securit heritage foundation
"senior research fellow" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

07:02 min | 9 months ago

"senior research fellow" Discussed on WGN Radio

"On Twitter at Jimbo talks And certainly the country was very shaken by word of that attack on the Texas synagogue the fact that there were no casualties other than for the shooter Certainly gave it a better outcome than might possibly been the case Nonetheless there are many questions about just what we need to do to prevent such things from happening in the future especially given the background of what we told is the background of the shooter We're joined by Laura reist director of the center for technology policy and senior research fellow for Homeland Security at the heritage foundation their website is heritage dot org and Laura thank you for joining us tonight Oh my pleasure Thank you for having me First of all are we asking a legitimate question Does it appear that reasonable security precautions could have prevented the attack that occurred Well it's difficult to say there's still a lot of information we don't know And part of it has to do with the lack of information coming out of the administration regarding the immigration history of Malik's all across from the United Kingdom Some reports have said he came on a tourist Visa it is probably more likely that he came using the Visa waiver program Which the United Kingdom is part of along with 39 other countries And using the Visa waiver program you don't need to get a Visa so you don't need to go into a consulate and appear before consular officer and get interviewed in person You grab your passport You fly to the U.S. and then you do get inspected by customs border protection inspector here But we simply don't know There's a lot of information we don't know So there's questions about information sharing We know that the United Kingdom was looking at him and pat him on a list but then moved him off the list and late last year So the case seemed to fall through the fracs for sure Yeah So in other words I gather what I'm hearing you say is that greater vigilance might have been able to pick out this person as somebody who shouldn't be traveling around us freely as he was Yes had he did in fact go get a Visa That is the point of the in person interview is to suss out whether someone tends to return to the country intends to do bad things to the U.S. and so if that interview happened he must have lied about his intentions And if it didn't happen if he just got on the plane using the Visa waiver program the many of us have traveled internationally and when you come back to the U.S. questions can be limited by the inspection officer and then the wave you through So I mean there were at least one opportunity a government encounter possibly to but again there's also questions about this information sharing between the U.S. and the United Kingdom and seemingly a lack of it in this case So international question which of course is not something that we alone can address something that would have to be addressed by international agreements I would have to assume that there is already something in place regarding our allies the civilized nations of the world in regarding cooperation about terror threats because those we've had them for long enough now for decades that I would assume that such arrangements are already in place and therefore by that assumption one would also assume that if these were put together well that somebody dropped the ball but am I assuming too much No you're not To be a member country Visa waiver program the other country has to meet some requirements They have to share information about identities They need to report lost and still passports They need to share terrorism information criminal information and so each country goes through a review every few years to make sure that there's they should still remain in the Visa waiver program country or is a waiver program On top of that the U.S. has a good relationship and something with the 5 eyes which is the U.S. and Ireland and the United Kingdom and Canada and Australia where it's specifically to share intelligence information Now after the Russia hopes with president Trump it looks like that some of those relationships were grossly abused and I don't know whether we know the full effect of that or the fallout from that could it affect individual cases It's possible But in regardless this case through the cracks And we have to ask why hasn't the Biden administration revealed at least the travel history of a crime Are they hiding something Because that's one of the first things they do when these cases happen is they within hours have a criminal history and immigration history travel history And I know during the Trump administration we used to report that information out and we're not getting information from this administration So that would be not a matter of misunderstanding or misapplication of international deals That would be something that arrests clearly on the Biden administration's Department of Homeland Security I believe you're saying Yes Absolutely And secretary After this happened we had the effort fully worded press conference by the Dallas the special agent in charge by FBI where he originally claimed that the motive and then President Biden kind of muddled his way for saying we didn't really know the motive although he did admit it was an act of terror And then DHS secretary mayorkas said well we don't know much about the motive And he defined to label this an act of terrorism So my fear is.

United Kingdom Laura reist center for technology policy a U.S. heritage foundation Malik Laura Twitter Biden administration Texas president Trump Trump administration Ireland Russia Australia Canada President Biden Department of Homeland Securit FBI Dallas
Cyber Influence and Misinformation  a Growing Threat in Cyber Space

Cyber Security Weekly Podcast

02:06 min | 1 year ago

Cyber Influence and Misinformation a Growing Threat in Cyber Space

"Stop. The lynn is a senior research fellow at the center for international security and operation and the hanke j. colin fellow in cyber policy and security hoover institute and also a fellow of the american association for the advancement of flying's he's also the scientists america. This computer science and communications bought national research council of the national academy so lynn. Thank you so much for your time today. Bigger telling you know when we talk about cybersecurity and cyber threats and we touch on the white range of topics we talk about heke data breaches privacy breaches and we also talk about cyberbullying social engineering and information operations in cyberspace so it's quite ranging so. We're very glad that you can spend thirty minute with us today. To give us your perspectives from one angle given your experience in the technical area as whereas decades of advising on type of policy for two so far today. I thought we can talk about you. Want to nominate on that is increasing attracting much attention which is misinformation is inflammation. So the first question about misinformation is. It's not new. Right is something that we have seen throughout history. We know about you. Sections distractions misdirections and many of us in cybersecurity also know about trojans and which cost based on the famous story of deception. So what really is new with information because we think the be that is getting so much attention and escalating into some sort of information warfare. Is it because events like the pandemic election providing for the ground foucault mistrust. All we just playing catch up. There's many questions to ask so. Let me just unpack a little bit to aggregate some. What you said one thing is that there's what's new the you're quite correct that what's going on with information warfare on has been going on for a very very long time thousands of years.

Center For International Secur Hoover Institute American Association For The A National Research Council Of T Lynn Colin America Trojans
Blocked Suez Canal Exposes Global Supply Chain's Fragility

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

01:56 min | 1 year ago

Blocked Suez Canal Exposes Global Supply Chain's Fragility

"Lead. Today comes to us. Courtesy of the ever given that is a thirteen hundred foot. Long two hundred foot wide containership. One of the biggest of its kind. That is as of this moment. Most embarrassingly stuck jamming up the suez canal. Nobody going north not going south one of the key routes of global trade basically closed we have gotten christine. Mcdaniel on zoomed. Help us understand how this might play out. She's a senior research. Fellow at the mercatus center at george mason university. Thanks so much for coming on. Thank you nice to be here. So i have to tell you the first thing i thought when i saw pictures of this ship turned sideways in the canal. Other than how the heck did that happen was wow. The global supply chain is really really fragile. If this can block a major artery yes. It is fragile. There's lots of moving parts but remember the global shipping industry logistics. They are used to supply shocks demand. Shocks weather related war-related. So you know it's nothing they haven't dealt with before fair enough but if you are a a tanker company looking at this traffic jam in the suez canal. How long are you gonna wait and let your extremely valuable ships. Sit there in the backlog before you go around down the south of africa and angola the long way round right. Well economists especially trade. Economists have spent some time trying to calculate how much time cost and international trade The couple economists demanded that each additional delay of shipping is equivalent to about a half a percent to two percents patera And then of course. This is cascading. Because it's not just the stuff on that particular ship That's that's delayed by that. it's everything else. That's getting delayed because of

Suez Canal Mercatus Center Mcdaniel George Mason University Christine Angola Africa
The Real Danger of QAnon

People of the Pod

05:20 min | 1 year ago

The Real Danger of QAnon

"Finkelstein founder and director of the national contagion researchers to a nonpartisan multidisciplinary research group of experts including neuroscientists psychologists. Physicists machine learning experts who study online disinformation pamela. Presi is one of those experts. A senior research fellow at the institute who focuses on the psychology of thriving in a liberal democracy both have been sounding the alarm about the dangers of the antisemitic conspiracy theory cue on and we're not at all surprised to see the events at the capitol on january six there with us now to discuss what we can expect to see next from the movement and what is within our control to stop it pamela. Joel welcome to people of the pod. Thanks for having us so first of all. Please explain for our listeners. In the most basic of terms what is cunanan and why a group called. The american jewish committee might find it troubling. So cunanan is a cybercult that organized with populist conspiracy theories largely on twitter but another social networks as well it really got its roots in a trench community called h. ham and hmi is largely considered armpit of the internet Some of the worst ideas that arrived from social media come out of. Atm was inching about the colt of cunanan. Is that unlike other populist movements which rely on trash tags and organiz based on conspiracies have anti semitic components be value add for cunanan also had an anonymous profit so these diffuse organizations that form lobs on the basis of hashtags. They have a lot of power and benefit because people can act out in the name of the conspiracy without anybody really being responsible but one of the drawbacks. They have is that there's no leadership q. Figured out a solution to solve that you create anonymous leader who can drop missives secret coded information on avon that's encrypted with encryption that he's the only one that has the key for doing q enlisted his followers to become fellow researchers but got them researching with one another to portray vision of reality became increasingly apocalyptic. Interesting and so tell me a little bit more about the anti semitism that runs through cunanan. And how it informs these theories and this movement. The conspiracy group really semitic disinformation because every single successful conspiracy. Group necessarily has to reach for antisemitic. Disinformation as a matter of history and pragmatics. The beauty for a conspiracy theorist beauty being an awkward us but the the ease of anti semitic elements is that they are conspiratorial. And so there's a long history of as joe was saying things to grab things to look for that you just need to look at anti semitism defined and then you just enter that world that conspiratorial world where there is a mysterious you know evoke but somehow secretly powerful other who hides among you and is not always easy to spot that has tentacles in every seat of power government media and finance. That's the jewish conspiracy theory. That's the disinformation about jews. Jews benefit from transparency and the new technology of social media allows for so many areas of black boxes. You know so. Many areas of the dark web so many areas were light is not shining. And that's where these conspiracies grow pamela. Going back to your point about transparency. I'd argue everyone benefits from it. But yes i see your point about jews benefiting from that. I also should point out q. Went on rose to prominence not just during the isolation of the pandemic but during a moment of racial reckoning in this country is that relevant one of the places where we see this coming together in terms of the tools of the network contagion research institutes used to to create transparency and social media. Literally our goals create literacy on social media use machine learning to extract trans at a massive scale. So you characterize the information operations from these groups like you know and one of the largest information operations ever witnessed took place in the middle of quarantine when george floyd was killed and it was mobilized by cuban on and it was blaming george soros for instigating a civil war against antifa the moral other and so that really kind of i think brings home pamelas point in very concrete terms. You had this entire conspiracy network mobilizing around the idea that jewish international financier was causing a civil war was the force behind the moral other and that that was happening in the midst of the conditions of quarantine in that force not coincidentally also behind the virus so that was the largest surge of source activity. We've seen on twitter

Cunanan National Contagion Researchers Presi Pamela Finkelstein American Jewish Committee Joel Twitter JOE George Floyd George Soros
"senior research fellow" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

03:29 min | 1 year ago

"senior research fellow" Discussed on KOMO

"Blank today on the Dan Patrick Show this question Are you involved in personnel decisions? Have you been involved in personnel decisions? Not not as much. I don't You know, I think that you know what do you want to be involved for us? I think it helps. I think it helps it to be involved. More Ross Wilson not happy with the number of sacks and hard knocks he took in 2020. Former Kansas City and San Diego head football coach Marty Schottenheimer has died. 8 77 from Alzheimer's. He won more than 200 games with four different teams into his son, Brian was Seattle's offensive play caller Sports A 10 and 40. After the hour Bill Swartz come on news and the Coma news time now for 11 health leaders north of the border are predicting a possible second pandemic, causing lockdowns and stalled economies to linger even longer comes Brian Calvert explains why some are starting to panic. The words came from the mouth of Dr Eileen developed health officer in Toronto. We are in a position of great uncertainty with respect. Two variants. What we know. Is alarming to clarify her concern isn't over the covert strange doctors have been treating the last several months. Her concern are the variance in Britain and South Africa as well as Brazil that have made it to this continent. We are in a transition from one pandemic. To another a transition. To a new pandemic. The currently known variants are said to be treated with current vaccines bought these new strains from these three countries appear to be more contagious. They spread easier and faster with the possibility of spreading faster than current vaccination efforts can actually keep up with British Columbia Health officer, Dr Bonnie Henry agrees. Sadly, yes, it does change the game in some ways, if it starts to take off and become dominant in the community, who says she's focused on travel restrictions as a way to keep more new strains out of her province tends to be a younger population. So these are people who have traveled or have been in contact with Who have traveled for the most part, travel restrictions have been imposed on those coming into the U. S. For the same reason, which is why many health experts aren't is worried about the new variants. As long as we can pick up the pace with vaccinations. Some are comparing it to a foot race, saying we win if vaccination rates can outrun the variance. If not, there's a possibility of a second pandemic. Andrew Pollard, chief investigator of the Oxford Vaccine trial, told the BBC. He's confident the current vaccines can make a difference. With these variants. It might not prevent covert altogether, but it would prevent the most serious symptoms, he's quoted as saying. As long as we have enough immunity to prevent severe disease, hospitalizations and death And we're going to be fine in the future in the pandemic. Brian Calvert camo news camo news time for 13, Or maybe see news TECH trends. A new report evaluates whether your state is ready for the drone. Revolution delivery drones have said to take this guy's in a big way in the coming years. Red score up senior research fellow at the Mercatus Center says it means local and state governments need to get plans in place because there are privacy issues. There are trust past issues are nuisance issues, and it would behoove all of us for states to start thinking about these things before. Is thrust upon them. The center of the new report looks at what states are the most ready for commercial drone businesses to start operating score up, says they did this by looking at laws around airspace over 20 states. Loud airspace, leasing, sometimes over state highway,.

Brian Calvert Marty Schottenheimer Andrew Pollard Mercatus Center officer Dr Bonnie Henry Dan Patrick Ross Wilson Alzheimer Bill Swartz Dr Eileen British Columbia Health senior research fellow Brian Toronto Seattle head football coach Coma San Diego
"senior research fellow" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

01:44 min | 1 year ago

"senior research fellow" Discussed on KOMO

"And Park around state route 5 to 7 North bound four or five of the slow between Talbot in Northeast 44th. Our next Cuomo traffic up 7 34 report This time is sponsored by the extra Jin temporal scanner. Everyone's temperatures very throughout the day. So it's important to screen for fever in the morning and in the evening fever is a sign of covert 19. So stay safe with the ex surgeon temporal scanner. Now from the diversified crawl Space Weather Center, the forecast and it could get interesting or the next few days. Partly sunny today dry and the high temperature about 40. We may see some more sunshine by this afternoon. Frosty weather overnight, though tomorrow still partly sunny, but some spots could start seeing a few snowflakes like on the Olympic Peninsula. Tomorrow night breezy a chance of snow lows in the mid twenties, and then we start seeing a chance of snow it for some respect. Thursday, Friday and even Saturday Mostly cloudy and 33 downtown Comeau News wants to know. Did you hear now? Kierra has the question in our Daily news trivia contest. Well, a recent survey reveals that one in five of us carry this in our glove box and I'll give you a hint. This item is normally found in your bathroom. What is it? Well, if you're the first caller with the correct answer, you score a digital download of Peter Jackson's middle Earth saga. You get the Hobbit and the Lord of the Rings. All six films here the numbers to call 206421 Coma. Our toll free 877397 KOMO the winning answer at 7 40 from ABC News TECH TRENDS, A new report evaluates whether your state is ready for the drone Revolution. Delivery drones have said to take this guy's in a big way in the coming years. Bread score up senior research fellow with the Mercatus Center says it means local and state governments need to get plans in place because there are privacy issues..

Space Weather Center Mercatus Center fever Cuomo Comeau News Olympic Peninsula senior research fellow KOMO Jin Peter Jackson Daily news ABC Kierra
"senior research fellow" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

02:11 min | 1 year ago

"senior research fellow" Discussed on KOMO

"News TECH TRENDS, a new report evaluates whether your state is ready for the drone. Revolution delivery drones have said to take this guy's in a big way in the coming years. Red score up senior research fellow with the Mercatus Center says it means local and state governments need to get plans in place because there are privacy issues. There are trespassed issues are a nuisance issues, and it would behoove all of us for states to start thinking about these things before is thrust upon them. The center to new report looks at what states are the most ready for commercial drone businesses to start operating score up, says they did this by looking at laws around airspace over 20 states Allow airspace leasing sometimes over state highway. Sometimes over local roads. Sometimes both states like North Dakota and Arkansas top the list. Other states weren't as successful. Some states there near the bottom. Kentucky, South Carolina, West Virginia, South Dakota. Funny enough. North Dakota is very well south and putting out so well with tech trends. I'm Dave Packer, ABC News Co. Moh news time 5 27. NBC Entertainment News. It's the biggest TV event of the year regularly more than 100. Million people tune in, and the ratings for Sunday's Super Bowl in halftime show are absent even come out yet from Nielsen, and that's a serious delay. Last year we knew the score by around 1 P.m. Pacific time. Nelson said Monday evening that the numbers are still being processed and verified. And to look for them on Tuesday. What do you gonna tell groundbreaking country star Mickey Guidance? Latest single, Her son, Grayson gotten and husband grants avoid welcoming their first child, posting a pic of the little one on Instagram, writing that Grayson is quote the hardest and most beautiful thing I've ever done. You have to wash Jason Alexander Hoody that Tide commercial, one of the weirdest from Sunday and now you can get an official Jason Alexander hoody and support charity. Those who donate will be entered to win a limited edition sweatshirt. You're the most beautiful woman I have ever seen. Many saying Michael B. Jordan was a winner of the Super Bowl with his Amazon commercial and the creed and Black Panther stars 34 Today, Jason Nathan's and ABC knows Hollywood New Extra Charge. Hot Nice copy from Duncan is made with 20% extra caffeine from green coffee extract because we could all use a little extra this year whether that's an extra boost some extra boldness or the drive to go.

North Dakota Mercatus Center Jason Alexander Hoody Grayson Michael B. Jordan Jason Alexander senior research fellow South Dakota Jason Nathan ABC News Co Moh ABC Dave Packer Mickey Guidance NBC Nielsen caffeine Duncan Kentucky
What we know - and what we don't - about the new coronavirus variant

BBC Newshour

02:19 min | 1 year ago

What we know - and what we don't - about the new coronavirus variant

"Normal for viruses to mutate. So how alarms should we be about the emergence of this highly infectious variant of the Corona virus, which is now prevalent in southern England, and if the variant is that much easier to transmit? How do you stop? It spread both within the UK and around the rest of the world On Sundays, its impact was starting to be felt. Britain's Health secretary Matt Hancock said people had to act as if they all had. Variant. The new variant is out of control when we need to bring it under control, and this news about the new variant has been a Um, incredibly difficult and, frankly, an awful year on bond. It's important for everybody to act essentially act like they might have the virus. And that's the way that we can control it together. It's not something for government or individuals. It's something for us all to do together. But could this you vary into the coronavirus also Be resistant to the vaccines that have been developed to counter the existing strain. I've been speaking to Dr Lucy Van Dorf, senior research fellow in Microbial Genomic, said the UCL Genetics Institute. What's name for certain about this virus mutation at the moment. What we know is we have a variant in circulation, which is carrying 14 defining mutations, which we haven't seen in the combination we see in this particular variant before This includes seven within the spike protein off the Corona virus, which is the protein that's most important for binding and entering human cells. One of the reasons that this has raised some concern, it's because some of these previously identified mutations have been implicated. In having some kind of biological relevant So the vast majority of mutations we have in this virus and and mutations are very much a natural process and this thousands of variance in circulation have no impact. But in this case we do have sets of mutations, which have been flagged as may be relevant. So are important in terms of the ability of the virus to bind to human cells, and also potentially for some degree of communication. And so this is one of the reasons together with the A marked increase in frequency of this particular Varian within the UK that scientists are studying it really very carefully right as we speak. But what makes this

Matt Hancock Dr Lucy Van Dorf Ucl Genetics Institute Britain England UK Varian
"senior research fellow" Discussed on KPCC

KPCC

06:48 min | 1 year ago

"senior research fellow" Discussed on KPCC

"On with best best efforts to China Limited to 1.5 degrees and remember global temperatures already one degree warmer than it was a pre industrial time. In order to get close to that 1.5 degree target. It means countries, particularly the rich countries will have to try and get to net zero by about 2050. That's the significance of the European Union's target. It's consistent with that call those of why Joe Biden has is talking about that being the target the United States and it's also the target, which the U. K. Which is now no longer a member of the European Union has already put into its own domestic more for that the significance and we've had a huge boost in the last few months by three EU and other countries setting next zero targets, including China, which is declared in September that they will try and reach that dear by 2060. There's a lot that's in this deal that's not meant to specifically address climate change. Though we spoke with Richard Fuchs, he's a senior research fellow at the calls were Institute of Technology. The Green Day is actually much more than just setting a cop in a mission goal. It consists actually offer a wide variety off policy frameworks that feed into this So, for example, it's also setting targets for reduction in pesticide use and fertilizer used in determining how much off Records for production should come from organic production. Sitting are forestation targets targets for nature conservation, rebuilding off natural watershed sense on, so it's much more than what the green deal is about, and I think it's sheer complexity and also amount off these goals that they Sometimes do not always go hand in hand with each other. In an article in the journal Nature, Fuchs argues that these aggressive goals may result in environmental damage being offshored to other, less prosperous regions. If you'll look how the European Cree India is now formulated. It's a purely domestic policy framework. It just tackles domestic targets. And if you want to achieve these domestic targets that say, reducing fertilizer. This will come with the trade off that we probably have to outsource part off this food production toward world regions. If you wanna use less fertilizer. This will immediately affect the years also in parts off Europe. And also pesticide use and restoration of riverbeds. And so on. I think our article was about this that we wanted to raise this awareness that we, as a result, probably have to outsource some off the local domestic production to other parts off the world, which probably produced not that environmentally friendly as we set the targets for ourselves. This is probably the way it will behave if we don't take all these floors. That's Richard Fuchs, He's senior research fellow at the Cultural Institute of Technology. I'm John Penkovsky, and this is science Friday from W. N. Y C studios. We're talking with Frederick Simon, he's energy and environmental editor for Your Active Com, based in Brussels and Bob Ward, he's policy Director Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change in the environment. London School of Economics and Political science rhetoric. I'm wondering first, if you could comment on what we heard from Mr Fuchs about this idea of offshoring. You're upsetting these very aggressive goals. But maybe some of the environmental damage is going to be caused elsewhere. Yes, that's right. And this is what they call in jargon in Brussels carbon leakage, meaning the carbon emissions that we have in Europe. Instead of being emitted hair they're being emitted. Elsewhere. The fact is, at the moment there is no evidence that carbon leakage is happening at all. What is happening, though, is that looking forward as the European Union adults Much more aggressive climate targets for 2030 and 2050. The risk of carbon leakage indeed could become much more real. And this is why one of the things that was mentioned and announced this part of the green deal. Is this idea of introducing a common border adjustment mechanism? It's often being called a carbon border tax. But in fact it's they call it an adjustment mechanism because it's linked to the European emissions trading scheme, the carbon Market. And so that will be an essential central element off the new climate legislation. I would say architectures as your it becomes much more aggressive and cutting emissions in needs to protect itself. From carbon leakage and prevents green dumping. Bob Before we run out of time. I should ask, you know, we've already talked a little bit about the differences between the U. S and the EU politically on these issues, one of the big policy debates. In the U. S. Is whether or not to quote unquote listen to the scientists from people who actually study climate change. How how much have scientists been involved in crafting this European green deal? Our scientists have been involved in creating the environment which policy makers are acting, and it's been a very clear communication from the scientists about what the limits are The emissions targets that the U U is embedding through this climate law is absolutely based on the analysis that's been presented. By the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, another expert grade, So it's creating environment on made very clear that these are the limits. And if you want to be consistent with goals, the international goals that I have been fined up to in the Paris agreement these of the emissions cut you need The U. S. I think will Be moving that way, because I think I would hope that the pandemic has shown what happens when you don't listen to the scientist. You end up with chaos and you end up with adverse outcomes. For a lot of people. You need international cooperation to tackle the big global threats, infectious diseases and pandemics, loss of biodiversity. And climate change. The main message is we all have to act together to tackle the first, because if any one country is not acting, we are all exposed to the risks. Rhetoric. Simon is energy and environmental editor for Euro Active com, based in Brussels, Bob Warden's policy director at the Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change in the environment at the London School of.

Richard Fuchs European Union Brussels Europe senior research fellow Grantham Research Institute Frederick Simon Joe Biden scientist China Limited editor director London School of Economics China United States Bob
"senior research fellow" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:39 min | 1 year ago

"senior research fellow" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"On with best best efforts to try and limited to 1.5 degrees and remember global temperatures already one degree warmer than it was a pre industrial time. In order to get close to that 1.5 degree target. It means countries, particularly the rich countries will have to try and get to net zero by about 2050. That's the significance of the European Union's target. It's consistent with that God does have why Joe Biden has is talking about that being the target of the United States and is also the target which the U. K. Which is now no longer a member of the European Union has already put into its own domestic more so that the significance and we've had a huge boost in the last few months by three EU and other countries, setting Net zero targets, including China, which is declared in September that they will try and reach that dear. By 2060. There's a lot that in this deal that's not meant to specifically address climate change. Though we spoke with Richard Fuchs, he's a senior research fellow at the calls were Institute of Technology. The Green Day is actually much more than just setting carbon emission goal it could this actually offer a wide variety off policy frameworks that feed into this So, for example, it's also setting targets for reduction in pesticide use and fertilizer used in determining how much off agricultural production should come from organic production. Sitting are forestation targets targets for nature conservation rebuild. Thing off natural watershed sense on, so it's much more than what the green deal is about, And I think it's sheer complexity and also amount off these goals that they sometimes do not always go hand in hand with each other. In an article in the journal Nature, Fuchs argues that these aggressive goals may result in environmental damage being offshored. Two other, less prosperous regions. If you look how the European Cree India is now formulated, it's a purely domestic policy framework. It just tackles domestic targets. And if you want to achieve these domestic targets, that's a recusing fertilizer. This will come with the trade off that we probably have to outsource part off this food production 12 World regions. If you wanna use less fertilizer, this will immediately affect the years also in parts off Europe. And also pesticide use and restoration of riverbeds. And so on. I think our article was about this that we wanted to raise this awareness that we, as a result, probably have to outsource some off the local domestic production to other parts off the world, which probably produced not that environmentally friendly as we set the targets for ourselves. This is probably the way it will behave if we don't take all these floors. That's Richard Fuchs, He's senior research fellow at the Cultural Institute of Technology. I'm John Penkovsky, and this is science Friday from W. N. Y C studios. We're talking with Frederick Simon, he's energy and environmental editor for Euro Active com, based in Brussels and Bob Ward, he's policy Director Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change in the environment. London School of Economics and Political science rhetoric. I'm wondering first, if you could comment on what we heard from Mr Fuchs about this idea of offshoring. You're upsetting these very aggressive goals, but maybe some of the environmental damage is going to be caused elsewhere. Yes, that trying to move. This is what they call in jargon in Brussels carbon leakage, meaning the carbon emissions that we have in Europe. Instead of being emitted here, they're being emitted. Elsewhere. The fact is, at the moment there is no evidence that carbon leakage is happening at all. What is happening, though, is that looking forward as the European Union adults Much more aggressive climate targets for 2030 and 2050. The risk of carbon leakage indeed could become much more real. And this is why one of the things that was mentioned and announced this part of the green deal eyes this idea of introducing a common border adjustment mechanism. It's often being called a carbon border tax. Ah, But in fact it's the whole adjustment mechanism because it's linked to the European emissions trading scheme, the carbon market and so that will be an essential central element off the new climate legislation. I would say architectures as your it becomes much more aggressive and cutting emissions in needs to protect itself. From carbon leakage and prevents green dumping. Bob Before we run out of time. I should ask. We've already talked a little bit about the differences between the U. S and the EU politically on these issues, one of the big policy debates In the U. S. Is whether or not to quote unquote listen to the scientists and people who actually study climate change. How how much have scientists been involved in crafting this European green deal? Scientists have been involved in creating an environment which policy makers are acting, and it's been a very clear communication from the scientists about what the limits are. The emissions targets that the EU is embedding through This climate law is absolutely based on the analysis that's been presented By the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, another expert grade. So it's criminal firemen on made very clear that these are the limits. And if you want to be consistent with goals, the international goals that I have been fined up to in the Paris agreement these of the emissions cut you need The U. S. I think will Be moving that way, because I think I would hope that the pandemic has shown what happens when you don't listen to the scientist. You end up with chaos and you end up with adverse outcomes. For a lot of people. You need international corporation to tackle the big global threats, infectious diseases and pandemics, loss of biodiversity. And climate change. That main message is we all have to act together to tackle the fact because if any one country is not acting, we are all exposed to the risks. Rhetoric..

European Union Richard Fuchs scientist Europe senior research fellow Brussels Bob Ward Joe Biden China United States London School of Economics John Penkovsky India Institute of Technology Paris
"senior research fellow" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

Newsradio 970 WFLA

08:26 min | 2 years ago

"senior research fellow" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

"Ethan you cur, joined by Jeff Wagstaff, Kimberly and Doc are not here. Although Doc will pop in for the next segment here to tell us what's new in medicine today. But right now, a recent report by the scientific journal Nature Medicine claimed that if more people warm asked as many as 130,000 fatalities, Could be prevented by February. But further investigation has shown that their initial data was flawed. So what are we supposed to believe? I don't know. But joining us to discuss is Philip Magnus. Research fellow at the Independent Institute as well, a senior research fellow at the American Institute for Economic Research. Thank you for being here, Phil. Thanks for having of course, now tell us about this study that was published by nature medicine. Well, your whiskers may remember about two weeks ago, there's a major headline grabbing study that claimed that if Americans would increase the rate of mask adoption 130,000 lives could be saved by January or maybe early February on this study was cited by Anthony Fauci, Joe Biden is referenced in several times. It's been all over the media. The problem with this study is it was based on outdated data on the current rate that the Americans were using masks. So you read into the study itself that claims that as of late September, only 49% of Americans were even wearing masks when they got in public. I'm with the statistic is it's outdated by at least 3 to 4 months. This was based on a survey that had been done back in the spring, when mask of use was not as common and when experts reckon more, divided them on the subject. What happens is we look at more recent survey data on how prevalent mask rates are in the United States is actually above 80%. Bill. I'm curious. How do you feel mask wearing can affect the virus. At this point based on your research. Well, this is the science on Mount does seem to support the notion that they are a protective advice for a protective device for other people. This is why they've been used in hospitals or better part of a century. Yet at the same time, they aren't a magic bullet. They aren't something that's going to Clinton make the virus go away. If we always thought masks, and unfortunately I think what's happened in the past several months is the narrative has emerged around mask used. Has treated them is that it was a measure of the difficult on Lee Americans would adopt this public health measure. The virus itself would be controlled. And what we're seeing, actually, in the evidence is that the benefits of masking though not a negligible were overstated. It was treated as more of a magic bullet than a preventative measure among many different things that people can do to stem the fires. You know what's really crazy. Phil, is that How sporadic. The different mask mandates are, depending on where you go here in Florida in Tampa, where I live, it's pretty much everywhere. Everywhere you go. It's Zeman three error to see someone not wearing a mask than people wearing them because they wear them everywhere will last weekend, my wife and I traveled to the opposite side of the state. Say Augustine, Florida and spent the weekend And it was insane. Some places that you went. It was like it is here in Tampa. Everybody wearing masks signs on the doors. You know, you can't enter without a mask. Then we went to this pizza place to get dinner. Luckily, there is an outdoor courtyard so we could sit outdoors with a nice breeze. But when we walked in, I almost turned around and walked right back out. Nobody had masks on and including the servers s. Oh, it's just strange and it was like that all over the city of ST Augustine. Some places you'd see him some places you don't. Sometimes there was a mix. I think there's been a mixed message here from from the governor from our mayors and leadership. What do you think? I know. Biden has basically said that he will institute National mask mandate if necessary. What are your thoughts? Right? So part of this goes all the way back to the spring. You remember when Anthony's Valachi and the surgeon general and the World Health organization that event Back in March and April. They were giving very mixed messages about what Master deuce in. Sometimes they even went on technology went on 60 minutes and said that master not effective. Turns out that there were other political reasons behind some of these clients, but that mixed mixed messaging really set the country off on a unkind of the wrong course. And so it's basically until the summer to really correct that, when mask used became Much more common what we are seeing in the data that urban areas are German areas tend to have much higher rates of Massachusetts, the often coaches near universality so upwards of 90% of people in most major cities. Are reporting that they wear masks. That number does drop off a bit if you move away from major cities of the smaller towns and rural regions, But still, even in the rural regions, it's clear majority that's wearing math. Oftentimes upwards of 70 to 80% of the public, So we caught up with a lot of the misinformation. That happened even though the reason consistency in the nationwide you know still one of the things that I believe the research will will. After this is all over and people take a look back. I think that originally when Dr Fauci was talking about He wasn't sure of the effectiveness of mask. I think there was a major concern by the government by CBC by W. H. O That if they said to wear masks that there would be a run on mask much like there is Right on toilet paper and paper towels today. So a smudges. I agree with you. I think some of that initial information was misleading. But I also believe it was misleading for our own good so that the medical professionals doctors, nurses on the front line, Our first responders would have first access to pee pee. My concern now is with mask wearing now that we're in, you know, it seems like day 4000 of this pandemic that people are beginning to have covert fatigue. And they start to release and reduce their Their guard. I'll give you a perfect example. Listeners of the regular listeners of this show know that I am a caretaker for my father. We were going to have My daughter. And my mother in law for Thanksgiving, who both households. Quarantine and with all of the news this week, even though they're quarantining they're urging. Don't bring people into your home that don't live there. We canceled even that among quarantine people I would at this point. I hope the country agrees that we need to air on the side of caution so we can get this virus under control. I think that's absolutely the case. I mean, Our own risk assessment and risk aversion is going to be our best guide moving forward. Unfortunately, we've fallen into a bit of a trap here because not only do we have coded fatigue. We have fatigue from the lockdown fatigue from all these blunt instruments of policy that we adopted in the spring. Now they're talking about bringing them back. And in some states, they have even brought elements of this back. People are are starting to get wary of that. And what it does is it reduces the The public's willingness to comply and participate in these measures that they were more willing to tolerate that in the spring To complicate that the mixed messaging that we've got many scientific Community members. Many public health officials up into including this study that was published in nature is that evidence is often set aside for some of the political arguments that are being made. Unfortunately, that's starting to take a total on the public's trust in our public health officials in the trusting scientists, which is a really bad situation, to be in in the middle of a pandemic, the stolen with us Still ongoing and still. Ah, very severe threat. Theo individual in public health. Yeah, Philip's strange because I told you this the other day, Jeff that Everything has been so politicized, especially the mask this and that there's conspiracy theorists out there, for instance, anecdotally, my wife and I went and bought. She bought a piece of furniture about an hour south of Tampa. Down in Britain. We drove down there to get it. It was an older woman. Obviously, we know they're the ones that should be the most taking the.

Tampa Anthony Fauci Nature Medicine Philip Magnus Phil Jeff Wagstaff Joe Biden Doc Florida American Institute for Economi Research fellow Independent Institute senior research fellow United States ST Augustine Massachusetts Zeman Clinton Augustine
"senior research fellow" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

Newsradio 970 WFLA

08:23 min | 2 years ago

"senior research fellow" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

"I am Ethan. You cur, joined by Jeff Wagstaff, Kimberly and Doc are not here. Although Doc will pop in for the next segment here to tell us what's new in medicine today. But right now, a recent report by the scientific journal Nature Medicine claimed that if more people wore masks, as many as 130,000 fatalities, Could be prevented by February. But further investigation has shown that their initial data was flawed. So what are we supposed to believe? I don't know. But joining us to discuss is Philip Magnus. Research fellow at the Independent Institute as well, a senior research fellow at the American Institute for Economic Research. Thank you for being here, Phil. Thanks for having me, of course. Now tell us about this study that was published by nature medicine. Your listeners may remember about two weeks ago, there's a major headline grabbing study that claimed that if Americans would increase the rate of mask adoption 130,000 lives could be saved by January or maybe early February on this study was cited by Anthony Fauci, Joe Biden is referenced in several times. It's been all over the media. The problem with this study is that was based on some outdated data on the current rate that Americans are using masks. So he read into the study itself that claims that as of late September, only 49% of Americans were even wearing masks when they got in public. Come with the statistic is it's outdated by at least 3 to 4 months. This was based on a survey that had been done back in the spring, when mask of use was not as common and when experts recommend more divided them on the subject. What happens is if we look at more recent serving data on how prevalent mass graves for in the United States is actually above 80% Bill, I'm curious. How do you feel mask wearing can affect the virus. At this point based on your research. Well, the science on mouse does seem to support the notion that they are a protective advice for a protective device for other people. This is why they've been used in hospitals or better part of a century. Yet at the same time, they aren't a magic bullet. They aren't something that's going to Clinton make the virus go away if we always thought mask. Unfortunately, I think what's happened in the past several months is a narrative has emerged around mass views. Has treated them is that it was a measure of the difficult on Lee Americans would adopt this public health measure. The virus itself would be controlled. And what we're seeing, actually, in the evidence is that the benefits of masking though not a negligible were overstated. It was treated as more of a magic bullet than a preventative measure among many different things that people can do to stem the buyers. You know what's really crazy. Phil, is that How sporadic. The different mask mandates are, depending on where you go here in Florida in Tampa, where I live, it's pretty much everywhere. Everywhere you go it Zeman three error to see someone not wearing a mask than people wearing them because they wear them everywhere will last weekend, my wife and I traveled to the opposite side of the state. Say Augustine, Florida and spent the weekend And it was insane. Some places that you went. It was like it is here in Tampa. Everybody wearing masks signs on the doors. You know, you can't enter without a mask. Then we went to this pizza place to get dinner. Luckily, there is an outdoor courtyard so we could sit outdoors with a nice breeze. But when we walked in, I almost turned around and walked right back out. Nobody had mass son and including the servers s. Oh, it's just strange and it was like that all over the city of ST Augustine. Some places you'd see him some places you don't Sometimes there was a mix. I think there's been a mixed message here from from the governor from our mayors and leadership. What do you think? I know Biden has basically said that he will institute a national mask mandate if necessary. What are your thoughts? Right. So sort of this goes all the way back to the spring. If you remember when Anthony's Palocci and the surgeon general and the World Health organization even back in March and April, they were giving very mixed messages about what Master do And sometimes they even went on technology went on 60 minutes and said that master not effective. Turns out that there were other political reasons behind some of these claims. But that miss mixed messaging really get the country off on a unkind of the wrong course. And solar is basically until the summer to really correct that, when mask used became Much more common what we are seeing in the data that urban areas, large urban areas tend to have much higher rates of vast usage of the often approaches near universality, so upwards of 90% of people in most major cities Are reporting that they wear math. That number does drop off a bit. If you move away from major cities in the smaller towns and rural regions, But still, even in the rural regions. It's clear majority that's wearing that. Oftentimes upwards of 70 to 80% of the public. So we caught up with a lot of the misinformation to happen, even though the reason consistency in the nationwide you know still one of the things that I believe the research will will. After this is all over and people take a look back. I think that originally when Dr Fauci was talking about He wasn't sure of the effectiveness of mask. I think there was a major concern by the government by CBC by W. H. O That if they said to wear masks that there would be a run on mask much like there is Right on toilet paper and paper towels today. So a smudges. I agree with you. I think some of that initial information was misleading. But I also believe it was misleading for our own good so that the medical professionals doctors, nurses on the front line, Our first responders would have first access to pee pee. Um My concern now is with mask wearing now that we're in, you know, it seems like day 4000 of this pandemic that people are beginning to have Coben fatigue. And they start to release and reduce their Their guard. I'll give you a perfect example. Listeners of the regular listeners of this show know that I am a caretaker for my father. We were going to have My daughter. And my mother in law for Thanksgiving, who both households. Quarantine and with all of the news this week, even though they're quarantining they're urging. Don't bring people into your home that don't live there. We canceled even that among quarantine people I would at this point. I hope the country agrees that we need to air on the side of caution so we can get this virus under control. I think that's absolutely the case. I mean, Our own risk assessment and risk aversion is going to be our best guide moving forward. Unfortunately, we've fallen into a bit of a trap here because not only do we have coded fatigue we have Fatigue from the lockdowns fatigue from all these blunt instruments of policy that we adopted in the spring, and now they're talking about bringing them back. And in some states, they have even brought elements of this back. People are starting to get wary of that, and what it does is it reduces the public's willingness to comply and participate in these measures that they were more willing to tolerate that in the spring? To complicate that the mixed messaging that we've got many scientific Community members. Many public health officials up into including this study that was published in nature is that evidence is often set aside for some of the political arguments that are being made. Unfortunately, that's starting to take its toll on the public's trust in our public health officials in the trust in scientists, which is a really bad situation to be in in the middle of a pandemic, the stolen with us still ongoing and still, ah, very severe threat Theo the individual in public health. Yeah, Phil, it's It's strange because I told you this the other day, Jeff that everything has been so politicized, especially the mask this and that there's conspiracy theorists out there, for instance, anecdotally, my wife and I went and bought. She bought a piece of furniture about an hour south of Tampa. Down in Britain. We drove down there to get it. It was an older woman..

Anthony Fauci Phil Tampa Nature Medicine Joe Biden Jeff Wagstaff Doc Florida American Institute for Economi Philip Magnus Ethan Research fellow Independent Institute Fatigue senior research fellow United States ST Augustine Zeman Clinton
"senior research fellow" Discussed on WDRC

WDRC

01:51 min | 2 years ago

"senior research fellow" Discussed on WDRC

"What most of your local newscasters called the mostly peaceful protests, which is just so completely inaccurate. Because if they were mostly peaceful, and there was no violence whatsoever, most of the news stations would have lost interest in this about four months ago, about two or three days into the ongoing protests, so to the extent that they began as a peaceful protests and rapidly escalated into arson into even murder into assault into attacks on the police and calls for the police to be killed and the police officer's families to be killed, I mean some truly ugly stuff. And if you wonder to yourself, how is it that over the last four months America's scene according to the insurance industry over $2 billion in damages, But that only counts the insured damages. Of course, there were damages that happened beyond that, and said, Well, why can't we get this stuff to stop? I think there's a very simple solution. Enforce the law when people break the law, arrest them. When you arrest them, charge them when you charge them, prosecute them. But what happens when your local prosecutor says I'm simply not going to prosecute those cases? And that is happening in far too many cities around America, including the city that is the home base for the Lars Larson show. And that's Portland, Oregon, which has now become the poster child. For what not to do as a city. Almost every politician out there is now using Portland, Oregon as a punch line for the story. Well, Laura Reese joins me now is a senior research fellow for Homeland Security at the Heritage Foundation. Laura Welcome to the program. It is my idea of simply enforcing the law and prosecuting criminals. Is that too simplistic for solving this problem? Think large for having me on and no, it is not too simplistic. Other cities that have had riots break out the summer have been able Teo.

Laura Reese America Oregon Portland Lars Larson arson Teo officer prosecutor assault senior research fellow murder Homeland Security Heritage Foundation
UK and Germany's different approaches to the pandemic

NPR's World Story of the Day

07:00 min | 2 years ago

UK and Germany's different approaches to the pandemic

"The UK and Germany are both leading democracies and not far apart on the globe. They took very different approaches to the pandemic with very different results the UK as suffered the most covid nineteen deaths in Europe Germany with a much bigger population has lost far fewer people. NPR's correspondent in each country rob Schmitz in Berlin and Frank Langfitt in London had been talking among themselves. Hey Rob Frank. So tell me what happened in the UK. were. So many mistakes a big reason is the government honestly doesn't really seem to think ahead Boris Johnson you remember he sold Brexit to the British people in two thousand sixteen with no plan on how to execute it. So in the virus began spreading here Johnson course he's now prime minister. He was slow to recognize the threat here he is on March Third I was at movie night. where I think the rush if you credit ours patience and I shook hands of everybody. So by April Johnson an icy ICU covid nineteen I was talking to you in Boyd he's a member of the scientific group that advises the government. The UK didn't really grasped the speed with which the epidemic was entering the country under are all sorts of reasons for that, some of which are to. Lack of organisational capability sometimes when there's very high uncertainty, you simply have to shut things down really quickly and frank here in. Germany. That's what they did on January twenty seven. The first known case of coronavirus was sent to Clemson ventner chief physician at the Munich Schwab in clinic we have very similar like the boys gall. Be always prepare. Then you're watched what was happening in Italy in January where the virus was spreading pretty fast and we knew that we have to flatten the curve. So even before the first case of Covid nineteen and Germany, he was working on slowing its progress and he says the German government was involved from day one asking us what do you need we? We? We didn't have to ask them for example, Germany already had a big supply of ICU beds clouds Deutsche is at the Federation of German. You know that it's been a long debate on whether we had too many intensive care beds that warned us that often obviously that debate is over Deutsche says, Germany also has a lot of hospitals. If you take all the beds in all of Germany's hospitals, you get four times more per capita than what the UK has rob. You had slack in your system in Germany there. Was Not much here because the government had been cutting funding to the National Health Service for years, the hospitals were afraid of getting swamped with Cova patients. So they sent elderly patients back to nursing homes some broad cove with them infected other residents at least twenty, thousand nursing home residents died of covid. That's terrible in while in Germany, deaths were prevented through testing and contact tracing. The health authority in Berlin district of Hong, Kong and operator talks to man at conduct with a positive case, there are around four hundred call centers like this across Germany Peters directs this one become Austin We have traffic wardens and librarians working for us. We've recruited gardeners from parks and recreation Germany had a lot of manpower and testing to infrastructure filled with labs and university medical centers across the country. You know here the government misread the corona virus they thought it was going to spread as quickly as the flu. They didn't even try to develop a testing system where we steward he's a former British cabinet minister they were very, very confident. And slightly arrogant neb beliefs that they understood this disease better than other countries, I think the lack of scientific education amongst a lot of the British political elite meant that they were very reluctant to challenge scientists but here, Germany. Frank. A trained scientist is at the helm and Chancellor Angela Merkel. gave one of the most powerful and heartfelt speeches in her life when she made a rare national address on March. Eighteenth dusted fees above in then. Comes here. I have absolutely no doubt that we will overcome this crisis. How many victims will it claim? How many loved ones lose to a large extent? The answer lies in our own hands miracle has a doctorate in quantum chemistry, and in another speech, she patiently explain how important it was for Germany to reduce the viruses reproduction rate. Her tone was always humble and deadly serious. I'm. Doing this Icefield is off that. We are thin ice. This is a situation in which caution not over-confidence is the order of the day it really different here Johnson studied classics at Oxford University. He was president the debating society and as Prime Minister he's tried to rally the country with rhetoric. We must act like any wartime government and do whatever it takes to support our economy Johnson's Ori helped win a landslide election last year, but a pandemic, of course, not a campaign. Here's where. We store again he sees himself as somebody who is encouraging a rugby team for nineteen minute match telling them that fantastic to make them play. Well, he doesn't primarily see himself as somebody whose job is to get into uncomfortable details were chew over policy and strategy but frank, it's this chewing over of policy and strategy. This technocratic nature of the German government that may have also contributed to Germany's success hunts could is senior research fellow at Chatham House this sort of doubling down on technocracy. Populism has now been discredited by the Corona Virus. He says, that's potentially dangerous. If technocrats feel too emboldened, there might be an even bigger growth populist backlash in the future some people will blame Johnson for Britain's handling of covid campaigner. He thinks Johnson's more symptoms than 'cause captors just written a book called why the Germans do it better notes from grownup country. We've descended into believing that somehow because we always muddled through in the past muddling through is a recipe that will get us through in the future. So rob where's Germany now with crow verse? Well cases are rising deaths are not that tells us these new cases are from young people, children across the country are back in classrooms, but the German government seems so far. Okay. With the dangers of this, there remains a strong infrastructure of hospital beds, testing, tracing Germany fields, prepared and Chancellor Angela Merkel's popularity ratings are sky high eighty, six percent. WOW cases rising rapidly to we've got new strictures but Johnson actually had trouble explaining them to the nation recently the last surveys Ron Johnson is under forty percent approval rating testing capacity here still can't meet demand. And Winter's coming. NPR London correspondent Frank Langfitt, and Berlin correspondent. Rob? Schmitz.

Germany Boris Johnson Frank Langfitt German Government UK Berlin Rob Schmitz Rob Frank Prime Minister Covid Chancellor Angela Merkel NPR Europe London UK. Brexit Boyd Clemson Coronavirus
Are Australia's security agencies getting too big?

Between The Lines

03:09 min | 2 years ago

Are Australia's security agencies getting too big?

"Well, you'd have to be living under a rock not to notice that Australia, is radically different security environment than walls just two years ago. The Prime Minister he's locked into the situation to the nineteen thirties, and in the last six months, we've seen a massive increase to the budgets for defense and our intelligence agencies. Now, the external threats are undeniable. You just think of the rising power of China, but are we at risk of undermining our political freedoms by expanding the powers of security agencies too much. Hell big and powerful. Should we let security agencies get? And what kind of oversight exists to ensure that the intelligence is not collected or used for political purposes? What do you think we'll pay the redwoods is the former official historian and the author of several award winning books. He's most recent one is called law politics and intelligence a law of Robert. Hope. Welcome back to the show painter. Thanks very much tom thanks for having me and just into carol she's a visiting fellow and senior research fellow at the national. Security, college it you good to be with you again just enter right to be thanks Tom. Now let's start with the hope commissions in the seventies and eighties Peter. This is your faces take us back to that time. Why are those commissions so important well between the mid seventies in the mid eighties over ten year period three successive Prime Ministers Whitlam Fraser and Hoke commissioned the same man just as good hope to conduct major inquiries into the intelligence agencies What he set up was not just not just any inquiry into a agency in Asia was the declared one and quite controversial that he set up a whole system for the agencies. Sitting out what each what agencies Australia needed, what each one should do, and what should not do how they should interact with each other, how they should interact with departments with individual ministers with the cabinet and cabinet committees and with the international partners Those we now know is five is and he emphasized a number of things. He particularly emphasized the intelligence system should serve the whole of government and not be unduly influenced as it was when he started by one or two very powerful departments, and towards that end, he said that should be a central coordinating agency which would only be invoked with assessment and he allocated collection assessment and dissemination different agencies. this one would be only concerned with assessment on like the American CIA and with its the independence of its. Assessments guaranteed by legislation. To, be independent from ministerial oh departmental. Precious. and. He said a of other things about the relationships between intelligence and lure enforcement agencies. Keeping Intelligence and policy making separate keeping intelligence and law enforcement separate were among the the basic

Australia TOM Prime Minister CIA Visiting Fellow Whitlam Fraser China Senior Research Fellow Official Peter Asia Hoke
"senior research fellow" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

08:11 min | 2 years ago

"senior research fellow" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Monday through Friday on the Wintrust business lunch from noon to one and a devil Entous after that, among our conversations today, the Art institute's opening back up. How do you go to that? How do you do that? We told you on this show. Not that long ago about the Shedd Aquarium opening, we talked about the field museum, The Art institute's turned today. We'll catch up with Amy Allen, the vice president of engagement at the Art Institute. Stick around for that, Just a little after 12. 30. Right now we start with David Beckworth, the senior research fellow at the Mercatus Center for a TTE George Mason University of former international economist. At the U. S Department of the Treasury. You khun visit mercatus dot org's Thanks for joining us, David, How are you today? Great. Thanks for having me on the show. It's ah, it's it's nice to hear your voice again. We've talked to a number of quote unquote experts on the economy this week, and a lot of attention was obviously on the tech companies. I suppose that's on your radar, too. Sure it's important part of our economy, and what happens to them happens to the rest of us indirectly, if not directly, I was talking to somebody the other day. They said that when you look at the Dow and some of these indices, It's actually sometimes just a handful of companies that are driving it. It's googol. It's Amazon. Maybe they aren't perfect arbiters of how the market is doing overall or the economy for that matter. Is. Do we put too much weight when we look at the markets into just a handful of companies? I think that's a possible problem for investors. If you're thinking in terms of policy, what we should be doing then? Yeah. I don't think the stock market is the economy economy broader than just, you know. Few influential firms and the stock indices. At least they're doing well, though, right? Oh, certainly There has been a great time for them. In fact, after their hearing this week, their stock prices shot up his, you know, so this has been a great time for them, and there's controversy, but they seem to be doing relatively well during the pandemic. Why did they? Why did they go up after the testimony on Capitol Hill? It's not entirely clear me. No one knows for sure I think happened. My sense of a better established themselves. They have a better footing going forward, but I don't think anyone really has a clear answer. I suppose it was that they sort of dodge that bullet. I mean, you know, some of them did better than others. But I didn't see any table pounding where we discovered by guy. They're corrupt and they're going to go down. And I thought, you know, uh, Amazon looks really well mean that the testimony given by its chairman with outstanding I think they again firmly kind of established themselves. They're not going to go anywhere. It's not some big scandal me. There's bigger fish to five for Congress. Right now. Economy in general is no. Well, it has tanks we learned yesterday and I think it's going to be better this next quarter. There's still some ground. Toa worry. Think you look a little bit shaky in July, and we never know what's gonna happen in new fears about the virus caused further concerns among spenders. Yeah, You've got the second wave coming in one direction and then the hope for a vaccine and the other. I was having some negative thoughts the other day, And they were this that one of these trial runs that were investing billions of dollars in putting our hopes and Comes up negative it fall so short of expectations that it's not going to reopen the economy, and I think the markets as well, as you know, employment would react to that. Oh, absolutely. And there's that factory. We might be disappointed, but there's also the fact that we're still in a big, big wholeness economy. We lost 22 million job. In March and April, and main Junior's gained about 7.5 1,000,000 back. There's still a big hole to fill employment there. Still on 30 million people who are on all forms of state and federal jobless insurance or something will run out this week. But there's still a huge huge hold the economy and I think that hole by itself has been a tradition of tight spots to the rest of the year. In addition to being disappointed by what happens, vaccine how do you suppose then the depositor the were and that everybody's in should impact the way we deal with China. That was boy on everybody's front burner before the pandemic, you know, trade with China. How does that change things? Right. In my view, I think it is is you put it back burner on things for when we have enough things going on. Our plate is full. Me. Policymakers plates are very full, just trying to get through this health crisis, which is also an economic crisis and then Why, On top of that we want to rattle things more. And I think you know that was a big issue before it's gonna be a big issue going forward, But I would feel if Iran President Trump's shoes, I would be what I could to kind of minimize that distraction right now. We need all hands on deck. With this public health crisis as well as economic crisis. One last thing for you, then. Are you on board A second round of stimulus checks? $1200 or another round of unemployment benefits Serpent, you know the boost of 45 $600. Well, let me put it. Let me say this. All The evidence shows that the concerns about the unemployment insurance, he added, One other level hasn't really hampered people going back to work there. Definitely hearing their stories You can tell If you look at, for example, all the people who were hard back seven million, many of the one study found 7% of them were making more with their unemployment insurance and what they got going back on the job. There's a number of spending that showed that in practice hasn't been a problem. That's because They can economy the hole so big my worry is it will be something kind of off probably will leave this drastic results. I do think the over longer and you do have to face it out Long term. Definitely think of the big issue but a sudden cut off Probably not in our best interest. I think that is so interesting. I have not heard anybody quote that that well, yes, there are people that are making more money on unemployment. Given the opportunity, people still go backto work. By the way, I presume that has something to do with health care coverage as well. It does, and people want to work. You went back to normal. But think seven happy seven million folks have gone backto work in 70% of them were making more on unemployment insurance all their benefit. Rather than work. Another indicator that supports this interpretation is that you look at indicators. Job bacon, employers who paste job vacancy If it benefits were truly keeping people back on a large scale, you big spike in that, but we haven't seen that either. So I there's trade offs here. There's definitely a distortion airing Senate. But there's also the need to help. You know the economy of the whole again. I think you don't want to do a sudden cut off. You want to. Maybe Plan to phase in a sudden draw down but make a gradual make it predictable. Give people time to adjust. David Beckworth is a senior research fellow at the Mercatus Center at George Mason University. Really interesting. David will call again. I appreciate your time. All right, Thank you. 12 16 on W. G N into the newsroom Steve Bertrand, partly sunny today, a high in the low eighties and looking into the weekend. There's a chance of a shower on Saturday and Sunday, but Both days highs in the lower eighties. Right now it's 81 degrees at O'Hare. As for Wall Street, the Dow is down 268 points, yes and P 500 down 20 and the NASDAQ has given up almost all of its earlier gains its now well now it has moved into negative territory. Down a couple of points. A gas leak in Downers Grove has 55th close between Maine and Fairview. And if you're wondering why a CFT helicopters hovering around Navy Pier along with some Marine units, they're searching the lake after a pedal boat was found floating with no occupant, However, there's no confirmation of a missing person. Lauren Latka, WG and Traffic Central. Every.

David Beckworth Amazon Art institute Mercatus Center senior research fellow China Shedd Aquarium Amy Allen Wintrust TTE George Mason University vice president Navy Pier Congress Treasury U. S Department
"senior research fellow" Discussed on WDRC

WDRC

03:01 min | 2 years ago

"senior research fellow" Discussed on WDRC

"8664395277 Emails go to talk. At Lars Larson dot com. I have been telling you for some time about thie really threat that China poses to the United States, not just from things like the China virus and telling the world lies about it in the early days when it would have made a difference, but also about the fact that this is a country that has allowed companies that are largely controlled by the Chinese communist government. To spy on our country on not just to spy on our government. I kind of expect governments to spy on each other, but to do spying that goes after our corporations and after our intellectual property, Dr Wei Fung Zong joint joins me Now Zhang joins me now Who's a senior research fellow at the Mercatus Center, Doc, welcome back to the program. Thank you for having me back. So many of us took note of the fact that the U. S ordered China to close its consulate in Houston, Texas, because of actions by the Chinese government. Would you mind telling us exactly what happened there and what and what the Chinese responds to it has been Well, I wish I I knew exactly what happened. I think everybody out. I'm very curious about the example What they were burning the other night in court. Yeah. On a more serious note, though I think this is indeed a very unusual move, and it just came out today that the council general at the consulate in Houston was saying that was saying that they were not going to follow the order to close down, So it was very it will be very interesting to see what would happen next. One thing for sure. Is that the U. S. China rival Li. It's certainly going to heat up much more in the in the in the months to come. Well, Dr John before we leave that, to your point in particular is that possible? Is it possible for a foreign government to say we're not going to close our embassy? We're not going to leave when its host country says leave. I guess it's possible. I don't know how eviction works in this area. But I assume that if they do not follow the order to close down the U. S authorities would be it would be possible for the U. S. Authorities to go in and You know if they have a warrant and a concert or something like that. So let's go back to the subject, though of what is happening with regard to the Chinese government or Chinese companies are acting at the direction of the government stealing intellectual property. They have quite a history of that, don't they? Yeah. Yeah, that's certainly suit. So that comes to the point off. The cause ofthe engagement with China, which Secretary Pompeii will was just talking about in the speech this afternoon. And I think the U. S on ly policy makers but even lay people Like you and I are talking about that way, sort of have underestimated the cost of engagement in the late seventies, when when China started to reform The hypothesis hypothesis..

Chinese government China Houston Lars Larson Dr Wei Fung Dr John Mercatus Center Secretary Pompeii senior research fellow United States Texas Zhang U. S
"senior research fellow" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

02:01 min | 2 years ago

"senior research fellow" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

"Many justices are acting like lawmakers instead you have a separate court appears to be legislating and what really troubles a lot of people is that some of the folks that the Republican Party has put on this bench to be not because the policy conclusions but because they say that they understand that their job is to interpret the law not to write are actively becoming activists the foundation senior research fellow for homeland security lower res tells the seller radio network the majority on the court did not do the job it was supposed to do it's a pro core in this decision seems to be making arguments for the pointers rather than being just deciding on the question the question at hand res calls judicial activism by the majority where does president trump's approval numbers stand by the measure of the Rasmussen daily presidential tracking poll president trump's forty seven percent total approval is four points better than the forty three percent he had on may twenty fifth the day George Floyd died in Minneapolis police custody by the measure of five thirty eight dot com president trump's aggregate poll numbers are almost equal to new year's day twenty twenty before all of the unrelenting turbulence of this year's first half as of Thursday according to a same day matching comparison president trump is a percentage point ahead of where former president Obama was forty seven percent to forty six percent George ones on a reporting house speaker Nancy Pelosi ordering capital portraits honoring for previous house speaker who served in the confederacy be removed saying they have no place in the hallowed halls of Congress Dow futures early this morning up forty seven points news and analysis at townhall dot com really thank the pain relief that's natural pain relief that works on pain relief that attacks the source of the pain that's the experience of tens of thousands of Americans we'll take you really factor right now see the incredible video endorsements that really faxes are coming.

Republican Party senior research fellow trump George Floyd Obama Nancy Pelosi president Rasmussen Minneapolis twenty twenty
"senior research fellow" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

05:04 min | 2 years ago

"senior research fellow" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"Immigrants in the country illegally heritage foundation senior research fellow for homeland security Laura rea says the majority of the court did not take into account the doctors should never have been implemented the Supreme Court could have simply said this rescission was lawful because the Obama administration was without authority either by Congress or the constitution to create this program in the first place for now the immigrants to retain their protection from deportation as well as their authorization to work in the U. S. even though they are in the country illegally racial tension was probably during a house hearing on police reform here are the details from correspondent Bernie but at a house Judiciary Committee hearing on the justice and policing act Louisiana Democrat Cedric Richmond got into a very contentious exchange of congressman Matt Gaetz says a Florida Republican asks are you suggesting that you're certain none of us have non white children it is about black males in the streets how to do it in a move one of them happens to be your kid I'm concerned about him too and clearly I'm more concerned about him then you'll socialist we I think so for my family I do any better than Washington correspondent Karen Travers reports even as a crowd of virus spreads rapidly around the world China is being called on to relieve the financial burden on the African African nations have called for a two year suspension of debt payments another relief that would allow them to focus resources on the health crisis but China Africa's biggest creditor has not indicated it will offer a sweeping solution and experts say will focus instead on bilateral arrangements with countries that is correspondent Karen jam is reporting on Wall Street right now the Dow is down sixty six points or the stories it town home dot com Thursday June eighteenth two thousand twenty you are listening to the Riley update here's what's happening across our nation a former Atlanta police officer faces the death penalty for the killing of a shard Brooks meanwhile some Atlanta cops call in sick revolting new cases of the virus hit record highs in six states the NBA unveils his plan to bring back pro basketball is it time for the Dixie chicks they changed their name also ahead American police may backlash against the anti cop movement but first stories in Georgia charging Garrett Ralph with eleven counts in the killing every shard Brooks looting felony murder if convicted Mr Ralph could get the death penalty meantime a number of Atlanta police officers called in sick last night I will deal with this in my upcoming commentary the department justice targeting social media companies like Facebook and Twitter issuing new proposals that would end the legal protections for content published on those sites what forms could face big penalties for posts that promote cyber stalking terrorism defamation or child exploitation six states now reporting the highest level of coal with infections since the contagion began Florida Texas Arizona Oklahoma Oregon and Nevada confirming the biggest single day spikes on record nineteen other states seeing cases rise since re opening in may covert is killed more than a hundred and twenty thousand Americans in less than four months the National Basketball Association releasing all one hundred thirteen page plan to bring basketball back by July twenty two teams will relocate to Disney world in Orlando after a mandatory quarantine period players will be sequestered in three hotels the athletes will be allowed to roam around the properties but they will stay primarily isolated the Dixie chicks could be the next act to change their name just days after another trio lady antebellum became lady AA users on social media are targeting the checks according to a writer for variety the word Dixie conjures up a time and place of bondage for black people farewell Dixie cups in a moment we'll American police revolt right back with it Edward and his wife Margaret we're looking forward to retirement Edward started having serious health issues a few years before he turned sixty five and had to take an unplanned early retirement the loss of income and medical bills meant that word could not afford his expenses including the premiums on a one million dollar life insurance policy faced with lapsing their policy for nothing Edward and Margaret turned to Coventry direct.

senior research fellow
"senior research fellow" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

11:27 min | 2 years ago

"senior research fellow" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"Hi John this is the John Batchelor show at the end of the lockdown the question about this day the opening yeah open for business yes there are problems in the states that existed before the virus and are now deeper I go to Veronique de rugy of the Mercator's center a senior research fellow who with her colleague tad DeHaven have some focus very carefully on the states and their budgets that were in trouble before and are more in trouble now very good very good evening to you I'd heard about this for years and I've reported on and on and off and then it floats are away from me unfunded mandates or states making promises to their unions especially the public unions that can possibly be matched with the tax revenue at hand but now we have a Levin weeks have shut down especially in large states with large dense populations I'm thinking of California Illinois New Jersey New York continuing all right is the federal government this is a straightforward question is the federal government the executive or the or the legislative are they entertaining bailing out the state's good evening to you good evening a lot of it Democrats are in fact that there are four servers should not disturb others still have has a big big provision to bailing out the state I mean it's worth it's worth saying by the way that in the characters there was already a lot of money given to the state there's a hundred fifty billion for corona virus really thought that their state thirty billion for education forty five billion for disaster relief and then there was another twenty five billion for public transit so it's not as if they haven't received they haven't received or anybody but he dared the Democrats think that the we should give them at least another hundred fifty billion for the state Senate and I have also a time for local and state government so local government so yeah but I think there's no appetite for from the federal government and this administration to to bail out the states and and I'm glad there is no appetite for it and it is an election year and the states are looking for help we had the governor of New York recently in Washington to talk with the president about infrastructure projects that are said to generate revenue but what is it that's most in debt I just spoke generally when I talked about the public unions is it tensions that put these states under water is it promises they've made for capital projects is there one place where there it's more agree just than any other yes labor and pension and health costs for public employees that's like the biggest the biggest chunk of their problems first because it never tells I was spending it's pretty significant but it's also because they've made promises for the future without actually planning appropriately money to pay for it and in order to actually kind of like cook the book in a sense to make it look as if they were doing the right thing Dave Lewis used a lot of accounting gimmicks like the route the wrong discount rate ten and also you know projection of the best that they were going to grow espectacular rate and I took all of that together comes to big like a big big big fat mess and I think that's not a knock you have state like Illinois that have passed constitutional amendment and limit on actually the ability to put any reforms on on on the a new reforms to reform pensions for employees what is to be done is bankruptcy a viable option for Illinois for New York so in not in that's one of the six right now all states obviously don't have the right to go bankrupt and only admissible government but actually my study has been to support government bankruptcy which is significantly different in a lot last fifteen years because they've been used by bigger and more intact businesspeople government who do you suffer from the same problem that other solutions we suffer you suffer from and and which if they suffer from that there's just a political influence from those public employees and their unions that got us in this in this place in the first it indispensable first place supporters like click about the fact that the great big boobies gone through bankruptcy is it a bunch of places especially in California he is put all the other public service back on the chopping block like crazy right and I have nothing against this honest people one actually really pay a ton of taxes something's got again yeah tensions were not changed it would be word which is very insignificant so unless we find really a true solutions tied the hands right of public a public interest it was also a special interest we always have this political question I think the solution rest with people in the state to state an office in the office and demand demand that actually you know that those reforms were after all there are many more staff that they are public employees can the states create their own bankruptcy process you suggests that no it has to be it has to be allowed by the by the by the Congress because they would take place in federal court there are constitutional issues without issue actually I'm I have a paper that's coming out of this type you leaky I do all of that on the issue of of bankruptcy and if there are good things about about a lot of the state to go bankrupt because of it it would be if done well away to tie the hands of those public employees that are public employees but it's it's really far fetched but it would be done well so so it's a matter of whether or not you know Congress is going to allow it to allow the bankruptcy process and and right now it doesn't look like it in the cart do the states want to be bailed out are they asking I should have asked started with this but the puzzle here is you present a case where the states are okay with being under water where it limits their ability to explain themselves because they can always cry poverty I it's a yes it does it depends on the state's right there are states like Florida where they're absolutely saying no wait we're not we're not we don't need to first we don't need to be balanced belt out there not every state in the state our financial situation the one that you would expect on a back the worst problem our position are you know you would be surprised California Illinois New York and what else is in Pennsylvania I mean there's just a lot of them at the end but there's not there like it is actually there used to be if you treat each other they're like you know Alaska Florida all right and a bunch of the states that they don't want to be spelled out and they also understand that there's something out there where basically the state that over and over and over put in place bad policies and acted very irresponsibly persons they don't have big rainy day fund I've been a little it literally as a share of its budget has zero rainy day fall plant crazy and and they don't want to be bailing out because effectively that's what I think is right we say white taxpayers federal taxpayers this pedal taxpayers believe all across the country not everything it's Walt Walt bell out and the public service unions are they ready to work with the states on this or did they just cross our arms and say pass no usually they they are very very absolutely opposed and and that and that's one of the problem by the way we've actually bankruptcy which he knew that the medicine to a level that they've actually learned to play at the municipal level the bankruptcy game and to actually basically get everything they want most of what they wanted basically they agreed to a few concessions at the beginning and so no they don't want it now there are things that are changing and it could be where they may not be but actual versus Illinois as a Senate has this constitutional restraints on reforming the pension ever a California used to be used to have a limit like this on it on it well it's constitution and this still hasn't been recently a judge actually said that when the state is in a state of emergency actually that limit can be lifted in some ways so basically right now public pension employees they are fully aware that something is going to happen in California and that their pension is going to be touched at least if this window persist if it and if it exist there will be challenges in court but you know that that what's important is to start talking about the fact that it must be done Veronique de rugy senior research fellow at the Mercatus center at George Mason University with her colleague tad DeHaven do not bail out the large states that are under water I'm John that's this is the job that Sasha in the daily recommended servings of fruits and vegetables fit into just six capsules yes we start by sourcing organically grown whole fruits and vegetables we ensure they are picked at peak ripeness all of our produce is third party tested for pesticides heavy metals bad bacteria and nutrients they are then washed cut and put through an advanced vacuum cold process which removes the water using pressure this maximizes the nutritional value while preserving the color smell and taste of the fruit or vegetable the freeze dried food is then ground into a fine powder without adding any additives fillers or extracts these.

senior research fellow John Batchelor Veronique de rugy
"senior research fellow" Discussed on WTMJ 620

WTMJ 620

01:40 min | 2 years ago

"senior research fellow" Discussed on WTMJ 620

"Senior research fellow in the Asian studies at the heritage foundation one eight six six five oh Jimbo one eight six six five oh five four six two six we'll be back in just a moment please listen this is important anyone can be affected by the prescription opioid crisis if you think you've been hurt by produ or its prescription opioids like oxycontin you may be entitled to compensation as part of produce bankruptcy but you have to file a claim claims overdose death substance use disorder lost wages in neonatal abstinence syndrome claims can be filed by individuals the legal guardian for survivors or relatives of people who have died or are disabled the deadline to file the claims June thirtieth twenty twenty or you will lose your right to file a claim for more information visit Purdue pharma claims dot com or you can call toll free one eight four four two one seven zero nine one two that's one eight four four two one seven zero nine one two a four by C. liberty mutual insurance company presents Doug and repeat after liberty mutual customize your car insurance hang for one a pretty mutual customizes your car insurance so you only pay for what he might the seating my candle so seriously because.

Covid-19 Spreads: Is a global economic downturn on the cards?

John Batchelor

08:23 min | 2 years ago

Covid-19 Spreads: Is a global economic downturn on the cards?

"Show covert nineteen the corona virus beginning in China but now we see the news stories the satellite nation of South Korea it's watching turmoil in its production lines the non satellite nation Iran is cut out from the world community and world manufacturing so we're going to set that aside and go to northern Italy where there is a super spreader we're told and there are Italian town shutting down particularly Italian towns near the best mills the Italian mills now I'm describing economics but I'm doing it anecdotally so I welcome Christine McDaniel a senior research fellow at the Mercatus center who is approaching covered nineteen from the point of view of world economics Christina very good evening to you mention in your remarks we don't have a great deal of data but what we have is there any indication of an analogy to the corona virus have we seen the world deal with at this scale of threat before and do we know what it means for the economy when and if it recovers good evening to you good evening thank you so much that to be here on this fascinating it's not grim topic well the condiments you know we look at our historic events and course there's the mayors and the sars outbreaks although this one is a somewhat different in the sense that the incubation period as the actual duration is not yet known at first it was reported to be two weeks but then just today we're hearing out of China out that there was an extra long coated nineteen incubation dad a whole family of six tested positive for the virus falling and your bonds long cord G. so if we were still very unclear on the parameters and until we get a better sense of the incubation and the and the spread then you know until that happens it's still gonna be very difficult to to what we know what the reach could be all that said today China is much more integrated into the world economy than it was during the sars outbreak and US production can be shut down if China shuts down so so well we haven't reached a health epidemic yet like Diane Swonk said you know it is very possible that there will be an economic camp that make even without health condemning it even if it's just so what if you're driven but again we just don't have the data to know for sure we have a report from South Korea that Honda I will suspend production in South Korea because of the covet nineteen actually because they can't get parts from China but that leads to shin bone the bone we also have a similar indications from Sam song and we can expect that care will also struggle is it does this tell us that it's a profound damage to the world economy as my thinking as bad as an amateur Christine is that whoever wants to buy an automobile has the money in his pocket and when that automobile is available the purchase will happen so whether it happens in the first quarter of the second quarter the third quarter it's still part of growth is that it is that it is that it is the wrong way to approach this or is is that too positive well it's it's probably right you're talking about pent up demand you know things like for you know a large consumer goods if I want a new car or a new washing machine you know whether I go out today tomorrow or next month I'm going to go out and buy one so there are certain purchases that will happen even if they are delayed and their other purchase at your purchases and and trip trips that just won't happen because they didn't happen last week you know for example a conference that you don't you might wish they were supposed to go to that you didn't go to are you what are you did you go out to dinner you didn't have to go to work another event so there are some things that those sales are just gone and they're gone forever so it it depends on the type of sale that we're talking all right let me give an example I was scheduled to be in it was Pakistan within these next days for an international conference of financial conference called by the president very important to the development of Central Asia which you know is undergoing a re awakening right now renaissance it's been delayed till fall now yes that's a delay but it's not a cancellation and yes there will be a negative effect on the hotel years and the drivers and the airlines in and out of those Pakistan is that profound the travel agency is what I'm chiefly of focusing on but also the business travel agency which is a which pays top dollar well remember travel and tourism accounts for about ten percent of global economic activity so if that ten percent slows down for the next quarter or two then that's going to show up in the in the GDP numbers it will eventually bounce back but you know in the near term it you know it probably is going to look to bleed out through the through lower GDP a lower GDP in the first and second quarter but we look at GDP globally is this just a job for the IMF Christine Shawcroft well you know it it just goes to Millis is is not really going to help here if our people are just staying home right there in the we heard the CDC and HHS today and they said that the other course they're balancing against you now it depending on how things go in the eyes of would be a very aggressive on one hand they want an aggressive containment strategy on the other hand they want minimal impact to communities and so they were talking about you know encouraging people to stay home okay we'll find staying home then your physical stimulus is not necessarily going to help you know it might help some particularly I financially failing firms but in terms of the core they're the real reason for the economic slowdown the two center bucket tied to the virus back to school season which is not necessarily going to help so you have to remit long term economic growth is driven by mainly two things number one population number two productivity growth and so don't the long term is what you need to ask yourself how is this going to affect populations how was it going to affect productivity growth productivity growth you know that's our ability to make more eager to do more with less and in the long run I don't see how this would affect predicted to gross and last we have to make some structural changes to how we do business and that yeah it is no cost and slow things down but I think we're far from getting to that discussion yet Christine you read your colleagues and there do they love to kind of this love modeling is their modeling to describe something at this scale is there a book about this or are they writing the book now there are lots of models of modeling a chance going on right now and you're right we we we economists love models and up we use models to you know basically hold everything constant and just change one thing to get a better sense of how one thing can affect everything else we can model anything right and we have a global economic models country by country even the sub national level regional level models sector by sector so we can and we're very good at at modeling the economic effects of a chair or tax but the problem with this is we don't really know what the the the shock to the model is is it a supply side shock is the demand side Sharkey is a little bit little bit of both so and so economists get a better sense of how the virus is going to translate into affecting costs is supply and demand it's it's really hard to to use models to get some type of precision on the economic

China South Korea Iran
Amid Arms Race, Macron Offers Europe French Nuclear Wargames Insight

Monocle 24: The Briefing

06:32 min | 2 years ago

Amid Arms Race, Macron Offers Europe French Nuclear Wargames Insight

"The United Kingdom's departure from the European Union recalibrate Europe's politics six in all kinds of ways. One such and at this point pause to enjoy the rumbling caused by centuries of British diplomat spinning in their graves may have been to make France more powerful with the UK Gone France is the EU sole nuclear state and as such the E. U.'s only permanent member of the UN security. The council within the last hour French President Emmanuel Macron has spoken in Paris outlining an updated doctrine of deterrence while joined with more on this by Elizabeth the pro senior research fellow at Russi's modern deterrence project Elizabeth. What did President Macron have to say this morning he essentially reaffirmed? What every president every postwar presidents before him said which is Franz is committed to its nuclear deterrent. Now you may think that's. That's not a big big deal because which country would voluntarily give up its nuclear weapons but but this is a big deal because by focusing on on the nuclear deterrent than Francis desire and indeed intention to keep it and keep it as as as strong as as it is now it's essentially intially saying to the US France wants to play a larger role in Europe because so far the UK has been another nuclear power within the European in Union. Of course we have the US as well Franz to say now we want to play a larger role does the fact of the UK's departure from the a you. You make a difference to this really. Because isn't this something that would be would fall more under the ages of NATO which obviously the UK remains a member of it. Ah on the surface of it makes no difference because it to say it's not the handles all military matters even though the you would like to become stronger militarily tally but it is a symbolic It's a matter of political symbolism so France is really the the the strongest remaining power are within the European Union and in fact remains up to these remaining states. What's what's what to do with her combined? Military Essen against whom mm to defend themselves Of course NATO will remain by far the largest military alliance in the West but still there is a lot of room room for maneuver for innovation. I think that's what McConnell aiming and in fact he said that the US is an important partner. What's that Europe as said by by which we all assume he meant the European Union has to be able to act autonomously. Well well that is a bit of a signal to Washington. Did President Macron. Talk at all about what he perceives as the current threat. or or at least I guess specifically what he now thinks the deterrent is deterring. That's always a challenge with with deterrence And deter Berens That's you're never really sure with with this particular Tehran's nuclear weapons whom it is supposed to deter so the the only the only possible advisory Whom you could threaten nuclear weapons are other countries. That are heavily armed. So Russia does Europe need to deter China with nuclear weapons. It's unclear so it's really Russia it's interesting also Macro himself recently said a terrorism is the the biggest threat to Europe today so A threat against which I nuclear deterrent his more or less useless exactly so you can only deter a country with a strong government by using nuclear weapons or by telling them that you're going to use nuclear weapons terrorist won't be deterred cyber cyber hackers VAUGHN's been interred in fact he he will happily hathaway and possibly bring down your grid Your Electric Grid and other critical national infrastructure. It doesn't bother him that you threaten him nuclear weapons because he will know county will drop a nuclear weapon on a hacker but macron instill clearly believes the deterrent is important. Is this part of it. It's been a recurring theme of his presidency. There there is a desire. If you will to make France great again he does want to restore the idea. As many of his predecessors have been so keen on the restoring this idea of France fronts as a global power is is is he. Basically pitching himself was the defacto leader. Of A post dangle Merckel Europe he is and frankly there is lots of competition. There really isn't although it would be will be interesting. Just in a quick sign on it will be interesting to see what happens if in Germany. The Greens Emerge even stronger in the next election and and Germany and software with the Green Chancellor which would presumably be Robert Topic. Who is Ah Not at all keen on these ideas so Michael may have some competition than but with nuclear weapons. It's it is a a military tool but touch on top of that and maybe more importantly it is a symbol of great power status which is why all these other countries want wanted to India. Wanted it so then of course Pakistan don needed to have it as well and so forth So it's not about it's being of weapon that is going to be used anytime soon or even in in any distant future Richard but it is about great power status does as far as it's possible to tell. Does that play for him. Domestically with with the French people is there A thing you can tap into among the French electorate of this desire for France to be seen as a great power I think among any reasonably the large countries there is There is a desire to be seen as a strong country. We've seen here in the UK. Many people felt that the UK wasn't getting gifting enough credit as a as a major power in Europe was just being seen as some sort of middling power for a smaller countries are much happier with just being seen a small countries. And so I could tap into that I I don't think it will be enough for him to win. Over all those disaffected voters including the the yellow vests but Who wouldn't who wouldn't like the phrase make the UK great again make America great again or whatever happened to be

France Europe United Kingdom President Macron European Union United States Nato President Trump Russi UN Germany Franz Russia European In Union Elizabeth Senior Research Fellow E. U.
Brexit: Day 1 brings talk of EU unity with trade talks ahead

AP News Radio

00:57 sec | 2 years ago

Brexit: Day 1 brings talk of EU unity with trade talks ahead

"Despite some U. K. flag waving and celebrations for brexit supporters very little has actually happened other than it being a symbolic moment senior research fellow with U. K. in a changing Europe to Russia says not much will change during the transition period until the end of the year always a great so far is with your agreement and how at noon on and continues to trade on goods of to price otherwise we have nothing else agree well the AP you accounted for fifty four percent of Britons imports and forty three percent of its exports in twenty sixteen British prime minister Boris Johnsons top trade price outside the E. U. is the United States but reconciling the US's demands will be difficult because any attempt to do so by lowering British standards will push Britain further away from European rules the E. U. has already made clear that the price of access to its markets is continued it here instead of the books regulations Sarah Bassett London

Senior Research Fellow U. K. Europe Russia Prime Minister E. U. United States Britain London Brexit Sarah Bassett
"senior research fellow" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

16:19 min | 2 years ago

"senior research fellow" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"With more on the situation in Iran were joined on the phone here in Washington with the James Phillips he is a senior research fellow for middle eastern affairs at the heritage foundation we heard from the president earlier today my question is who makes the next move into the region what potentially are you looking for well I think it looks like Iran may be temporarily willing to step down of from tensions and step back of trying to lower the temperature of the confrontation however there is a report that tries so because Ali who leads in a round box Melissa has this has called for his followers to follow up on the initial response of the Iranians and launch further attacks and if that happens I think unfortunately we be back to square one we have learned a lot over the last couple of days about the now killed Iranian general Qassem Soleimani for Iran its government and its military from your perspective how big of a deal was this well I think from Rahn's perspective this was huge because of journal so money wasn't just a military or terrorist leader he actually functioned as Iran's viceroy for not only Iraq but Syria and Lebanon and all the ambassadors of those are countries formally served under him in the codes for so the special operations branch of the revolutionary guard corps so he was controlling or not only military and malicious and terrorist networks but also Iran's diplomatic and foreign policy in that part of the world in addition he was known as or or war hero from the Iran Iraq war back in the eighties and of the supreme leader Ayatollah Khamenei he are considered him to be a son and a very close political follower and for that reason general Slimani had extensive freedom to operate and latitude to take initiative that I think his successor or will not have but he was also a senior government official and I mention that because many on Capitol Hill among Democrats especially saying that it may have been justified but it wasn't a wise decision by the president well I would agree I did it was justified and I think it will kick over a Hornet's nest store or already has in Iraq but it's important to I remember that this is the beekeeper that character runs a Hornet's nest and if you eat though was still alive and functioning she'd be us setting up even more dangerous situations in the future we're talking with James Phillips of the heritage foundation and so does his death either further escalate tensions between the US and Iran or is this a good moment for rapprochement between our two countries I think you in the short run it has escalated tensions and I think it will take so many months for that to to dissipate but on the other hand it does seem like the trump administration and of the Iranian government are both up pausing to reflect on what's happened and this could provide a diplomatic opening and but I remember back in the nineteen eighties the accidental downing of an Iranian airliner that flew over a U. S. ships that were fighting battles in the Persian Gulf with the Iranian revolutionary guard navy that downing accidental downing of that Iranian airliner led the Ayatollah Khomeini to end the Iran Iraq war that he has consistently rejected and I think in part because he feared that the US would end of the war on Iraq signed and Khamenei at that point accepted you and mediation of that he previously had rejected and said that he was forced to drink arch but chalice of poison because of the accidental downing and if that is a president to hold so some relevance than it is possible that this uptick intentions now could be a shark that leads to some kind of a diplomatic opening down down the road we will follow you work at heritage dot org James Phillips thank you for being with us thank you and so let's turn to congressional reaction all of this and will begin with the Senate Republican leader Mitch McConnell of Kentucky we must remain vigilant in the face of serious threats posed by Iran apparently the strike did not kill or wound Americans but they demonstrate the significant progress around is made over the last decade in building a large long range and accurate ballistic missile force many of us have long cited the absence of any constraint on around sophisticated missile program is one of the primary shortcomings of the Obama Iran deal and this strike stands as a reminder to the world of this growing threat we rightly talk a lot in this chamber about American interests but last night was another stark reminder that Iran and its proxies have been a cancer on a rock sovereignty and rocks politics for sometime Iran has long shown disregard for Iraqi live just in the last few weeks as militia proctor's of slaughtered innocent Iraqi protesters and as long as realistic missiles at a territory the millions of Iraqis who have been taken to the streets for months of protests of understood is perfectly well I spoke to the president last night I'm grateful for his patience and prudence as soon as cabin and liberate how to respond appropriately for the latest Iranian provocation as a super power we have the capacity to exercise restraint and to respond at a time and place of our choosing if need be I believe the president wants to avoid conflict or needless loss of life but is rightly prepared to protect American lives and interests and I hope around leaders do not miscalculate back question our collective will and launching further a **** for our part are certainly hope our own congressional delegations do not give her on a reason to question our national will but there are divisions among Senate Republicans the hill newspaper reporting the following Republican senators Mike Lee of Utah and rand Paul of Kentucky quote Rick thing the administration over a closed door briefing on Iran today announcing they will now support a resolution to reining in the president and his military powers we'll have more on that coming up later in the program the democratic reaction beginning with leader Chuck Schumer of New York the president has promised to get the United States out of these forever wars in the Middle East but the arrow is headed in the wrong direction the president how many more is it going to be how long will they remain abroad what is their objectives how will they ensure their safety I will we assure their safety will more people be deployed in the weeks and months ahead these again questions the administration must answer the but so far there's been a profound lack of information provided to Congress from the department of defense concerning what the department is doing in response to a Ron so I joined senators reading there in requesting regular briefings and documents from the administration detailing the number of troops the president has deployed and plans to deploy in support of contingency plans with respect to with respect to Iran we need to know if the administration is committing additional troops to the region and for how long with that from the Senate democratic leader Chuck Schumer on the Senate floor we've course carry the Senate live on C. span to and want to share with you one moment that you might have missed this from democratic senator Tammy Duckworth of better herself from Illinois kids in school cafeterias no not to look up when someone tells them that gullible is written on the ceiling but I'm pretty sure Donald Trump a man once who once they are directly into a solar eclipse would be caught stealing a glance just to be sure the thing is trump told us who he was long before he stepped into the oval office and too many chose not to believe him as a so called businessman he left a string of bankruptcies wherever he went destroying both his own companies and the small businesses I'm lucky enough to be caught in his wake now though as commander in chief his incompetence has concerts are standing in the world in danger on national security and place an even bigger target on our deployed troops now the currency that he is spending isn't just the money that his father left him but the blood of the men and women who have sworn an oath to defend this nation to their deaths sixteen years ago I was one of the many Americans who deployed to Iraq one of the many who was willing to sacrifice everything after our commander in chief convince Congress that our nation's security depended on removing Saddam Hussein and replacing his regime with a democracy a decade and a half later we spent trillions of dollars to achieve that goal hundreds of thousands of Iraqi civilians have been killed or displaced thousands of operators have died for that goal tens of thousands more have been wounded and maimed we do not sacrifice all of that for this president to turn our rocky partners into adversaries who vote to kick us out of the very democracy we help to build I have friends have done eight nine ten tours in Iraq who go each time knowing that they'll probably be back on the same stretch of sand and a couple of years who probably answered the call and we will continue to answer the call fighting for that same patch of desert over and over again because they believe they believe us when we tell them that that will make America safer and more secure and more secure those comments earlier today from illinois' democratic senator Tammy Duckworth and a joining us on the phone is Bryan Bender he's defense editor for politico and I want to share with our listeners to this headline fears are growing that the president is knee capping the Pentagon explain your essay well this is your military officials complaining that you know one after another the president has been saying things and doing things that are undermining something that the military holds pretty deer in that is credibility and close the last few months whether it's an abrupt pull out of Syria and abandoning our allies to curves whether it's hardening or granted clemency to use for convicted war criminals within the military and then most recently you know claiming on Twitter that the president was looking at target in the lawn they include cultural flight which could be a war crime any of the Pentagon is scrambling you know literally day after day decline plane away some of the things the president is saying and doing and there's growing fears it's getting to the point where you know they can't go to allies he can't go to the American public is facing or do you think and have a talk with the people are going to believe them in for the fears growing after some of the proceeds from the approach and you know his his often lack of credibility because he says one thing one day hello in the office that is going into the kind of and we some part of that early today because among those meeting with members of Congress senior military leaders and especially among Democrats a lot of skepticism in terms of the president's decision and the factors that led to the decision to use that drone attack this skepticism you know it's always been there which is yours I think I'm telling the truth they will only have intelligence I think the Iraq war in the claims of no weapons of mass destruction obviously undermining the credibility of the military intelligence agencies but you know I think it's it's it's a new high where you have members of Congress on oversight committees not just Democrats but also Republicans who will say you know what I don't know what to believe anymore because the presence of one thing the Pentagon says something else and I think the most recent example of that was this letter that was leaked from a general US general in Baghdad it was written to the Iraqis alerting them that the US was preparing to withdraw we learned obviously after the fact to that letter was not authorized to be sent graph but even Republicans in Congress demanded to know what you know what the story that I'm are you open to a folder not it's not you know I think I probably would produce market the secretary defense mark Milligan are more clearly thank you chairman have been dealing with all around the world they also have to spend a lot of time just convincing people that they're telling the truth in a lot of people in the Pentagon will blame the president partly because we are talking with brain vendor he's defense editor for politico let me ask you about the relatively new defense secretary mark esper how is he handled all of this William was secretary the army for the first there are two plus years of the trump administration so he's not fully known quantity within the Pentagon but he's pretty quiet now I'm assuming he he's not someone who's out there on the Sunday shows watch sort of seats that secretary of state Mike Pompeii who you know clearly is probably the big dog in the the president's national security team here mixed reviews about mark asper makes some would like to see him the more force for someone like you see in stand up for the president a little bit more I think ask for got a lot of criticism within the ranks when when the president pardoned the three soldiers who had been implicated in war crimes in in he backed the president and and supported the decision even though a lot of people thought that was sent me a really bad message to the troops but you know it's he's calling about six months mark asper is is the Pentagon chief and I think I think he's still in a position where people are willing to give him some space and and and sort of see how it goes but there's no doubt he himself has acknowledged the top spot the president's shoot from the hip style putting the military's reputation at risk to the reporting of Bryan Bender available at politico dot com.

Iran Washington James Phillips senior research fellow president
Canada Names New China Envoy Amid Damaged Relations

World News Analysis

04:07 min | 3 years ago

Canada Names New China Envoy Amid Damaged Relations

"Canada has announced the appointment. If a new ambassador to china immed- damaged relations falling arrest of a top chinese tech exec prime minister justin trudeau said dominic barton the former global many director of consulting firm mckenzie as the new envoy. The former ambassador was fired after expressed grassed seamlessly for china saying to be great if the u._s. dropped as academia request for hallway executive mon one joe for more on this less welcome. I'm who win ping senior research fellow at the chinese academy of social sciences. Thanks for joining us hook. Hi thank you for having me so first of all so tell us more about the new ambassador dominic barton what made him the right choice for the job <hes> well <hes> you'll know the nikkei's <hes> <hes> very professional <hes> business person <hes> he has a now he was born in uganda africa. I also had long <hes> <hes>. I think it's a five p._m. Along in time you're songhai so even palm beach the bulk about how to you'll know knowing china so have seen it was obvious as the expert on china. I think south also has a lot of his <hes> <hes> experience we have seen as ceo <hes> like before the <hes> ladies they must become south and say company my country and also being essay come because counselor adviser <hes> you know for the <hes> canada phony not <hes> you know those kind of the the minister for finance so he knows how i felt he knows enough about the economic issue he got ta be on economic on august body from oxford university so he and not on the expert of i'll tell you come study and also as part two in business like <hes> <hes> we kinda with other you spent <hes> yeah you sound. You'll know eighteen counties so <hes> and also facing kinda also for five years. No china not really given his previous experience. Do you think the new ambassador will be able to ease tensions between china and canada and what for some key challenges. He's going to face well. I won't <hes> you'll know exactly the role. That's the play by a back up even though and back it's a very voted possessing an omni and back to the <hes> himself. I don't think he can make a lot of pig. You like <hes> a desktop by diplomats. So of course this is also <hes> important <hes> at least the now we see i'm back to ah has been back. <hes> you know <hes> lucky <hes> happy. I'm people on as long as eight months long. So of course it's not john for canada relationship so so now this thing has seen fields at least he's a very good signal and also has fueled by a very very professional person yet. He's not that traditional diplomacy. He's a business person. Here's the economies and also trying to exploit so only days as i think about <hes> which is very positive and also we hope that he will soviets the breach between china and canada. That's also becoming very constructive. <hes> this <hes> brief builder <hes> kind of ties of lots of tiny ally you you you prompt him for example. <hes> <hes> you know <hes> on friendly ties between canada has been there. That's a long time and also coming from i last week so <hes> <hes> you'll know rivalries like those case and also even now also hurt offense has to be made by the prime minister of canada and the media stuff immediately just that that that at this new ambassador will certainly raise human rights issue <hes> lacking so.

China Canada Dominic Barton Prime Minister Justin Trudeau Chinese Academy Of Social Scie Senior Research Fellow Executive Mckenzie Director Oxford University Uganda CEO Africa Eight Months Five Years
Big Tech Lobbying Looks For Allies Among Republicans And Libertarians

NPR's Business Story of the Day

05:03 min | 3 years ago

Big Tech Lobbying Looks For Allies Among Republicans And Libertarians

"Support for npr and the following message come from if a college where students home their talents and skills through a deep exploration of very ongoing practice in their field am performance at the professional level more at i t h h c h dot you you the relationship between big tech in washington has sunk to a new low congress the justice department and the federal trade commission are getting closer to investigating the biggest tech companies and those come in companies are painter protect themselves npr's peter overby reports washington finished talking about the big for tech firms amazon apple facebook and google but not in ways they appreciate here's democratic senator and presidential candidate elizabeth warren on npr's morning edition recently it's about the concentration of wealth and what that does it a marketplace but it's also about concentration of power economic power in political power up until a decade ago big tax audit didn't have to deal with washington politics that changed and last year the big four firms spent fifty five million dollars on lobbying it marked as sevenfold increase over ten years a decade when lobbying spending overall state essentially flat it puts and you know basically unpire with some of the the big players that we've long known about the banking industry a car industry lisa gilbert is with the watchdog group public citizen she was citing data from the nonprofit center for responsive politics which tracks campaign and lobbying money for tech firms again amazon apple facebook and google this year ported hiring seventy different lobby shops they also pay lawyers so called strategic consultant and others who were not legally lobbyists and so don't get disclosed in his gilbert notes big tech contributions flows through the governing infrastructure in washington it's really hard to turn a corner in dc without running into some google money both google and facebook has funded hundreds of tanks and influential trade associations congress in big chapters collided before in twenty twelve antifa piracy bills in the house and senate would have allowed for regulation of website content industry led protests culminated in in internet blackout and sank the legislation then last year big tech was in trouble over failures to protect users personal smell datta congress held hearings which accentuated how little the lawmakers knew about internet here's republican senator john kennedy of louisiana questioning facebook ceo mark zuckerberg are you willing to go back and an end work on on giving me a greater right to a race montana senator you could already delete any of the data that's their legal jewish i am network on expanding that is the sender i think we already do what you're referring to besides congress the justice department and he ftc or also looking at big tech the senate judiciary committee hasn't antitrust hearing this month and house judiciary has begun a series of hearings democratic congressman david seleny chaired the first one and this is the first significant antitrust investigation undertaken by congress in decades antitrust is serious stuff if the government thinks the tech giants are competing unfairly the companies could even be broken up you'll choson is senior research fellow at the charles coke institute there's a lot of things that are kind of coming together right now to make this a bigger issue than it has been in the past one of those things is politics internet industry donors have given at least sixty percent of their money to democrats every election since two thousand four that's according to the center for responsive politics choson said that now i think they're finding out that that was maybe not the best approach tech firms are looking for allies among republicans and libertarians were more likely to oppose government intervention at the same time some republicans have muted their allegations of social media bias but among tech companies there's also a hunter compromise is attorney mix stole tippy electronic frontier foundation put trying to steer the government towards solutions that maybe they don't love but the vacant deal if one possibility is a privacy bill something they would protect the personal data collected by social media companies but he's a good portion of industry is four eight broaden comprehensive federal level privacy though nicole long is a former executive at twitter and google she was also deputy chief technology officer india obama white house there's a point where line regulation comes into play the tech community is now facing that moment we are here would lock in millions of dollars are being spent to control but that law will say peter overby npr news washington

NPR Fifty Five Million Dollars Sixty Percent Ten Years
Israel Folau Debate: Freedom of Speech or Homophobia?

Between The Lines

09:51 min | 3 years ago

Israel Folau Debate: Freedom of Speech or Homophobia?

"Well, you don't have to be a rugby fan to know that Wallaby sti- Israel allow has been a big news story over the past few months, when I pretend he posted these woods on his personal social media accounts, quite warning drunks homosexuals adulterers, lies fornicated his thieves eighth assed, odometers hill. White, you repent. The fallout was a means rugby Australia won't allow that he had breached these plaid code of conduct by posting homophones combs on social media after examination of the event this happened. Well, he's roughly is football career to be TATA's right now, rugby Estrella saying is going to rip up his contract and no long matted that allow was one of the most talented players in the game. Hanes four million dollar contract will no longer together. Now, this story has ignited a discussion across the nation. That is polarized opinion really before. Why love invited to experts to navigate what all this means? Joining me in Sydney is paid a cookie. He's an eye junked associate professor of law at Notre dumb. He's also a senior research fellow at the center for independence studies as off started on this program before CIs. That's the thing tank. I hate it. Well, the guest is professor, Catherine Gilda, Catherine research, is freedom of speech, human rights in public discourse at the university of Queensland school of political science and international studies, and she's in Brisbane studio cath paid, welcome to the program. Thanks to be here. Now, let's stop hearing both of your opinions about what the exact issues are that we need to address a cookie. What's the hot of what's dividing public opinion? Well, I think Israel has done two things that run counter to the culture. The first thing is that he's stalked, very, clearly and openly about his religious beliefs, something that we're not really accustomed to doing in Australia. We just don't tend to. About God publicly, but the other thing that he's done is whereas straightens, generally very accepting of LGBT. I people there is a small, but very powerful group that wants to move the community beyond acceptance to endorsement, where dissent is not tolerated, and Israel allow refuses to go along with that. But it seems to be a difference between how people define freedom of speech religious freedom discrimination cath. What's the release you? He really show in my opinion, is that all human rights are not absolute and all human rights, stop at the point at which your exercise of your own right impairs, somebody else's exercise of their human rights. So what we have here is a difference of opinion of what the implications are for these Ralph last said, so in my view Israel now has engaged in discrimination occurs is not about religious freedom. It's about discrimination, pater, freedom, offense, discrimination, Joel on well agree with Catherine's assessment of human rights, and I think they are not absolute. I think that's very important. I don't think this is an issue really over religious freedom. I think it's gonna be on that. Now, I don't think that Israel has discriminated against in any more of a sense that he's just made a decision to he's chosen one group over another, he and he's not vilified not incited violence against this particular Cody should there, be limits to what freedom of speech allows people decide. Well, I think we have very careful about where we want to draw those limits. What what's wrong with him expressing an opinion? And remember that this opinion is, it's a conditional warning, as it were he saying, essentially, I love these sinners including homosexuals, and I want you to repent because in my religious belief you go to hell. If you don't so he's issued a warning out of love and Israel flowers, post vilifies more than one element of society. Cath gilda. What is it about homosexuality? That is really triggered the greatest response. Well, the answer to this question response directly, what pay to just sit? Absolutely. What is? Flouts said, Philipon homosexuals. And the reason that the issue with sexual was more important than liars or adulterers, or drunks is that there is no entrenched systemic discrimination, or bias in society against lies or against adulterers. There is entrenched systemic discrimination against time a sexual and by saying what he said, what is flour saying was that guy. People have no place on this earth. They must repent I ate Thiam must become not guy in order to be acceptable now. That's what crosses the line that is what is. But what is wrong with expressing that opinion? Again, I think Catherine's analysis is right ex-. I don't think is what have occasion. But if that's what you believe what's wrong with expressing it. Which is why I'm concerned that we've reached the point now in society where we simply cannot descend from certain positions that are laid down calculator. It is not just an expression of opinion to think that is to say that when. In your talking. All you're doing is expressing your thoughts, but we have decades of scholarship that tell us that words can do things worked can do good things and words can do bad things, and there is wise expressing yourself that constitute a form of discrimination, and that is why we recognize that law as height speech or vilification, or the Katherine disagree about whether or not to these this amounts vilification, because it seems to me that in Australia, at the moment that being gay is no bar to holding the highest office, highest officers in the land to holding commanding positions in business and in, in the academic world. So I wonder to what extent this discrimination, which certainly was very real. And I think very toxic early generation is is as prevalent today. Cather some commentators, they say that we're already over instructed by the nanny state governments, institutions. Are we headed towards becoming the nanny state? Many libertarians think we already are. Absolutely not. What we have in this country are very narrowly drone very carefully constructed laws that don't side that you can't talk about particular topic. So Israel Lau would have been free to say as he is in has infect said, don't support same sex relationships and audience put same sex marriage. And if that's all he'd said, we wouldn't be having this discussion go. Fund me has finally closed down. Fillets requests for money to becky's legal challenge, cath, is that fair? Yes. Guy fan me has a policy that is in sync with a and law in sync with international human rights law, and in sync with public opinion in strategy that we should to combat discrimination repeater fails, a millionaire. At least how is it moral to us, the public for money? He's using go fund me to correct what he perceives to be an injustice, and go on me is clearly, a barometer of public opinion because he's got tractor nearly two two million dollars of support even though the has taken over the funding. So whether or not he can afford it. I think is beside the point on Thomas. What's important is that he's attracting a great deal of public support through donations to the site, which suggests that there are many, many people who agree that not necessarily agree with flowers views about the destination of sinners, but they, they believe committed to his the freedom that he should have to express those views cath is Australia angry about censorship. I think there are lots of reasons why people are giving to fund. One of them is, of course, that he's a staff footballer. And so he has a lot of fans. Another one is that he has a particular religious community supporting him. So it's not possible to say that people are against since ship just because they giving him money. This issue has become much bigger than an issue of his religious freedom. And so people are giving money for all kinds of reasons, Catherine you've said that fillet himself is a victim. He why flower caught up in something that's much larger than himself. This is an orchestrated an organized campaign by conservatives who are evidently frustrated at the decades of progress that have been made. Human rights and anti-discrimination, particularly in law. But also in hearts and minds in terms of public opinion. And this movement is now somewhat clearly using the language of human rights at self to try and Hanis public support for Wanding back thighs protections. I don't think this is a push back in a sense. I think it's a reaction to the tyranny of tolerance that Torrence's demanded any dissent from what needs to be tolerated. What is required to be tolerated will not be tolerated. And I think that is what people are reacting to. They would say we've reached a tipping point where now you simply cannot express a dissenting point of view that departs from that, that's a certified by design guy says it were and Kath, how do you see this ending? I'm very, very concerned that paper light paid deny that discrimination still exists simply because there are one or two people in positions of power who may be, for example guy, and that therefore discrimination doesn't exist. Look at the research about what happened during the same sex marriage. So if I look at the research on what happens to young. Gay and lesbian people when role models like fil might comments like this incidence of suicide and self harm increase. It is absolutely the case, both in my research, and in lots of social science research. Discrimination is well, and truly alive and well, and we must not get to the point where we say, oh, discrimination is Ivan. Now. We can stop this fight. I hope that people Tyke from this, the message that we can need to maintain at posture. We need to maintain stance against discrimination, and bigotry, a lovely debate, Catherine Gilda, pita, Cody, thanks so much for being on our end today. Thanks to thanks. Tom Kettering, Gilda is a researcher of freedom of speech, human rights in public discourse at the university of Queensland's school of political science international studies and pay the cookie is a senior research, fellow at the center for independence. Studies also -ffiliated with Notre Dom, and he specializes in religious freedom. And if

Catherine Gilda Israel Australia Catherine Rugby Senior Research Fellow Sydney Cody Associate Professor Odometers Hill White Tata Thiam Israel Lau Football Estrella Brisbane
Sudan talks to resume soon as opposition halts strikes, says mediator

World News Analysis

05:06 min | 3 years ago

Sudan talks to resume soon as opposition halts strikes, says mediator

"Protests. Military leaders in Sudan have agreed resumed talks. Anythi OPN, mediator says, separately an opposition alliance agreed to suspend this campaign of civil disobedience and widespread strikes the army which has been in control since President, Omar Ashir was ousted in April has agreed to release polit-. Ical prisoners. The protesters are demanding return to civilian government talks broke down after dozens of protesters were killed in a crackdown on a city in early of this months since then much of the country has been shut down after the opposition open in strike for more on this. We are now joined on the line by home paint, senior research, fellow of the institute of West Asia, and African studies at Janis academy of social sciences. So Dr her a what led to this breakthrough and what makes the military council and opposition groups agreed to to resume the talks. Wow. This survey for leading for the bricks release, because many council and Auburn for position panties, they cannot have re upon like eventually the transitional in terror is a constant what kind of presentation coming from. Before they're saying often is the foam a fifteen person a member. There's kind of a crisis. My personal this. Council and seven coming from like the note of saving inside a coming from the military side by the ministry side, saying they will be inside. They'll be ahead of this conflict over inside of, you know, they didn't have break did a great. So this does eventually I think, becoming a leading for to miss Mississauga in the break-up of this talk. And now think that resume costs. So what happened is because the lots of nationalization goes on that the AU especial avoid like the labor country opium. Fi minister, despite the IB also traveled to the not Saddam playing to bring them together to bring them to issue. All these offers. The new idea, how to reach their for international also goes up after being assessing the open fire for the people so testers cost a lot of tests, so especially much. So that's why now they both play now that to to the talk. It will ask me the military civilians, they actually had agreed on a deal on a three year transition period on the fifteenth of may litter. The military just decide to scrap all those agreements. So what kind of deal could be struck as they return to talks this time? Are well on the talk actually feel goes to how shared his power both sides. And I suppose for the mini Terry concept they have already in touch, all the power now they're they also travelled, the like Amini, Terry the transitional either. They traveled to surrounding the neighboring county, even traveled body and Saudi also seems that these two so all those leaks labor. They agree upon to suppose for many concert now in so this same confidence, not the heath up any real power. So this opposition, this contact so happy, they also, you know, backstop from the, the people support, the best time from this, and I suppose and the media suppose though they wanted to come with the five whistles a. The first round of whiskey lay and then around the wrong. So that's the. Lease it will Sudan contributes military to the Saudi effort in Yemen, and his military leaders have gotten some support from Saudi Arabia, and will, so the United Arab Emirates. So what is at stake for those rational powers as they seek to protect their interest in Sudan. Oh, yes. Especially in the race in the years, this the Middle East other big powers, like Saudi UAE, and I to amorous, they all have, you know, increasing interesting on and when they're building their I like together to come from with Iran. That is Iran now has been causing the biggest threat of Assadi for three and the sole, they want your mind to the mall this, you know, the I like this thing in there.

Sudan Saddam Saudi Arabia Iran Saudi Uae Omar Ashir President Trump Janis Academy Of Social Scienc Terry Institute Of West Asia Middle East Mississauga United Arab Emirates Opium Yemen Assadi Amini Three Year
White nationalism is on the rise across the globe

PRI's The World

03:59 min | 3 years ago

White nationalism is on the rise across the globe

"Zealand is a country looking for answers this week answers to questions raised by the deadly attacks last Friday onto mosques in Christ Church. Here's prime minister just into our Dern today. The public rightly are asking right now is why is it? And how is it that you should end currently able to buy military style semi automatic weapons in New Zealand, and that's the right question to us. Our government is already promising to announce changes to New Zealand's gun laws and response to the attacks. Another related question raised by the attacks should countries be developing a strategy to fight the global rise of white nationalism. Some countries are doing that. But many are not the Sufen center here in the US analyzes emerging threats and global security, and they argue that the federal government government's generally need to address right wing extr. AM specifically white nationalism with the same focus as they address other areas of global terrorism. So what would that look like calling Clark is a senior research fellow at the Sufa center. There's multiple pillars in laying out that kind of strategy. The first is I'd like to see some congressional hearings on on the topic. Just speaking personally, I've been called to testify on the threat posed by south jihadists, maybe three times in the last year and a half. You don't see that same sense of urgency with right wing extremism. At all. I think there's also a funding issue in terms of countering violent extremism programs and other programs aimed at preventing terrorism. Those seem to be earmarked specifically for for terrorism that's related to Jihadist groups and not for right wing groups. And then Lastly, I think these are really at kind of the higher Schettino level. I'd like to see some kind of equivalent to what the. Department has for designating foreign terrorist organizations. So whether that's the FBI taking the lead or the department of homeland security some domestic agency that's able to do the same thing for domestic terrorist groups is it possible to rearrange funding at the federal level like the global war on terror still kind of can trigger authorization for use of military force around the globe. So why can't those funds also address white nationalism? Yes. So there's always a lag effect in dealing with us when you look at the amount of analysts that are dedicated to focusing on kite or the Islamic state compared to right wing nationalism. I think it's probably extremely disproportionate. It's not a threat. That's emerging the threat is here. It's right in front of our faces. And we need to wake up to it sooner. Rather than later are there countries that you see the that are doing work on this that that you think they're they're models are that we can actually the US can actually learn from. Yeah. I think both Germany and the UK have recognized how. -nificant this threat is and are starting to shift resources in that direction. I know that in Germany there are plans to increase their ranks by fifty percent for researchers that are studying the the right wing threat domestically. Similarly in the UK there's been an eighty eight percent increase in counterterrorism operations as part of investigations into four right extremist activities. These are countries that we have long standing relationships with. And I think I think there's a lot that we could learn in terms of best practices from what these countries are doing and again, putting the pieces together because this isn't an issue that just affects the United States or Australia or the UK. This is a global movement just like salvaging hot ISM. And we've really been slow to recognize that why do you think the US has been slow to recognize that I think there's a lot of probably social political and cultural reasons why why we've been slower to recognize the threat of right wing extremism. But that's not an excuse. Particularly given events of the last year. I'm talking to today from Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

United States New Zealand UK Zealand Germany Prime Minister FBI Dern Pittsburgh Sufen Center Christ Church Sufa Center Pennsylvania Senior Research Fellow Clark Australia Eighty Eight Percent Fifty Percent
White nationalism is an international threat on the rise

The World

04:57 min | 3 years ago

White nationalism is an international threat on the rise

"A country looking for answers this week answers to questions raised by the deadly attacks last Friday onto mosques in Christ Church. Here's prime minister just into our Dern today. I think what the public rightly are asking white now is why is it? And how is it that you should end currently able to buy military style semi automatic weapons in New Zealand, and that's the right question to ask our during government is already promising to announce changes to New Zealand's gun laws in response to the attacks. Another related question raised by the attacks should countries be developing a strategy to fight the global rise of white nationalism. Some countries are doing that. But many are not the Savan center here in the US analyzes emerging threats and global security, and they argue that the federal government government's generally need to address right wing extremism, specifically white nationalism with the same focus as they address other areas of global terror. So what would that look like calling Clark is a senior research fellow at the Sufa center. There's multiple pillars in laying out that kind of strategy. The first is I'd like to see some congressional hearings on on the topic. Just speaking personally, I've been called to testify on the threat posed by south Jihadist, maybe three times in the last year and a half. You don't see that same sense of urgency with right wing extremism. At all. I think there's also a funding issue in terms of countering violent extremism programs and other programs aimed at preventing terrorism. Those seem to be earmarked specifically for for terrorism that's related to Jihadist groups and not for rattling groups, and then lastly, and I think these are really at kind of the the higher Schettino level. I'd like to see some kind of a quivalent to what the State Department has for designating foreign terrorist organizations. So whether that's the FBI taking the. Lead or the department of homeland security some domestic agency that's able to do the same thing for domestic terrorist groups is it possible to rearrange funding at the federal level like the global war on terror still kind of can trigger authorization for use of military force around the globe. So why can't those funds also address white nationalism? Yes. So there's always a lag theft and dealing with this. When you look at the amount of analysts that are dedicated to focusing on Qaeda, sonic state compared to right wing nationalism. I think it's probably extremely disproportionate. It's not a threat. That's emerging the threat is here. It's right in front of our faces and we need to wake up to. It's sooner rather than later. Are there countries that you see that are doing work on this that you think they're they're models are that we can actually the US can actually learn from? I think both Germany and the UK have recognized how significant this threat is starting to shift resources in that direction. I know that in Germany. There are plans to increase their ranks by fifty percent for researchers that are studying the right wing threat domestically. Similarly in the UK there's been an eighty eight percent increase in counterterrorism operations as part of investigations into far-right extremist activities. These are countries that we have long standing relationships with. And I think I think there's a lot that we could learn in terms of best practices from what these countries are doing and again, putting the pieces together because this isn't an issue that just affects the United States or Australia or the UK. This is a global movement just like self Eugene autism. And we've really been slow to recognize that why do you think the US has been slow to recognize that I think there's a lot of probably social political and cultural reasons why why we've been slower to recognize the threat of right wing extremism. But that's not an excuse particularly given events of last year. I'm talking you took to today from Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. I live. In squirrel hill. I've lived there for ten years. And so that's where the shooting at the synagogue happened yet the tree of life shooting. So this is this is something that's impacted my life personally. And and I, you know, I know for fact because I talked to the researchers regularly that they believe that this is an issue as well. I think again, I mentioned the lag affect we need to start moving on this immediately to get the proper balls authorities and policies funding streams in place to tackle the stret- head on. I mean nine eleven was profound a shock to the US system. Is it possible? Do you think the track any form of extremism without overlaying with race and political identity? It's tough. I mean, especially in this country where we really struggle with those issues. That's apparent right? And so there's these kind of political landmines that people are wary of stepping on. And so I think we have to have an honest Frank discussion, and that that that's really not only occur at the grassroots level. But there's gotta be some leadership driving that from

United States UK New Zealand Prime Minister Christ Church State Department Dern FBI Germany Savan Center Overlaying Sufa Center Pittsburgh Clark Theft Pennsylvania Senior Research Fellow Frank Squirrel Hill Australia
Xi Jinping and Donald Trump exchange congratulations over 40th anniversary of China-US diplomatic ties

World News Analysis

03:10 min | 4 years ago

Xi Jinping and Donald Trump exchange congratulations over 40th anniversary of China-US diplomatic ties

"Janis president Xi Jinping, and as you as counterpart Donald form have exchanged. Congratulations on the fortieth anniversary of the establishment of China US diplomatique relations, while reiterating cooperation as the best choice for boats shooting pain suggested that bilateral relations are in an. Stage he caught on both sides to implement the consensus. They reached earlier and advance relations, featuring coordination cooperation and stability US. President Donald Trump suggested it has priority to promote cooperative and constructive US China relations, adding that his solid friendship was president. She has laid a firm foundation for the great achievements of the two countries in coming years for more on the Jonah US ties. We're now joined on the line by Toan Joe senior research fellow of institute of American studies was Chinese Academy of social sciences. Good evening. Dr tell them. So what are the key messages that we can get from this? I think we at least to get three messages. I were the both leaders attached great importance to China US relations. New they're important to China. They important to the United States and also important to what please stability and prosperity. Second. Message is the both leaders hope that the consensus. They reached a month ago. You not we'll be realized and in two months time, the two sides were reach a new trade agreement food wet the both leaders want cooperative constructive relationship and prisoner. She put forward coordination copperation stability as the basis for the future relationship. Yes, Dr towel. How would you describe the Jonah US relations over the past forty years? Well in the past forty years, China and the US differences in frictions and. There were the fuck Titians and ups and downs in relation inspite of that the general trend of the ballot relations wasn't moving forward. And there's a two countries cooperating you many areas and both countries got a lot of benefits for from the ballot or relations. So I think. Since over the bilateral relations is we corporation. Well, as you said earlier, actually, both leaders have emphasized on cooperation and coordination between the two countries. But actually, many critics are saying that the forty years of Jonah US convergence is starting to unravel because some are talking about an economic iron curtain and even a new code war. What do you make of the current state of China US ties? This is very hot topic.

United States China Janis President Xi Jinping President Donald Trump Jonah Toan Joe President Trump Chinese Academy Of Social Scie Senior Research Fellow Institute Of American Forty Years Two Months
No doubt MbS behind Khashoggi murder: Republican senators

Monocle 24: The Globalist

03:17 min | 4 years ago

No doubt MbS behind Khashoggi murder: Republican senators

"Following a briefing by the director of the CIA, gene hospital. US senators said that there is no doubt that crown prince Mohammed bin Salman should be held accountable for the murder of the Saudi journalist Jamaica Shoghi kashogi was killed on October. The second after entering the Saudi consulate in Istanbul to obtain documents needed for his upcoming marriage hustle met with democrat and Republican senators yesterday and they've now vowed to take action against Saudi Arabia. Well, joining me in the studio is Bill Lou who's a Middle East analyst, and who was also a friend of Jamaica Shoghi. Elizabeth KENDALL Buhl also be joining us. She's a senior research fellow in our bec- at Pembroke college. Oxford Bill, let's just talk about Gina hospital. Now, she's the head of the CIA. The agency's been quite clear about who it thinks is responsible for this. But of course, she was kept away from the initial briefing. Tell us tell us what the CIA has said, well, essentially, they have confirmed what everyone has been saying really for quite some time that it's very clear abundantly clear from. The evidence that they have acquired, including these electronic messages that that the moments Amman was very much involved in the murder of Hashem Rosie in the in the consulate in Istanbul. What's what's interesting is the junior hospital was prevented from going to the Senate to just last week. Mr. pale, the sectors state engine, manufactured fence were the ones who went. And I think that was a blunder I think it was a serious blunder by by Trump because it damages both a pump Heo and Mattis as well as as President Trump. And I think to put this into context with tend to a look at all these statements that come out of the White House said about various actors and players on the world, San, but this is unprecedented. This is a very senior members of the of the ruling Republican party attacking an ally in no uncertain terms. Calling him crazy saying we will not do business with this, man. Speaking about really, a a mental aberration. And and being appalled at what he has been told. And what he's heard. So it's an unprecedented step that that is that is that is unrivalled. And I think it's going to be damaging for Trump. I think it's going to be damaging for the people that support him. And really, I you know, my home. Convince Oman obviously now is on very very thin ice as you say unprecedent to attack an ally like that, but also hugely problematic for the Senate to go. So against what the president to say. Yes. An and because it's leading Republicans supporters vocal supporters of of Trump that have carried this attack out. So it's not just an attack on Amman is an attack on the strategy that somehow we can maintain a relationship with my mind because we need Saudi Arabia now, what Lindsey Graham was saying. I'm making a distinction here. Saudi Arabia is not NBS an and really that's a road perhaps out of this mess. Don't trump. But when you look at Saudi Arabia right now, it is MBA because he controls everything the economy, the military security system. And and and now really the challenge is can there's some space be created. So those within the ruling found in Saudi Arabia can start the process of actually getting rid of. I'm on..

Saudi Arabia President Trump Saudi Consulate Elizabeth Kendall Buhl CIA Istanbul Amman Senate Murder United States Bill Lou Gina Hospital Middle East Prince Mohammed Republican Party Director Pembroke College Analyst Oman Hashem Rosie