34 Burst results for "Senior Research Fellow"

Blocked Suez Canal Exposes Global Supply Chain's Fragility

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

01:56 min | Last month

Blocked Suez Canal Exposes Global Supply Chain's Fragility

"Lead. Today comes to us. Courtesy of the ever given that is a thirteen hundred foot. Long two hundred foot wide containership. One of the biggest of its kind. That is as of this moment. Most embarrassingly stuck jamming up the suez canal. Nobody going north not going south one of the key routes of global trade basically closed we have gotten christine. Mcdaniel on zoomed. Help us understand how this might play out. She's a senior research. Fellow at the mercatus center at george mason university. Thanks so much for coming on. Thank you nice to be here. So i have to tell you the first thing i thought when i saw pictures of this ship turned sideways in the canal. Other than how the heck did that happen was wow. The global supply chain is really really fragile. If this can block a major artery yes. It is fragile. There's lots of moving parts but remember the global shipping industry logistics. They are used to supply shocks demand. Shocks weather related war-related. So you know it's nothing they haven't dealt with before fair enough but if you are a a tanker company looking at this traffic jam in the suez canal. How long are you gonna wait and let your extremely valuable ships. Sit there in the backlog before you go around down the south of africa and angola the long way round right. Well economists especially trade. Economists have spent some time trying to calculate how much time cost and international trade The couple economists demanded that each additional delay of shipping is equivalent to about a half a percent to two percents patera And then of course. This is cascading. Because it's not just the stuff on that particular ship That's that's delayed by that. it's everything else. That's getting delayed because of

Suez Canal Mercatus Center Mcdaniel George Mason University Christine Angola Africa
The Real Danger of QAnon

People of the Pod

05:20 min | 3 months ago

The Real Danger of QAnon

"Finkelstein founder and director of the national contagion researchers to a nonpartisan multidisciplinary research group of experts including neuroscientists psychologists. Physicists machine learning experts who study online disinformation pamela. Presi is one of those experts. A senior research fellow at the institute who focuses on the psychology of thriving in a liberal democracy both have been sounding the alarm about the dangers of the antisemitic conspiracy theory cue on and we're not at all surprised to see the events at the capitol on january six there with us now to discuss what we can expect to see next from the movement and what is within our control to stop it pamela. Joel welcome to people of the pod. Thanks for having us so first of all. Please explain for our listeners. In the most basic of terms what is cunanan and why a group called. The american jewish committee might find it troubling. So cunanan is a cybercult that organized with populist conspiracy theories largely on twitter but another social networks as well it really got its roots in a trench community called h. ham and hmi is largely considered armpit of the internet Some of the worst ideas that arrived from social media come out of. Atm was inching about the colt of cunanan. Is that unlike other populist movements which rely on trash tags and organiz based on conspiracies have anti semitic components be value add for cunanan also had an anonymous profit so these diffuse organizations that form lobs on the basis of hashtags. They have a lot of power and benefit because people can act out in the name of the conspiracy without anybody really being responsible but one of the drawbacks. They have is that there's no leadership q. Figured out a solution to solve that you create anonymous leader who can drop missives secret coded information on avon that's encrypted with encryption that he's the only one that has the key for doing q enlisted his followers to become fellow researchers but got them researching with one another to portray vision of reality became increasingly apocalyptic. Interesting and so tell me a little bit more about the anti semitism that runs through cunanan. And how it informs these theories and this movement. The conspiracy group really semitic disinformation because every single successful conspiracy. Group necessarily has to reach for antisemitic. Disinformation as a matter of history and pragmatics. The beauty for a conspiracy theorist beauty being an awkward us but the the ease of anti semitic elements is that they are conspiratorial. And so there's a long history of as joe was saying things to grab things to look for that you just need to look at anti semitism defined and then you just enter that world that conspiratorial world where there is a mysterious you know evoke but somehow secretly powerful other who hides among you and is not always easy to spot that has tentacles in every seat of power government media and finance. That's the jewish conspiracy theory. That's the disinformation about jews. Jews benefit from transparency and the new technology of social media allows for so many areas of black boxes. You know so. Many areas of the dark web so many areas were light is not shining. And that's where these conspiracies grow pamela. Going back to your point about transparency. I'd argue everyone benefits from it. But yes i see your point about jews benefiting from that. I also should point out q. Went on rose to prominence not just during the isolation of the pandemic but during a moment of racial reckoning in this country is that relevant one of the places where we see this coming together in terms of the tools of the network contagion research institutes used to to create transparency and social media. Literally our goals create literacy on social media use machine learning to extract trans at a massive scale. So you characterize the information operations from these groups like you know and one of the largest information operations ever witnessed took place in the middle of quarantine when george floyd was killed and it was mobilized by cuban on and it was blaming george soros for instigating a civil war against antifa the moral other and so that really kind of i think brings home pamelas point in very concrete terms. You had this entire conspiracy network mobilizing around the idea that jewish international financier was causing a civil war was the force behind the moral other and that that was happening in the midst of the conditions of quarantine in that force not coincidentally also behind the virus so that was the largest surge of source activity. We've seen on twitter

Cunanan National Contagion Researchers Presi Pamela Finkelstein American Jewish Committee Joel Twitter JOE George Floyd George Soros
What we know - and what we don't - about the new coronavirus variant

BBC Newshour

02:19 min | 5 months ago

What we know - and what we don't - about the new coronavirus variant

"Normal for viruses to mutate. So how alarms should we be about the emergence of this highly infectious variant of the Corona virus, which is now prevalent in southern England, and if the variant is that much easier to transmit? How do you stop? It spread both within the UK and around the rest of the world On Sundays, its impact was starting to be felt. Britain's Health secretary Matt Hancock said people had to act as if they all had. Variant. The new variant is out of control when we need to bring it under control, and this news about the new variant has been a Um, incredibly difficult and, frankly, an awful year on bond. It's important for everybody to act essentially act like they might have the virus. And that's the way that we can control it together. It's not something for government or individuals. It's something for us all to do together. But could this you vary into the coronavirus also Be resistant to the vaccines that have been developed to counter the existing strain. I've been speaking to Dr Lucy Van Dorf, senior research fellow in Microbial Genomic, said the UCL Genetics Institute. What's name for certain about this virus mutation at the moment. What we know is we have a variant in circulation, which is carrying 14 defining mutations, which we haven't seen in the combination we see in this particular variant before This includes seven within the spike protein off the Corona virus, which is the protein that's most important for binding and entering human cells. One of the reasons that this has raised some concern, it's because some of these previously identified mutations have been implicated. In having some kind of biological relevant So the vast majority of mutations we have in this virus and and mutations are very much a natural process and this thousands of variance in circulation have no impact. But in this case we do have sets of mutations, which have been flagged as may be relevant. So are important in terms of the ability of the virus to bind to human cells, and also potentially for some degree of communication. And so this is one of the reasons together with the A marked increase in frequency of this particular Varian within the UK that scientists are studying it really very carefully right as we speak. But what makes this

Matt Hancock Dr Lucy Van Dorf Ucl Genetics Institute Britain England UK Varian
UK and Germany's different approaches to the pandemic

NPR's World Story of the Day

07:00 min | 7 months ago

UK and Germany's different approaches to the pandemic

"The UK and Germany are both leading democracies and not far apart on the globe. They took very different approaches to the pandemic with very different results the UK as suffered the most covid nineteen deaths in Europe Germany with a much bigger population has lost far fewer people. NPR's correspondent in each country rob Schmitz in Berlin and Frank Langfitt in London had been talking among themselves. Hey Rob Frank. So tell me what happened in the UK. were. So many mistakes a big reason is the government honestly doesn't really seem to think ahead Boris Johnson you remember he sold Brexit to the British people in two thousand sixteen with no plan on how to execute it. So in the virus began spreading here Johnson course he's now prime minister. He was slow to recognize the threat here he is on March Third I was at movie night. where I think the rush if you credit ours patience and I shook hands of everybody. So by April Johnson an icy ICU covid nineteen I was talking to you in Boyd he's a member of the scientific group that advises the government. The UK didn't really grasped the speed with which the epidemic was entering the country under are all sorts of reasons for that, some of which are to. Lack of organisational capability sometimes when there's very high uncertainty, you simply have to shut things down really quickly and frank here in. Germany. That's what they did on January twenty seven. The first known case of coronavirus was sent to Clemson ventner chief physician at the Munich Schwab in clinic we have very similar like the boys gall. Be always prepare. Then you're watched what was happening in Italy in January where the virus was spreading pretty fast and we knew that we have to flatten the curve. So even before the first case of Covid nineteen and Germany, he was working on slowing its progress and he says the German government was involved from day one asking us what do you need we? We? We didn't have to ask them for example, Germany already had a big supply of ICU beds clouds Deutsche is at the Federation of German. You know that it's been a long debate on whether we had too many intensive care beds that warned us that often obviously that debate is over Deutsche says, Germany also has a lot of hospitals. If you take all the beds in all of Germany's hospitals, you get four times more per capita than what the UK has rob. You had slack in your system in Germany there. Was Not much here because the government had been cutting funding to the National Health Service for years, the hospitals were afraid of getting swamped with Cova patients. So they sent elderly patients back to nursing homes some broad cove with them infected other residents at least twenty, thousand nursing home residents died of covid. That's terrible in while in Germany, deaths were prevented through testing and contact tracing. The health authority in Berlin district of Hong, Kong and operator talks to man at conduct with a positive case, there are around four hundred call centers like this across Germany Peters directs this one become Austin We have traffic wardens and librarians working for us. We've recruited gardeners from parks and recreation Germany had a lot of manpower and testing to infrastructure filled with labs and university medical centers across the country. You know here the government misread the corona virus they thought it was going to spread as quickly as the flu. They didn't even try to develop a testing system where we steward he's a former British cabinet minister they were very, very confident. And slightly arrogant neb beliefs that they understood this disease better than other countries, I think the lack of scientific education amongst a lot of the British political elite meant that they were very reluctant to challenge scientists but here, Germany. Frank. A trained scientist is at the helm and Chancellor Angela Merkel. gave one of the most powerful and heartfelt speeches in her life when she made a rare national address on March. Eighteenth dusted fees above in then. Comes here. I have absolutely no doubt that we will overcome this crisis. How many victims will it claim? How many loved ones lose to a large extent? The answer lies in our own hands miracle has a doctorate in quantum chemistry, and in another speech, she patiently explain how important it was for Germany to reduce the viruses reproduction rate. Her tone was always humble and deadly serious. I'm. Doing this Icefield is off that. We are thin ice. This is a situation in which caution not over-confidence is the order of the day it really different here Johnson studied classics at Oxford University. He was president the debating society and as Prime Minister he's tried to rally the country with rhetoric. We must act like any wartime government and do whatever it takes to support our economy Johnson's Ori helped win a landslide election last year, but a pandemic, of course, not a campaign. Here's where. We store again he sees himself as somebody who is encouraging a rugby team for nineteen minute match telling them that fantastic to make them play. Well, he doesn't primarily see himself as somebody whose job is to get into uncomfortable details were chew over policy and strategy but frank, it's this chewing over of policy and strategy. This technocratic nature of the German government that may have also contributed to Germany's success hunts could is senior research fellow at Chatham House this sort of doubling down on technocracy. Populism has now been discredited by the Corona Virus. He says, that's potentially dangerous. If technocrats feel too emboldened, there might be an even bigger growth populist backlash in the future some people will blame Johnson for Britain's handling of covid campaigner. He thinks Johnson's more symptoms than 'cause captors just written a book called why the Germans do it better notes from grownup country. We've descended into believing that somehow because we always muddled through in the past muddling through is a recipe that will get us through in the future. So rob where's Germany now with crow verse? Well cases are rising deaths are not that tells us these new cases are from young people, children across the country are back in classrooms, but the German government seems so far. Okay. With the dangers of this, there remains a strong infrastructure of hospital beds, testing, tracing Germany fields, prepared and Chancellor Angela Merkel's popularity ratings are sky high eighty, six percent. WOW cases rising rapidly to we've got new strictures but Johnson actually had trouble explaining them to the nation recently the last surveys Ron Johnson is under forty percent approval rating testing capacity here still can't meet demand. And Winter's coming. NPR London correspondent Frank Langfitt, and Berlin correspondent. Rob? Schmitz.

Germany Boris Johnson Frank Langfitt German Government UK Berlin Rob Schmitz Rob Frank Prime Minister Covid Chancellor Angela Merkel NPR Europe London UK. Brexit Boyd Clemson Coronavirus
Are Australia's security agencies getting too big?

Between The Lines

03:09 min | 8 months ago

Are Australia's security agencies getting too big?

"Well, you'd have to be living under a rock not to notice that Australia, is radically different security environment than walls just two years ago. The Prime Minister he's locked into the situation to the nineteen thirties, and in the last six months, we've seen a massive increase to the budgets for defense and our intelligence agencies. Now, the external threats are undeniable. You just think of the rising power of China, but are we at risk of undermining our political freedoms by expanding the powers of security agencies too much. Hell big and powerful. Should we let security agencies get? And what kind of oversight exists to ensure that the intelligence is not collected or used for political purposes? What do you think we'll pay the redwoods is the former official historian and the author of several award winning books. He's most recent one is called law politics and intelligence a law of Robert. Hope. Welcome back to the show painter. Thanks very much tom thanks for having me and just into carol she's a visiting fellow and senior research fellow at the national. Security, college it you good to be with you again just enter right to be thanks Tom. Now let's start with the hope commissions in the seventies and eighties Peter. This is your faces take us back to that time. Why are those commissions so important well between the mid seventies in the mid eighties over ten year period three successive Prime Ministers Whitlam Fraser and Hoke commissioned the same man just as good hope to conduct major inquiries into the intelligence agencies What he set up was not just not just any inquiry into a agency in Asia was the declared one and quite controversial that he set up a whole system for the agencies. Sitting out what each what agencies Australia needed, what each one should do, and what should not do how they should interact with each other, how they should interact with departments with individual ministers with the cabinet and cabinet committees and with the international partners Those we now know is five is and he emphasized a number of things. He particularly emphasized the intelligence system should serve the whole of government and not be unduly influenced as it was when he started by one or two very powerful departments, and towards that end, he said that should be a central coordinating agency which would only be invoked with assessment and he allocated collection assessment and dissemination different agencies. this one would be only concerned with assessment on like the American CIA and with its the independence of its. Assessments guaranteed by legislation. To, be independent from ministerial oh departmental. Precious. and. He said a of other things about the relationships between intelligence and lure enforcement agencies. Keeping Intelligence and policy making separate keeping intelligence and law enforcement separate were among the the basic

Australia TOM Prime Minister CIA Visiting Fellow Whitlam Fraser China Senior Research Fellow Official Peter Asia Hoke
Covid-19 Spreads: Is a global economic downturn on the cards?

John Batchelor

08:23 min | 1 year ago

Covid-19 Spreads: Is a global economic downturn on the cards?

"Show covert nineteen the corona virus beginning in China but now we see the news stories the satellite nation of South Korea it's watching turmoil in its production lines the non satellite nation Iran is cut out from the world community and world manufacturing so we're going to set that aside and go to northern Italy where there is a super spreader we're told and there are Italian town shutting down particularly Italian towns near the best mills the Italian mills now I'm describing economics but I'm doing it anecdotally so I welcome Christine McDaniel a senior research fellow at the Mercatus center who is approaching covered nineteen from the point of view of world economics Christina very good evening to you mention in your remarks we don't have a great deal of data but what we have is there any indication of an analogy to the corona virus have we seen the world deal with at this scale of threat before and do we know what it means for the economy when and if it recovers good evening to you good evening thank you so much that to be here on this fascinating it's not grim topic well the condiments you know we look at our historic events and course there's the mayors and the sars outbreaks although this one is a somewhat different in the sense that the incubation period as the actual duration is not yet known at first it was reported to be two weeks but then just today we're hearing out of China out that there was an extra long coated nineteen incubation dad a whole family of six tested positive for the virus falling and your bonds long cord G. so if we were still very unclear on the parameters and until we get a better sense of the incubation and the and the spread then you know until that happens it's still gonna be very difficult to to what we know what the reach could be all that said today China is much more integrated into the world economy than it was during the sars outbreak and US production can be shut down if China shuts down so so well we haven't reached a health epidemic yet like Diane Swonk said you know it is very possible that there will be an economic camp that make even without health condemning it even if it's just so what if you're driven but again we just don't have the data to know for sure we have a report from South Korea that Honda I will suspend production in South Korea because of the covet nineteen actually because they can't get parts from China but that leads to shin bone the bone we also have a similar indications from Sam song and we can expect that care will also struggle is it does this tell us that it's a profound damage to the world economy as my thinking as bad as an amateur Christine is that whoever wants to buy an automobile has the money in his pocket and when that automobile is available the purchase will happen so whether it happens in the first quarter of the second quarter the third quarter it's still part of growth is that it is that it is that it is the wrong way to approach this or is is that too positive well it's it's probably right you're talking about pent up demand you know things like for you know a large consumer goods if I want a new car or a new washing machine you know whether I go out today tomorrow or next month I'm going to go out and buy one so there are certain purchases that will happen even if they are delayed and their other purchase at your purchases and and trip trips that just won't happen because they didn't happen last week you know for example a conference that you don't you might wish they were supposed to go to that you didn't go to are you what are you did you go out to dinner you didn't have to go to work another event so there are some things that those sales are just gone and they're gone forever so it it depends on the type of sale that we're talking all right let me give an example I was scheduled to be in it was Pakistan within these next days for an international conference of financial conference called by the president very important to the development of Central Asia which you know is undergoing a re awakening right now renaissance it's been delayed till fall now yes that's a delay but it's not a cancellation and yes there will be a negative effect on the hotel years and the drivers and the airlines in and out of those Pakistan is that profound the travel agency is what I'm chiefly of focusing on but also the business travel agency which is a which pays top dollar well remember travel and tourism accounts for about ten percent of global economic activity so if that ten percent slows down for the next quarter or two then that's going to show up in the in the GDP numbers it will eventually bounce back but you know in the near term it you know it probably is going to look to bleed out through the through lower GDP a lower GDP in the first and second quarter but we look at GDP globally is this just a job for the IMF Christine Shawcroft well you know it it just goes to Millis is is not really going to help here if our people are just staying home right there in the we heard the CDC and HHS today and they said that the other course they're balancing against you now it depending on how things go in the eyes of would be a very aggressive on one hand they want an aggressive containment strategy on the other hand they want minimal impact to communities and so they were talking about you know encouraging people to stay home okay we'll find staying home then your physical stimulus is not necessarily going to help you know it might help some particularly I financially failing firms but in terms of the core they're the real reason for the economic slowdown the two center bucket tied to the virus back to school season which is not necessarily going to help so you have to remit long term economic growth is driven by mainly two things number one population number two productivity growth and so don't the long term is what you need to ask yourself how is this going to affect populations how was it going to affect productivity growth productivity growth you know that's our ability to make more eager to do more with less and in the long run I don't see how this would affect predicted to gross and last we have to make some structural changes to how we do business and that yeah it is no cost and slow things down but I think we're far from getting to that discussion yet Christine you read your colleagues and there do they love to kind of this love modeling is their modeling to describe something at this scale is there a book about this or are they writing the book now there are lots of models of modeling a chance going on right now and you're right we we we economists love models and up we use models to you know basically hold everything constant and just change one thing to get a better sense of how one thing can affect everything else we can model anything right and we have a global economic models country by country even the sub national level regional level models sector by sector so we can and we're very good at at modeling the economic effects of a chair or tax but the problem with this is we don't really know what the the the shock to the model is is it a supply side shock is the demand side Sharkey is a little bit little bit of both so and so economists get a better sense of how the virus is going to translate into affecting costs is supply and demand it's it's really hard to to use models to get some type of precision on the economic

China South Korea Iran
Amid Arms Race, Macron Offers Europe French Nuclear Wargames Insight

Monocle 24: The Briefing

06:32 min | 1 year ago

Amid Arms Race, Macron Offers Europe French Nuclear Wargames Insight

"The United Kingdom's departure from the European Union recalibrate Europe's politics six in all kinds of ways. One such and at this point pause to enjoy the rumbling caused by centuries of British diplomat spinning in their graves may have been to make France more powerful with the UK Gone France is the EU sole nuclear state and as such the E. U.'s only permanent member of the UN security. The council within the last hour French President Emmanuel Macron has spoken in Paris outlining an updated doctrine of deterrence while joined with more on this by Elizabeth the pro senior research fellow at Russi's modern deterrence project Elizabeth. What did President Macron have to say this morning he essentially reaffirmed? What every president every postwar presidents before him said which is Franz is committed to its nuclear deterrent. Now you may think that's. That's not a big big deal because which country would voluntarily give up its nuclear weapons but but this is a big deal because by focusing on on the nuclear deterrent than Francis desire and indeed intention to keep it and keep it as as as strong as as it is now it's essentially intially saying to the US France wants to play a larger role in Europe because so far the UK has been another nuclear power within the European in Union. Of course we have the US as well Franz to say now we want to play a larger role does the fact of the UK's departure from the a you. You make a difference to this really. Because isn't this something that would be would fall more under the ages of NATO which obviously the UK remains a member of it. Ah on the surface of it makes no difference because it to say it's not the handles all military matters even though the you would like to become stronger militarily tally but it is a symbolic It's a matter of political symbolism so France is really the the the strongest remaining power are within the European Union and in fact remains up to these remaining states. What's what's what to do with her combined? Military Essen against whom mm to defend themselves Of course NATO will remain by far the largest military alliance in the West but still there is a lot of room room for maneuver for innovation. I think that's what McConnell aiming and in fact he said that the US is an important partner. What's that Europe as said by by which we all assume he meant the European Union has to be able to act autonomously. Well well that is a bit of a signal to Washington. Did President Macron. Talk at all about what he perceives as the current threat. or or at least I guess specifically what he now thinks the deterrent is deterring. That's always a challenge with with deterrence And deter Berens That's you're never really sure with with this particular Tehran's nuclear weapons whom it is supposed to deter so the the only the only possible advisory Whom you could threaten nuclear weapons are other countries. That are heavily armed. So Russia does Europe need to deter China with nuclear weapons. It's unclear so it's really Russia it's interesting also Macro himself recently said a terrorism is the the biggest threat to Europe today so A threat against which I nuclear deterrent his more or less useless exactly so you can only deter a country with a strong government by using nuclear weapons or by telling them that you're going to use nuclear weapons terrorist won't be deterred cyber cyber hackers VAUGHN's been interred in fact he he will happily hathaway and possibly bring down your grid Your Electric Grid and other critical national infrastructure. It doesn't bother him that you threaten him nuclear weapons because he will know county will drop a nuclear weapon on a hacker but macron instill clearly believes the deterrent is important. Is this part of it. It's been a recurring theme of his presidency. There there is a desire. If you will to make France great again he does want to restore the idea. As many of his predecessors have been so keen on the restoring this idea of France fronts as a global power is is is he. Basically pitching himself was the defacto leader. Of A post dangle Merckel Europe he is and frankly there is lots of competition. There really isn't although it would be will be interesting. Just in a quick sign on it will be interesting to see what happens if in Germany. The Greens Emerge even stronger in the next election and and Germany and software with the Green Chancellor which would presumably be Robert Topic. Who is Ah Not at all keen on these ideas so Michael may have some competition than but with nuclear weapons. It's it is a a military tool but touch on top of that and maybe more importantly it is a symbol of great power status which is why all these other countries want wanted to India. Wanted it so then of course Pakistan don needed to have it as well and so forth So it's not about it's being of weapon that is going to be used anytime soon or even in in any distant future Richard but it is about great power status does as far as it's possible to tell. Does that play for him. Domestically with with the French people is there A thing you can tap into among the French electorate of this desire for France to be seen as a great power I think among any reasonably the large countries there is There is a desire to be seen as a strong country. We've seen here in the UK. Many people felt that the UK wasn't getting gifting enough credit as a as a major power in Europe was just being seen as some sort of middling power for a smaller countries are much happier with just being seen a small countries. And so I could tap into that I I don't think it will be enough for him to win. Over all those disaffected voters including the the yellow vests but Who wouldn't who wouldn't like the phrase make the UK great again make America great again or whatever happened to be

France Europe United Kingdom President Macron European Union United States Nato President Trump Russi UN Germany Franz Russia European In Union Elizabeth Senior Research Fellow E. U.
Brexit: Day 1 brings talk of EU unity with trade talks ahead

AP News Radio

00:57 sec | 1 year ago

Brexit: Day 1 brings talk of EU unity with trade talks ahead

"Despite some U. K. flag waving and celebrations for brexit supporters very little has actually happened other than it being a symbolic moment senior research fellow with U. K. in a changing Europe to Russia says not much will change during the transition period until the end of the year always a great so far is with your agreement and how at noon on and continues to trade on goods of to price otherwise we have nothing else agree well the AP you accounted for fifty four percent of Britons imports and forty three percent of its exports in twenty sixteen British prime minister Boris Johnsons top trade price outside the E. U. is the United States but reconciling the US's demands will be difficult because any attempt to do so by lowering British standards will push Britain further away from European rules the E. U. has already made clear that the price of access to its markets is continued it here instead of the books regulations Sarah Bassett London

Senior Research Fellow U. K. Europe Russia Prime Minister E. U. United States Britain London Brexit Sarah Bassett
Canada Names New China Envoy Amid Damaged Relations

World News Analysis

04:07 min | 1 year ago

Canada Names New China Envoy Amid Damaged Relations

"Canada has announced the appointment. If a new ambassador to china immed- damaged relations falling arrest of a top chinese tech exec prime minister justin trudeau said dominic barton the former global many director of consulting firm mckenzie as the new envoy. The former ambassador was fired after expressed grassed seamlessly for china saying to be great if the u._s. dropped as academia request for hallway executive mon one joe for more on this less welcome. I'm who win ping senior research fellow at the chinese academy of social sciences. Thanks for joining us hook. Hi thank you for having me so first of all so tell us more about the new ambassador dominic barton what made him the right choice for the job <hes> well <hes> you'll know the nikkei's <hes> <hes> very professional <hes> business person <hes> he has a now he was born in uganda africa. I also had long <hes> <hes>. I think it's a five p._m. Along in time you're songhai so even palm beach the bulk about how to you'll know knowing china so have seen it was obvious as the expert on china. I think south also has a lot of his <hes> <hes> experience we have seen as ceo <hes> like before the <hes> ladies they must become south and say company my country and also being essay come because counselor adviser <hes> you know for the <hes> canada phony not <hes> you know those kind of the the minister for finance so he knows how i felt he knows enough about the economic issue he got ta be on economic on august body from oxford university so he and not on the expert of i'll tell you come study and also as part two in business like <hes> <hes> we kinda with other you spent <hes> yeah you sound. You'll know eighteen counties so <hes> and also facing kinda also for five years. No china not really given his previous experience. Do you think the new ambassador will be able to ease tensions between china and canada and what for some key challenges. He's going to face well. I won't <hes> you'll know exactly the role. That's the play by a back up even though and back it's a very voted possessing an omni and back to the <hes> himself. I don't think he can make a lot of pig. You like <hes> a desktop by diplomats. So of course this is also <hes> important <hes> at least the now we see i'm back to ah has been back. <hes> you know <hes> lucky <hes> happy. I'm people on as long as eight months long. So of course it's not john for canada relationship so so now this thing has seen fields at least he's a very good signal and also has fueled by a very very professional person yet. He's not that traditional diplomacy. He's a business person. Here's the economies and also trying to exploit so only days as i think about <hes> which is very positive and also we hope that he will soviets the breach between china and canada. That's also becoming very constructive. <hes> this <hes> brief builder <hes> kind of ties of lots of tiny ally you you you prompt him for example. <hes> <hes> you know <hes> on friendly ties between canada has been there. That's a long time and also coming from i last week so <hes> <hes> you'll know rivalries like those case and also even now also hurt offense has to be made by the prime minister of canada and the media stuff immediately just that that that at this new ambassador will certainly raise human rights issue <hes> lacking so.

China Canada Dominic Barton Prime Minister Justin Trudeau Chinese Academy Of Social Scie Senior Research Fellow Executive Mckenzie Director Oxford University Uganda CEO Africa Eight Months Five Years
Big Tech Lobbying Looks For Allies Among Republicans And Libertarians

NPR's Business Story of the Day

05:03 min | 2 years ago

Big Tech Lobbying Looks For Allies Among Republicans And Libertarians

"Support for npr and the following message come from if a college where students home their talents and skills through a deep exploration of very ongoing practice in their field am performance at the professional level more at i t h h c h dot you you the relationship between big tech in washington has sunk to a new low congress the justice department and the federal trade commission are getting closer to investigating the biggest tech companies and those come in companies are painter protect themselves npr's peter overby reports washington finished talking about the big for tech firms amazon apple facebook and google but not in ways they appreciate here's democratic senator and presidential candidate elizabeth warren on npr's morning edition recently it's about the concentration of wealth and what that does it a marketplace but it's also about concentration of power economic power in political power up until a decade ago big tax audit didn't have to deal with washington politics that changed and last year the big four firms spent fifty five million dollars on lobbying it marked as sevenfold increase over ten years a decade when lobbying spending overall state essentially flat it puts and you know basically unpire with some of the the big players that we've long known about the banking industry a car industry lisa gilbert is with the watchdog group public citizen she was citing data from the nonprofit center for responsive politics which tracks campaign and lobbying money for tech firms again amazon apple facebook and google this year ported hiring seventy different lobby shops they also pay lawyers so called strategic consultant and others who were not legally lobbyists and so don't get disclosed in his gilbert notes big tech contributions flows through the governing infrastructure in washington it's really hard to turn a corner in dc without running into some google money both google and facebook has funded hundreds of tanks and influential trade associations congress in big chapters collided before in twenty twelve antifa piracy bills in the house and senate would have allowed for regulation of website content industry led protests culminated in in internet blackout and sank the legislation then last year big tech was in trouble over failures to protect users personal smell datta congress held hearings which accentuated how little the lawmakers knew about internet here's republican senator john kennedy of louisiana questioning facebook ceo mark zuckerberg are you willing to go back and an end work on on giving me a greater right to a race montana senator you could already delete any of the data that's their legal jewish i am network on expanding that is the sender i think we already do what you're referring to besides congress the justice department and he ftc or also looking at big tech the senate judiciary committee hasn't antitrust hearing this month and house judiciary has begun a series of hearings democratic congressman david seleny chaired the first one and this is the first significant antitrust investigation undertaken by congress in decades antitrust is serious stuff if the government thinks the tech giants are competing unfairly the companies could even be broken up you'll choson is senior research fellow at the charles coke institute there's a lot of things that are kind of coming together right now to make this a bigger issue than it has been in the past one of those things is politics internet industry donors have given at least sixty percent of their money to democrats every election since two thousand four that's according to the center for responsive politics choson said that now i think they're finding out that that was maybe not the best approach tech firms are looking for allies among republicans and libertarians were more likely to oppose government intervention at the same time some republicans have muted their allegations of social media bias but among tech companies there's also a hunter compromise is attorney mix stole tippy electronic frontier foundation put trying to steer the government towards solutions that maybe they don't love but the vacant deal if one possibility is a privacy bill something they would protect the personal data collected by social media companies but he's a good portion of industry is four eight broaden comprehensive federal level privacy though nicole long is a former executive at twitter and google she was also deputy chief technology officer india obama white house there's a point where line regulation comes into play the tech community is now facing that moment we are here would lock in millions of dollars are being spent to control but that law will say peter overby npr news washington

NPR Fifty Five Million Dollars Sixty Percent Ten Years
Israel Folau Debate: Freedom of Speech or Homophobia?

Between The Lines

09:51 min | 2 years ago

Israel Folau Debate: Freedom of Speech or Homophobia?

"Well, you don't have to be a rugby fan to know that Wallaby sti- Israel allow has been a big news story over the past few months, when I pretend he posted these woods on his personal social media accounts, quite warning drunks homosexuals adulterers, lies fornicated his thieves eighth assed, odometers hill. White, you repent. The fallout was a means rugby Australia won't allow that he had breached these plaid code of conduct by posting homophones combs on social media after examination of the event this happened. Well, he's roughly is football career to be TATA's right now, rugby Estrella saying is going to rip up his contract and no long matted that allow was one of the most talented players in the game. Hanes four million dollar contract will no longer together. Now, this story has ignited a discussion across the nation. That is polarized opinion really before. Why love invited to experts to navigate what all this means? Joining me in Sydney is paid a cookie. He's an eye junked associate professor of law at Notre dumb. He's also a senior research fellow at the center for independence studies as off started on this program before CIs. That's the thing tank. I hate it. Well, the guest is professor, Catherine Gilda, Catherine research, is freedom of speech, human rights in public discourse at the university of Queensland school of political science and international studies, and she's in Brisbane studio cath paid, welcome to the program. Thanks to be here. Now, let's stop hearing both of your opinions about what the exact issues are that we need to address a cookie. What's the hot of what's dividing public opinion? Well, I think Israel has done two things that run counter to the culture. The first thing is that he's stalked, very, clearly and openly about his religious beliefs, something that we're not really accustomed to doing in Australia. We just don't tend to. About God publicly, but the other thing that he's done is whereas straightens, generally very accepting of LGBT. I people there is a small, but very powerful group that wants to move the community beyond acceptance to endorsement, where dissent is not tolerated, and Israel allow refuses to go along with that. But it seems to be a difference between how people define freedom of speech religious freedom discrimination cath. What's the release you? He really show in my opinion, is that all human rights are not absolute and all human rights, stop at the point at which your exercise of your own right impairs, somebody else's exercise of their human rights. So what we have here is a difference of opinion of what the implications are for these Ralph last said, so in my view Israel now has engaged in discrimination occurs is not about religious freedom. It's about discrimination, pater, freedom, offense, discrimination, Joel on well agree with Catherine's assessment of human rights, and I think they are not absolute. I think that's very important. I don't think this is an issue really over religious freedom. I think it's gonna be on that. Now, I don't think that Israel has discriminated against in any more of a sense that he's just made a decision to he's chosen one group over another, he and he's not vilified not incited violence against this particular Cody should there, be limits to what freedom of speech allows people decide. Well, I think we have very careful about where we want to draw those limits. What what's wrong with him expressing an opinion? And remember that this opinion is, it's a conditional warning, as it were he saying, essentially, I love these sinners including homosexuals, and I want you to repent because in my religious belief you go to hell. If you don't so he's issued a warning out of love and Israel flowers, post vilifies more than one element of society. Cath gilda. What is it about homosexuality? That is really triggered the greatest response. Well, the answer to this question response directly, what pay to just sit? Absolutely. What is? Flouts said, Philipon homosexuals. And the reason that the issue with sexual was more important than liars or adulterers, or drunks is that there is no entrenched systemic discrimination, or bias in society against lies or against adulterers. There is entrenched systemic discrimination against time a sexual and by saying what he said, what is flour saying was that guy. People have no place on this earth. They must repent I ate Thiam must become not guy in order to be acceptable now. That's what crosses the line that is what is. But what is wrong with expressing that opinion? Again, I think Catherine's analysis is right ex-. I don't think is what have occasion. But if that's what you believe what's wrong with expressing it. Which is why I'm concerned that we've reached the point now in society where we simply cannot descend from certain positions that are laid down calculator. It is not just an expression of opinion to think that is to say that when. In your talking. All you're doing is expressing your thoughts, but we have decades of scholarship that tell us that words can do things worked can do good things and words can do bad things, and there is wise expressing yourself that constitute a form of discrimination, and that is why we recognize that law as height speech or vilification, or the Katherine disagree about whether or not to these this amounts vilification, because it seems to me that in Australia, at the moment that being gay is no bar to holding the highest office, highest officers in the land to holding commanding positions in business and in, in the academic world. So I wonder to what extent this discrimination, which certainly was very real. And I think very toxic early generation is is as prevalent today. Cather some commentators, they say that we're already over instructed by the nanny state governments, institutions. Are we headed towards becoming the nanny state? Many libertarians think we already are. Absolutely not. What we have in this country are very narrowly drone very carefully constructed laws that don't side that you can't talk about particular topic. So Israel Lau would have been free to say as he is in has infect said, don't support same sex relationships and audience put same sex marriage. And if that's all he'd said, we wouldn't be having this discussion go. Fund me has finally closed down. Fillets requests for money to becky's legal challenge, cath, is that fair? Yes. Guy fan me has a policy that is in sync with a and law in sync with international human rights law, and in sync with public opinion in strategy that we should to combat discrimination repeater fails, a millionaire. At least how is it moral to us, the public for money? He's using go fund me to correct what he perceives to be an injustice, and go on me is clearly, a barometer of public opinion because he's got tractor nearly two two million dollars of support even though the has taken over the funding. So whether or not he can afford it. I think is beside the point on Thomas. What's important is that he's attracting a great deal of public support through donations to the site, which suggests that there are many, many people who agree that not necessarily agree with flowers views about the destination of sinners, but they, they believe committed to his the freedom that he should have to express those views cath is Australia angry about censorship. I think there are lots of reasons why people are giving to fund. One of them is, of course, that he's a staff footballer. And so he has a lot of fans. Another one is that he has a particular religious community supporting him. So it's not possible to say that people are against since ship just because they giving him money. This issue has become much bigger than an issue of his religious freedom. And so people are giving money for all kinds of reasons, Catherine you've said that fillet himself is a victim. He why flower caught up in something that's much larger than himself. This is an orchestrated an organized campaign by conservatives who are evidently frustrated at the decades of progress that have been made. Human rights and anti-discrimination, particularly in law. But also in hearts and minds in terms of public opinion. And this movement is now somewhat clearly using the language of human rights at self to try and Hanis public support for Wanding back thighs protections. I don't think this is a push back in a sense. I think it's a reaction to the tyranny of tolerance that Torrence's demanded any dissent from what needs to be tolerated. What is required to be tolerated will not be tolerated. And I think that is what people are reacting to. They would say we've reached a tipping point where now you simply cannot express a dissenting point of view that departs from that, that's a certified by design guy says it were and Kath, how do you see this ending? I'm very, very concerned that paper light paid deny that discrimination still exists simply because there are one or two people in positions of power who may be, for example guy, and that therefore discrimination doesn't exist. Look at the research about what happened during the same sex marriage. So if I look at the research on what happens to young. Gay and lesbian people when role models like fil might comments like this incidence of suicide and self harm increase. It is absolutely the case, both in my research, and in lots of social science research. Discrimination is well, and truly alive and well, and we must not get to the point where we say, oh, discrimination is Ivan. Now. We can stop this fight. I hope that people Tyke from this, the message that we can need to maintain at posture. We need to maintain stance against discrimination, and bigotry, a lovely debate, Catherine Gilda, pita, Cody, thanks so much for being on our end today. Thanks to thanks. Tom Kettering, Gilda is a researcher of freedom of speech, human rights in public discourse at the university of Queensland's school of political science international studies and pay the cookie is a senior research, fellow at the center for independence. Studies also -ffiliated with Notre Dom, and he specializes in religious freedom. And if

Catherine Gilda Israel Australia Catherine Rugby Senior Research Fellow Sydney Cody Associate Professor Odometers Hill White Tata Thiam Israel Lau Football Estrella Brisbane
Sudan talks to resume soon as opposition halts strikes, says mediator

World News Analysis

05:06 min | 2 years ago

Sudan talks to resume soon as opposition halts strikes, says mediator

"Protests. Military leaders in Sudan have agreed resumed talks. Anythi OPN, mediator says, separately an opposition alliance agreed to suspend this campaign of civil disobedience and widespread strikes the army which has been in control since President, Omar Ashir was ousted in April has agreed to release polit-. Ical prisoners. The protesters are demanding return to civilian government talks broke down after dozens of protesters were killed in a crackdown on a city in early of this months since then much of the country has been shut down after the opposition open in strike for more on this. We are now joined on the line by home paint, senior research, fellow of the institute of West Asia, and African studies at Janis academy of social sciences. So Dr her a what led to this breakthrough and what makes the military council and opposition groups agreed to to resume the talks. Wow. This survey for leading for the bricks release, because many council and Auburn for position panties, they cannot have re upon like eventually the transitional in terror is a constant what kind of presentation coming from. Before they're saying often is the foam a fifteen person a member. There's kind of a crisis. My personal this. Council and seven coming from like the note of saving inside a coming from the military side by the ministry side, saying they will be inside. They'll be ahead of this conflict over inside of, you know, they didn't have break did a great. So this does eventually I think, becoming a leading for to miss Mississauga in the break-up of this talk. And now think that resume costs. So what happened is because the lots of nationalization goes on that the AU especial avoid like the labor country opium. Fi minister, despite the IB also traveled to the not Saddam playing to bring them together to bring them to issue. All these offers. The new idea, how to reach their for international also goes up after being assessing the open fire for the people so testers cost a lot of tests, so especially much. So that's why now they both play now that to to the talk. It will ask me the military civilians, they actually had agreed on a deal on a three year transition period on the fifteenth of may litter. The military just decide to scrap all those agreements. So what kind of deal could be struck as they return to talks this time? Are well on the talk actually feel goes to how shared his power both sides. And I suppose for the mini Terry concept they have already in touch, all the power now they're they also travelled, the like Amini, Terry the transitional either. They traveled to surrounding the neighboring county, even traveled body and Saudi also seems that these two so all those leaks labor. They agree upon to suppose for many concert now in so this same confidence, not the heath up any real power. So this opposition, this contact so happy, they also, you know, backstop from the, the people support, the best time from this, and I suppose and the media suppose though they wanted to come with the five whistles a. The first round of whiskey lay and then around the wrong. So that's the. Lease it will Sudan contributes military to the Saudi effort in Yemen, and his military leaders have gotten some support from Saudi Arabia, and will, so the United Arab Emirates. So what is at stake for those rational powers as they seek to protect their interest in Sudan. Oh, yes. Especially in the race in the years, this the Middle East other big powers, like Saudi UAE, and I to amorous, they all have, you know, increasing interesting on and when they're building their I like together to come from with Iran. That is Iran now has been causing the biggest threat of Assadi for three and the sole, they want your mind to the mall this, you know, the I like this thing in there.

Sudan Saddam Saudi Arabia Iran Saudi Uae Omar Ashir President Trump Janis Academy Of Social Scienc Terry Institute Of West Asia Middle East Mississauga United Arab Emirates Opium Yemen Assadi Amini Three Year
White nationalism is on the rise across the globe

PRI's The World

03:59 min | 2 years ago

White nationalism is on the rise across the globe

"Zealand is a country looking for answers this week answers to questions raised by the deadly attacks last Friday onto mosques in Christ Church. Here's prime minister just into our Dern today. The public rightly are asking right now is why is it? And how is it that you should end currently able to buy military style semi automatic weapons in New Zealand, and that's the right question to us. Our government is already promising to announce changes to New Zealand's gun laws and response to the attacks. Another related question raised by the attacks should countries be developing a strategy to fight the global rise of white nationalism. Some countries are doing that. But many are not the Sufen center here in the US analyzes emerging threats and global security, and they argue that the federal government government's generally need to address right wing extr. AM specifically white nationalism with the same focus as they address other areas of global terrorism. So what would that look like calling Clark is a senior research fellow at the Sufa center. There's multiple pillars in laying out that kind of strategy. The first is I'd like to see some congressional hearings on on the topic. Just speaking personally, I've been called to testify on the threat posed by south jihadists, maybe three times in the last year and a half. You don't see that same sense of urgency with right wing extremism. At all. I think there's also a funding issue in terms of countering violent extremism programs and other programs aimed at preventing terrorism. Those seem to be earmarked specifically for for terrorism that's related to Jihadist groups and not for right wing groups. And then Lastly, I think these are really at kind of the higher Schettino level. I'd like to see some kind of equivalent to what the. Department has for designating foreign terrorist organizations. So whether that's the FBI taking the lead or the department of homeland security some domestic agency that's able to do the same thing for domestic terrorist groups is it possible to rearrange funding at the federal level like the global war on terror still kind of can trigger authorization for use of military force around the globe. So why can't those funds also address white nationalism? Yes. So there's always a lag effect in dealing with us when you look at the amount of analysts that are dedicated to focusing on kite or the Islamic state compared to right wing nationalism. I think it's probably extremely disproportionate. It's not a threat. That's emerging the threat is here. It's right in front of our faces. And we need to wake up to it sooner. Rather than later are there countries that you see the that are doing work on this that that you think they're they're models are that we can actually the US can actually learn from. Yeah. I think both Germany and the UK have recognized how. -nificant this threat is and are starting to shift resources in that direction. I know that in Germany there are plans to increase their ranks by fifty percent for researchers that are studying the the right wing threat domestically. Similarly in the UK there's been an eighty eight percent increase in counterterrorism operations as part of investigations into four right extremist activities. These are countries that we have long standing relationships with. And I think I think there's a lot that we could learn in terms of best practices from what these countries are doing and again, putting the pieces together because this isn't an issue that just affects the United States or Australia or the UK. This is a global movement just like salvaging hot ISM. And we've really been slow to recognize that why do you think the US has been slow to recognize that I think there's a lot of probably social political and cultural reasons why why we've been slower to recognize the threat of right wing extremism. But that's not an excuse. Particularly given events of the last year. I'm talking to today from Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

United States New Zealand UK Zealand Germany Prime Minister FBI Dern Pittsburgh Sufen Center Christ Church Sufa Center Pennsylvania Senior Research Fellow Clark Australia Eighty Eight Percent Fifty Percent
White nationalism is an international threat on the rise

The World

04:57 min | 2 years ago

White nationalism is an international threat on the rise

"A country looking for answers this week answers to questions raised by the deadly attacks last Friday onto mosques in Christ Church. Here's prime minister just into our Dern today. I think what the public rightly are asking white now is why is it? And how is it that you should end currently able to buy military style semi automatic weapons in New Zealand, and that's the right question to ask our during government is already promising to announce changes to New Zealand's gun laws in response to the attacks. Another related question raised by the attacks should countries be developing a strategy to fight the global rise of white nationalism. Some countries are doing that. But many are not the Savan center here in the US analyzes emerging threats and global security, and they argue that the federal government government's generally need to address right wing extremism, specifically white nationalism with the same focus as they address other areas of global terror. So what would that look like calling Clark is a senior research fellow at the Sufa center. There's multiple pillars in laying out that kind of strategy. The first is I'd like to see some congressional hearings on on the topic. Just speaking personally, I've been called to testify on the threat posed by south Jihadist, maybe three times in the last year and a half. You don't see that same sense of urgency with right wing extremism. At all. I think there's also a funding issue in terms of countering violent extremism programs and other programs aimed at preventing terrorism. Those seem to be earmarked specifically for for terrorism that's related to Jihadist groups and not for rattling groups, and then lastly, and I think these are really at kind of the the higher Schettino level. I'd like to see some kind of a quivalent to what the State Department has for designating foreign terrorist organizations. So whether that's the FBI taking the. Lead or the department of homeland security some domestic agency that's able to do the same thing for domestic terrorist groups is it possible to rearrange funding at the federal level like the global war on terror still kind of can trigger authorization for use of military force around the globe. So why can't those funds also address white nationalism? Yes. So there's always a lag theft and dealing with this. When you look at the amount of analysts that are dedicated to focusing on Qaeda, sonic state compared to right wing nationalism. I think it's probably extremely disproportionate. It's not a threat. That's emerging the threat is here. It's right in front of our faces and we need to wake up to. It's sooner rather than later. Are there countries that you see that are doing work on this that you think they're they're models are that we can actually the US can actually learn from? I think both Germany and the UK have recognized how significant this threat is starting to shift resources in that direction. I know that in Germany. There are plans to increase their ranks by fifty percent for researchers that are studying the right wing threat domestically. Similarly in the UK there's been an eighty eight percent increase in counterterrorism operations as part of investigations into far-right extremist activities. These are countries that we have long standing relationships with. And I think I think there's a lot that we could learn in terms of best practices from what these countries are doing and again, putting the pieces together because this isn't an issue that just affects the United States or Australia or the UK. This is a global movement just like self Eugene autism. And we've really been slow to recognize that why do you think the US has been slow to recognize that I think there's a lot of probably social political and cultural reasons why why we've been slower to recognize the threat of right wing extremism. But that's not an excuse particularly given events of last year. I'm talking you took to today from Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. I live. In squirrel hill. I've lived there for ten years. And so that's where the shooting at the synagogue happened yet the tree of life shooting. So this is this is something that's impacted my life personally. And and I, you know, I know for fact because I talked to the researchers regularly that they believe that this is an issue as well. I think again, I mentioned the lag affect we need to start moving on this immediately to get the proper balls authorities and policies funding streams in place to tackle the stret- head on. I mean nine eleven was profound a shock to the US system. Is it possible? Do you think the track any form of extremism without overlaying with race and political identity? It's tough. I mean, especially in this country where we really struggle with those issues. That's apparent right? And so there's these kind of political landmines that people are wary of stepping on. And so I think we have to have an honest Frank discussion, and that that that's really not only occur at the grassroots level. But there's gotta be some leadership driving that from

United States UK New Zealand Prime Minister Christ Church State Department Dern FBI Germany Savan Center Overlaying Sufa Center Pittsburgh Clark Theft Pennsylvania Senior Research Fellow Frank Squirrel Hill Australia
"senior research fellow" Discussed on World News Analysis

World News Analysis

02:04 min | 2 years ago

"senior research fellow" Discussed on World News Analysis

"How minus situation involve I think, of course, the most of the the the the ideal way, of course, if the the b India. Pakistan to sit together and talk about this issues and take steps to low of tension and avoid thought of escalation, and and also exercise I mean, restrain this is very important, but other other situation very fluid and now well, it was t-. What what happened the next the Pakistan side as being as kind of the parties have been. Does other being under the aggression? And I am in the then it was with a with the have to respond, and that this moment what I see is Pakistan, most primarily focusing on diplomatic sort of front of being now calling upon the organization of Islamic Conference's and into and other friend friends considering to Wien, but but the meantime is also prepared to respond any possible military aggression about it is tied. I said they are going to leave a mutually to respond at the time and the place of his choice. So well, well, it was the the next few. I think days can be very dangerous, and it can be very a war isn't if I mean vacs collation does not low up then it was possibly skill of a more tension. But I hope and I I hope that the two sides. I. Cool minded, prevail and peace pavilion. And I think it takes two side to work together to take steps to will prevent him peace and stability and working together to promote on terrorism. This is also very much. Thank you. Dr owning vice president and senior research fellow at the China Institute of international studies..

Pakistan peace pavilion India vice president China Institute of internation senior research fellow
"senior research fellow" Discussed on Talk 650 KSTE

Talk 650 KSTE

03:03 min | 2 years ago

"senior research fellow" Discussed on Talk 650 KSTE

"Guest is senior research fellow and director of the equity initiative at the Mercatus center at George Mason University in Fairfax Virginia before we go any further what exactly does the equity initiative due. Well, what we do is we explore instances government, favoritism. So that's where the Foxconn deal came to light. There's a great deal of evidence that economic freedom is good for prosperity that lower taxes and fewer regulations. Those types of policies tend to be good for society. But what we find is that, you know, targeted tax breaks regulatory privileges. Those types of things that that sort of undermine economic freedom that raised the burdens on everybody else are often really driven by special interests who want some sort of government assistance. So our our project really aims to better understand the causes and consequences of this type of government, favoritism, and I gather that you would see the evidence as being that in most cases. The cost benefit analysis would shoot these down. Yes. That's right. That's right. Go ahead. Well, one thing I wanted to point out is, you know, there's a off as I was saying, you know, you could think about absent a subsidy to one firm you could lower everybody else's taxes. The there's an interesting political economy thing going on here though as well. So we knew spare particular firms from having to pay an an onerous tax. Then they no longer are advocates for for lowering that tax. So as I mentioned earlier, Wisconsin, actually spares all this is a relatively new policy for the last. I think about four years Wisconsin has spared all of its manufacturers from its corporate income tax rate. So while sixteen thousand firms have to pay a corporate income tax rate some three thousand firms don't because they're manufacturers. Well, those firms are no longer advocates for reducing the states corporate income tax rate, and so you actually find and there's there's recent evidence where some economists looked at the relationship between economic freedom and subsidies, and they found that states. That give out more subsidies actually, have lower levels of economic freedom, which is another way of saying they have higher taxes and more regulations on everybody else. One eight six six five O JIMBO our number one eight six six five zero five four six two six as we talk with the match you Matthew Mitchell of George Mason University. It could be argued I suppose that while you could use the same expenditure of money to lower overall tax rates, but that other people aren't offering a a ton of jobs such as at least in the beginning. Foxconn was offering in other words, it could I guess from from that perspective be argued that they're more worthy of a tax break because they're breaking in all these jobs. If in fact, they had in fact, you brought in.

Foxconn George Mason University Wisconsin senior research fellow Mercatus center Fairfax Virginia Matthew Mitchell director four years
Xi Jinping and Donald Trump exchange congratulations over 40th anniversary of China-US diplomatic ties

World News Analysis

03:10 min | 2 years ago

Xi Jinping and Donald Trump exchange congratulations over 40th anniversary of China-US diplomatic ties

"Janis president Xi Jinping, and as you as counterpart Donald form have exchanged. Congratulations on the fortieth anniversary of the establishment of China US diplomatique relations, while reiterating cooperation as the best choice for boats shooting pain suggested that bilateral relations are in an. Stage he caught on both sides to implement the consensus. They reached earlier and advance relations, featuring coordination cooperation and stability US. President Donald Trump suggested it has priority to promote cooperative and constructive US China relations, adding that his solid friendship was president. She has laid a firm foundation for the great achievements of the two countries in coming years for more on the Jonah US ties. We're now joined on the line by Toan Joe senior research fellow of institute of American studies was Chinese Academy of social sciences. Good evening. Dr tell them. So what are the key messages that we can get from this? I think we at least to get three messages. I were the both leaders attached great importance to China US relations. New they're important to China. They important to the United States and also important to what please stability and prosperity. Second. Message is the both leaders hope that the consensus. They reached a month ago. You not we'll be realized and in two months time, the two sides were reach a new trade agreement food wet the both leaders want cooperative constructive relationship and prisoner. She put forward coordination copperation stability as the basis for the future relationship. Yes, Dr towel. How would you describe the Jonah US relations over the past forty years? Well in the past forty years, China and the US differences in frictions and. There were the fuck Titians and ups and downs in relation inspite of that the general trend of the ballot relations wasn't moving forward. And there's a two countries cooperating you many areas and both countries got a lot of benefits for from the ballot or relations. So I think. Since over the bilateral relations is we corporation. Well, as you said earlier, actually, both leaders have emphasized on cooperation and coordination between the two countries. But actually, many critics are saying that the forty years of Jonah US convergence is starting to unravel because some are talking about an economic iron curtain and even a new code war. What do you make of the current state of China US ties? This is very hot topic.

United States China Janis President Xi Jinping President Donald Trump Jonah Toan Joe President Trump Chinese Academy Of Social Scie Senior Research Fellow Institute Of American Forty Years Two Months
No doubt MbS behind Khashoggi murder: Republican senators

Monocle 24: The Globalist

03:17 min | 2 years ago

No doubt MbS behind Khashoggi murder: Republican senators

"Following a briefing by the director of the CIA, gene hospital. US senators said that there is no doubt that crown prince Mohammed bin Salman should be held accountable for the murder of the Saudi journalist Jamaica Shoghi kashogi was killed on October. The second after entering the Saudi consulate in Istanbul to obtain documents needed for his upcoming marriage hustle met with democrat and Republican senators yesterday and they've now vowed to take action against Saudi Arabia. Well, joining me in the studio is Bill Lou who's a Middle East analyst, and who was also a friend of Jamaica Shoghi. Elizabeth KENDALL Buhl also be joining us. She's a senior research fellow in our bec- at Pembroke college. Oxford Bill, let's just talk about Gina hospital. Now, she's the head of the CIA. The agency's been quite clear about who it thinks is responsible for this. But of course, she was kept away from the initial briefing. Tell us tell us what the CIA has said, well, essentially, they have confirmed what everyone has been saying really for quite some time that it's very clear abundantly clear from. The evidence that they have acquired, including these electronic messages that that the moments Amman was very much involved in the murder of Hashem Rosie in the in the consulate in Istanbul. What's what's interesting is the junior hospital was prevented from going to the Senate to just last week. Mr. pale, the sectors state engine, manufactured fence were the ones who went. And I think that was a blunder I think it was a serious blunder by by Trump because it damages both a pump Heo and Mattis as well as as President Trump. And I think to put this into context with tend to a look at all these statements that come out of the White House said about various actors and players on the world, San, but this is unprecedented. This is a very senior members of the of the ruling Republican party attacking an ally in no uncertain terms. Calling him crazy saying we will not do business with this, man. Speaking about really, a a mental aberration. And and being appalled at what he has been told. And what he's heard. So it's an unprecedented step that that is that is that is unrivalled. And I think it's going to be damaging for Trump. I think it's going to be damaging for the people that support him. And really, I you know, my home. Convince Oman obviously now is on very very thin ice as you say unprecedent to attack an ally like that, but also hugely problematic for the Senate to go. So against what the president to say. Yes. An and because it's leading Republicans supporters vocal supporters of of Trump that have carried this attack out. So it's not just an attack on Amman is an attack on the strategy that somehow we can maintain a relationship with my mind because we need Saudi Arabia now, what Lindsey Graham was saying. I'm making a distinction here. Saudi Arabia is not NBS an and really that's a road perhaps out of this mess. Don't trump. But when you look at Saudi Arabia right now, it is MBA because he controls everything the economy, the military security system. And and and now really the challenge is can there's some space be created. So those within the ruling found in Saudi Arabia can start the process of actually getting rid of. I'm on..

Saudi Arabia President Trump Saudi Consulate Elizabeth Kendall Buhl CIA Istanbul Amman Senate Murder United States Bill Lou Gina Hospital Middle East Prince Mohammed Republican Party Director Pembroke College Analyst Oman Hashem Rosie
China and India reach border issue consensus

World News Analysis

01:49 min | 2 years ago

China and India reach border issue consensus

"The first border talks held in China's since last year still allow standoff China and India, they reached importing consensus and pledged to implement the consensus to maintain border peace. That's according to a statement released by the Chinese ministry of foreign affairs during the weekend during a meeting Saturday representatives from China and India exchange views on bilateral relations, and issues of share concern, though, size agreed to reach a fair reasonable and mutually acceptable solution to border disputes as soon as possible before a final settlement. Coulda border disputes. This reached the two countries are dedicated to maintaining peace entering quality at border, the twenty first round of talks between Chinese and Indian special representatives on boundary. Issues was co chaired by Chinese state councilor and foreign minister one e an India's national security adviser g Davar ancient do southwest China's Sichuan province the more about about this latest round of border talks between China and India, go earlier talk with ringing my president and senior research fellow with the China Institute of international studies, professor around both twenty nine India said they reached important consensus. How do you understand the important? Consensus was takeaway from the statement released by the Chinese ministry of foreign affairs. I think this round of talk is important in the fact takes point consensus being reached and also published about in the Chinese subtly the Chinese. The website China's foreign ministry and also the website of the India ministry of external affairs, and even look at the six points for me, the most important thing, of course, is that the two Basho Representative.

Chinese Ministry Of Foreign Af China India India Ministry China Institute Of Internation G Davar Sichuan Senior Research Fellow Representative Professor President Trump
"senior research fellow" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

09:03 min | 2 years ago

"senior research fellow" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"Most recently the conversation about trade turn to NAFTA and Mexico agreeing with the confrontation by the Trump administration about a better deal for the United States. And then no not so not so happy about the Canada matter, although that seems to turn on dairy farming in Quebec, especially if you're French-Speaking Quebecer. However, the larger story of trade is still unfinished, and I welcome Veronese senior research fellow at the Mercatus center writing most recently at the New York Times about trade and how this plays out for the American people the American consumer especially for all the rest of his Bernie, I seize on your wonderful metaphor that the steel industry steel executives in particular, have quote, an iron grip on the White House. Why is this? And how does this illustrate? The quandary of the Trump administration's policy about trade. Good evening to you. Good evening, John. It's the grip of the of the steel industry on the White House, and and many different levels of government is actually is a long running one. And it's been going on for decades, man, if you read the history of the steel industry, it's been one of protection it's been one of avoiding modernisation only really been lost of the when there was no other options available to them. It's it's one of a high subsidies in it's one that the that has effectively resorted in the price of US still being significantly higher than the price of steel worldwide or even in western Europe. And and of course, now because of these terrorists placed on on still coming in. To the country that gap between US steel, and and and the world like price steel has gone up the roof because steel is one example of trade conflict. Let's make the larger point the trade. The tariffs proposed by the Trump administration across across the board against Mexico that seems to resolve against Canada guest, our European trading partners against China. Are they going to create jobs in America? No, they're on my face. I it's important to note that the decline in the number of jobs in the steel industry has been going on since nineteen fifty three where it actually peaked at six. I think it was roughly six hundred fifty thousand jobs in the steel industry. And now it's down to a hundred forty thousand jobs and the costs for the decline, even though it's easy to blame it on trade. It's been mostly innovation and technology, and that has actually allowed some of the I mean a big increase in productivity. And higher wages for workers and all manufacturing because this is trying to been going on everywhere. It's been slower to adopt in the steel industry. But it's happened everywhere. And it's this is the reason why manufacturing jobs in the US, and then still industry command very high rates. The concern that we all know, the very high rate is the concern that we all have is that if it's not creating jobs for the steel industry has been losing jobs, and it's not creating jobs for the steel industry in a in a sizable fashion. What does it do for people who depend upon the steel industry? Does it help them? It's quite devastating. Now there I mean there there are some question about whether this time around is still going to create a few jobs because that's always possible on in two thousand and two. Some forget you've already done this. And there was no significant it was roughly the same. And there was no significant increase in employment on still, but we know that they were massive amount of losses up to two hundred thousand jobs in the steel industry. So I said that the steel industry employs one hundred forty thousand workers. Well, the steel-consuming is street industry. A conservative estimate of the number of workers is six point five million. And even according to the department of commerce weighed when you actually look at the table that they produced you can see that they estimate that this kilter tariffs could raise the employment in iron and steel industry by fourteen thousand jobs, and they would actually. Extraorde job. Like ten times this amount in the in the downstream industry. That's construction automobile. I mean, there's there's there's a ton of downstream industry that affects all of us. And that's not even counting consumers like you. And I, you know, and and the final price of goods or three by so it's it it affects a lot of people on some people will lose their job and are already losing their job. Let's move away from steel to something simple like newspaper print newsprint. You report that the Commerce Department in March of two thousand eighteen I believe had decided has decided to put impose tariffs on a Canadian newsprint paper. Why? So they were companies complaining there. I mean, one in particular complaining that the competition of of Canadian company used importing groundwood papers to the US was causing some distortions and losing jobs in the United States and asked for protection to for for Torah and the Commerce Department was more than happy to indulge, unfortunately. And and it imposed up to thirty two percent and tariffs on Canadian importers of of papers. And that was a big big deal because while the competition like the company that was that was you know. Complaining cold, nor nor specific taper company was, you know, getting a boost out of it because then competitors are getting you know, like like really getting a hit over the head. And and and their costume are exploding consumers, Canadian papers, and they were roughly six hundred thousand people potentially affected were facing higher costs. And and and these were not all of them say we're jeopardized. Did we save any jobs through we create any jobs by putting a tariff on Canadian newsprint? Listen clear that industry, the north Pacific paper company when I looked two weeks ago, it was thirty three employees. And when I was writing the New York Times piece of thirty four maybe one, I guess, but you know, the good news is the actually the International Trade Commission came out against those terrorists. So those. Sheriffs are going to be removed. And that's one of the rare cases where the downstream industries actually end up winning were their case in their please is actually you know, somehow being saved by the decision from the IT commissioners. No, there's no on fairness here. It's pits. We need to remove this very unfair terrorists. One. More example, we have less than a minute Veronese during the Obama administration the president used his his powers once against tyre dumping by China. Did it work? We have about thirty seconds. No, it it didn't work. But you terrorists. I mean, they never work because very often they try to protect already protected industry. Who's problem on are are just have nothing to do with competition and their way harder to address than actually blocking competitor's? So it really did not work. And and it made on the, you know, process more expensive for consumers. It's always how it works. And they never really it's not a good way to raise employment economic growth. That's the way to go. If you wanna increase economic jobs. That's the way to go are Reggie at the Mercatus center at George Mason University writing recently on tariffs in the New York Times. I'm John Batchelor. This.

United States New York Times Trump administration Commerce Department John Batchelor Canada Mexico White House Mercatus center NAFTA China Veronese International Trade Commission Quebecer Quebec senior research fellow Europe Bernie America
"senior research fellow" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:43 min | 3 years ago

"senior research fellow" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Political gabfest and senior research fellow at yale law school welcome emily basilan good to have you with us thanks for having me and we also want to welcome douglas connect and he's sharing professor of constitutional law at pepperdine university former us investor a malta former reagan administration justice department official welcomed connect thank you good morning good morning to you and emily beige let me begin with you and let's begin by talking about the record here there is certainly a great deal of concern particularly on healthcare and on abortion but we're hearing kind of conflicting reports from not only the right and the left obviously but within the right and within the left what i mean by that is there a conservative to say that from the record especially when it comes to roe versus wade we haven't had a strong enough position or we haven't despite the garza case that i alluded to with an immigrant young woman we haven't seen enough to convince us these are what the real concern are saying that we have a true conservative here and yet on the other hand national review for example calls him the best social conservative in the land so can we sort of mediate between those two views at least from the right i well i'll be interested in doug's take on this but my sense is that any dissent about judge cavanaugh among conservatives is going to quickly fade away he is a very conservative judge he has a conservative record on abortion in the garza case you're referencing and the fact that he hasn't gone out of his way to you know make a big speech about overturning roe versus wade unnecessarily in terms of reaching a decision in garza that's a point in his favor in means he seems more abound by the law slightly more cautious and it also means that he doesn't have a huge target on his back for the two pro choice republican senators lisa murkowski and susan collins so really servative should be glad that cavanaugh was slightly circumspect and how he worded his descent in that abortion opinion which in yeah and he did say he did not think this undocumented immigrant teenager in government custody had a right for the government to allow her to get an abortion there seems to be though don't go professor come back on this seems to be a great deal of concern factor earlier this morning i don't wanna get necessarily totally caught up in the question of roe versus wade but it certainly is one big one looming over this nomination along with the nominees consideration of healthcare is said to be i want to hear from you on this also from both of you but let's i pursue the idea that he would be opposed to roe versus wade or we tried to maybe even overturn it let me actually have you hear senator kamala harris morning on the nomination apropos of this if you are a young woman in america or you care about a young woman in america pay attention to this because it will forever change your life professor comeback let me hear from you well i think this is a much more complex question than senator harris let's it be described as it's not a question of for row or against roe i agree with emily that we don't have much of a of a trail here to follow with regard to judge cavenaugh by what we do have suggests that he's not going to be greatly expanding the right to an abortion or or or greatly sensitive to regulations that might might limit that right but that's true of almost any of the conservatives that were on the list for the president quite frankly the president shows judge cavenaugh because i think he was convinced it was the easiest of the confirmations he had the he had all of the right credentials for from the federalist society he had gone to yale and he had clerked for people that were popular at the time including justice kennedy but in in point of fact if the president really wanted to appeal to his political base if he really wanted to take up the issue of social conservatism the role of the family as opposed to the role of the market he would have chosen someone like ab coney barrett at notre dame and judge on the seventh circuit than than brad kavanagh brad kavanagh basically represents the fact that when donald trump came up to the line on this question he blinked and he walked away from the from the.

senior research fellow yale law school
"senior research fellow" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:24 min | 3 years ago

"senior research fellow" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Political gabfest and senior research fellow at yale law school welcome emily basilan good to have you with us thanks for having me and we also want to welcome douglas connect and he's sharon professor of constitutional law at pepperdine university former us investor malta former reagan administration justice department official welcome to connect thank you good morning good morning to you and emily visual and let me begin with you and let's begin by talking about the record here there is certainly a great deal of concern particularly on healthcare and on abortion but we're hearing kind of conflicting reports from not only the right and the left obviously but within the right and within the left what i mean what i mean by that is there a conservatives who say that from the record especially when it comes to roy versus wade we haven't had a strong enough position or we haven't despite the garza case that i looted to with an emigrant young woman we haven't seen enough to convince us these are what the real conservatives are saying that we have a true conservative here and yet on the other hand national review for example calls him the best social conservative in the land so can we sort of mediate between those two of us at least from the right i well i'll be interested in dogs take on this but my sense is that any dissent about judge cavanaugh among conservatives is going to quickly fade away he is a very conservative judge he has a conservative record on abortion in the garza case you're referencing and the fact that he hasn't gone out of his way to make a big speech about overturning roe versus wade unnecessarily in terms of reaching a decision in garza that's a point in his favor in means he seems more bound by the law slightly more cautious than it also means that he doesn't have a huge target on his back for the two pro choice republican senators lisa murkowski and susan collins so really conservatives should be glad that cavanaugh was slightly circumspect and how he worded his descent in that abortion opinion which in the end he did say he did not think this undocumented immigrants teenager in government custody had a right for the government to allow her to get an abortion there seems to be though let me go professor comeback on this there seems to be a great deal of concern factor earlier this morning i don't want to necessarily totally caught up in the question of roe versus wade but it certainly is one big one looming over this nomination along with the nominees consideration of healthcare is said to be i want to hear from you on this also from both of you but let's i pursue the idea that he would be opposed to roe versus wade or we try to maybe even overturn it let me actually have you hear senator kamala harris this morning on the nomination apropos of this if you are a young woman in america or you care about a young woman in america pay attention to this because it will forever change your life professor connect let me hear from you well i think this is a much more complex question than senator harris let's be described as it's not a question of for row or against roe i agree with emily the we we don't have much of a of a trail here to follow with regard to judge cavenaugh but what we do have suggests that he's not going to be greatly expanding the right to an abortion or or greatly sensitive to regulations that might might limit that right but that's true of almost any of the conservatives that were on the list for the president and quite frankly the president chose judge cavenaugh because i think he was convinced it was the easiest of the confirmations he had the he had all of the right credentials for from the federalist society he had gone to yale and he had clerked for people that were popular at the time including justice kennedy but in in point of fact if the president really wanted to appeal to his political base if he really wanted to take up the issue of social conservatism the role of the family as opposed to the role of the.

senior research fellow yale law school
"senior research fellow" Discussed on Marketplace All-in-One

Marketplace All-in-One

01:35 min | 3 years ago

"senior research fellow" Discussed on Marketplace All-in-One

"Yes weight watchers and you could lose seven times more weight than on your own we're gonna talk about marinda as the next hot superfood for the year ahead and it's called true thirty day over journey when you wave of people trying out on my therapy drinking benadryl vinegar so positive now very i'm lizzie o'leary and this is marketplace weekend or the economy meets real life and this week we have a show about the industry of wellness which means we need to start with the big picture there is a lot of money in the wellness industry partly because by using that very word wellness we mean a lot of things so when we talk about wellness or think about it we're not just talking about our physical health but many other dimensions to so things like social and community wellness mental emotional spiritual financial that's kathryn johnston she's senior research fellow at the global wellness institute and according to johnston's research the global wellness economy was worth three point seven trillion yes with a t dollars in two thousand fifteen yes it's huge and growing fast and it's been growing faster than global gdp over those years right now if you compare it to health expenditures which are about seven and a half to eight trillion dollars globally wellness is now about half the size of that can you give me a breakdown down sort of wear people globally spend their money on wellness you know how much goes to exercise how much goes to spiritual practices at cetera the largest segment.

senior research fellow lizzie o'leary eight trillion dollars thirty day
"senior research fellow" Discussed on KVNT Valley News Talk

KVNT Valley News Talk

02:06 min | 3 years ago

"senior research fellow" Discussed on KVNT Valley News Talk

"Helen fisher is senior research fellow at the kinsey institute and author of the book anatomy of love published by norton she says conventional wisdom is wise indeed on one subject had a man standing in the street with a dog as opposed to a plant or some other kind of living organism more women gave him their phone number dr fisher is also chief advisor to the dating website match dot com we did a study of over twelve hundred single americans of every age and as it turns out women are more discerning a man with a dog is more important to a woman that a woman with a dog is important to a man really is not as powerful we've found that the men certainly do like women who have a dog but it's not as meaningful to a man and there may be a good reason women are almost prime to look for a good partner in parenting men are primed to look for a partner who's very fertile who can give him healthy babies so a signal for women with the dog is feeling that she might be a good mother but they've not at basic signal that she's going to bear them healthy babies all someone has a disability obedient dog it almost signals that the owner is not terribly reliable but they don't do things on time that they aren't able to control the animal are they going to be able to control their children i mean children need boundaries animals need boundaries people need boundaries all this just applies to dogs goldfish not so much and as for the main alternative casto require the emotional connection the constant connection that dogs don't so it's less of a potential signal ones parenting ability at perhaps more of a signal that you're a villain in a bad movie so of heavy petting thing the right pup just might beat bling as a key to a date boys call it chick bait it beats a wing man is something to bring the offbeat i'm jim bohannon dogs dating what an interesting concept right there.

Helen fisher senior research fellow kinsey institute advisor partner casto
"senior research fellow" Discussed on WHO NewsRadio 1040 AM

WHO NewsRadio 1040 AM

01:57 min | 3 years ago

"senior research fellow" Discussed on WHO NewsRadio 1040 AM

"Do because doing nothing is not acceptable if tariffs are not the right way then what is it that we do that will in fact change chinese behavior and some of these issues we also know that those tariffs do not change china's behavior beyond with chinese is assume that's correct and then therefore what do we do it the way i there's no silver lining there's no easy solution there has to be a solution it may not be easy with what is what is the negoti let's talk get the tpp was meant to create competition against china it was meant to actually create a an agreement with a lot of asian and and and transpacific countries so they would lower their tariffs we would agree on ip walls who would agree on state ownership of property and that if china ever wanted to join which they would ultimately want to join because of the competition would be too big to pass on this market opportunity they would have to play by the wall and yet we've withdrawn from the it was far from perfect agreement because you're talking about importing they're bad labor well what are we doing with nafta when we are demanding that china the next in mexico they impose fifteen dollar minimum wage where importing are bad labor laws and using the cover of trade negotiation to impose our badly lost to it goes both ways all the time and there are no silver lining there are problems there are a lot of problems pd forget were was that time has pretty much pretty much elapsed here but suffice it to say that there may be a solution out there in the long run or or shortly thereafter veronique de rugy senior research fellow with the mercatus center at george mason university it's fourteen till one america in.

china mexico george mason university senior research fellow fifteen dollar
"senior research fellow" Discussed on KBOI 670AM

KBOI 670AM

01:39 min | 3 years ago

"senior research fellow" Discussed on KBOI 670AM

"Wanna cut texas so you take the two and then the bottom line is as long as we have this behavior on the domestic stage we actually should be grateful that there are foreigners who are willing to buy our debt because if they weren't willing to buy our debt it would mean that interest rates will would rise even faster and then the amount of interest on our debt that we're paying is it would explode even faster than it's on schedule to explode right now now there is a remedy in new york times oped it's a tough remedy about i believe that it's coming it always does it's the cycle a recession that will reduce our trade deficit severely sharply correct yeah that would indeed because because americans become savers defacto and has also because we're poor so we can't afford the standard of living that we have and and it just the bottom line is like all the ways to reduce the trade deficits or either politically out of reach right now like cutting spending or they're particularly unpleasant like a recession and you know and i just think we've to be careful what we wish for and and the other thing is like yes imposing massive terrorist could trigger the recession could work recession and i would massively also that's what you see investment in the us and we would be collateral damage rivera is a senior research fellow at the mercatus center.

us rivera senior research fellow mercatus center new york
"senior research fellow" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:57 min | 3 years ago

"senior research fellow" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Preventing another crisis dodd frank rules make it more likely that they'll be future crisis which could be even worse now as we have more homogeneous entity i worry that the next quantity crisis for example could be much more severe because everyone is going to be in a very similar position another area that i worry about particularly is clearing derivatives clearing i think that again i understand the push for clearing but i think it was done with a little bit of a naive view of what clearinghouses actually could accomplish as commissioner purrs who's co edited two books on the god frank rules she's testified before congress worked with the senate banking committee and served on the fcc investor advisory committee prior to joining the commission this year she served as senior research fellow and director of the financial markets working group the mercatus center.

senate banking committee senior research fellow director mercatus center frank commissioner congress fcc
"senior research fellow" Discussed on As It Happens from CBC Radio

As It Happens from CBC Radio

01:47 min | 3 years ago

"senior research fellow" Discussed on As It Happens from CBC Radio

"Facebook is in crisis mode the company is struggling to respond acusations it played fast and loose with the data of millions of users it started with the revelation that a uk company called cambridge analytica was able to harvest personal information from some fifty million facebook users got the data from an app that was supposed to be used for academic research but was repurpose or commercial gain bernie hogan is intimately familiar with that strategy he is a senior research fellow at the oxford internet institute he created a facebook app that could have harvested personal data but he decided not to take advantage of his invention we reached bernie hogan in atlanta this just how hard was it for you as an academic to access data such as what cambridge analytica was able to access so our dana they had was really a combination of data that was given by facebook through a facebook web out and data that was entered by people on websites and that's a pretty conventional thing that's actually really really widely available or was at the time widely available you know as researchers i get it but other companies to get it to in fact pretty much anybody who installed any app on facebook had access to a treasure trove of data shocking to a lot of people to realize that this treasure trove of data which is is so available to to anyone who wants to who can design the facebook app to get at it but how often does it happen that we're harvested like this oh so this happens all the time and i think part of the reason that it's shocking is because people aren't aware of.

Facebook cambridge analytica senior research fellow oxford internet institute atlanta uk
"senior research fellow" Discussed on KVNT Valley News Talk

KVNT Valley News Talk

01:44 min | 3 years ago

"senior research fellow" Discussed on KVNT Valley News Talk

"Year old daughter tells you she's trapped in the wrong bodies really a boy once hormone therapy to begin that process of transitioning as your parent you love your daughter but you disagree you want her to look at other options to help her what she decides to take you to court even though she is a minor under your care the judge decides year beliefs are a danger to your daughter and takes her from your custody well maginness scenario no more that's exactly what happened in ohio recently and we shouldn't be surprises ryan anderson a senior research fellow at the heritage foundation warns americans can expect more cases just like this one anderson's indepth research on the transgender movement and sexual ideology is now available in his new book when harry became sally responding to the transgender moment and i don't say this lightly this book is one every single christian needs to read and needs to understand this is a movement with considerable momentum in popular culture education and even public policy it's an evolving movement to he's what i mean as anderson points out gender ideology used to be based on the idea that are sex in other words are physical nature's including reproductive organs and hormones was biological but our gender was socially constructed activists challenged traditional gender roles is being oppressive to generalised but today the movement claims that sex is not biological but assigned at birth it's as if the doctor makes a random decision to identify a child is either male or female that's how the popular theory goes these days boys can be trapped at girls bodies and vice versa now this is of course a scientifically indefensible position in assumes that deep in some part of one's brain that we're not sure where our true gender identity is located the theory is.

ohio senior research fellow heritage foundation harry ryan anderson sally
"senior research fellow" Discussed on Marketplace All-in-One

Marketplace All-in-One

01:43 min | 3 years ago

"senior research fellow" Discussed on Marketplace All-in-One

"It's a new year and like every year i suspect a lot of you have resolved to get fit stop beating junk him more sleep released be better to your body now that most of the holiday cookies are gone these days there are a lot of businesses that want to help with that it's an app that actually makes you feel better say yes to weightwatchers i you could lose seven times more weight than on your own we're gonna talk about rural ringa as the next hot super food for the our heads and and it's called true a thirty day overturning the new wave with people trying out online therapy drinking then urging vim vigor's so posner author of hot i'm was the only area and this is marketplace weekend where the economy meets real life and this week we have a show about the industry of wellness which means we need to start with the big picture there is a lot of money in the wellness industry partly because by using that very word wellness we mean a lot of things so when we talk about wellness or think about it we're not just talking about our physical health and many other dimensions to so things like social and community wellness mental emotional spiritual financial that's catherine johnston she's senior research fellow at the global wellness institute and according to johnston's research the global wellness economy was worth three point seven trillion yes with a t dollars in 2015 yes it's huge and growing fast and it's been growing faster than global gdp um over those years right now if you compare to health expenditures which are about seven and a half.

ringa senior research fellow thirty day
"senior research fellow" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

02:03 min | 3 years ago

"senior research fellow" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"In on that london joining us right now senior research fellow that heritage foundation's asian studies center dean chang to sort of give us a good sorta the overview of the president's trip to asia dean we had your on before the trip began and now were sort of winding things down what's your overall assessment home i think the president in his uh visit hit certain key mess is repeatedly we could be sounded uh the us commitment to our allies from inch firm the us remains engaged in asia uh the us coins let up the pressure on north korea um serb president one of the messages he wanted to send was that there would be a reshaping of our trade policy um what exactly that uh reshaping is going to mean it remains a little bit unclear uh i think we're gonna need to wait until he is back here and tells us exactly what he talked about with the chinese uh to to get that part clear out um i think was interesting they did talk to mr putin even if it was just in passing species exactly what it is that he's going to sabau in those conversations but it i mean do the china was going to be you know the big tent whole ten pull of this meeting the what happened in china how the president's seems to interest chinese leadership do you how do you think that that went just on its own i think that one on the one hand you everyone focused on his i don't blame the comment except that when you actually rallied his thought he actually is blaming china uh um we need that those things about how the press covered the story was like the quite pond incident in japan you read didn't get the full picture all you pay two was was the headlines a great way to put it if they they did sorta zoom in on that one phrase but why don't you expand on that because the president's entire remarks with regard i don't blame china or other countries for a you know taking advantage of us when the.

senior research fellow dean chang president us asia china japan london north korea mr putin one hand
"senior research fellow" Discussed on 850 WFTL

850 WFTL

02:09 min | 3 years ago

"senior research fellow" Discussed on 850 WFTL

"And very warm with i 85 tie slow seventy friday a cold front blowing and cloudy skies scattered showers friday and gusty norteast wins twenty five miles an hour the high v two very windy weekend ahead with scattered showers saturday sunday and high temperatures in cell quarter only the sun is hotter them choice shelf kgb navegate thrifty wfp al the rise welcome back and obviously one of the most uh i'm gonna say under covered subjects as usual whenever the president goes overseas it's amazing to me how many members of the of the press and certainly of these cable news network's don't find stories as important as i do um and i think they are so important that i like to get the experts on to talk about such things and we've been fortunate today from the heritage foundation we have dean chang on with us and he is a senior research fellow on chinese political and security affairs so that's the kind of expertise talkative owl you today very good how are you i'm good i mean ii i'm actually very please these so far with this trip that the president is on um i think that uh i think it was clever the way he said you can't put a blame beige for doing what leaders of countries do getting the best deal for themselves no i think that's um a very good point i seek fat uh folks didn't seem to take statements like he's doing a good job where i get along with him as so that kind of statement almost a and the alliance or something i think that uh what was hidden in the president's comment was look you guys are taking advantage of us i'm not gonna blame you for doing that but you're not playing on the up and up here and.

president senior research fellow
"senior research fellow" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:58 min | 4 years ago

"senior research fellow" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The final days of the socalled caliphat but still the islamic state is no less of a threat a middle east cross pen acquantaince summerell reporting the well women and the studios radicalization in terrorism expert nikita malik she's a senior research fellow at the henry jackson society that's a think tank recalls for the robust spreading of liberal democracy welcome to the program at this is to be two groups hit those who choose or chose to join us in those who were groomed by the group that we heard about let listed with the first group if they have like ahmed become disillusioned having chosen to fight with them they unlikely to return to the fold i think the thing we need to focus on here is that the authorities are not even aware of these children and their background so it makes it remarkably difficult to provide them with the level of reeducation de radicalization and care that they would meet the these are people who have been smuggled into europe and as such actively in bestcase scenarios dealt with the violence of war in worst case scenario scenarios had to execute and commit extreme acts of violence themselves and their effectively being left with the civilian population with absolutely no special care attention having studied this for quite some time i've seen the level of him dr nation both in the former and lahti category that you mentioned it's entities extreme there is a religious indoctrination it's extremely systematic and children are encouraged to do terrible terrible things so it doesn't matter if somebody says that are disillusioned they're still lives to those experiences there there's still live through extreme conflict and where effectively providing them with absolutely nothing i'm not even identifying that that that that's happened to them and what do they need then this is the most contentious thing we aren't even sure as yet the the islamic state as is the first terrace organization.

senior research fellow henry jackson society ahmed europe
"senior research fellow" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:59 min | 4 years ago

"senior research fellow" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Insight crime and a senior research fellow at american university senator for latin american studies he says the gangs presence here dates back to the 1980s the wars in central america were raging the residents of those countries were fleeing to latino havens in the united states where they had relatives places like los angeles and this is where the ms thirteen and many other latino gangs were formed many were later arrested in part because of their gang activities and then when they were released from jail they were sent back to their countries of origin al's salvador honduras guatemala they found areas that were wartorn there were deposits of weapons left over from the central american wars fertile ground in which they could then create their own brand of ms thirteen which in many ways is much worse then the brand of ms thirteen that has emerged in the united states now i can't help but notice you said the 80s which is like thirty years ago president trump characterized ms thirteen as the harvest of the obama administration's failed immigration policies to the influx get worse under obama what we had during the obama administration shen was in increase in undocumented migrants in particular unaccompanied minors amidst these population a number of them have been connected to gang activity in the united states sense this has fuelled this narrative that this surge in unaccompanied miners is related to now this surge in violence in the united states the most notable case happened in long island where there were a number of murders and there were fourteen arrested and about half of those arrested came during that surge period but in that same area they had taken in about forty five hundred unaccompanied minors you can look at it two ways you can save 6 of fourteen arrested were connected to that surge or you could say six of forty five hundred which is very much show you can basically look at it through whatever lanes you'd like to see it through jeff sessions has made ms thirteen the justice department poster gang i guess but elsewhere in the justice department every year they produce a gang threat assessment level and i wonder where ms thirteen stance in comparison to other gang organisations in their annual threat assessment the us justice department nearly always puts the ms thirteen amongst the middle of the pack in.

senior research fellow senator america united states los angeles obama administration obama long island american university latin american salvador honduras guatemala president justice department thirty years