22 Burst results for "Senior Product Manager"

"senior product manager" Discussed on The Voicebot Podcast

The Voicebot Podcast

02:07 min | 2 months ago

"senior product manager" Discussed on The Voicebot Podcast

"Daniel gornja. Welcome to the voice. Podcast much brackets and big for me to turn today today. It's my pleasure to have you. This is a long time in the making. We've been i guess chatting on slack for maybe year and a half something. Yeah i think so. I started to read your westport. Insider was fascinated by opportunity to look into your think to on hand Why not took. Yeah that that's that's how it happened. Well the is really perfect. Because we're going to talk about a few things today. Obviously d. Pavlov is a project i've been interested in for at least a year. I don't remember when i first came across it but it might have been might have been. You introduced it to me. Or maybe shortly before that i found out about it but definitely answered that project and then obviously you've been involved recently with the elec surprise social competition. We've had another conversation about that about this. What a perfect time to go a little deeper on that because it is a different way to build bots and so really looking forward to this conversation today. But i'll let you get started. So why don't you tee it up for the The audience right now first and let them know what d- pavlov is before we get deep sure depot is like lab at moscow's physics and technology. That is focused on conversational And neural efforts Officially cool to neural networks in Terrain but Wednesday were standard like full. Five years. ago it's also got to down moniker Because follow fossil famous russian scientists who discover it reflects us in all those things that encouraged scientists researchers to understand how human brace books and we still have a lot of things that we have to uncover. But that's was formed as the name.

yanji czech technical university daniel korneyev moscow institute of physics an Alexa pavlov cornell John g pavlov daniel twitter shipman daniels russia devas angeles new cornell alexa Alice daniel gornja Google
"senior product manager" Discussed on The Product Podcast

The Product Podcast

07:54 min | 3 months ago

"senior product manager" Discussed on The Product Podcast

"Get people to care about your vision with our guest. Gye cholera a product leader at ebay. This episode is brought to you by thoughts. Bought the modern analytics cloud company building a more fact driven world with consumer grade search in ai driven analytics with thought spot everywhere. You can embed a highly interactive analytics experience into your data app and take your user adoption to the next level. Learn more and try thought spot for free today by visiting thought spot dot com slash everywhere. Hire me one welcome. I'm so glad to be here. My name is matt anonymous senior product manager at a lawsuit. Today i'll be talking about influencing without authority and giving you a practical tips on how you can do it. We all know how important of a skill set. This is as a product manager. So let's get into it before we begin though we need to. I have shared definition what this even means just like how managing is different than leading influencing without authority is different than telling someone to go do something for the rest of the stock. We can use this. As our definition to influence without authority is the ability to make others act. Behave or think without having any power or right over them. Why is it so important while it's important because as product managers. We often don't have direct reports. We can't just tell folks to go do do something. Just because and so it's really important that as product managers we internalize the skill because a lot of the world's greatest achievements in breakthroughs have been possible because of meeting and influencing without authority as fast forward. And you look at the ever fast moving world we live in. It's increasingly important. That leadership is provided at all levels and all from different people regardless of where they sit in the management hierarchy the notion that just a few extraordinary people can provide all the leadership that is needed. Today is not scalable in austin a recipe for disaster now before we begin though just like how rome wasn't built in a day influencing without authority doesn't happen overnight and takes hard work time and patients. The very first thing you need to do before you influence without authority is to understand the culture in the context of your organization. Al culture means a lot different things a lot of people but in an ideal world culture might be a one-size-fits-all but that's hardly ever the case at alassio. We always encourage new and existing in las to adopt a sikh. I understand attitude before making any kind of change after all. You can't change the thing if you don't know how the thing works to do this. We asked teams to really observe in co-locate in and get a feel for how things are done here. There's so much implicit knowledge that gets built up within teams that it's important to really. I take the time to understand how things work. We then encourage a lousy instant. Ask questions within their teams such as tell me about the thing that succeeded in fail. The last thing that succeeded and failed what happened. How did the team respond. How is something shipped here you know. What are the practices in the processes. And how do you decide what you're building next for example now once you've understood the culture you need to understand the degrees of separation as the this is essentially just a measure of the social distance from one person to another. You're one degree from everyone. Know and two degrees from everyone they know and so on and so forth as you can see here as you go further out in your degrees it becomes harder to influence. It's often easiest influence those that you work with on a day to day because you often share the same contacts in the same mission so it's easier to make a lot of quicker decisions et cetera. Now let's recap before he start influencing without authority you need to. I understand the culture and context observe how things work and ask questions and then you need to understand the degrees of separation know how far you are from the thing where the person you want to influence the further away. They are the more time you're gonna have to spend to go. Trust in equity with that person now atlassian there are a couple of different plays we use internally to the practice are influencing without authority. Now none of these are mutually exclusive in fact A lot of our product managers will go from one to the other so you can kind of think of it as steps however they do represent different mindsets when it comes to influencing. Let's start with a psychologist. This is really a play. That's all about understanding the motivations and context of the people that you're trying to influence and then working backwards to achieve an outcome the best time to use the psychologist play. When you're new to a situation this could be your new to accompany or your new team in a project. Or maybe there's been a change in hands in terms of the management and so you really are just brand new and trying to get away the land another great time to use this as win. Yes situations conflict at a last night. We have a lot of internal teams doing a lot of different things. And so There can be times where you have misalignment in different goals than each other. So it's really good to use this understand what the other team is working on and from the degrees of separation standpoint. You can use this at any level really integrate one to us regardless of where you are and who the person is that. You're trying to influence now how to do this. There's really three things that you need to take into mind for mary. I just kind of like the seat. I understand attitude is practice active listening to so so that you can understand the context in the motivation. What does success look like for the other team. What are the challenges. Can you establish some common vocabulary to work off up from there. You're gonna wanna play that back. Do you really understand what it is that the other person is working on. Why they're doing it. Can you show your empathy share the same set of uncertainties in make decisions collaboratively last visas to enter rate on your ask you know what what trade-offs offs do you need to make. Can you reframe the thing that you're trying to influence with their vocabulary. And their goals in mind show at how show how it helps them now at alaska and there's a lot of things we do internally to do this one on ones or great ways to to start to understand the other party a team. Health monitors is in alaskan. Play that you can get online for free and it's a really great way to get a pulse of how your team is doing to understand what's working well. What's not working so well on some background reading a by looking at what the person is doing. And what thirteen is up to you. Through a company blogs or profiles in directories is a great way to kind of think about how that person is working on what they're doing and last but not least is to get social with it. You know in a world like today is not as easy to have a meal or drink but you can actually go and do these over soon. 'cause understand the person for a person not just a colleague or some- somebody that you're just trying to work with to achieve some goal. You have when we talked to all our product managers really the one on ones stuck out the most It was a great way for people to talk freely and to really get intimate with the other person to understand what they're working on why they're working on it. So to recount. The psychologist is really about understanding the motivations in the context of who you're trying to influence and then working backwards to reach an outcome the best time it uses new situations or when you have conflict and very three steps to do it. You want to understand what they're doing. Play it back to them to make sure you truly understand and then integrate on the ask some things you can try of course one of our.

cholera ebay matt rome austin las mary alaskan alaska
"senior product manager" Discussed on Sounds Profitable

Sounds Profitable

06:12 min | 9 months ago

"senior product manager" Discussed on Sounds Profitable

"Thank you so much joining me. Here mama We're going to talk today about brand safety at the article. I wrote a little while ago was brand. Safety is here. let's use it. And you and i have been talking about brand safety and conceptualization all the great things in advertising for a long time. We've been working together in in different formats for a long time. But i wanna highlight you hear your from oracle moat your senior product manager on a team. That really digs into these teachers. You're pretty much an expert on it. And i think that what you can explain to the audience here and what we can go over communicate extension because i think a lot of us in the space in podcasting are kind of brought up from podcasting into advertising whereas i think a lot of other mediums. Like what i'm realizing is that you could hire an advertiser in another medium and you could from digital spy. And then they can move over to digital video or programmatic is transferable between them. Podcasting is different and a lot of these things that we take for granted and other advertising channels are either a little bit more nuance to get started or things that aren't commonsense till out of the space so let's kick it off by brand. I'd love to hear what you define brand safety is like what's really important about it. Yeah absolutely brian. Thank you so much for having me. This is great. I love your newsletter. A so informative and i think it's a really important part of educating the ecosystem over all the good news says audio is evolving so all the true education we can get out there and somebody to dig through all of the research. Nash put stuff together in a digestible format. I think it's gonna help though. Full ecosystem every player across the board. So a i'm a fan but yeah brand. Safety is definitely a very important one. I absolutely love audio. All things audio. And i know you and i have spoken about all things from podcast. Measurement brand safety the opportunity than the dangers of things with within our ecosystem as well which which i think is always really interesting so i think just starting off with what brand safety means. It's interesting because it's oftentimes just considered key words that should be avoided and certain genres many get full categories of things that are completely avoided and what we tend to mess as not just an ecosystem of advertising but more so a society is that when advertising does not fund these stories when you have the short sighted approach towards france safety blocking key words or refusing to run with publishers. Who might be telling sure thing talking about things which are controversial but really important stories to be told you ultimately hurt journalism so brand safety right now. I think still a lot of work that can be done and has to be a little bit more thoughtful. We're not quite there yet. And one comment. I will make more about this and we can. Of course keep continuing the conversation as well. But i think for displaying video. We've we've definitely had some really neat. Innovations in the space is an industry. So we've done some really cool stuff but there's no denying that certain things that we've done have actually hurt the consumer experience and it's really created a trust deficit for online content whether it's social media whether it's reading articles and right now in the podcasting space. There's almost like this loyalty. And trust and most publishers have moved into podcasting to be able to create that connection of trust with their audiences so brand. Safety is a really important one because this is something we can control to make sure that we're protective off the medium and we don't end up ultimately hurting not only journalism but also just the experience of listening to a podcast. Yeah yeah and so in other mediums. Do they Brand safety do they take. They take the tax on a page or they take the information that they know about the website domain and they make decisions based off of it and it is that accurate. How it works. Well it's it's interesting. There's a few different ways and we to brand safety at oracle moat as well but just kind of keep it a little bit more informative of just what's in the industry right now. There's definitely these keyword block lists that are going around where there's words like knife on there. Which means that all recipe pages could potentially get blocked as well. There's words like that gets classified as adult content whereas that is so much mom content to and you're cbj brands. If you're not going to be serving around mom content than you're missing key demographics for yourself. So there's definitely been a level of just throwing out the it's kinda comes from like a fear based approach of like. Oh my god. We can't have our ads running against any kind of content. So be more careful. But but i think there's there's a lot to be learned there so one of the things that we focus in on just to kind of talk about this from the standpoint of why we care about it so much and where we're hopefully being a little bit more mindful about it is that you have to understand the context of the text so not just was the keyword on the page but how frequently did it show up on the page. What were the corresponding words. What other words. We're on the page. That can truly tell you what. The content is in the context of adipose digest. Did a specific word show up. One other thing that we've also heard of in the podcasting space is just doing brand safety based on the description of the yet the no. It's an absurd to because it's like okay. So i could write these notes and say like this is a very brand safe podcast and then i could talk about whatever i want. And there's no visibility into that the hopefully the transcriptions of these podcasts and having a really strong algorithm to figure out will not only provide advertisers with the tools. They need but also publishers with the ability to monetize a much more effective way and not have content unfairly

today brian Nash while ago oracle
How You Should Be Protecting Your Brand with Moomal Shaikh

Sounds Profitable

06:12 min | 9 months ago

How You Should Be Protecting Your Brand with Moomal Shaikh

"Thank you so much joining me. Here mama We're going to talk today about brand safety at the article. I wrote a little while ago was brand. Safety is here. let's use it. And you and i have been talking about brand safety and conceptualization all the great things in advertising for a long time. We've been working together in in different formats for a long time. But i wanna highlight you hear your from oracle moat your senior product manager on a team. That really digs into these teachers. You're pretty much an expert on it. And i think that what you can explain to the audience here and what we can go over communicate extension because i think a lot of us in the space in podcasting are kind of brought up from podcasting into advertising whereas i think a lot of other mediums. Like what i'm realizing is that you could hire an advertiser in another medium and you could from digital spy. And then they can move over to digital video or programmatic is transferable between them. Podcasting is different and a lot of these things that we take for granted and other advertising channels are either a little bit more nuance to get started or things that aren't commonsense till out of the space so let's kick it off by brand. I'd love to hear what you define brand safety is like what's really important about it. Yeah absolutely brian. Thank you so much for having me. This is great. I love your newsletter. A so informative and i think it's a really important part of educating the ecosystem over all the good news says audio is evolving so all the true education we can get out there and somebody to dig through all of the research. Nash put stuff together in a digestible format. I think it's gonna help though. Full ecosystem every player across the board. So a i'm a fan but yeah brand. Safety is definitely a very important one. I absolutely love audio. All things audio. And i know you and i have spoken about all things from podcast. Measurement brand safety the opportunity than the dangers of things with within our ecosystem as well which which i think is always really interesting so i think just starting off with what brand safety means. It's interesting because it's oftentimes just considered key words that should be avoided and certain genres many get full categories of things that are completely avoided and what we tend to mess as not just an ecosystem of advertising but more so a society is that when advertising does not fund these stories when you have the short sighted approach towards france safety blocking key words or refusing to run with publishers. Who might be telling sure thing talking about things which are controversial but really important stories to be told you ultimately hurt journalism so brand safety right now. I think still a lot of work that can be done and has to be a little bit more thoughtful. We're not quite there yet. And one comment. I will make more about this and we can. Of course keep continuing the conversation as well. But i think for displaying video. We've we've definitely had some really neat. Innovations in the space is an industry. So we've done some really cool stuff but there's no denying that certain things that we've done have actually hurt the consumer experience and it's really created a trust deficit for online content whether it's social media whether it's reading articles and right now in the podcasting space. There's almost like this loyalty. And trust and most publishers have moved into podcasting to be able to create that connection of trust with their audiences so brand. Safety is a really important one because this is something we can control to make sure that we're protective off the medium and we don't end up ultimately hurting not only journalism but also just the experience of listening to a podcast. Yeah yeah and so in other mediums. Do they Brand safety do they take. They take the tax on a page or they take the information that they know about the website domain and they make decisions based off of it and it is that accurate. How it works. Well it's it's interesting. There's a few different ways and we to brand safety at oracle moat as well but just kind of keep it a little bit more informative of just what's in the industry right now. There's definitely these keyword block lists that are going around where there's words like knife on there. Which means that all recipe pages could potentially get blocked as well. There's words like that gets classified as adult content whereas that is so much mom content to and you're cbj brands. If you're not going to be serving around mom content than you're missing key demographics for yourself. So there's definitely been a level of just throwing out the it's kinda comes from like a fear based approach of like. Oh my god. We can't have our ads running against any kind of content. So be more careful. But but i think there's there's a lot to be learned there so one of the things that we focus in on just to kind of talk about this from the standpoint of why we care about it so much and where we're hopefully being a little bit more mindful about it is that you have to understand the context of the text so not just was the keyword on the page but how frequently did it show up on the page. What were the corresponding words. What other words. We're on the page. That can truly tell you what. The content is in the context of adipose digest. Did a specific word show up. One other thing that we've also heard of in the podcasting space is just doing brand safety based on the description of the yet the no. It's an absurd to because it's like okay. So i could write these notes and say like this is a very brand safe podcast and then i could talk about whatever i want. And there's no visibility into that the hopefully the transcriptions of these podcasts and having a really strong algorithm to figure out will not only provide advertisers with the tools. They need but also publishers with the ability to monetize a much more effective way and not have content unfairly

Oracle Nash Brian Cbj Brands France
"senior product manager" Discussed on Daily Tech News Show

Daily Tech News Show

07:21 min | 1 year ago

"senior product manager" Discussed on Daily Tech News Show

"Hello there this message is coming to you from the history. Extra podcast from bbc history magazine a collection of fascinating conversations with leading historians. Giving you the low down on these big characters hidden stories and greatest adventures speaking of great adventures. This week. The history extra podcast is brought to you by booking dot com whether you're looking for a culture filled city break a local away or a far-flung adventure you can save at least thirty percent with booking dot com black friday deals these deals for a limited time only so you'll need book before i december to make the most of them. But the good news is they go have the flexibility to travel any time in twenty twenty one head to booking dot com ford slash blackfriday to book your next big adventure. These are the daily tech headlines for monday november. Twenty third twenty twenty. I'm rich apple enough. Snap launch new feature snapchat called spotlight a dedicated space with short entertaining videos in a vertically skirt. Little feed snap says it's algorithms will personalize feeds with the most engaging recent snaps and the feed will be human. The algorithm will look at. How many of us a snap gets how long people watch it if it's frequently skipped and whether it gets shared spotlight will feature snaps from both private and public accounts by either sending to spotlight directly or posting the our story feed snaps from private accounts won't feature attribution with no way to comment or message that creator snap also says it will pay over one million dollars a day to users who create top spotlight snaps for the rest of twenty twenty the california public utilities commission approved the driver and driverless autonomous vehicle deployment programs that allow for paid autonomous. Ride hailing services in the state to participate. Companies will need to obtain either a charter party carrier class p permit or a class a charter party certificate in the av passenger service pilot program as well as an ab testing permit from california department of motor vehicles expects it will take several months for companies to be accepted into the programs operating thomas. Ride hailing service will require submitting quarterly reports that include anonymous pickup and dropoff information. The availability wheelchair accessible rides fuel and electric charging types of vehicles vehicles and passengers miles traveled and working with the disadvantage accessibility communities previously these c. p. You see a lot for autonomous testing in the state but not for paid autonomous vehicle services a coalition of digital marketing companies calling themselves marketers for an open web announced. It filed a complaint with the uk competition and markets authority to block implementation of google's privacy sandbox initiative. This initiative is set to roll out in early twenty twenty one and would phase out third party tracking cookies. The coalition is asking for the privacy sandbox to be delayed until regulators devise long-term competitive remedies to mitigate google's dominance google's privacy. Sandbox is an open set of standards. The company announced last year. That would replace cookies with browser privacy budget that allow for a site to make a limited number of calls to get information to group user into a larger group but not sacrifice anonymity. While apple's rumored augmented mixed reality headset isn't a thing yet mike. Rockwell apple's head of a are and l. asandra mcginnis it senior product manager for air. Tell seen that apple's mission right now is through the device. You already have in your pocket. The iphone apple says there are already ten thousand air enabled ios apps with seven thousand developers many of which focused on shopping or home improvement. Google launch an invitation only trial of a new app called pask mayton india designed to let users earn money by doing simple tasks on your smartphone. The app says tasks for from businesses around the world and are categorized as either sitting or feel tasks with a provided walking. Eta example task include walk into a store front and taking a picture recording a spoken sentence transcribing content or checking details of a business users can either select from a number of available tasks or the app can send a notification requesting a task be done. It's unclear if local businesses make quest to google for these tasks or are paying for the service. Twitter confirmed that a bug in its ephemeral fleets feature could offer content to be viewed after the supposed twenty four hour expiration these fleets would disappear from the. Ui of the main twitter app but a developer tool using twitter's api could pulling fleet wells. Which could then be used to view content after twenty four hours of posting twitter. Clarified that the api. Only post-flight your house less than twenty four hours old and is working on a fixed to make older url's viewable after twenty four hours. Twitter does door fleet content for up to thirty days and is available to users twitter data for download until the platform deletes. It and updated apple support page says. The company is working with microsoft to bring compatibility for the xbox series x controller to apple devices apple devices currently support the xbox wireless controller with bluetooth xbox elite wireless controller xbox adaptive controller and the playstation dualshock four controller twitter user. Ling ling confirmed that he was able to use the check. Rain jail breaking tool to jailbreak a first generation home pot posting a screenshot of accessing the homepage over an ssh connection this is the first publicly demonstrated jailbreak of a homepod which runs an os based on tv os. An update to google assistant now allows it to schedule turning on or off smart lights. This works through assistant scheduled actions feature and can't be set for either specific times for events like sunup. Sundown previously google assistant could turn off smart lights or use them as part of an alarm and finally to celebrate the video of billie eilish is bad guy surpassing one billion views on youtube. Google created infinite. Bad guy an endless music video built on covers of the song at billy. Dot with youtube dot com. The site initially played the official video with one of fifteen thousand cover videos on either side of the plane. Version cooking on those videos will transition to the new version without missing a beat or a lyric. Google trained neural network to sink the different versions clicking pause. We'll list every cover. You listened to during your session. Remember from our discussion of the tech news of the day subscribed to dealing new ad tech new show dot com and remember to rate and review daily tech headlines. Wherever you get your podcast. beck's listening. We'll talk to you next time. And from all of us here at daily tech headlines remember have a super sparkly day. Hello there this message is coming to you from the history. Extra podcast from bbc history magazine i collection of fascinating conversations with leading historians. Giving you the low down on history's biggest characters hidden stories and greatest adventures speaking of great adventures. This week. The history extra podcast is brought to you by booking dot com. Whether you're looking for a culture filled city break a local getaway or a far flung adventure you can save at least thirty percent with booking dot coms black. Friday deals themes deals a for a limited time. Only so you need to book before. I december to make the most of them. But the good news is that have flexibility to travel any time in twenty twenty one head to booking dot com forward slash blackfriday to book your next big adventure..

google apple Twitter bbc history magazine california public utilities co Dot uk california Ling ling beck pask mayton india microsoft Rockwell senior product manager official
"senior product manager" Discussed on Daily Tech News Show

Daily Tech News Show

03:36 min | 1 year ago

"senior product manager" Discussed on Daily Tech News Show

"As well anybody with a microsoft account can host up to three hundred people for up to twenty four hours at no charge. And you don't even need a microsoft account to join that call. The prime minister granted the pakistan telecommunication authority. The power to enforce data localization rules and blocked content deemed harmful the asia internet coalition or. Aic has warned that its members may have to stop doing business pakistan if these new rules are enforced as written the includes facebook. Google twitter apple amazon linked in sap airbnb rocketed cloudflare. Line a whole lot. More over in vietnam reuters sources say the vietnamese government is threatening to shut down facebook if it does not agree to further censor local political content beyond what facebook agreed to do in april. Well apple's rumored augmented or mixed reality. Headset is not a real thing yet. Mike rockwell and all asandra mcginnis apple's senior product manager for a are till. Seena that apple's mission right now is through that device. You already have in your pocket. That device the iphone of course apple says there are already ten thousand a are enabled from seven thousand developers many of which focus on shopping and home improvement and yes android people. We know you don't have one in your pocket. That's not following a financial times report. That amazon is laying off a number of people working on its internal drone. delivery project. Amazon confirmed that it is shrinking. Its internal team and working with independent contractors. F acc aerospace from austria and nova aerospace from spain. Both component manufacturers are the first to partner with amazon to help finally make that sixty minutes segment about prime air. A reality with drones depositing small amazon packages on people's front yards. The faa granted amazon approval to begin testing. Its concept earlier this year. all right. let's talk a little bit about those new mac books. I got their hands on one day. Did the anticipated tear down of the m one based macbook air and macbook pro from fix. It has happened. This is what i it does. And they've done it again so here are some of the interesting takeaways that they found first of all almost nothing has changed inside except that an one chip looks pretty similar. Otherwise among the few things that have changed. The air doesn't have a fan and neither neither laptop not the air and the macbook. Pro has the t to chip. The tea to function is handled by the m one chips secure enclave the m one macbook pro does have a fan. It's just the air that doesn't have a fan and is the exact same fan is the one of the previous generation. So the your previous gen. Macbook could run as quietly as the m one if it weren't for that chip and the unified memory architecture means no upgradeable ram. Some people mumbled grumbled about this to eight gigabyte s k high necks lpddr. Four x chips are integrated into the m one. Meaning that all parts of the cpu including the neural engine and the gpu can access the same memory pool without having to cash the data elsewhere. 's how they can get away with you. Know a swam over all the parts in the same means. Repairability still low. That was a sticking point for a lot of folks not any better now. I fix it points out that the n. One chip being used in both laptops. The air and the pro could have meant interchangeable parts between the two models. Alas that does not happen. Patrick.

amazon apple facebook microsoft pakistan telecommunication aut prime minister Aic pakistan asia internet coalition vietnam reuters faa cloudflare Mike rockwell Google spain senior product manager
"senior product manager" Discussed on The Kindle Chronicles

The Kindle Chronicles

05:20 min | 1 year ago

"senior product manager" Discussed on The Kindle Chronicles

"He'd been injured in Afghanistan and Iraq, and he became one of my most influential climbing instructors and these three experiences really just opened up my eyes completely to how all of these. Normal? Talented wonderful. Wonderful people were just being hit in the face every time they turn around by these seemingly artificial barriers just existed existed all around the world and for me, it really just solidified that there was something here that needed to be changed. It wasn't just a complex technical problem. It was like this this huge objective to try and equalize the playing field in technology and after that. The idea of working in anything but accessibility and building inclusive experiences is just a nonstarter for me. I learned so much about the people that I interacted with on a regular basis and how they use technology, how we could build technology that was actually designed intentionally to remove some of these barriers and create that equality. There was just lacking in so many different things at the time. And it really became something I was hugely invested in after that it was incredible. It's. It's interesting because I think a lot of people that I've talked with involved in accessibility issues have some personal experience that they've had to fight through themselves and it doesn't sound like that was your path you you obviously close to home with your nephew and the people you met but. You. You sort of had your eyes open to the topic not because it's something that you had struggled with personally it sounds like, right? Exactly. But just the fact that people had to struggle with that just blew my mind. It just seems so like not necessary. Janet position to do something about it, I wanted to do that. That's cool. Well, then in twenty seventeen, you made a big move across the country. You took a job at dams on as a senior product manager accessibility. I'm always interested when I talk to people in the Amazon team as to you know the things they've done in the past and then that decision to join Amazon it always..

Amazon senior product manager Afghanistan Iraq Janet
"senior product manager" Discussed on Beyond the Wheel

Beyond the Wheel

05:20 min | 1 year ago

"senior product manager" Discussed on Beyond the Wheel

"To help you find these offsite locations I. And even when you do find them to kind of like program into jeep as you're usually using like the longitude and. Latitude, is that yeah, long today. You should leave that mistaken there. I didn't know what was actually called John but this will be easy if you could just click on the icon and say I'm looking for red. I'm looking for off grid location. This is where I wanna be and maybe a list comes up and that'd be awesome I. think that's awesome. Yeah. I think it's really cool that they added these off off the grid areas and then I think they've also like partnered with a lot of the camp ground what are they called the chain? Campgrounds like Koa and knows in have all those programmed in as well. I think they have a lot of preloaded content in this is going to be very helpful to our fears for sure according to Don Schmidt. He's a senior product manager for automotive garment. He said that it's going to have tens of thousands of RV parks and campgrounds nationwide. Wow. So Again. Know just makes it easy to have that information program right in there and you're like, Oh, I'm going to Tulsa Oklahoma let me see what comes up and then you just pick pick the one. That's great. I think that makes things easy and it will make things easier while traveling from like Queen Eight appoint behavior doing like a three four day. Trip and maybe you don't have every stop planned out and you're just like well, let's pullover in this area. See what's in the area and it comes up with a list right in your your garment that's got your height weight length all set in there. You know that you're going to be able to get there I think it's pretty cool. I think. I think it's just a way to make our and traveling just a little bit easier. And they're also going to have the national parks in there too I think. So Oh, that's good. I didn't know that that's great. It should be good for our being I know we use an APP that's on our iphone for navigation. It was originally designed for truck drivers within they made a different version for our viewers a I'm always looking at new navigation stuff and I like the eight inch touchscreen it's. When you get older the biggest disagreement better. Yeah unfortunately I I can my eyesight is just not what it.

senior product manager Latitude Koa Tulsa Oklahoma John
"senior product manager" Discussed on Animal Radio

Animal Radio

05:58 min | 1 year ago

"senior product manager" Discussed on Animal Radio

"Topic lately like it was last year years ago but the list has grown of animals that can carry Ebola at first they thought it was just three different kinds of fruit pats but not anymore more cautionary tales just around the quarter we welcome from I robot the Senior Product Manager Melissa. O.`day. Hi. Melissa. How are you? Great. How how are you? Splendid. What a genius you guys are over I robot you know why I've always loved the room, which is the vacuum that goes around. It's a robot backing that cleans the entire carpet if you're lazy like me and I love that. But now you guys have invented a mop that automatically mops our kitchen and any tile floor, and we've had a chance to try it out over the weekend. Wait a minute had a chance to try it out. We were mesmerized for about an hour watching this. I know it's the kind of thing that you're. You're supposed to set it up and just let it go. But we we actually watched the whole kitchen get done, and this is great for us because we have a lot of cats a lot of studio cats and they're messy eaters. So this is something that's near and dear to my heart, and I mentioned this at the start of the show that we're going to give away one and the phones have been ringing nonstop since they have to wait it's brand new it just came out right. Now. We just launched the product and March. So it's been on the market for less than three months and it is a wet mop. It actually has three options. You can do a wet mop and then a semi wet mop and then a total dry mop present correct. That is yeah. So the product we advertise it as a mopping robot. That's what our customers are really telling us they love it for but. Depending on your floor surface you can put it into a damp mop with a little bit less water if you have a more sensitive for surface or it can be used as a as a sweeping robot with with our dry mode. So goes around I'll explain what I saw at least it goes around its Brits is a little water right out the front, and then there's kind of a scrubby little Mopti. Double Passer triple past depending on the mode is that correct crack? Yeah and So we have the position jet spray that comes out when you're in the wet or damp mode, and then the the creaming head where that had is vibrates while the robot is driving along the floor give you a little extra scrubbing and it it just picks up.

Melissa Ebola
"senior product manager" Discussed on Cell Culture Dish Podcast

Cell Culture Dish Podcast

03:58 min | 1 year ago

"senior product manager" Discussed on Cell Culture Dish Podcast

"Senior Product Manager. Corning Life Sciences Audrey Bergereon application scientists corning life sciences, Debbie King Scientific Technical Writer Cell, culture dish and Hillary, Sherman senior scientists with corning life sciences. Thank you all for joining me. W would you be able to provide us with an introduction about the evolution of three D cell culture, and also a brief overview of the systems? I'd love to. I think that everyone is aware that two D. cell culture has been used by researchers since the early nineteen hundreds, but we know that growing cells on cleaner surface has lots of drawbacks excels own in two dimensional space. They don't behave cells found in Vivo. They lack critical cell to cell and cell to Matrix interactions that drives their form function and response to external stimuli. This really limits their prognostic capabilities more recently. Three D cell culture techniques have become popular because the cell morphology interactions and tissue specific architecture more closely resembles that of native tissues. Spirits organized more complex three D tissue systems just. A chip are examples of three D cell culture used by researchers to model native tissues. Steroids are simple. Bible used three D models that form based on the tendency of adherent cells to aggregate and can be generated from many different cell types. The multicellular tumor spheroid model is widely used in cancer. Research organizations are more complex three D aggregates more like miniaturized simplified versions of an Oregon they can be tissue or stem cell derived with the ability. Ability to self organize spatially and demonstrate organ specific functionality more complex yet. Our technologies like organ on a chip. This is a multi Channel Three D. micro flu attic cell culture system that mimics whole organ function with artificial vascular cells are cultured in continuously per fused micrometer sized chambers, which recreate physiologically relevant levels of flu attic, Cheer Force to allow for Gas Nutrient and waste transport to and from the cells, mimicking in Vivo S colorized issues. Audrey could ship. Tell us how steroids are impacting cancer research and what you see as future applications for this technology. Yes, so. Can Be improved model for cancer..

corning life sciences Audrey Bergereon cancer Hillary Senior Product Manager Debbie King Writer Sherman Oregon
"senior product manager" Discussed on 7 Layers

7 Layers

01:33 min | 1 year ago

"senior product manager" Discussed on 7 Layers

"There are a couple of different versions of this malware broker pop point one targets devices running busy box, a UNIX like software that has exposed telnet or secure shell that are outdated bricker point to goes after Lennox based IOT devices have exposed telnet services and default credentials. Another way pirker point to is unique is that it uses tour exit nodes cover up. The Mount Wears activities. The initial version reportedly attacked about a thousand devices in subsequent alternate versions attacked thousands more the author of recruit went by the moniker the janitor. I'm going to paraphrase some of the statements he has written after seeing the Iot had attacks of two thousand sixteen, the janitor at hope, the industry would move to improve device security, and the janitor did not see any progress made after months of record-breaking attacks. They took it upon themselves to perform what they called. Internet chemotherapy a harsh treatment for seriously ill Internet. Now it's time for a short at break. Afterwards will be an interview with Rahul Super. Money senior product manager at the home security. Company simplisafe leverages IOT devices. The IT Department is changing. Automation has caused a shift and job, descriptions and priorities as once manual tasks, such as network monitoring are being taken over by a I at the same time, new technologies such as cloud, five G. Machine, learning and big data are creating demand for new jobs and career paths, and subsequently a massive skills gap. Gap that organizations are desperately trying to bridge the.

Mount Wears IT Department Rahul Super Lennox senior product manager G. Machine
Julie Maas, Senior Product Manager for Voice and Multi-Modal Sensemaking Products and Tools for Intel Corporation

The VoiceFirst Roundtable

05:42 min | 1 year ago

Julie Maas, Senior Product Manager for Voice and Multi-Modal Sensemaking Products and Tools for Intel Corporation

"People think Intel you know they might think bub-bubba up you know or you know silicon bunch of silicon rolling off manufacturing Share with us. How Intel thinks about voice? Now you were in attendance of project voice and that was great. We appreciate you being part of that. sure what this how. Intel thinks about Voice Technology. You know until it's not like Intel's produced its own smart speaker You know but Intel is watching this technology closely walk us through a little bit on on your perspective and Intel's perspective on on how all of this has Emerged yeah So I I mean until has had a presence in in smart home And and Smart Automotive Representations over time As we look at the the continued kind of maturity of the markets and the the growth Alongside of our partners. We focused a lot on the broader kind of system Enterprise and commercial deployments that we believe will be A large part of the growth in in Boyce Over the next couple of years so really focused on some of our Our big opportunities within our not verticals on from retail hospitality National Services Education As well as healthcare And recognizing and hearing regularly from our customers as we look at the The opportunity across artificial intelligence For growing demand in in voice As well and I would say that the other The other layer That were really attuned to is The growth in multi-modality in the bridging of vision and voice You know we see that In in some Just incredible Consumer domain areas right now With with the ECHO. Show with you know. Some of the the voice ops That include more of the visual interaction. No that that's going to be an area where we just continue to see. Incredible Innovation But you know we also know that that will. Those sorts of usages will be moving Very quickly into commercial enterprise as well and A good deal. But we're focusing on in terms of the the System workloads that we will be looking to help our customer support the school. Yeah so and you're right it it. It's touching everything at this point every every sector you know this year. There's a lot to be excited about. I think specifically in the enterprise. And we've seen the on bringing conversational eight I into the enterprise with things just basic stuff flight. Turn on the lights like smart home stuff but in the office type stuff and then we have seen a little bit of experimentation primarily Google into okay. What can we do with email? Maybe bring ai into into e mail a little bit But I think there's a lot more we're GONNA see this year with that. Could you share any particular? Use Case that you've seen a customer think about her take on In involving bringing a Oriented in machine learning oriented approaches into the enterprise. You know what what excites you? The most about what you're seeing play out specifically with you know corporate culture in the enterprise so at a couple of I you know I think that in the retail areas Some of the the work that were Seen scale with regard to kiosks That maybe traditionally wore more of a visual kind of display Orientation whereas you had voice capabilities into that kind of mechanism You you get just a an increase in terms of the the customer experience and the level of engagement From from that sort of Foreign factor and that kind of interaction Where we're really excited about some of the advances that are happening within the Smart Media Brim context From a collaboration and productivity standpoint When we start to to layer in transcription and the ability to do everything from Provide coaching within the context of a meeting and create greater efficiency and effectiveness for For people Within within the the day to day. Collaboration Some of those things are really exciting. And and we We are particularly interested in in sort of the voice and vision or display oriented Approach that were Watching expand quite rapidly supposedly a couple of

Intel Voice Technology Smart Automotive Representatio Google Boyce Multi-Modality Echo National Services Education
The many ways professional organizations help product managers  with Mark Adkins

The Everyday Innovator Podcast

09:32 min | 2 years ago

The many ways professional organizations help product managers with Mark Adkins

"How pita evolving to keep up with the Times. So it's funny because the one thing I in kind of full disclosure sure is I have two sons I four children. Two sons oser product managers. Not that I made them do that. Once a senior product manager at Google the other one is a product manager for ten cents the Chinese company that owns we chat but they also own riot games. James and he's part of the League of legends brand so I have these two sons who think they invented product management right. No no no no. Oh No it's been around a long time. I can't remember. I don't know who to ascribe it to a friend once called it the accidental profession. That's right and I. I've always loved that term. Although it's changing right I think that's what we'll talk more today about it. It really is a legitimate profession Russian. If you will but twenty thirty years ago it was you're tapped on the shoulder you know you're working at a company and you have an engineering degree or Marketing degree or finance degree. Somebody says hey. Atkins I want you to Ron product development in like what really and boom you're a product manager and that's part of again my history with PD was when I was tapped to run a product development program. I'm like who do I return to. How do I learn it is a profession? How do I become better at it? And that's where we are today. The role of product manager product owner her and so on his exploded and I think pedia may as well position to be the keeper that Professional Association for for this community. Because the other thing I would like to add is product. Managers are in corporations. Say We're practitioners but we have a great great history with academics. We welcome service providers so one of the very unique things about PD. Ama Professional Association is we include the entire our community so it it yes. It's people incorporations is people in startups doing product development. But it's the academic people that give us the foundation that we need to be he great at innovation and it's the service providers market research companies. The the design firms that are instrumental in doing great product Komo. Yeah I think that that Nicks is really key to PD me. And what I find so appealing about it and I was having a discussion with someone. This wonderful experience. I got to train in their product managers in this large organization and the guy that brought me and it was senior director of product management for them and he was talking about what we did for the training raining. My group is all based on. PDA's body of knowledge and put my hands around that. And the reason why I chose that is instrumental in the work that I did that. I successful and it's also grounded in research every what four five years. There's this study that does about what are the best organizations doing in the space. And how does that compare to everyone else and it gives you a real appreciation for what you need to be doing right. The distinction there and his reflection on this. Was You know Chad. Yeah I've done training from all the different organizations right. I've been in product management longtime. I've never seen something that is as wide breath and as integrated as this Body knowledge that covers all the things that you really need to know. So what I'd like to do to build on that there's two elements one is going to be China. Our Program in China is going to be teaching at the University of Pittsburgh Environ January. So let me let me start with my personal program. I teach a course I in the technical title is managing medical device. RND right but I use the PEDIA may body of knowledge approach as my textbook. Because when I looked at what I'm trying to do with these graduate students who are pursuing a master's of science and bioengineering. I I I WANNA give them the full breadth of understanding of what it is to develop new products and the PDA body of knowledge is the guidebook is as a wonderful resource. So I use it personally might textbook as far as China. There's not a better example when you were talking earlier about. PM Am I and project management and Pedia. May We have a wonderful program. I've been twice to China to be representing Pedia. May It was is our former chair. Alan Anderson it really got the program going and we are certifying thousands of Chinese folks who have a PM so they were project managers but now literally the government of China wants to move up the value you chain. They WANNA be innovators. They don't WANNA be simply low. Cost manufacturing companies in a country. That just can only make cheap product. They want want to innovate and so they've turned -pedia may as their partner in developing a certification program. So if you WANNA be a product manager in China China you need to get your n. p. which is our revocation and we have literally trained thousands and thousands of Chinese and it grows every a year so I think it's a wonderful example of this differentiation and the move up if you WANNA call it. The value chain from project management into product management innovation. And we're doing it in China in spades. I think it's really interesting. How PD may is in? A sense has always been international nationalization but exporting what has been known as the US has capability dominance in product management to other places and China paid attention to that right an open the doors to this just as they did two PM. I sometimes goes well. Can I also add the global nature on our former tair. He's a key week he's from New Zealand. So for the last three years our chairpersons been the New Zealander so I agreed read the PDF roots are in the US but it would be complete underestimation of us to think of us as a US only organization. Yeah I I do. Think the recognized dominance in at least the area of product management has been kind of US base. Because when I talked to other people in other countries they talk about well. You guys have so much experience in that. How do we get that experience to? And this is one way. And that's awfully kind of a wakeup call. I think for product managers. If you're listening to this now certification. Should I think historically has not made a big difference in our industry frankly. I very rarely see job. Announcement saying some kind of certification is desired but if if we have thousands and thousands every year of product managers in China getting certified. It's going to start making more of a difference and it's something just to look into frankly clearly the value to me. The value of many people that have helped train for specifically for the certification isn't really getting that certification right. It's not the piece. The papers not magical but learning that body of knowledge learning the framework man if there was big light bulb moments. That went off for me as I was doing that personally. And I had the pleasure of helping to co train on that body of knowledge at last year's conference of you and I were that and I assured just my journey with that too and said when I learned about this. That was huge. I suddenly put together the pieces that I've been doing for the last ten years that I didn't really know how they fit and there were other people in the room that came up to me afterwards and said you know. lightbulbs would offer me too during the training today that I never made these connections before it was just really powerful. Really good so let's talk about the benefits associated associated with a so if people want to check out the professional organization lots of free resources available and of course it is a professional association. If you're a paid member when you get access to other things to just what's involved in those benefits I really WanNa go instead of going down into the dark details of everything everything when I reflect on my time with. PDA In this recently yesterday. On a link to impose it's been a couple apple decades of meeting fantastic people so whether you volunteer for DNA or you're just see participating or online or as part of a chapter after I can guarantee you're going to meet some of the smartest most interesting most dedicated people you'll ever meet you'll meet them through pedia and that's pretty priceless kidding. It's very priceless. And then the second thing is what you learn right. Yeah so like to your point about body of knowledge right. I tap on the shoulder twenty years ago. It's like you're in charge of product development. Oh man what does that mean. And the ability to go to the website the body of knowledge all of the books we published all the webcast we do. There's so much you can learn is part of PDA so rather than going down into the weeds of benefits in listing a dozen. You'RE GONNA meet great people and you'RE GONNA learn a lot. Just become become part of our community and I can guarantee those benefits you'll get

Product Manager China Product Development Pedia Senior Product Manager United States Senior Director Of Product Man Times Professional Association China China Riot Games Google James League Of Legends Ama Professional Association New Zealand Nicks University Of Pittsburgh
Tips for Building a Compelling Product Vision by Amazon Sr Product Manager

The Product Podcast

06:59 min | 2 years ago

Tips for Building a Compelling Product Vision by Amazon Sr Product Manager

"So tonight I want to tell you how to create a compelling product vision and a little bit about myself. I'm a senior product manager at Amazon I am the The technical variant. That just means I. I don't code every day. I like coating sometimes but I typically work on a more technical product so for me that includes is a lot of real time systems that includes machine learning that includes a lot of algorithms and data science And also thinking about technology patterns that would scale across the world across a variety of features. So that's me. I also worked at Microsoft before I worked on a thing called Hololens. It's like an augmented reality helmet that you put on your head kind of cool but I was very something. Different and customer reviews is all me now all right. Let's get right into it. I can guess actually which product is reviewed. Right here has forty two thousand reviews and he guesses no not me I hope by rating is that good but any idea what this is saying. It's the echoed dot actually and it is one of the most reviewed but not the most reviewed brock on Amazon so yeah and pretty good star rating all right so this is what I'm talking about. Today I broke it down to five topics. So here's we're GONNA do. Why chose this topic? This one's a little bit Near and dear to me as well L. Among the many other topics I chose. I WanNa talk about what it means to be a visionary There's this mean about what it means to be a visionary that I just I wanNA on a day so I wanNA talk a little bit about that I'm GonNa talk more specifically about how you create a compelling productijn and what that looks like in a very step by step process us in a talk about how to communicate your productijn which a lot of people forget about but it's actually really important. That product vision is worth nothing. If it's only in your head talk about communication and I'm also GONNA talk about how to make it a reality I'm GONNA spend a little bit less time on that because today is all about the vision but if you can't execute get your product vision you know you're not going to go anywhere alrighty. Let's do it why I chose this topic so last winter I met with one of my peers at work and and I'm gonNA keep them anonymously. I've been really tough day. And I said Hey will accumulate a coffee talk about something and I could tell something was wrong because I like didn't look very happy And you know maybe their dog died you know. Maybe they had a tough conversation with their manager. I really don't know but I need to talk. And we went to starbucks blow my building and and this is what she said to me not the exact words but basically this she said. I can't come up with any good ideas from my product. I'm not a visionary and I'm not creative how do you come up with their product vision. I feel like giving up as a product manager every day because of this and I didn't really know what to say to that actually I it took me a while to think of like. How do I actually do that? Like I knew in my head how I did it but I had a tough time really describing her in that that moment so I decided to talk today because of that conversation that I had and I realized that my own career. I wish someone had given this talk to me before I started because I made a lot of the mistakes That many people make when creating PROC vision and these are. This is a struggle. I think many product managers go through in in their career. And I WANNA help everyone here or who watches online or or anyone who gets exposure to this in some way Not have to feel like this. You know being tears feel like they can't be a product manager So here's why here When I worked at Microsoft this is the new hot thing And just to put it really simply. Here's how you might think about growth mindset with respect to a product vision the fixed mindset and the other hand is like I'm born with this ability or or you know I I can't learn you know I'm stuck. I'm not creative. I'm not a visionary. I'm not going to be able to come with the right ideas to leave that to someone else That is the mindset that my friend had when she came to me at starbucks and told me that she couldn't be product manager and I think a lot of people in here like to say that they don't have that mindset and you may have a growth mindset in other areas of your career but when it comes to being a visionary I find that many many people actually have this mindset and they may not realize it I say you know what I'm not a visionary. I'M NOT GOING TO BE Steve Jobs. I'm not going to be on And it's good to check accu self and say do I think that way. Or do I think I have the potential to be a visionary on the other hand we have the growth mindset and you can guess it's the opposite of the fix mindset. Basically you believe that you can overcome any challenge by working at it the potential to do something not something. You're born with the F. to stick with it work at it and then you can choose whatever you want So growth mindset is a is a great way to think about any problem in your career but for being a visionary. I think there's a really important concepts concepts and you should check yourself and say which. which viewpoint do I have And I think of you are here at this talk today. I hope you have the second one. The growth mindset. Because you're the first I want I'm not going to be able to help you honestly So please think about what it means to have. A growth mindset. Does anyone you know. Put on their Lincoln their thought leader. Did anyone give a huge talk. About what their their next big idea was. Anyone might be an aspiring visionary. Nobody okay I expected zero for that one too. Oh Yeah so not. Many people describe themselves as a visionary I think are some very good reasons for that and part of that is because a lot of who who we think is a visionary are people like this so i WanNa know all six people here. I'M GONNA get zero people now six but some people might know five life. These are some things that I hear a lot about what a visionary is and I would say. They're all wrong so one of them. I'm is that I can't say visionary 'cause I just don't have those crazy ideas. I don't know the Moonshot. I'm not making flying skateboards or self driving cars And there's this out there that in order to be a visionary you have to have these wild outlandish ideas and you have to go on a long walk on the weekend by herself and come home and have his is magical idea that you've come up with And we just keep perpetuating that music over and over again but in reality like coming up with the vision really doesn't work that way. Another one is that visionary seemed to know everything about the future you know they know it'll happen and one hundred years from now fifty years from now even ten years from now and the reality is is that humans are really really bad at making predictions about the future So most successful visionaries aren't actually that good at predicting the future future because nobody is So if you thought. That's a visionary. was I encourage you to check that one out And reconsider

Product Manager Senior Product Manager Starbucks Microsoft Amazon Hololens Steve Jobs Brock Lincoln
How Alan AI Gives Enterprise Apps a Voice

Inside VOICE

03:41 min | 2 years ago

How Alan AI Gives Enterprise Apps a Voice

"Today my guess is is James Shelburne. The senior product manager for Allen the platform that makes it easy to add context based conversational voice assistance to your application welcomed James. Thanks for being here. Thank you for having me Jerry. Happy to be here. So let's start off with the history of this company. The founders and the company name Allen. Come from a very interesting place. Can you tell us a little bit more about it. Yes so our company is named after Alan Turing. He's the famous computer. Scientists who deciphered be `nigma machine in World War Two you know helped get victory for the allies and he asks the question can machines think and so we're kind of rephrasing phrasing not into Kenya application thing and that's the whole premise. Alan in adding intelligence to existing applications with voice so our founders founders are Ramaphosa Kara and Andre Riot and Ramu previously. You know his Oracle veteran you are on the parallel survey were there and he founded Dan. The company quick which was the first version was during the first version of video streaming on mobile devices. It's kind of before the iphone in facetime. So that company ended up being acquired by skype and Andre. Ri- other co-founder Work John. That was him in he. He's the one who built a lot of the video streaming components of it so he also worked at the Russian social network classic. And he's the real genius behind our technology wonderful now. Can you tell us a little bit about why you think boys can improve the experience of existing applications that are are out there. Yes so voice in existing applications. It's taking all of the functionality that they have and making it available at any he time from any different screen so not all mobile. Applications are easy to use as instagram. Day Are GonNA especially in enterprise. They're packed with functionality and Plexiglas a lot of screens a lot of tapping and touching typing on the mobile phone. It's just kind of in general hard to do. And so is unlocking the power of those applications by letting anyone just be able to talk to them to get work done to access functions while they're driving rather than have to touch the screen it can just talk to it and the screen is providing a visual feedback so they can easily continue it conversation there in what we'd seen in kind of existing voice ecosystem with Google home device Amazon exit vices day at least the version one. They didn't have of the screen. There is not the later came out with a show and the Google Hav and with the initial devices no screen. The user has to memorize what to say in what what to do. And it's hard to kind of keep up with it and it doesn't necessarily memorize the context or understand the context of the user so with voice and within existing existing applications. The user has some idea already of what the application does they can see on the screen. This was visual feedback. And that's why voice experience a mobile when it's supported by those existing functions is just a much better way to interact and enterprise which were primarily focused on the a user's there have very defined or close that they have to complete in so at every step. They're talking to talking back. It's a conversation and they're able to see. Alan is able to understand the visual context of the user and then we also kind of maintain the dialogue on deck. So it's a much richer

Ramaphosa Kara Allen James Shelburne Alan Andre Riot Senior Product Manager Kenya Oracle Google RI Skype Facetime Jerry Co-Founder
"senior product manager" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

04:06 min | 2 years ago

"senior product manager" Discussed on KOMO

"Highlight of his upcoming trip to Asia I'm Tom rivers that the ABC news foreign desk in London were barely in the fall but for the people in charge of getting ready for winter weather now's the time to gear up come was Carlene Johnson tentative multi agency briefing or officials say they learned a lot about what worked and didn't work during last Feb worries majors snow event weather service folks metro bus drivers utility crew. and D. O. T. they were all stretched thin by the unusual amount of snow over several days we had to get through and today they all came together to talk about that event what they've learned and what's on the radar for this coming winter Chris Johnson was state DOT's says they just order insult for their trucks anticipating this should be a normal year weather wise we learn about eighty thousand ton of salt for washing studio to statewide Kerrison last year because of the snow storm we actually went through just shy of a hundred thousand ton of song it was a long range forecast looks like it should be more mild temperature wise the farmers almanac says we could be in for it was snow especially east of the mountains weather forecasting a parade of winter snow storms at the No Way headquarters in Seattle Carly Johnson come on news. good for mostly cloudy one here this Thursday in the wet weather it's back again all due to a front that's coming through and that front to give way to some showers even a few scattered storms to as high temperatures reach the upper fifties to about sixty to those lingering showers continue on Friday with a partly cloudy to mostly sunny sky late Saturday into Sunday so there is some sunshine up on the horizon enjoy your day I'm south wait a couple weather center. from ABC news tech trends well some smart watches measure battery life in days garment is boosting that two weeks thanks to the sun one of the newest smart watches from Garmin is a monster feature you can't even see. and it's a brand new technology where we're basically putting a layer of photovoltaic solar cells behind the glass but they're trying their speakers John hustler senior product manager a garment says by putting transparent solar cells right on the face of the watch the Phoenix six X. pro solar can extend its battery life. yeah hours outside in the direct on Thursday. so you're out by the twenty three hours a day then you'll gain about a day per week letting you go more than three weeks between charges another addition to the Phoenix six series of feature for runners called pace pro while you're out the watch will check your course for hills and adjust your pace when you're battling the inclines with tech trends I'm Dave Packer ABC news. Microsoft unveils some exciting new products in New York City that'll soon go on sale the new generation of hardware devices include upgrades to surface laptop three Microsoft hardware cheese panels pants today two times faster than the product that's already the highest customer satisfaction rated product on the planet which is awesome this we're very proud of and to put it in context if you're using a macbook air right now this product is three times more powerful than the macro. it's also include new foldable dual screen devices called surface do and surface Neil but they won't be available until twenty twenty. one is you got it ten hours of everything purple and gold. the only home of the house call Williams one thousand seven ninety seven seven. northwest it's iPhone season it's spring which to sprint and get a new light on a lot and I've done a lot of the meeting on the camera systems and I think I got eleven zero dollars per month when you trade in your I. phone seven or newer in any condition seriously any condition. visit your local sprint store spring dot com or call eight hundred three one hundred and sixty forty later this month and I like to look at the twenty seventeen with critically likely to bite into those are frightened when a service has already made enough to cover. you know it makes me taxes restrictions apply..

Microsoft ABC Carlene Johnson farmers almanac Carly Johnson senior product manager Chris Johnson John hustler Garmin Asia Seattle Tom rivers New York City Dave Packer Kerrison London D. O. T.
"senior product manager" Discussed on Techstination

Techstination

02:01 min | 2 years ago

"senior product manager" Discussed on Techstination

"Your destination for gadgets gear. I'm Fred friskin, Father's Day is on the way and the folks that works are out with some new tools for outside. And in that used the latest twenty volt power share battery system from the GT evolution trimmer, and Edger, or hydro shop power cleaner to the new Samdech five and one multi Sander senior product manager, Jean white go from let's say a picnic table, but that you want to repaint. So we've got a random or add, basically, if you flip up lever, she can switch over to a quarter sheet pad and then again, you can send over to like I detail padded really versatile. And when dad has done with all of that work. He might be able to use the next Smith. Help reduce neck and shoulder pain. It inflates with a blood pressure type bulb for just the right comfort. Find it at the next myth dot com. You can find us at texter nation dot com. I'm Fred friskin. Now this. Innovation. Hi, I'm red fish. And I've been covering consumer technology for a long time, and it takes a lot to impressment. That's why I'm excited to tell you about the latest way to enjoy cooking and the great outdoors for my friend. Patrick, Sherwin and his great team at goes on stove. What if you could harness the sun to cook your meals, anywhere you go day or night? The goes on fusion arrives this summer using the companies tried and true, reflectors, and the solar vacuum tube to get through cooking without the mess of charcoal, heavy propane tanks or smoke. And with an optional solar panel and battery storage, and the ability to plug in at home or on the road. You really can use the ghosts on fusion to cook, anytime and anywhere want to learn more head to go son dot CO and use the code text nation to save ten percent. That's goes on the oh.

Fred friskin dot CO Edger senior product manager Jean white Smith Patrick Sherwin ten percent twenty volt
"senior product manager" Discussed on Techstination

Techstination

11:35 min | 2 years ago

"senior product manager" Discussed on Techstination

"Welcome to text evasion. Joining us as Jean white senior product manager at works. W O, R X. Thanks for being here, gene. Fred. Thank you for having me him to light to hear a word says been really doing some innovation when it comes to its battery technology, and how it's used an variety of power tools for inside and out. Tell us about the latest strategy that you have you've moved up, I guess, to sort of a higher voltage system. Sure, we're working with twenty batteries. That is called our power share program and twenty volt batteries sit on, we practically have every tool that we make in twenty volt option. That's outdoor products. Lors trimmers hedge trimmers, and we're looking at more and more every day. And then those same batteries sit over own our powered. Hand tools, such as Sandra. We'll talk about today. Oh, drills leading tools Sol's creating much you name it. We can we can put a battery on it, and I guess the vantage is of, of using common battery system are, are pretty obvious here for for owners and they're good for worse, too, because people are gonna buy you going to stay in the works family. I guess when they're out shopping, right? Yeah. You know, years ago we, we started out as works are, are. I, I guess you'd call big project was a, a string trimmer, twenty volt string trimmer, with, with the, the battery and we were quite successful with that. And a lot of folks purchase that string trimmer loved it and had the battery. So as we started developing this power share program, every tool we offer has a battery option or just what we call. A tool only option because a lot of folks have our batteries and would rather not have to buy more batteries, if they could get some tool that they wanted and already have the battery. So that's why we try to stay with one battery platform multiple tools, but we have gotten into some bigger tools that need more power than say, twenty volt might be able to, to manage again, bigger loan more or more powerful string trimmer. So we've gotten into some forty volt platform and fifty six volt, so, yeah, that's growing, and this is the trend the cordless tool market has just exploded in the past twenty years, and as technologies with batteries, get better. Don't see the trend stopping at all just, just like with cell phones. You know, the used to have little slip phone or those. I had a car for one time. You had to carry it in like a bag for the battery, so big, but the batteries are getting better, stronger, more durable and smaller. There are times when, when if more power is needed as, as you have with one of your newer. Trimmers and yours, you can actually use to batteries instead of one, so yeah. Yeah. And that keeps you going for a longer. Well, let's talk about the. A product that really is in your wheelhouse here. You've got a brand new product called the works twenty volt power share five and one sand Sandik multi Sander give. Give us. It is. Yeah. It it's it is a sanding machine. Let's say Powerball twenty volt battery, but it's got sanding pads alternatives. So you can go from maybe let's say a picnic table that you want to repaint does just going to be a lot of paint. You want to get off. So we've got a random or pad five inch randomly that'll that'll fit. But basically, if you flip up a lever and turn it a few times, you can switch over to a quarter sheet pad. And then again, you can change over to a like detail padded always looks like the bottom of an iron to me. But that's what I'm talking about. Is that, that pad with a narrow point, and that's forgetting into close spots, you know, or right up into corners that kind of thing? And then in addition to that, we have a couple of little of attachment s- that can sit on the, the point that say of, of the deal. Pat, one of one of these attachments is a finger. Sander, it's just a really narrow little pad that can get up and just about any spot, and as an alternative. We have what we call a contour sanding attachment and it's kinda got a. Like a flexible aspect to it. So if you have to San say, spindles stare, stare spindles, or some, some convex, little surface, it'll work real well for that. Built into this. Yeah, yeah. No. The versatility. And also the convenience, sometimes like if you are outside sanding, the say, again, the picnic table out under the tree, you can make it run maybe three extension cords but it's just so much easier quicker to be able to grab the Sander, the whole kit. Take it out there. And you can do do the entire project as far as sanding. And then repainted earns any, so and a lot of folks, you know. Need sanders? They do craft work or little stuff now. And then but they don't have a lot of space. So you have like five different Sanders all that. It's all in one bag, and so it saves some space and some money to 'cause you're, you're buying one sandr- that can do so many things. So I guess what some folks might wonder is okay if I'm going to go with a battery operated. Sander like this, in my really going to be able to get the job done on a charge of I guess it depends on how big the job is. But speaking, I mean, you've designed these really run for the length of time that, that there needed. Yeah, this this Santa comes with a two hour battery. So it's got it's got a pretty good amount of run town. And of course, we do have options with, with higher voltages of batteries, forty volts or or whatever but to to stay with your question. You know, you can you can maximize the Runtime for any to really by by managing the load and with the Sander, it's especially important to remember that the pad, does the work so and the movement of the pad work pressure on the pad just makes the standard work harder. But it doesn't really help with the team. So just putting a light touch on the sand into the work we'll extend your run time. Of course. There's a lot of other bear variables the material that you're working with the grit, the level of grit on the sanding pad. The little fine takes off just a tiny little bit at a time. Doesn't doesn't drain the Sanders powers much say, a big coarse grit on a on a heavy heavy material. And then, of course, even little things like temperature and how how what speed you running. It often you turn it on and off all that kind of. Affects the run time. So I could give you maybe a range of per battery. Real heavy usage. My, you might see twenty minutes, twenty five minutes light usage, you know, conservative usage. You see, maybe forty forty five and that doesn't sound like a lot, but. With sanding. There's a lot of starting and stopping and so continuous us forty five minutes. That's a lot of saying you can convert a lot. If you never joined that Senator off and just keep going. But most looks have to stop rearrange the material, you know, rearrange, their, their how their hands positioned all that. And so that, that gives the Sander little time to rest and a battery little time to rest and books out, great and you help out to and controlling the sawdust generated here. Tell us about that. Oh, well the, the Sandra has two options for should be saying the sand. It Sander there's a bag. And the sand sodas came flow right into the bag. But if you're working inside the shop, or you really don't have to baggage all the others to disappear. There's a vacuum option. It's a little doctor that fits right? Onto the tool. And then you can hook up a dry vac or, or Saul vacuuming system and just pull that sold us right up through the through the holes in the pad and right out the back of the Sander. And to whatever's collecting it. Very handy. And you can you can have multiple batteries handy to swap out in the event. You've got a bigger job, that's going to take longer. And chances are if you've got other works tools or outdoor -ment. The you might have that extra battery on hand. Yeah. We should hope everybody does. And, and you're right think ahead, maybe have an extra battery or two on hand and, and it's a matter of the end of just pushing about in and flooding. The battery often clicking a fresh battery on, and any any configuration of a works battery in the in the twenty volt work. So we've, we've got like a one and a half empower option to our option. And we're now getting into four six our at our options. So you put a big old battery like a four or six an hour and the is going. It'll go for a while, but. The, the two point. Oh, empire battery is what comes with it. Riddick. Now tell us about the pricing and, and availability, you're all over the place. I know we're getting there, this is very new product. So it's, it's only sound found its home a couple of places so far. The Amazon has it and certainly anytime for any of our products you can go and works dot com and get it. And if you want more batteries or say drill or something just just load 'em. Hold on there. And we'll sure ship them out. So that's that my knowledge is our listing so far. We are hopeful to see it at Menards. Very soon and. I guess those that's the conversation that has the pricing. I can say, well, the without the battery you'll see it at seventy nine dollars. If you want the battery, it's going to be up in the hundred two hundred twenty dollar range again. For more info, folks can go to works dot com. It's W

Sander sanders Jean white San say Sandra Fred Sol senior product manager Menards Saul Pat Amazon Santa Senator twenty volt hundred two hundred twenty dol seventy nine dollars twenty five minutes forty five minutes
"senior product manager" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

OC Talk Radio

07:24 min | 2 years ago

"senior product manager" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

"And now back to Matt and his guest. I go back to sales pipeline radio. Thanks for joining us again. If you like what you're hearing here today as new research we have with on relationships selling with Microsoft dynamics three sixty five you can find a copy of that. We've got links to get a copy of that in the show notes for this podcast. We've got a sales pipeline radio. We also have links to that. It's hines marketing dot com and get a copy of that for sure but wanted to get a little more with Liz Michelle. She's a senior product marketing manager at Microsoft specifically focused on dynamics three sixty five and it's been pretty exciting list as are watching the world bias because I know we work together on this to watch sort of the growth of dynamics three sixty five with the Microsoft acquisition with the increase market share. You're getting just with the abolition of a product and really doing that based on deep understanding of sellers in house sellers operate view talk a little bit about how sir deep customer insights have been war of how Microsoft is building in developing improving dynamics three sixty five sales tool Dana driven company so that is foundation of almost everything we I do and that's why we're building capabilities that we have been building in our products to make use of all that data that's out there artists right pieces of services INSCI- to sales team in kind of streamline what they're getting to do day-to-day so that they can focus on guy said a little bit earlier building those strong relationships. We also really eat our dog food here Microsoft so it's really fun for me to on a product that's our sales team gears actually using data day and when you look at the Lincoln <unk> as well one of my favorite parts of what I do is getting tech elaborate on the giant market we have across accent sales navigator seeing those tools data's come together working across the teams Lynton has doing team has great expertise when it comes to Diaz as sales team ball and so there's a really nice synergy there across the two products you mentioned your dogs. Whatever some people describe it as you know drinking champagne certainly the relationship between sales marketing and then you've got multiple organizations selling together complex talk about you know as you apply as you as you see the impact of this research in your own organization powders having having greater customer insights how having better integration intended communication between sales marketing teams in Microsoft between Microsoft Lincoln? How does that help you become more efficient? How's that helped seal team? They're doing inside. Were getting really prescriptive about who were targeting and how we're getting to that and then on sale side now we're enabling capability to really focused their day-to-day activities so instead of hiring them in the morning and they come to our grenade it might log into the sixty five in instead of having to low through list of these are working on it to make that decision about what I do for her soon. I reach out to were actually starting. Into insight into which -tunities should they be prioritizing. What are the top things that they should do day offer money? A lot of the segments are inside sales team in particular that that's a really kind of exciting thing to see what's going on laboratory alive. The capability is that Microsoft has built in that building into our the answers to five for sales practice and even though this research was really focused on sales and focus on sales organization sitting there number is strikes me that a lot of these insights insights and just sharing your last answer as well. This really has an impact on the broader organization for revising teams in your mind is this haven't implication to these insights reach an impact customer success and account management seemed as well yeah I just as important and just it's necessary to have this feedback mechanisms on inside rewarding is on the customer success site is also making sure that are tied at the head is a few more minutes here with mid Liz we show she he is these senior product marketing manager Microsoft Dynamics three sixty five and again. We've been covering some highlights from the relationships selling a research that we recently completed and you get a copy of that in the journal she this podcast as well as sales pipeline radio DOT COM. We usually us the Lower S._E._O.. Is You continues volume row in your career who are some of the people that you've looked for and you've found end and spend time with to learn who are some of the mentors or influencers that you've read that have been professors or managers or authors. I recommend other people check out as well. I certainly learned a lot from the House that I worked with day-to-day throughout my career so pervious matters I had I had I think a really interesting path within in my marketing career in that I started out doing fiar in social media down a little bit of market research. I I worked at some star hopes for awhile right got to have my hands in almost everything marketing and so the different leaders managers that I had along the way like oftentimes they were taking a chance on me to do something. Take on tasks that I hadn't necessarily done before I've learned so much just from working with those people day to day picking up on what they're doing terms of whom I reading these days <music> who go to insights outside of the were place I have to say on the team at temple research has been really helpful to you so shout to Craig Rosenberg. I've learned a time for him. He operated when he has to say the era super hunts in sales marketing face really recommend checking out there blog. If you guys have read on yet I would agree with that. I love your answer in in terms where you've come from his well. I think managers there's good managers can sometimes be the best people Iraq's daily basis but also I resonate with your background. I came from a journalism major. You dial my first real job. Close journalism was in a P._R.. Firm is been interesting to sort of. It's a see how marketing is of all since then but also you know I'm curious. How has your perspective on marketing change from being more focused on P._R.? And social sin now being really immersed in the midst of the markings of these days in a missed you know organizations that are really integrating zelzal marketing marketing changes. Your perspective changes a little bit of bowls. It's certainly I think that the technology on marketing I seen that just grow so much pass several years probably past ten years even with the social media and this concept of not just branding that comes from Layton official sort of marketing team perspective where it's it's a little more restrictive about this grand is how we talkin doc and now there's more of this personal brand in people are bringing that to life I see actually a lot of salaries are doing that really effectively not helping them in their careers in a way that I think ten fifteen years ago it just wasn't as common really interesting elation to see throughout my career. Absolutely I WanNa thank our guest again. Lisbi shows she's a senior product manager at Microsoft Dynamics three sixty five and if you'd like to learn more about the study we've been talking about here today..

Microsoft senior product marketing manag Microsoft Dynamics Liz Michelle Matt senior product manager INSCI Dana driven company Iraq temple research Lynton Lisbi Diaz Layton Craig Rosenberg official ten fifteen years ten years
"senior product manager" Discussed on Twenty Thousand Hertz

Twenty Thousand Hertz

05:31 min | 3 years ago

"senior product manager" Discussed on Twenty Thousand Hertz

"Break. This episode is sponsored by Bose the engineers behind some of the world's best audio products. The football field can be anything. But quiet with thousands of fans cheering and booing screaming. It can be incredibly challenging for a coach to focus. That's why when the NFL needed to upgrade coach in player communication. They turn to Bose NFL coaches. Depend on Bose noise. Cancelling technology to block out the excitement of the stadium and focus on the game. Clarity is key to making the right calls and communicating them in an instant and Bose makes it happen that same technology is used off the field in Bose's, quiet comfort thirty five headphones. I love my QC thirty five so much that I bought a pair for everyone here at defacto sound in twenty thousand Hertz there super comfortable, and I use them every day, the QC thirty five's block out distractions and enhance your audio experience. So you can focus on your favorite music, podcasts television shows and movies. So whether it's on a football field or on the go bows delivers the best noise. Cancelling headphones out there give the both QC thirty-five headphones. A try for more information. Visit bows dot com. Okay. So here's this episode's mystery sound. If you think, you know, what that sound is tell us that mystery dot twenty K dot org. If you get it, right? You'll be entered to win a super soft twenty thousand Hertz t-shirt stick around to the end of the episode to hear the answer to last episodes mystery sound. We're looking for an incredible sound editor to help with twenty thousand Hertz and potentially other projects this position doesn't require relocation. And can be done wherever you are. If this sounds like something you'd be interested in you can find all the requirements and details at sound editor dot twenty K dot org. Also, if you're a writer, thank you have what it takes to write a twenty thousand Hertz episode. Let us know at writer twenty K dot org. When you watch an NFL game on television. You'll see coaches wearing large headsets with giant bows? Logos on them before I go any further a little disclaimer, none of this was written or influenced by Bose outside of fact checking they had no editorial control over this content. They just got wind of the episode and loved the idea so much that they decided to sponsor it. So with that out of the way the NFL legalized quarterback to coach radios in the ninety s that change ushered in an era of high speed complex offenses that took the league vice storm, but by the mid two thousands, the old headsets just couldn't keep up. That's when Bose got involved. My name's Matt really? I'm the senior product manager for aviation military and broadcast markets. Those makes headsets literally for m one Abrams tanks. I mean that could be any more extreme in terms of annoys. Those was a company known more for home speaker systems and later for military aviation headsets, some of our aviation headsets start to get used in D one football college football. And we started noticing this without wow, you know, people really think that this headset is must be really good because they're using it on the sidelines to take on a challenge. As unique as the NFL Matt needed the help of Dan Gager Dana's, one of the founders of the Bose noise cancelling division. He's now a distinguished engineer at the company. So I said, well, let's go learn about the noise Matt nine smothers went to the most convenient stadium Gillette stadium and measured. The noise recorded it men, Dan quickly discovered that noise at an NFL stadium is totally different than all of the noise. They've studied before the mimic range in football in general is incredible. Football goes from incredibly quiet early play in the first quarter. You can go from that to be in Seattle where the twelve may hand is incredibly. Supposedly the crowd is the twelfth person who actually impacts the game. And it is so loud there that if you're attending the game, you probably want to wear earplugs. It gets that allowed. It's fascinating. I can look at the data from some measurements. I took at a Seahawks forty Niners game, and you can see in the data the excitement of the crowd because the human voice changes its mix of its timbre. It's mix of spectral balance as people start shouting things shift higher in frequency. You can see that when it happens. And so it's figuring optimize our headphones to work. Well, in that sort of noise dominated those frequencies communication is everything that Sean McVay the current LA Rams head coach. Yeah. It can be extremely difficult especially in some of these road atmospheres from an offensive standpoint fans going crazy lot of different things going on throughout the course of the game. One of the most important things that we can provide is is clarity to our players when there's clear communication. There's no gray guys can operate with confidence. They can play without any uncertainty. And that's a big thing in this league. Matt

NFL football Bose Matt writer Hertz stadium Gillette stadium editor distinguished engineer Seattle Sean McVay Seahawks senior product manager Abrams LA Rams Dan twenty thousand Hertz twenty K
"senior product manager" Discussed on AWS Podcast

AWS Podcast

05:43 min | 3 years ago

"senior product manager" Discussed on AWS Podcast

"This is episode two hundred and eighty nine of the AWS podcast released on January thirteenth twenty nineteen. Lorena? Welcome back the adipose podcast Sunday. She here with you. Great to have you back, and I'm joined by very special guests to talk about a very special topic. I'm joined by Andrew crutch, who's is senior product manager for if X at Amazon workum, Andrew, thank you. Now, you I you talk to us today about a new service that I know a lot of customers who'd be waiting for which is Amazon if x four windows file server, and I'm sure all trip over that name at some point today. But one of the things that we're talking at briefly before we started recording the show is that ninety five percent of error map. He's actually created by what customers are asking us to do for them, which is a great way to go. So maybe let's start with that. Why did customers ask us to create the service for them? Absolutely. So a lot of customers that we spoke to when we were initially developing the product, you know, a lot of feedback that they shared was many of these customers have existing windows. Which workloads onto the currently running either on AWS or unpracticed and these are workloads like CRM software. European software done that applications of variety of media processing transporting workloads as well as simple home directories. So things like departmental shares or user shares where you're just storing your files and you want to share it with your teammates. And a core threat across all of these types of workloads is that many of these workloads rely on shared storage that can be broadly accessed from windows instances. And so a lot of these customers are really excited to move these workloads to Italy us, and they're looking for restored solution that can help support these workloads as we were looking at possible solutions, and you know, different alternatives for supporting the storage need. We asked a lot of questions to customers about what what are they need from the storage? You know, what what types of compatibility do they need? What types of features? Do they need? What are they looking for when they're evaluating storage options? And ultimately what a lot of customer. Is shared with us is they're really just looking for a native windows file system. A file system that you know, is compatible with currently doing the file system that has all the features that the currently taking advantage of customers don't want to necessarily need to compare the current solution to something else that exists in in do extensive testing to try to understand which features may or may not work. Exactly the same way. They're really just looking for a solution. That works the way their current solution. Does. You up in replacement anti let just give me what got easier for me. Yep. Exactly. So actually, we looked at a number of different options, including adding SMD support to our existing Amazon elastic file system product SMB as the underlying protocol that a lot of windows. Applications are used when talking to shared file storage. His him. Big. Yeah. I mean, it's sort of another another word that's used for it. And it makes people tweets when you say seeps humane assembly slightly. Yeah. We did. We did. Explore. Adding, you know, a bunch of different protocols to f s an ultimately what we realized was customers are just looking for a solution that works like what they have today. And so as a result that that was sort of the starting point for this product as we envisioned it, and as a result of this feedback that we heard pretty strongly from a large number of customers the product that we actually ended up building Amazon FSX for windows file server is actually built on top of windows server. It's it's powered by windows server software. And as a result, you know, it provides a lot of compatibility for features that customers have come to expect from window storage features like NTFS, like active directory integration features like distributed file system or DFS for replication across sites things like that. That's a really interesting starting point too. Because really what was saying here is the core of the service is built on the windows platform. So there's no kind of emulation or she means all kind of work arounds at my work. Nabet. Quick. Like, these these the the the NBA platform on the windows platform. Exactly. Yup. We really want to allow customers who have existing setup that are running on top of windows based storage to be able to have the same kinds of features the same kinds of compatibility in the cloud as they would today. So let's talk about that. Let's talk about the protocol support. Because it's probably the the starting point for most listeners who are running any kind of windows false is at the moment. It's and be protocol support. What are the versions that customers can use on this earth? So we support our version two point oh newer of the SME protocol. So we support, you know, up to the latest version at this time, which is a believe three point one point one. So we're accessible as a result from a variety of different operating systems, including the newest windows server, twenty sixteen twenty nineteen as well as windows ten but also some of the older versions such as windows server, two thousand thirteen or two thousand eight and windows seven is well, cool, and you could use lyrics to if if Lennox you've got leaked systems currently accessing those fall systems, whatever you can continue says to KAI. Yeah. Absolutely. Yeah. We we do support access to episode for windows file server file systems from Lennox clients. That are running the open source song to plant. Testing. And so let's talk about performance because performance typically is the the main will the first pine if you lock of false serve as which is do I make it run fast enough. And this service is built on is this day storage, which probably can't hurt the throughput in performance aspects Kennett. Yeah. No, absolutely not. Yeah. We we purposely wanted to make sure the product offer customers the performance that they would expect and they would need a lot of their applications. And so as a result, we

Amazon Andrew crutch senior product manager Lorena NBA Italy Kennett Lennox ninety five percent
"senior product manager" Discussed on The Product Podcast

The Product Podcast

05:54 min | 3 years ago

"senior product manager" Discussed on The Product Podcast

"I'm Rosiak of I'm a product senior product manager Pandora I worked before among others at Cisco for three years managing some of their hardware products. And. I had a lot of questions when I wanted to move from hardware to software around the differences between the industry. And so I thought that this talk the interesting for you guys too. So the first thing that mmediately stands out is the difference the striking difference between the hardware. The hardware PM is all about the circuit boards. And the software is all about those fluff and flowers. Really? Hell lake Certes live here, and it all boils down basically to this. So yeah, we're going to talk a little bit about what is with PM. Is a good PM should should be product. Agnostic doesn't even matter. If you're managing software product or cargo product. We'll talk a little bit about the actual differences between managing those types of products. And will connect the dots with talking about. How what what's the ideal kind of bland off personality and skills for the for the job? How to excel whatever job yet? Even before we dive into that. How many people here work for a software company, not necessarily as a software product manager, but company, cool and Kagera? All right, splits as yours are all software is kind of the. The dominating part, and hardware is slightly kind of mysterious. So I hope this will be really useful for for people. To learn more about hardware. The main. Okay. So. Should a good product manager be product agnostic? I actually Kim. The a bunch of wing thin jobs. Jobs on linked to see both hardware and software postings in. I found two interesting things I they didn't differ too much rather requirements for hardware and for social product manuals rolls didn't differ too much and on the other hand, those requirements didn't feel very relevant for me. They felt absolutely meaningless. So many of them almost most of them talked about technical, Akron, basically software or computer, science background or engineering background experience with coding. I would claim that in Geneva background is probably the worst background for a product manager to have from my own experience. Always especially initially pushed me to talk. When I was thinking about a product or about a teacher. I was thinking more about what's the easiest way to do it right rather than was user actually needs or I would engage in the conversations around was the best way to do it. Like how to do it instead of talking about what to do white? And other things that I'm noticed experience with development. I think that. Egil is a very. Is a buzz term nowadays. And basically, it means planning every more or less other every other week for for the next week two weeks who here have ever planned. You know, the task or scheduled in advance on his calendar who this week for the for the next one. All right. So you're a certified scrum manager. Yeah. This is that that simple. That's best. What's you basically scheduling every other week and your plan for the next two weeks, data driven mindset in other irrelevant requirement Everson is data driven which all of your decisions would be data driven. Even if those decisions based on emotions emotions is also some kind of data that you make your decision based on totally rela AB testing experience. All right. So that is not something that we do every day, but I would claim it's also pretty relevant because basically what it means you take a green button like a blue button you compare the number of clicks between the two and the green button guests more clicks, go with that. That's about it. It's a little bit more complicated. There is a bunch of trade offs involved. Usually rather the green button might get more clicks. But the blue button for somewhere. Reason might get longer sessions. And by the way, the Grynbaum clicks would come from twenty to thirty years old people in Minnesota. So, but that kind of drilling down on segmenting would be doing it so much in your job that basically is irrelevant whether or not you did a few time that if you times before one we can do the job you'll be doing it like like, like master planning story. Prioritization, something that also comes up almost in all those job postings. Have you guys ever planned anything? We'll prioritize anything. Great your planner masters. So I would claim this.

product manager senior product manager lake Certes Pandora Everson Cisco Geneva Minnesota Egil Kim Akron two weeks thirty years three years