35 Burst results for "Senior Manager"

3 Arrested in Italy Funicular Crash; Clamp Deactivated Brake

BBC Newshour

00:19 sec | 2 weeks ago

3 Arrested in Italy Funicular Crash; Clamp Deactivated Brake

"Three people have been arrested in Italy over a cable car crash that killed 14 people on Sunday. They include the owner and two senior managers off the company, which operated the cable car. They've reportedly confessed to knowing that emergency brakes on the car had been deactivated nearly a month ago to overcome

Italy
Google Unit DeepMind Tried and Failed To Win AI Autonomy From Parent

WSJ Tech News Briefing

02:40 min | 2 weeks ago

Google Unit DeepMind Tried and Failed To Win AI Autonomy From Parent

"Back in twenty fourteen. Google bought a company. Called deep mind specializes in making advanced a it systems to mimic the way human brains work. It's an approach known. As deep learning now for years senior managers there had tried to negotiate more independence from the parent company. And now we report that last month. Google ended those talks. Permian basin broke the story for us. And she's here to talk about it. Parmi thanks for coming on the show. My pleasure so parmi. Let's talk about these negotiations over deep mind. You've been speaking with people close to this situation. What did you learn about what the people at deep mind wanted. so what. I learned from speaking to people who were familiar with what happened. Was that deep mind. Had been proposing for some time to google that they could have some measure of independence from the company and this went back actually quite a many years back to around the time of the acquisition so google bought deep mind in twenty fourteen for about five hundred million dollars and actually the year after that. Google restructured into alphabet. It became more of an umbrella company with so called bets that it was managing and that came up as kind of opportunity for deep mind to get a new measure of independence and it was from around that time onwards that deep minds founders started telling staff at the company that there was this possibility to become more independent from one of the reasons for doing that was relevant to deep mines long-term goal which is to create something called artificial general intelligence. Now you probably heard of artificial intelligence. Artificial general intelligence is like this next level of ai. Which is much much more humanlike. Ai right now is very good at doing things. Like nizing voices or a face or typing text for you but it can't do all the different things that the human brain can do. And that's what artificial general intelligence. The theory that it will be able to do that become almost sentient is almost as kind of science science fiction style. Way of looking at a i but the people at deep mind are seriously working on trying to build this. No one's done it yet. But they are they take it very seriously and they they call it solving intelligence and the view in the company of the founders was that hey if we actually built this should be controlled by a single corporate entity

Google Permian Basin
Lawsuit accuses Amazon of racial discrimination

Atlanta's Morning News

00:19 sec | 3 months ago

Lawsuit accuses Amazon of racial discrimination

"Minorities and Amazon employee file suit alleging racial discrimination. Charlotte Newman claims There's a pattern of Amazon paying black employees less in their white counterparts. Human who is black, says she was hired at a lower pay grade, though tasked with the work of a higher level senior manager. Lawsuit claims that's routine she seeking damages in the millions. AMAZONS

Charlotte Newman Amazon
Lawsuit accuses Amazon of racial discrimination

Gaydos and Chad

00:35 sec | 3 months ago

Lawsuit accuses Amazon of racial discrimination

"Amazon Facing a lawsuit accusing the company of racial discrimination, Charlotte Newman said she qualified to be a senior manager in Amazon's corporate offices, but was offered a lesser position. Her lawsuit accused Amazon of routinely hiring people of color at lower levels than their white co workers. She also alleged a systemic pattern of insurmountable discrimination that opened her to harassment by co workers and supervisors. Amazon said it's investigating the allegations but does not tolerate discrimination or harassment of any kind. Newman's attorney, Duguid Door said. Amazon treats black employees like second class citizens. Erin Qatar SKI ABC News, New

Amazon Charlotte Newman Duguid Door Newman Erin Qatar Abc News
The Power of Humor

The Indicator from Planet Money

04:18 min | 4 months ago

The Power of Humor

"Jennifer occur a named by donuts or a professor and lecturer respectively at the stanford graduate school of business. They've just written a book called humor seriously so gentle. Why don't we start by well. Why don't you start by telling me the value of humor in the workplace. I in leadership when people use humor at work the are twenty three percent more respected and are seen as more competent and more confident. It doesn't even need to be good humor. Just not inappropriate humor. The bar is so low and for employee retention employees. Read their bosses. As having a sense of humor any sense of humor they were to be fifteen percent more satisfied and engaged in their jobs and even in sales studies show that people pay on average eighteen percent more if the seller includes a lighthearted line as part of their final offer like my final offer is x. And i'll throw in my pet frog again. The humor doesn't have to be good and just anything. So what do you think is the cost of not using humor. If you're recuperation well not only would it reduce creativity it also reduces engagement and retention so the koster significant All right so. I was thinking to myself as i read this book. If i was a corporation or a senior manager in a corporation and i was thinking i was wondering what the return on investment might be and i think touched on a couple of things. Creativity better relationships with clients productivity. Is there any other other any other things that you could think of. That would provide a decent return on investment for an investment in humor for companies. So just to be clear you want more than retention innovation leadership selling products. You want more from us. Pat coty. we'll give you another one. We'll give you a health that the cost of of health mental wellbeing physical wellbeing are enormous for companies and humor actually makes you not only healthier. It makes you live longer so one. Large-scale norwegian study conducted over the course of fifteen years. Found that people with a sense of humor. Happy thirty percent better chance of survival if severe disease strikes and they live eight years longer so laughter literally makes us more physically. Resilient has bottom line effects for companies. I know. I've met so many people in my career my careers in fact who are just not fans of humor that like look i just wanna do. My job paid and go home. But how do you deal. If you're a manager. How do you deal with someone. Who has that kind of vibe and feeling about them. Well you're hitting on one of costello's biggest pieces of advice the former. Ceo of twitter. Dick says if you wanna have more humor at work. Don't tell jokes. Don't try to be funny. Just look for more reasons to laugh. It's this idea of actually being human not about being humorous And this is the reality is right now that this is more important than ever because you know our work is much more technology mediated and therefore the harder it is to be to bring out our humanity and a sense of humor at work we subconsciously adopt to our medium and we're constantly communicating through technology. It's easy to sound like a robot so it's more really in a way it's more by sense of humor than being funny absolutely and it's also about being more generous with laughter so not trying to be funny just looking for moments to laugh generously and the entire texture of life changes when you're able to live this way And another thing that we try and tell people to do is to try and create small moments of joy for someone else and especially. If you're having trouble finding it in your own life right now just looked to create a little moment for someone and it can be a really small gesture not a joke by changing your virtual background to a picture from fun shared experience or You know leaving a nice posted on your fridge for the person that you cohabitate with But this focus on creating joy for someone else help. Take the pressure off. You know. I need to be funny. I need to look funny myself. And it's more about. How can i focus on someone else in. Elevate them

Stanford Graduate School Of Bu Pat Coty Severe Disease Strikes Donuts Jennifer Costello Dick Twitter
An Apple/Hyundai Car?

Techmeme Ride Home

03:29 min | 5 months ago

An Apple/Hyundai Car?

"Hundai has confirmed that it is in early discussions with apple on collaborating to develop a self driving car. But in case you're jumping ahead to apple may be buying hyundai or anything like that. This seems to be just a partnership right now and also hyundai says apple is talking to several carmakers about a bunch of things right now so quoting. Cnbc we understand. That apple is in discussions with a variety of global automakers including hyundai motor as the discussion is at its early stage. Nothing has been decided a representative from honda motor told. Cnbc's cherry king. The statement followed a local report from the korean economic daily. That said apple suggested the tie up and honda motor was reviewing the terms. The report said both electric vehicle production as well as battery development were included in the proposal. And that the car could potentially be released in two thousand twenty. Seven apple declined to comment on the report and quote at the exact same time in bloomberg mark. Gurman has a piece up saying yes. Apple is developing an autonomous electric vehicle. But the timeline for release. His sources say is five to seven years. Also this quote a key. Differentiator would be apple's ability to integrate. Its driving system a pricey initiative that has spurred the company to develop its own software sensor hardware chip technologies. The goal is to let a user input their destination and be driven there with little or no other engagement. According to the people familiar with the project apple doesn't manufacture its own products and it will likely take the same approach with a vehicle. It's unclear which company would assemble the car. Though in its first attempt about five years ago apple worked with engineers from magna international a major auto industry contract manufacturer apple has continued to investigate building. It's self driving car system for third party car partners rather than its own vehicle the people said and it could ultimately again abandoned. Its own car. Efforts in favor of this approach in assign it has now rebooted development of a vehicle apple in recent months shifted in executive known for his work on vehicle interiors and exteriors to its car team in twenty nine thousand nine apple hired former tesla engineering. Vice president steve macmanus but he initially worked on projects unrelated to the car. Now mcmanus leads a development. Group was several employees focused on car interiors fabrics car testing and vehicle manufacturing people with knowledge of the matter said he reports doug field a former top tesla vehicle engineer. Who runs the apple car project. Day to day apple also recently hired jonathan seve a vehicle engineer from bmw ag tesla and alphabets as a senior manager on the car projects in two thousand nineteen apple. Tapped michael schwer kuch tesla's former vice president in charge of drive systems adding to a growing list of former tesla employees working on the vehicle effort late in two thousand twenty apple also hired another former tesla vice president stuart bowers. According to a person familiar with the move. He led tesla's self driving technology team until mid two thousand nineteen and was an executive in residence at venture. Capital firm grey lag partners until july. According to his lincoln profile apples car team is filled with dozens of other x tesla hardware and self driving car. Engineers in total apple has several hundred engineers working on the project with most of them developing the self driving car system rather than the full fledged vehicle and

Apple Honda Motor Hyundai Hyundai Motor Tesla Gurman Cnbc Vice President Steve Macmanus Magna International Bloomberg Doug Field Jonathan Seve Bmw Ag Michael Schwer Mcmanus Stuart Bowers Alphabets Grey Lag Partners Lincoln
What drives trust in news and what can be done to rebuild it

Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism

02:17 min | 6 months ago

What drives trust in news and what can be done to rebuild it

"The public. Understanding of newsgathering and verification practices is persistently low. What does mean for the issue of trust so one of the things that we aired quito frequently from journalists and senior managers and newsrooms and talk to you for this report Were a lot of efforts around Communicating with their audiences about their newsroom standards journalistic practices emphasizing You know their conflicts of interest policy their crashes in various policies around the way that they collect news in information unfortunately most of the public meet but we know from a lot of existing. Research must've does not understand very much at all about newsgathering says much less The details Along these lines and so we want to. If what we know from enormously perspective what we think is organised for audiences to disarm differentiate between different news sources available them on the basis of the quality of information or the the rigor of the reporting You know we. We'd hope that they'd be able to Know a little bit more about what what's actually going on behind the scenes and basically we. We know that that doesn't really happen. People just don't have a basis of knowledge of what what goes on in terms of journalism and reporting information is is really really low in. That's most of our understanding of that is based on a full countries. And so we really don't very little at all about how this plays melissa's like India especially as brazil. And so you know. I think that's as a starting point for this product. Is you know for for news organizations for him This is a core part of their strategy around addressing trust They have to really be more cognizant of the fact that people are starting from a place where they really just don't have very much understanding about what goes into What differentiates their source from. All other information that they might be seeing in their social media feeds versus

Quito Melissa Brazil India
"senior manager" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

Outcomes Rocket

08:32 min | 7 months ago

"senior manager" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

"You know as potential customers or pilot sites or or research sites at one time and so we have some greats collaborators that sinai accelerator which is another great program. We share a lot of alumni. And that's in one system which provides a lot of great advantages. Because you know you. Have you know that direct tie but for us since we're a little bit more removed. We can navigate multiple different systems. Different champions different pathways. All at the same time there are a few other accelerators. That are customer driven In that same way you know that they provide access to different customers but none other that do multiple how systems in the way that we do and so if you're a startup looking to figure out not necessarily how do your proof of concept you've already had a pilot but you're trying to figure out how to scale your solution across multiple enterprise house systems. Then were a great destination for that company because you can explore that with multiple clinical leaders and finance decision makers with several different house systems. That have a lot of different structures. And so you can learn how to scale your company across such different customers with us. And that's That's so unique. And a great point to make. Emily and you know i think about key performance indicators and how we measure success how you guys measure success rate question and one that we always are refining and trying to improve how we communicate so right now the way that were measuring success is around it formed between a startup and a member institutions a health system or a corporate partner and so we track how many startups will have research agreement or a pilot started or clinical study started or full implementation. And so that's what we're really looking to a move because once the startup and a health system have a relationship like that then we can continue to support both parties to make that successful. We can provide an opportunity for the startups to have an office with us and to stay in our physical space and to get access to advisers. That can help them. Continue to navigate those discussions and we can really rock around a lot more supports and that's also what the health systems are looking for. They don't start up to just get in. Get out and get on with life and take those learnings and not include that system in how they're building the business so that's where we're seeing is how we can continue to help those relationships developed especially since most accelerator models or three to four months. And that's just not enough time to really hit that metric in healthcare exactly votes. He's that we used to have no not anymore We used to have a modeling that you know building off of the great success of other accelerators that are typically that that stage especially in tech but of course It's it's not enough time to know if someone's going to be successful and to hit those metrics that we discussed so we've extended the program to six months with an option to extend another six months and you know we we look at it A lot more fluidly As you know you're entering a community to get continued resources and support from us. We're gonna look to as quickly as possible. Get you on track to get that relationship. But you know if you're gonna do an enterprise wide implementation that could take two years to really navigate with the with the health system best case scenario so we're measuring. How while the start ups are on track to meet those metrics. And that's how we're able to measure how well we're doing with our program love it that's that's great thank you for that and The longer term is is certainly something we have to. We have to think about when you think you have enough money enough time. You're probably going to have to do that times too. So right so we are. Certainly you know fortunate to have centers like yours that that put together entrepreneurs and and health systems multiple systems in this case. How has what you do. Improved outcomes or made business better. I love to hear an example. Yeah absolutely so one of the companies that we've with in the last year is called verdy. It is a virtual reality company. So of course it's popular favorite among techies and so alex young. Who had that company was a clinician in the uk and he wanted to scale how medical education happens so right now that happens typically in assimilation center. And that's very expensive and a lot of equipments and requires a lot of access and so only a few people can be in their time but he's been able to recreate these three surgical videos within any headset or actually any iphone and to try to scale the access to medical education. And he's been going beyond that. Of course now. He has the opportunity to do corporate training for surgical devices for example with corporate partners as well as just general corporate training and so that company has been able to provide a lot of great value to the medical training groups as well as some other cool patient experienced things that he's Working on as well with some of our partners so that one is is a cool. When i think when we talk about access not just patient access but also access to training and education. That one is is a pretty cool one My other one. That has a direct impact and as a favourite is called tiba psalm and so they have a box that keeps organs breathing. More naturally So you think about current organ donation. Typically they're just put on ice in a in a box and their stats to where they're supposed to go. That surgeon doesn't know if that oregon is going to be ready to transplant or not and so There's not enough information and and that if it's a lung for example it's not breathing just sitting there and so two assault has created these really great Fabulous boxes that include negative pressure to help lungs breathe and it includes data about how that long is doing and and so the surge on the other side. You know if it's going to be ready for transplant has actually taken twelve lungs. That would have been otherwise discounted for transplant because they weren't suitable them in this breathing box and have transplanted twelve lungs. That would have otherwise not been transplanted so balanced definitely a really cool opportunity to show that you know. Lives are being impacted directly through technology. That is being developed by some amazing clinicians engineers. Outs you know the community. Yeah that's so interesting. And i mean if somebody's gonna give their long up make it work. You know it's like it's got it's got to work and and it's so neat that they raised it a find a way to do this awesome examples. I know two of many But you know there's going to be an opportunity for folks to go and and learn more about you and and the organization. Emily before we get there though. Let's talk about setbacks. Can you share one of the biggest ones you've experienced and and a key learning that came out of it yeah. I think that we redesigned our entire accelerator. Because it wasn't really working for the type of business that we were driving and so when we think about you know how we do our own business we always have to continue to reevaluate our value proposition. Just like coaching all of our startup to do. And so it felt like in the old model you were just repeating it because it was kind of successful you know. We had success stories but we didn't really have a lot of framework around that was happening. Or how we were driving that exactly And so the whole process of re formatting. The accelerator was definitely addressing. The fact that we kind of got into the routine and we we made things happened but we needed to really refocus on our business. dislike we coach oliver startups to do so. I think another example of a setback is more on the one on one relationship side. And so you know we're always trying to provide a way for the start ups and the the house of to come together around a relationship but sometimes you know. We don't provide the right advice early enough on how to you know. Make that happen. So for example there was a startup that went in asking for a pilot relationship with one of our systems that was paid but it was an area that they had never done before..

Emily partner uk oliver alex young oregon assault
interview With Emily Reiser

Outcomes Rocket

04:54 min | 7 months ago

interview With Emily Reiser

"Welcome back to the outcomes. Rocket saw marquez's here. And today i have the privilege of hosting emily riser. She is the senior manager of innovation community engagement with the texas medical center. She supports clinicians and administrators at the tmc member institutions as well as hundreds of startups and other corporate partners engaged with tmc innovation. You guys have probably heard some of the healthcare entrepreneurs we've had out of the center. They're doing such incredible things in her previous role at emc she was a strategist for two tmc x. Cohorts she contributed to the redesign of the tmc axe program for twenty twenty and started the tmc alpha program for local innovators prior to joining tmc innovation. She led and venture a nonprofit organization supporting entrepreneurship training and company formation in the life sciences. She has directly contributed to business development projects with dozens of local life startups and supported the formation of four new companies. So her heart is totally in healthcare. Emily earned her bachelor's in biology from emory university and her phd in bio engineering from university focused on drug delivery for cancer immunotherapy. So you can imagine that. It's going to be a really cool conversation and emily Really really grateful that you Carved out some time to be with us today. Thanks for thanks for being outcast. Thank you so much saw so excited to be with today. Yeah and so you have such a cool experience right you've been in the healthcare startups and you know you've kind of gone pretty far in your formal education with bio engineering. And now you're in this area with this like incubating these cool really forward thinking companies that are changing the game. so what is it that Inspires your work in healthcare. I think a lot of us in healthcare are looking to have an impact on how patients are being cared for and that certainly inspires my work as well. And i always knew that i wanted to be in the healthcare space but didn't know how to do that while also making the most impact that i could so when exploring -nology that took me into research which you know if you can develop something that s- impacts you know thousands of people then really feels like you've done something meaningful to impact patient care but of course you have to pick something good you can spend your whole life Working on something. That doesn't end up doing that. And so i've moved more close to the patient closer to the bedside throughout my journey and now i have the privilege to work with folks that are directly saving lives. Impacting how how systems are ryan and making things easier for clinicians hospital administrators and then of course the patients to access the care that they need. So that's what. I love about my job right now. Is being able to work with somebody different kinds of people within the community you know. The house systems themselves clinicians entrepreneurs so every day is different but every single person is working toward making patient. Care better love that you're so mission oriented in that love their by two as you as you think about the work you guys are doing. Tmc is texas medical centers innovationlab. And so i think it's a good opportunity for folks that don't know about it to educate them about it but then after you tell us about it let us know a little bit more about how you're adding value to the healthcare ecosystem absolutely so the texas medical center is that's really interesting. Nonprofit organization that was started seventy five years ago through a gift from the md anderson foundation and we don't provide health care so we're not a health stem but we provide infrastructure that sits under md anderson texas children's houston methodist small herman and twenty one other different clinical institutions as. Well as you know. Other research institutions universities rice university of houston etc and so our role is to be the connective tissue and dr collaboration between and among all of the different institutions. So right now that looks like data that we publish every day around You can go to our website. I you and see how were clobbering across all these institutions to share updates on hospitalizations and other things that are relevant within our hospitals or doing a lot of work behind the scenes to try and make sure that everyone is cloud reading and and sharing best practices. And there's been a lot of really cool work coming out of that but five years ago we also started this great innovation initiative which combines space talent physical resources that all come together to provide different actors to entrepreneurs that can work with our health systems. And so it's an incubator. We have a partnership with johnson and johnson j. labs and body and other corporate partners to create density around making startups possible and always relevant tied back to the clinical application clinical outcomes. And

TMC Emily Riser Texas Medical Center Marquez Emory University EMC Emily Md Anderson Foundation Cancer Rice University Of Houston Ryan Houston Texas Johnson J Johnson
The Key to Successfully Managing Remote Employees

Business Confidential Now with Hanna Hasl-Kelchner

04:02 min | 7 months ago

The Key to Successfully Managing Remote Employees

"A lot of managers for years have fought having remote employees because they just didn't feel they could keep their no with their employees redoing. They didn't trust their place. And i think we're we're going to enter a whole new era of This trust relationship trust and transparency transparency. Towards that i think will hear a great deal more of going forward in in management. Because we now you're right you can't see people you can't see what they're doing but you certainly can know whether or not they're they're they're at productivity is working. They're working whether they're at home or whether they're sitting in your office if the communication issue i love some of the great stories that i've been hearing about how successful managers have been using all kinds of ways to keep in touch with their employees including a hurt wonderful examples of senior managers owners of companies or high level vice presidents or executive directors nonprofit to actually make an individual phone call to an employee just to check in to see how they're doing and this is having a tremendous effect on productivity and engagement and loyalty and all kinds of things. It sounds really. You know hokey to say that you need to pick up the phone which nobody has used it a long time. We're all used to using email text. I am in dmz and whatever but the phone calls now. I really having a very very profound effect. So i think we're all going to be learning as we go. It's it's there's lots of lessons that we can learn canopy done. I think there was some very great examples of organizations that are being very successful with managing remote workers. And we'll all get better at it as we go Now i think one of the bigger issues as we're going through all this is managing the stress levels and and just the difficulty of of Families and people with with children and having to teach as both. Do you work at all of these other issues that are are hugely impacting right now today in twenty twenty absolutely and i like what you mentioned is the senior level managers actually calling employees. Because it's a two way street. It's not just about you know management being able to monitor productivity but. I'm also hearing that employees. Want to know that they still belong. That it's not just the zoom call is over and now okay. I'm in my four walls. got my computer. But i'm wondering if the next email or text messages says ohana you're highly qualified but your services are no longer needed. You know. i think there's that fear fear and that financial insecurity about how secure is my job. When i could get axed any moment in an uncertain economy so somebody reaching out by phone who can call and say hi barbara. How are you doing is everything. Okay i mean to know your name. Oh my gosh. i don't very powerful. I've i've heard wonderful stories of a senior people who've done it. And their first of all they are blown away by the response they get which is encouraging as a senior manager director. Vp or even the ceo to get that kind of feedback wonderful but the impact. It has on the employees and you cannot measure that no that that's huge. It's not only they know who i am but they come across as caring so when say those is is really important but making it in the first instance is just really as you said incredibly

Ohana Barbara
Interview with Khalifeh Al Jadda, Director of Core Data Science at The Home Depot

AI Today Podcast: Artificial Intelligence Insights, Experts, and Opinion

05:42 min | 8 months ago

Interview with Khalifeh Al Jadda, Director of Core Data Science at The Home Depot

"Hello and welcome to the AI Today podcast. I'm your host Kathleen Mulch. And I'm your host bottled schmelzer Our Guest today is Kelly fellow who is the director of core data science at the Home Depot Hai Khalifa. Thank you so much for joining us on AI today. Hi guys. Thanks for having me. It's my pleasure. Yeah, welcome Khalifa and thanks so much for joining us. We'd like to start by having you introduce yourself to our listeners. Tell them a little bit about your background and she current role at the Home Depot. Sure. So my name is Kelly fell Jetta. I have PhD degree in computer science. I started my career in data science back in June 2013 as a PhD intern at Careerbuilder, which is one of the largest job boards in the US and the my career with Career Builder actually took extended to until 2018 during that I was actually leading the search and recommendation data science team where I was lucky actually need to get involved early enough and building the semantic search engine for the company and after that building an AI based recommendation engine dead. So the semantic search engine actually is the one that has been leveraged by the company for their be to be sort of business and the day I guess recommendation engine which we built their home is now serving millions of job-seekers on the BTC side of the company. So very proud of that Journey with Career Builder in 2018. I joined Home Depot and I joined as a senior manager, of course recommendation data science team under the online business of Home Depot, I build the team and we actually worked very hard and the last two years to build again state-of-the-art e-commerce recommendation engine for Home Depot, very proud of what we accomplished as a team found in May this year twenty-twenty. I was promoted to director of course data science in my organization. Now, I have the court search data science team called recommendation wage. Science team and the visual AI team our focus our my route Focus now is as the name suggests to improve the core functionality of homedepot.com home from search and documentation perspective. So we work to improve sexual even see we work to make our recommendation more and more personalized and relevant to our customers and guide our customers and kind of give them the experience which they get in the physical store as part of our interconnected experience initiative. So that's overall. What am I roll includes now at Home Depot and I'm very proud and excited actually about the team that we have built for the core data science at Home Depot on the work that we have done that for the e-commerce, you know, that's that's fantastic. And you know, I I really have to give a plug for the talk that you gave at the data for a i week online conference because you you showed you age. And about thirty forty minutes really walking in Fairly good detail how the Home Depot actually does its product recommendation system. We showed how the system works. There was some math in there, which is great all the time a little bit of code more math than code showing how it was the song and it was fantastic. I mean and so, you know for those who are listening if you really wanted to to dive deeper and see this the presentation you can the the conference is available for free. So if you go to data a icon did a i c o n f c o n f, and look for a Khalifa's presentation page, it's on the e-commerce system and talks about the recommendation system. It's just fantastic and I love seeing it because you know, I have to say I'm you know, probably like many of us here in the United States now have a big Home Depot customer feel. I feel like I go there like every other week, especially, you know, we're all at home these days so you can't help but notice the things that you need to write a fix and repair right and they even do some stuff outside job. And it's it's it's the season of the deer kind of eating everything and Wrecking everything. So so I think it's fantastic what maybe maybe for our listeners here? If you can provide a little bit of insight you talked a little bit about the recommendation system. I know that it's really hard to we don't have slides here on a podcast that's going to be hard to share. But you were talking about solving challenging e-commerce problems using the power of data science as a Todd the title of the talk. So maybe you can share some of the insights that you shared at the conference around the recommendation system round recommendation systems in general maybe around the relationship between data science and e-commerce, which you know, maybe people haven't thought about that deeply Yeah, sure sure. And first of all, thank you for highlighting the talk. Absolutely. It was actually a great conference overall. So I congratulate you guys on the success of the conference just enjoyed being part of it. Thanks for having me back to the question about the talk and the relationship between the e-commerce and and the data science absolutely data size is transforming retail to the boss really on the e-commerce side and how we do things and the e-commerce and they use cases I presented in my talk. We're actually real use cases of things that we implemented at Home Depot on faith and that changed actually How We Do recommendation on our websites to make them more relevant and to make them as they mentioned earlier and more personalized to our customers need. So

Home Depot AI Khalifa Kelly Director United States Career Builder Kathleen Mulch Intern Careerbuilder Senior Manager Todd
Prof. John Flood, Professor of Law and Society at Griffith University, Brisbane, Australia. - burst 01

Scientific Sense

59:58 min | 8 months ago

Prof. John Flood, Professor of Law and Society at Griffith University, Brisbane, Australia. - burst 01

"Welcome to the site of accents podcast. Where we explore emerging ideas from signs, policy economics, and technology. My name is Gill eappen. We talk with woods, leading academics and experts about the recent research or generally of topical interest. Scientific senses at unstructured conversation with no agenda or preparation. Be Color a wide variety of domains red new discoveries are made. and New Technologies are developed on a daily basis. The most interested in how new ideas affect society. And help educate the world how to pursue rewarding and enjoyable life rooted in signs logic at inflammation. V seek knowledge without boundaries or constraints and provide unaided content of conversations bit researchers and leaders who low what they do. A companion blog to this podcast can be found at scientific sense. Dot. com. And displayed guest is available on over a dozen platforms and directly at scientific sense dot net. If you have suggestions for topics, guests at other ideas. Please send up to info at scientific sense. Dot Com. And I can be reached at Gil at eappen. Dot Info. My guests today's facade John. WHO's professor of Law and society at Griffith University in Brisbane Australia. He's also adjunct professor of law at Queensland University of Technology and Research Associated University College Under Center for Blockchain Technologies, he who suggests on the Bloomberg professional globalization of law and the technology in law. But come John. Hello. Thank you. Sure. Yeah. So I want to start with one of your recent people, professions and expertise hog machine learning, and blockchain redesigning the landscape of professional knowledge and organization. In invite you say machine learning has entered the world of the professions. The different impacts automation will have huge impacts on the nature of work and society. Engineering architecture and medicine or early and enthusiastic adopters. Other professions especially law at late you say at in some cases with leptons adopters. could you talk about you know sort of the landscape all? Of Law, profession and. They today in terms of opting these technologies. Certainly Louis interesting because it's a very old profession is. Often considered one of the. Original traditional professions along with medicine and the church. And in a sense law has used different kinds of technology might say I mean does it? Based around writing. And then the printing press and So on yet that. It's always being based on a craft. A skill which the individual person is that enables them to do, whatever is quote if you like and. said, there's never been a lot of room for any kind of automation. Certainly, the has been space for using. A people who are not fully qualified as low as about as paralegals, people like that, who will do a lot of repetitive work document checking and things like that and so on. But what will get into now is the situation where automation through machine learning. There's other kinds of artificial intelligence. is able to start constructing documents example contracts. Check dollop a documents for particular clauses and things like that mature they're up to date and this incense is. Replacing now, the kind of work that noise will do. So I think in some ways more more of of the profession of law is gonNA be subject to automation, but distinction I would many because I think it's quite important here is that A lot of what lawyers do. Is actually quite. Active that that that that the drafting contracts overtime or or they're reviewing documents to some sort or another or they're getting through particular. Negotiation. And so you know a lot of it is the same, but they build up the expertise through doing these same kinds of were over and over again and What we're now finding is that instead of having young lawyers coming in and doing what you might call the grunt work of checking documents and going through discovery applications where he goes through the size boxes of evidence to decide. which are the appropriate documents you want the emails, the invoices order, this sort of stuff that is the kind of work which is lending itself to automation. And, and so that his taking away a lot of the work which is used for trading purposes with young lawyers and is just doing it much quicker. will quickly I mean More efficiently in many ways and probably expensive much much expensive a Lotta. This work is being outsourced to you know legal process outsourcing India or Philippines South Africa places like that. So yeah, that's that's right and so in some ways, the group of lawyers who do the work which requires the skill, the judgment. Is Reducing in some ways. That pool is getting smaller. Yeah Yeah it's it's interesting. The the distinction that you make between automation. And in my job and let's call it decision making right which is you know a lot of work in the business side of this. So for example. in the nineties in large pharmaceutical company So you think about you know rnd. People might think it has really complex selection of programs that design of them, portfolio management, risk management, all those decisions. Genuine companies be say well, senior managers with lots of experience and intuition make those decisions really well right and so that's statement would automatically implied that machines can really do much there. But what we find in the mid nineties says that is systematic analysis of data make those decisions. Don't better. Actually, I've Tom to humans humans. Always seem to make decisions. These are typically bonding the decision. So if you go back and look at it, alternative experiment has not been wrong. So we have no date to say it was a good decision at typically. So human scaffold, fifty percents of making good decisions So do you know just throwing a coin or letting monkey make those decisions so? Yup We found that even complex decision making that humans hold. you know close to their you know kind of domain I'm not necessarily. So we have machines That could do that much better than I. Don't know there's an analog of that in in law I I. Think The may be actually I mean Two three years ago the royal. Society in England decided to arrange a working party on machine learning. One of the things that they put together a a roundtable on machine learning professions resolved to talk about that night and I talked about the history of professions in technology and. and. I think one of the peculiar things that came out to in relation to law is that law. Has always been a sort of on its own. If you think about medicine, for example, medicines always had the teacher hospital institution that sort of straddles the academic quilt and the practice walls and brings those people together and as a result. INCORPORATES loss of, scientific, work. Engineering work as well computing work and things like that. And that's been the first teaching hospital king into existence in in the French revolution in Seventeen eighty-nine. A long history of that. If you look at law, there was nothing equivalent to that whatsoever and there is in fact, actually a big gap between what academy does on what the practitioners in your do so that As a result as before law has come to this a quite late but what we are. Finding I think is that Certainly the management consultancy finding is that because of the nature of a lot of what goes on in legal office a remarkable amount of it can be automated. So what we are getting now is companies setting themselves up to do this automated work. So. We have companies which do nothing but contract our instruction formation sort of company. The typical lawyer would would say to a client Do you WANNA contract classes. Yes I want this for this. And loyal galway draft contract back with it, and then in the con- comes back against as I need another contract, you go through the same process. which is good for the lawyer but not necessarily good kind. What we're finding now is the company's not can think of a few of them that will, in fact, go into the company's show order contracts. Let's see the entire. Corpus of contracts you've got there and they will analyze them. And basically say, all right. We can create a new contract in automated way fairly easily it may need some modification according to special circumstances but on the whole, it's fairly standard and and they can do that INNOVA systematic world meaning the contracts are reviewed that checked. If they're going to expire marketing, you want an unable just the system will cope with that if you're. Yeah. So yeah. No No. No so I was just going to say yes. So that the distinction you make, you know in terms education sort of systematic graduate level education that because as you say, it is low in one sense of soft proficient. You say in called professions like made it to text reengineering this team has a strong concern ensuring that expertise applied in the public interest when as low little bit different from from bad and economics in some sense sort of in the same same vein we have now made economics at really odd. of mathematics you know north of analytics there. Whether they are actually useful from policy making perspective is left to debate but at least it has been an attempt to make this make economic video hard. So so I don't know A. Fascination has been in in law I very much that will happen in law. Oh there things are beginning to happen I mean let me just boob. At. One example I learned in that workshop that I mentioned the Royal Society held. With somebody from the engineering profession talking about. The difference in skills between people who above forty I'm below forty he said. If he he was about Forty Years Austin design an aeroplane, takeout pen and paper Pencil, and paper and. I don't know anyone under forty could do that would know how to do that go onto a computer program undecided there. So you can see that the incorporation of technology into the academy through to the actual. Occupation. Than phones and things is is already a standard and they're in law. It isn't law. As you said, it's still very much a soft skill although I will argue that there is a difference between the way nor is viewed in different parts of the world. So in the United States A law is I think more tilted towards the sciences. So low in economics is one of the big things in the. US. So you got a lot of people working in the of lower economics who might go onto antitrust work no competition work and things like that which across a lot of economics, mathematics and Statistics and so on. In, say a Europe Australia and so on. Law is more allied towards the humanities. And the classics. So it doesn't have that kind of scientific underpinning in that way. So anything that's going to change in these parts if you like is going to be something that's going to be imported from outside. And is going to have a very dramatic impact when whether it does An and I think that's yet to happen. I don't think there's been sort of Cambrian explosion. If you like in in law, the will be one I'm sure but but law has an advantage over engineering economics or the other areas you might. That's With the nature of the rule of law and absent justice is since law as a a way of ordering society is absolutely crucial to everything else. Then, Law and lawyers will say will look you know we have a special status here is different amid leave engineer. We certainly want to make sure bridges stay up. We don't want down but we can design different kinds of bridges. We can design different kinds of legal bills, but they're also the fundamental rules If you want to you know if you're an engineering company and you want to build a bridge in a different country, you're going to have to do it on the basis of the legal rules, which will be just vise by the lawyers according to the country's there in so on. So in in that was what? I might put in a special category if you live. Yea. Yea. Let me let me push NBA John. So. The. The conference that you mentioned you know the Internet is under forty and engineers at. So so one could argue you know from an engineering perspective could argue e- It sexually dangerous. To not use machines to build aircraft the goes you know all the technology that cap today actually help us make the trap lot safer. granted. If you sit down with a blank sheet of paper and Pencil, you might get the principal right. But, but the technology has advanced so much that you really have to use. Technology to do so in some sense, engineering is pushed back. that. I argue this myself then they were naive engineering school. I had a V exposed at my daughter bent to school. She used the same physics book. Twenty, five. meter. I argue that that is sort of backward because data speed no need for an engineer to really learn Newtonian physics anymore because it is prescriptive, it's deterministic can make machines, learn it very quickly and so why spend all? Right. So so then you know if you think about the the law field. I wonder if there is a senior argument that is to say Dan and tape really good lawyer casts lot of intuitions dot expedients to crap something Contract or a discourse, but then maybe the machine scan actually do it even better We haven't really tested that hypothesis yet. Right be almost have this idea that humans are always dominant. Or machines but that the not be true as technology lancers. So what do you think about that in the in the? It's a very important point actually because the. American bosses. being modifying its ethical rules recently to say that lawyers have a duty and obligation to keep up to date with technology. So we already know the technology is now a an important part and I have to say when when I say the word technology, I mean this at all kinds of levels from what you can do with Microsoft word for example, it strays plug ins all the way up to artificial intelligence IBM, Watson, or something like that So that if if lawyers become. A. Uses of technology whether this small firms or big firms or what have you a under the Aba now they they actually have an obligation to make sure that they are up to date. They can't just say we didn't know what we were doing. So I think in that respect, there is a there was a move. The other move that is taking place is actually the push from from the clients. Now, this you have to look into ways one is with corporate clients. The corporation seen US lawyers have to use noise if you'd like want their work done. PHILOS- money on Chiba they wanted to more efficiently They don't want the best piece of work every time they want something that works and they want officiant. UTA A and so on. So it was interesting I think a few years ago. The General Counsel Cisco. Actually made a speech. Saying that he expected his. Lawyers Law firms who worked for the company to be reducing their fees year on year. Now, that's the opposite of what lawyers normally do, which is to raise them year on year. So say that that's one push which is. Very profound push now, coming from the client himselves who are using the beginning to use their procurement departments in in the companies and things like that to help purchase legal services the other aspects which is just as important in this is if you look at the role of lawyers and individuals. So if you is what access to to legal services, it's expensive lawyers are not cheap they charge our money We don't know how to judge the quality of their work and so on. because. There was a credence which we just know that So. On this is where technology can begin to step in and provide services which are. Efficient and often quite. what very well for the individual saying that this. Technology can be seen to be improving access to justice a Lotta people. Yeah. Yeah yes. I want to come back to this. John. I think this is a very important point. So bent on put has a lot of uncertainty. Uncertainty maybe not not the right term, but it's called deterministic. It shows beatty ability and so the determination of quality it's not as easy as hard media India nearing or. Right business economics legal all sorts of well foreign that category and the application of technology sort of a different different meaning there but I want to touch on one of the things that you say in the paper, and that is you mentioned this before and that's about training training the next generation. So you savior regulating bodies professions are involved in the collection and reproduction of knowledge intended to be used by the entire body professionals, and so there was an expectation here that you know seeing it professionals. Is Providing the wisdom that knowledge mission to train the next generation now in a technology driven. regime. discuss vacations right. Our expert is going to be a computer engineer in the future. And so so how does that work from from cleaning and knowledge Asian will I think this is This is a crucial issue in it's one which the profession hasn't. Really. Got To grips with yet I think because you think of technology in terms of Predictive analytics a document review and things like this most law schools are not preparing students for this they may be a a a a causal to on some aspect of technology, but it's not something which lawyers themselves are learning. So I think what is going to happen is we're going to find a blending of skills occurring. So law firms will be sense having to bring in a range of technologists who perhaps have. A scales a straddle, both sides of the lines, the lawyers like this too I think I think we're going to find an avangard Who will begin to develop skills that allow them to talk to both sides of the line, the tech people and? Below people if you likes and there will be people who will acquire develop these skills as well but that's that's still some way down the line I didn't think we're anywhere near there yet, and part of the reason for that I think is that you know law is still a very highly regulated profession and and the regulators themselves are in the same situation they are unsure about what is going to happen and they also feel they have an obligation to. Not only ensure that. Customers clients and consumers are protected but in some ways, the profession is protected to if you like so. You know it's it's a it's a fine balancing. There I. Think. It's a fight balancing act and you'd say if the changing changing things. So going back, you know you care as an individual eighteen status of expert. Some form of encapsulation of knowledge and analysis occurs enabling professional experts, derived diagnoses, decisions, and conclusion wrapped late. and you make some distinctions. Type of learning that. Human? Beings. That the distinction between doing drive and become a gift and laster Yes yes. Yes I think that's important. So the the the the principle behind this is that Individuals can acquire a lot of knowledge in in various areas. So as I say learning how to drive a car, you learn how to change gear you though with the speeds. Braking different rates, conditions, and things like that. So. If you WANNA take that further and become a formula one drive or something like that. Then you have to undergo a very different kind of training and that kind of thing becomes a lot more collective rather than individual because you start to you're you're going to be in a group that is gonna be doing a particular kind of our driving. If you like everybody in the group has to understand what each other is doing that group, you can't have people going right a racetrack at two hundred miles an hour or thinking individually feel like they have to have a collective consciousness. About. How to drive in that situation? That's nothing like how? You and I might drive. I'm not saying we bad drivers just saying spreading very different. So I think professional work is not. That different from this in a way. So once you you can go through school and you can do your law degree and you can learn your low. We can learn you engineering's this applies to or professions really. But in order to become a professional in order to become somebody who can operate function within that. Group if you like you then have yourself have to develop collective consciousness and and one way of thinking about it is that we we can kind of tacit knowledge. This assorted knowledge you learn on the job from people, which is not always articulated in a precise formulate kind way but it's something you pick up from the way. Somebody does something you just recognize aw that that's how they've done that might not be. Written down anywhere or anything like that. But you know that's different from now exiting differently from the way that wise doing I think X.'s doing it better I and you and you just, and you can absorb that. That's what I mean by this kind of tacit knowledge and that comes about from the professional context. As how the professional context develops becomes absolutely crucial to how you introduce new ways of doing things new my daddy's new skills new outlooks if you like and I. Think this is where we're on the cost of of this beginning to develop I mean we we know it's got to be done quite how it's going to be done. is yet to be. So. So let me make a statement John and I want I want your reaction to it so eat in hard sciences eight years against again medicine. Expertise has about a consistent happy of remorse. Whereas enor- economics and business in general, let's say expertise is not about the ability to apply rules but to deal with. and at and if that is true, it has lot of implications rate. It has implications as to how we might divide work. Between. And machine in the future. And the skills that universities need to impart on on on new graduates are also quite different. So I always argued in the business. engineering contexts that universities having changed the dog they get mentioned before they're using the same. Using the same. Out Thirty four years without asking the question are those skills relevant, anymore or more importantly watch. Really relevant for a human being in the future rate. do you agree with that that expertise assert more about dealing exceptions apply? Putting it actually. I. I can see the logic behind what you. Saying I think what distinguishes? A good professional whether it's a good engineer good architect or good lawyer or doctor is is somebody who has a certain? This may sound strange but it's the. Imagination. Creativity. about. Kind of flare that allows them to function on the nausea they they've got and developed over the years and the experience. Gathered from Nova pitching what they'd be doing over the years and so on, and it allows them to see around things in ways which they perhaps would. I can give you an example if you like a law. So I'm in in Germany and some other countries. For example, there's a particular way of bundling together mortgage securities I I won't go to detail about this, but this statute that enables you do it. And then you can sell these securities and get money. In certain countries, the UK, the US, and so on. This, NICI. So in a sense to put this kind of a a deal together it. Couldn't be done if you live. So a bank came to one of the large English law firms and said, look we wanted we want to replicate this in in the UK, want to set a market this we're not the statues off there. What can you do and what was interesting was that the law firm then went back to first principles lawyers who were looking at this went back I suppose they looked at some vape basic areas of law matter your trust. And contract from what have you? I'm from that they constructed elite supplement that looked very much like the one in Germany, but without stat sheet and they tested it and it worked. Out To be credibly successful. So much so that the German government started German legal profession started to complain because they said. You can only do this by statute and these we find a way of doing it three. I suppose using law and there it is an they were vowed shops by but that was a particular example if you like of of what you were talking about, they took the exceptions they went back to first principles and said you know or How would we get? This is where we gotta get to, and this is a way right at the beginning what are the steps we need to take and and? And that's what a good loyal will do if you. Right right? Yeah. So that's very important point. So you in your paper dawn as the DREYFUSS and rice note that the proficient performer immersed in the world of skillful activities sees what needs to be done. But decides how to do it. So as we move into a and other technologies, I think it's important point it is. Right from Dad benefactor culture we have been using humans as you mentioned before in lots of with meted activities big not designed for humans I would I would contend enjoy doing things over and over again, and if you had thought of doing that, yeah, because they have to do it for living right and so so we should be moving to word It would where anything that is with pita on delegated to the machine at automation in the bottom of that and Appealed autonation you can have intelligent automation you can have you know reinforcement learning those types of things you have some aspects of intelligence into the into the two. And deploy humans Don't Miss. They're really good at in some case. I'm. So you know we've been studying the green for ages be our no close. It feels to understand mother. Heck it does You know it's not neat learning it. Oh, BBC of. thirty years ago as see that person again, you could see you could you could have a feeling. Then you've seen that before and and what the brain has done actually not only as he that pattern but also age that matter intuitively for thirty years and say, yes, that face I, guess before. and. So there are some superpowers the brain has reaped have been applying the all all. So for a technology might allow. Look I. Think Technology will allow us to incredibly complex things without having to think about too much I. Mean if you look at the way a port functions, for example, any major port these days they've got millions of containers and ships going through them all the time. So there's a lot of paper going through the you those charter parties, bills of lading guarantees. So the lot of legal work that's being done it, it's all quite standard stuff. I mean everybody. KNOWS, what needs to be done and so on. Now, some people are beginning to think while the best way to handle a port if you like I for everybody should know is to put everything that's going on in the poor into a blockchain so that you can see the whole supply chain. You see when something comes in, you can determine when the goods are being offloaded. When they're being shipped, you can stop making the payments as a result of the. Operation of the smart contracts if you like, and the whole thing would be just one quite seamless. In some ways without that much human intervention really just need oversight Some bits of coordination so on. But at the moment is still a a lot of humans are vote in that shipping people, law people, all sorts of things which is. I think insane. That's a waste of resources. We know that there are people who have all kinds of problems that require that creative flair she like as so why waste money on the routine stuff when you could develop skills to the the real need if you like in that way? Yeah Yeah. So I, want that some that bit that John Blockchain, for example, as you mentioned. So so one reason especially in the professions like law and business humans have an advantage justice dimension of trust. and you know at least our generation we don't really. At eighty level, right. So so having that. Human human touch is still extremely important for us. Now, technologies like Blockchain, for example, actually allows that trust to be tensely decoupled, right? Yeah, and I think I think you're right. Look I. Think I mean one of the reasons we make contracts is because We, don't trust each other. So we we devised these documents with all the conditions in them. Something goes wrong. This is what will happen things like that and so on. What are the interesting things? You know people really rely on contracts are met you. You draw up a contract. And the to business people stick him in the drawer I never look at again less something really really fundamental goes wrong but they know sumit doesn't that never look at that again. So you say value of the contract, what did it actually do if you look at some of the Asian countries say like Taiwan or parts of China, you have a assistant coach Guanxi, which is where people developed effective relationships by knowing each other over a period of time around business that allows them to develop trust it. So You know there are different ways of of handling trust, but we we seem to spend a lot of time on trying to minimize something You know which we don't really do a lot of if you like. So I think one of the advantages of of blockchain is that it just it removes a lot of this from from the equation if there's certain things you know that can happen. as a result off if this thing that systems. Lead happened And you know. As, long as you've got oversight and you can see what's going on than. You don't need to be too concerned about it. It will just do what it needs to do in that way and So. Again. That's still very much in the early stages, but we are seeing situations where supply chains A shipping goods from one country to another can actually be done under smart contracts through a blockchain. Technology if you live. That that is now happening I associate goodful dealing with things like gum counterfeiting if you're. Producing. Particular high-quality could site move our phones or particular pharmaceutical products and so on you know it's one way of guaranteeing the quality of the product is you couldn't I say look you can examine the whole supply chain or the data is there. And you know his Eq- code look at it and you get the whole thing going all the way back The. Again, issues around that if you're dealing with the digital. Is Much easier once you start dealing with physical products then you have. A question of how do you get that first initial digitization of the physical if you'd like to goes on so though some people I know here in Australia who? Run A company called Beef Ledger, which is trying to export beef straight beef to China using the blockchain supply chain, which will. Guarantee the security, and the quality of the goods to the Chinese consumer APP because having problems with this before. But I will tell you now do doing something like that does require that the people you are dealing with. You're going to set this up with You have to have a trusting relationship with you before you can set up a technology that will do away with the So we're still in that. That's really early days. I think another a lot of time way to go right Yeah, but the technology works it. Clean potential one could argue contracts exist because they probably known performance if you have a technology that drives that probably the of non-performance zero, then you can actually get rid of for contract. Yeah limit. It is. Not. Goes back to that earlier point I made that. Most most contracts are fairly standard. You know a routine things they're there to. Record a series of transactions payments that have gone on between people without the to do much. If you like you know once you you're you're doing the business, the contract just kind of records that in perpetuity. So the small contract just takes that into a different area and an an actually does the whole implementation and execution without people to be involved in that too much and there's something goes wrong. But if it if it all goes right then back it is done you need to you don't you think about it Right. Yeah. Hasn't been jumping to another are forthcoming people globalization law at. A time of crisis in the? Global Lawyer and so in the say Nikolai Condom Nieve a Russian economists in the nineteen thirties believed the worst economy operates long sixty year cycles Then he called K. Braves. And you safeguarding coronavirus analysis, the fifth psycho young's from nineteen eighty to twenty thirty. It's you save twenty, nineteen forthcoming John You might have. I think so I think say because I, tell you off the what's happening this year I thought my good I couldn't My God. I was just. Owners because you know a contract device these waves up into into what he calls four seasons spring summer or winter at, and we're in the winter off this fifth cycle if you like this is. All the bad stuff happens and he's news war. Famine Disease I think wait a minute that sounds Yes yes. That's exactly right. A. But one of the interesting things about contractors was that you know he he a because he's A. Solid economists are installing a dip executed. By the way you know he he got fed up ninety that was the end of Nikolai unfortunately but he. He said instead of know if you like the ownership of the means of production are being the determinate for changeover from system system, he said it's it's technology and and that the technology will drive you out of the downswing of the last cycle into the upswing of the new cycle, and and the way that works is the win. You're in this kind of winter period because of the kind of economic. Gloom pervades if you like people tend to hold back in subsurface vestment in terms of technological innovation of what have you and so a lot of energy resources, resources, money capital if you like builds up to a second point when people say we're GONNA go for this is this is it? And that's when if you like technology comes to the fall on, really drives it forward. So from that perspective, what he's saying is that you know come right about twenty thirty. If. Things are going slowly now regarding technology they're going to speed up. In. This period and that's when it will. You know really also take take off and people have looked back over our preceding cycles and they've you know it works if you like not just their. Fantasy theory there are also the people who do Cleo dynamics in history these the quantitative historians and they've done a similar kind of analysis of historical periods and said, yeah, you know there are all these citrical. Processes that take place even revolutions occur and big upset occurs and what have you and and. One of their Perspectives which I find quite interesting is that they say one of the reasons for revolutions come about is caused a lease beginning to compete with each other and and an an I look at say trump in in America and I look at the Democrats and I I I would say Modine, India I look she in China and different groups of elites who are engaged really profound struggle for the future of their countries if you live. Out which again is leading to this kind of potential eruption of activity and a new ways of doing things. Yeah. It makes a lot of intuitive sense gone. So one way to think about this also. There are a lot of excesses. So innovating go good their excesses in the system people to believe that invincible they changed assumptions about. because they don't see any. and. Financial markets to right. So these cycles and real real mass that uniquely talking about you can see the. Happening in the financial markets more clearly. But what he's saying is that he happens mortgage and you ask in this paper in two thousand, nineteen for in many ways go. Crystallization off the settling ketone economic forces lost throat ear Kublai doomed as populous. Separates nationalism and lead clients and I think they have that we have probably the answer to that. But you see I think. One of the points I was trying to make an in in this paper walls that Global Law. If you like is is, is the a kind of synthesis off chaos? How do we bring some kind of order to chaos now once you start seeing the undermining? Of his global institutions, you see trump was withdrawn from the W. H. O.. He's he's are criticized NATO he he won't have the do with the International, Criminal Court and so we've got this kind of real life tension now between a an international legal order that's being built up since the Second World War both Ekit economic and legal order is Global And so we can't just a radical globalization I mean even even with covert, we can't eradicate mobilize ation we've got to. Handle covert the Kobe pandemic on a global basis. Otherwise, we'll. We're lost it retreats to a national. Approach is not gonNA. Work? We'll be defeated in that race is going to be global. Might. Be One of my questions in in paper was will who are the people who are going to be doing this? Kind of bringing the the order to chaos if you like and that made argument that it's got to be the global lawyer. And this is a person who not only understand their national legal system but also able to communicate with lawyers and officials. From around the world if you like. To be able to develop a kind of common. Language common discourse that enables them to stop putting these things together are, and it's not just a simple massa of saying mathematically, it works this way or not. It requires the kind of pulling together of people, but it requires that sort of common understanding which. Comes out of what I was saying about this idea of testing knowledge you know as you got this kind of professional consciousness you know how people ought to behave and how they will interact with you, and then that enables you to be out of bizarre to predict how you can do things and so on and so on. That basis I think we can operate kind of global order. It had a a below the institutional level if you're not kind of private. As opposed to the public according and that will put three. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah you know I the limit John I don't know if you think this way I limit one could as. Want to stay need for. Countries what does the need for legal system differentials? We set this up with the premise that it's easier to manage small chunks. one could also argue with Edmund Affect. -nology that you don't need to segment this debate that we have done. which might make these types of issues you know. See where you're coming from and I'm going to say yes or no? Yes, I think the home range of of questions that can be handled by the technology the ones we got pay I don't chain, etc. I don't I didn't see any issues there but there are a lot of decisions that needs to be made a book in terms of putting things together and resolve disputes that can only function at a human level because it's not. These are not decisions that are simple binary decisions. If you'd like, it's yes or no it's it's often a lot more nuance than complex about I mean, one of the resources in the World Kiva Zero System, the world amendment which is being fought over if you like is water, a water is probably one of the most valuable resources anywhere and it's you often find that rivers and things like that sort of flow between countries, they form borders. And and you are you know people if you look at the Nile, ESL start stopping in Sudan throwaway down to the Mediterranean. So he goes to countries all three countries, east European and then into Egypt's and so unwell well, who has the right to put it dime at a particular place and things like that all of that has to be cooled in act. You see a not going to be done at a human level that that's what caused the skills in negotiation judgment interpretation understanding if you like of the other people, no machine can do that I got. Yes before we conclude, I want to touch on one other thing So in the paper, you say as technology and culture intersect more and more. Ethical conundrums will intensify these raising questions about the rights and obligations of robots. And go beyond as moves. Three laws of robotics in two issues of rights of all moon. Algorithm, stem serves. So this is this is an area that be Kevin babies even even really form some notions allowed rights of all modes at rights of a are. Sai, gets more sophisticated. Yes. Yes. I do. I, mean I think this is one of the issues we already know some of the problems with algorithms and and you know can we can be are they transplanted from you see what's going on the ethical issues around the construction and implementation of algorithms and things like that. But I I I think looking into the future we all going to rely on things like robots. And various kinds of machines so much more so that if you look at a country like Japan, which is a a an aging population such that it doesn't have sufficient younger people to look after the people who need looking often. So machines, I'll be part of that, and that means people will stop forming real relationships with machines and and so that's when I would say. Okay. So let's think about how we View a potential rights of machine that we give. We give rise to humans. Yes. We know that we give rights to animals. Now we've also given rights to viz in forest in some countries as well as so machines I think our. Next logical step you know do we do we treat them with respect Let me give you one. Very classic example yet the production of. Robots for sex if you like is a major industry at the moment, some manufacturers say they want to program them say that people can act out rape fantasies will do we want that I? Mean you know should we be at first of all? You know? We should be having people behave in this particular kind of way, but even an uncertain if you do it against another human being, you'll be punished for it and you say we'll a machine is a piece of property you should be you should be doing that but I'm getting to think that maybe a machines should be treated with dignity say that we are treat ourselves with. Dixie. This a kind of reflexive situation here what we? Do to machines we do to each other, and they may again due to US depending on how they evolve and and move forward in that way is a very contentious issue. A lot of people would reject that right out of hand I agree I think we've got to stop thinking about stop dining forward because I. think we're going to at some point again. I. Don't know when. But at some point we will be having to deal with that. It's a it's a very important point. Joan. So if I understand you correctly, you know that the rights to animals the rights to inanimate. INANIMATE things like Lubers The recent those exist is because of its effects on humans and can see video a clear link in the future we would see a very clear link between a algorithms and robots ended affects on human. So this is not me You know each not fantasy in the sense that yeah, robots should have rights, but rather it's a more conceptual question. Any fraud did not have rights each going to cabin negative I I think that's absolutely true. I mean just to highlight that if you like this firm called Boston Dynamics that produces. Robots and they produced these videos of these. Now, these robots are resistant being pushed over and things like that, and it was quite interesting because a lot of people say all you can't treat them in this way. This is awful and so what I mean that that's the answer for more fighting to to the extreme extent. But it I think you know on the basis what you're saying, you know how we Oakland. Hold human beings accountable to each other in an increasingly complex world machines have become part of that. We can't just have them all sitting on the edge as though they're not part of who we are, what we are and how we do things. Right. So. Incursion Johnny fuel sort of look forward five years. At. The intersection of law and technology. But you think people see sort of the biggest. I. Think you'll see it two wins. On the you know for the individual The individual, you're going to see a lot of them just interacting. With artificial Tennessee, say lost questions about what my rights for this how do I deal with a tendency agreement? How do I complain against a producer company or something like that or that's going to be automated? is fairly straightforward to do and and it will only need A. Minimal. Amount of human inside of. An intervention if you like. At the other end at the. In I think we're GONNA see more and more technology coming in because as those basic functions that are. Being, carried out by junior people or or paralegals or things like that are the ones which are going to be increasing, automating creasing. I'm. We will replace the humans and just let machines do that because there's no point in wasting human resources on that whether that means we need fuel or more lawyers That's an open question I think it will that we need different kinds of lawyers We will need Roy Moore to logically aware much more sophisticated. They don't it's be programmers or odors or anything like that, but they need to have a quite a a a a strong understanding and gross what's going on in technology in that way if you like so. Yeah. We can definitely see an. Yeah, so I, think you mentioned the so from a structure perspective in all forum DC law firm sprucing to word. It a group of equity partners. Around it by machine so to speak well, I. Think. I was in that paper or another one I. I'm S-. Forecast. Law. Firms. Being. Distributed decentralized we'll tournaments organizations running on a blockchain with with the various people. into setting when they will no I. Think the law firm is still a very strong and powerful is Shutian, that's not gonNA disappear straight away. But certainly the numbers of partners who control things will shrink. They'll that will get smarter as proportion and yes, they will be surrounded by machines and they surrounded by people who are servicing those machines. Your excellent. Yeah. Thanks for doing this weekend. John really enjoyed the conversation. Thank you very much. It's been great fun and very

Blockchain John Gill Eappen Eappen Queensland University Of Techn Blockchain Technologies Australia Griffith University India United States German Government Innova Bloomberg Inflammation Royal Society Brisbane John Blockchain Chiba
2 former eBay employees plead guilty in harassment scheme

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

00:40 sec | 8 months ago

2 former eBay employees plead guilty in harassment scheme

"Former ebay employees have pled guilty to the roles in what Massachusetts prosecutors call a campaign to terrorize a publisher and editor of an online newsletter critical of the company with A. Scheme that investigators say included live spiders and other disturbing delivery center their home. Stephanie Pop. The former senior manager of Global Intelligence and Veronica Zia a former ebay contractor but guilty to conspiracy to commit cyber stalking and conspiracy to tamper with witnesses. The scheduled to be sentenced in. February that amongst seven former ebay employees charged in the scheme than other anonymous delivery center. The couple's home three others were expected to plead guilty later. This

Ebay A. Scheme Stephanie Pop Veronica Zia Senior Manager Stalking Global Intelligence Massachusetts Publisher Editor
Ellen DeGeneres makes on-air apology, vows a 'new chapter'

NBC Nightly News

01:43 min | 9 months ago

Ellen DeGeneres makes on-air apology, vows a 'new chapter'

"Ellen DeGeneres. Began the eighteenth season of her talk show today with an apology. Here's Cathy Park. Everybody summer good yeah. Mine was great. Ellen degeneres kicked off her new season with more than just laughs. I. Learned that things happened here that never should have happened. I take that very seriously and I want to say, I am so sorry to the people who were affected. I know that I'm in a position of privilege and power and I realized that with that comes responsibility and I take responsibility for what happens at my show her on air apology in front of a virtual audience address allegations of toxic work culture at the show reports published by Buzzfeed this summer allege senior managers engage in ramp rampant harassment and sexual misconduct. We have had a lot. Of conversations over the last few weeks about the show place what we want for the future, we have made the necessary changes and today we are starting a new chapter. The changes following an investigation by Warner media degeneres was not part of that review. Three of the shows top producers were eventually fired. Now, her longtime DJ twitch will help lead the daytime series, my co executive producer. The host also addressing claims that she hasn't always lived up to be kind mantra. Means that truth is I am that person that you see on TV I am also a lot of other things I. Sometimes I get sad I get mad I get anxious I get frustrated I get impatient and I am working on all of that. I am a work in progress today generous acknowledging Joe is to

Ellen Degeneres Cathy Park Harassment Warner Media Executive Producer JOE
Episode 53: mediUSA Reduction Kits with Christopher Miles

Lymphedema Podcast

02:50 min | 9 months ago

Episode 53: mediUSA Reduction Kits with Christopher Miles

"I'm so excited to introduce today's guest. Christopher Miles is the senior manager for clinical services at many USA he's trained as an occupational therapist and a certified in both limping Dima and wound-care. He has been working with patients to assist in managing chronic Dima for over eighteen years and currently his role as managing a team of clinical educators for many USA and also completing clinical education to direct hospital systems national and International Conferences Hi Christopher. Welcome to the PODCAST. Thank you so much, Betty I'm excited club join your pot cow. I am so excited to talk to you about the reduction kit. So many of my patients in the clinic won a single garment that can do it. All is the reduction kit, their answer. You know I wish that there was a magic pill for lengthy Dima. I've been working Olympia for a long time and I think everyone spent hunting for that I. Wish I could say the reduction kit will do everything I'm not gonna I'm not GonNa say that it can but it certainly can do lot. It's a phenomenal bandaged replacement system. So. Can you tell us how the product came to be and what inspired it? Absolutely. I would love to and it's always a great story share. So the reduction Kit is part of the circuit product line The cirque aid product line has been around for over fifty years in a way it was inspired. It was actually invented by a individual who was trying to find a solution to help his wife who suffered from chronic limping Dima. Anti came up with this idea when he was at the San Diego Zoo he noticed that drafts are very tall yet for some reason, they never have swelling in they're very skinny legs. In the reason they don't have swelling in their legs is because their skin is inelastic it won't stretch. It doesn't have the ability to give to excess pressure or fluid. So there's no swelling or. So we've that. Concept he wanted to create a garment that didn't stretch because up to that point all compression garments had been made out of elastic that we're very stretchy. So key. The first inelastic product actually a very crude on product that he designed was actually out of leather belts. But over time he designed and created the circuit blind, which is the combination of an inelastic product with inner juxtapose spans to allow patients to automatically adjust and apply their compression.

Dima Christopher Miles USA San Diego Zoo Senior Manager Betty
The Post-COVID Workplace: Will Employees Be Safe?

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:22 sec | 9 months ago

The Post-COVID Workplace: Will Employees Be Safe?

"Of Corona virus continued to surge in many communities. Some companies air starting to bring workers back to the office. But it appears workers have reservations and Edelman survey of 3500 employees in seven countries finds on Lee 51% believe office spaces air safe. And even fewer trust their senior managers to keep them safe.

Edelman LEE
Does TikTok Really Pose a Risk to US National Security?

the NewsWorthy

05:59 min | 11 months ago

Does TikTok Really Pose a Risk to US National Security?

"Hank Shaw. He's the senior manager on the security solutions team for the cybersecurity company lookout I asked him whether he thinks Tiktok is actually threat and how it compares to other Social Media Apps when it comes to your privacy, is it really that much different from what's being collected from other social media? In reality no these APPs we give them access to lot and we accept that right. There is this kind of level of access that we all except when it comes to our lives on on the Internet. The difference he says is tick talks parent company by dance, any access, the Chinese, Communist Party, which you'll hear them referred to as C. C. P. May get your data. The core of the concern is who owns it? It's it's the fact. That it's a Chinese own company in that the CDC has demonstrated certain data usage tactics that don't fly in the United States, and that's why the center this whole debate tic TAC itself at least says, the data is secure and doesn't go to China, but Hank isn't so sure by dances under contract with the CCP to promote propaganda in the Chinese equivalent APP, which is called Julian getting getting that pronunciation right? They do that in the Jinjiang Province where The government is to put likely controlling the weaker Muslim population. So when I look at it from a moral perspective, I just personally when want my data potentially accessible by people who are doing something like that and in comparison to a US based company someone like facebook or twitter obviously instagram's owned by facebook they at least have to answer to the US government. As we've seen, know can take a series financial hit they have the US government. In Regulatory standards to answer to, and they've they've got a federal by to answer to which in my opinion bite dance doesn't totally considering they have that agreement with C.. P.. That's why Hank feels the possible Microsoft takeover of Tiktok in the US would be a step in the right direction and would help set some new standards for the APP but I also spoke with Patrick Jackson. The chief. Technology. Officer at the privacy firm disconnect who's also worked. For the NSA test. APPS. For a living I look at the network communication I also reverse engineer, the binoculars areas to see what secrets they hold in them. He says not so fast I would say that anytime you let your data leave your device Goto even if it's a US company or a foreign company that data can wind up in the wrong hands and it's because data is sold, it could be shared or could be stolen he points. To, facebook scandal a few years back facebook a US company allow data to be used by Cambridge. ANALYTICA to possibly interfere with the US election that data was was misused by companies that were US based, and so it to think that just because this APP is owned by a US company that data will only stay in the US and users don't have to worry is is false because you know money talks and these companies will do deals that will. Bring in dollars in May mean exchanging data for those dollars and also data can be stolen if we're giving up all of this data about ourselves location things that we like you know how long we look at certain videos. If we're giving up all this data to a US company and that data is stolen, then we're still back at square one. In fact, he says facebook who owns instagram and is now rolling out the tiktok copycat. Reels may have. More information about us than any other company almost every single APP that I do testing on has an integration with facebook, and so if you think about how much data that facebook is getting not only from the APPS that you use directly owned by Facebook Messenger. What's APP instagram and then eventually reels they're also embedded in so many apps that they don't own including Tiktok and so it's it's you know for a lot of attention to be on TIKTOK. Justified. That's okay. It's it's people's right to be suspicious, but that same suspicion should carry over to even. US. Companies like facebook they know when you're opening your workout apps and they know how much time you spend in them, our phones go everywhere with us. Our phones probably knows better than our loved ones still patrick has found some abnormal things about Tiktok specifically even beyond. Who owns it the amount of data that they collect within the first I counted the first nine seconds I counted two hundred, ten network requests from my device back to tick tock servers. It's clear that they've architect did this in the way to suck up as much data as possible. So knowing what these experts no I had to ask, would they ever download Tiktok? Henshaw says not right now personally for the privacy concerns until it's all hashed out I just is just something that I don't want to be the potential of Patrick Jackson on the other hand has downloaded it, but he gave it very limited access are revoked all the permissions that it's asked of me in the APP is still usable I can't postings because I don't give it microphone and camera permission. But if you just WANNA browse what's popular, you can do that and he says that's a good rule of thumb for any APP give the least permissions prop possible. See that APPs still works without permission that they were asking you for, and if it does then great if it doesn't and let's say you need, it's a calendar APP and you needed to actually access your calendar thing just give it that single permission ultimately, both experts agree it's up to us to understand where our data might be going for. As much as we use mobile phones in for as much as as comfortable as we are with them, people generally don't really know what to do to keep themselves safe. So we have to get really savvy about being able spot that abnormal behavior and then decide for ourselves. What do we feel comfortable with as they know that this is that this is happening then they could make better decisions. But if you don't know that you know High Fructose Corn Syrup is in your children's you know Pancake Syrup. Then you'll continue to buy it, but once you realize then you might say you know what I'll pick this other natural one over here. That just has a sugar

United States Facebook Tiktok Hank Shaw Patrick Jackson Communist Party Instagram Jinjiang Province Senior Manager CCP NSA Officer Engineer CDC Cambridge Microsoft
Trump to sign executive order limiting temporary work visas

Marketplace

00:20 sec | 1 year ago

Trump to sign executive order limiting temporary work visas

"President trump will soon sign an executive order to extend a hold on green cards to immigrants the measure also holds temporary work visas for high skilled workers senior managers and seasonal workers the goal of the move is to protect more than half a million jobs for US workers according to a senior administration

Donald Trump United States President Trump Executive
"senior manager" Discussed on Latinos Who Tech

Latinos Who Tech

05:46 min | 1 year ago

"senior manager" Discussed on Latinos Who Tech

"Engineer. But I'm still just getting started on being a woman. Ceo I'm still getting started on you know Having a relationship right or I give advice for what I know. So far but I've only been with my fiance for four years versus someone who's done it for twenty five years you know so acknowledging that you know to have different people that you tap into for different reasons There's even people know where I'll have three or four mentors for the same thing but the house foreign different perspectives of people that you say that I respect their opinion but I know that they're giving different suggestions. Helps me get a better gauge? Rather than Oh you know. Susan's that I need to do this. And this is what I should do. And it's like well Susan said a little bit of this and Hector's at a little bit of this and he said I had suggested altogether a totally different suggestion. So kind of having that collectiveness you know. It takes a village. And that's why even know psychologists say it's important if you have two parents you know because they bring different perspectives to different humans. Raising one individual So you the Madigan tapping into different resources. Different mindsets Different people of experiences to help it give that advice or to help support. You need the and I think Again if we actually. I commend you for taking an hour a day for personal development. That that's awesome. I think that investing that timeline books on podcast and listening to Konkan like this a think of people like Rian and people that come to the show as your mentors and again the beauty of podcasts thing is the eve you're an introvert or maybe you're shy of reaching out to people like you is that Hey you don't want me to deal with that because I'm the one that brings people in so you don't think of me almost like a proxy for you like I as questions for you It and again. Is there anything else I forgot to ask you? That you wanted to mention anything else in your mind about being an ally how can be better allies for women in some? Yeah I think use made a great point of again like introvert or if you don't know what type of questions to ask Again obviously thank you for having me but this is exactly the type of things in these type of conversations that I feel are really necessary of why even created my own personal brands So almost like micro blogging on instagram. You know with the picture and just kind of what's going on what I'm facing like you said my own kind of conversations that I'm having with friends families my own personal mentors In so even just creating the people engineer. Podcast having a personal website Again having his youtube and facebook just kind of post it was it was just acknowledging that a lot of people started sharing nine of these SICOM Kind of conversations their expectation on started kind of seeing this women stem Hashtag grow and creating that online community and so again a lot of people that had questions. They'll ashamed or they weren't afraid of asking the wrong things I really to me and you and I know right like in the DMZ. I'd get blown up all the time and I'm by no means INSTA- famous and it's not you know what I'm showing. I'm shooting for Cycle of space to have these conversations. I'll never be once he condemn. Anyone say like how dare you asked that I just want people to feel safe To ask those questions for me personally. I'm really passionate about the life career and growth. Because I feel like a whole person you know. No one really gives us a hamburger life right how to be an adult to be successful how to make decisions how to even deal with our emotions In so kind of again being that whole person is very important and obviously love what you're doing with the gas and all the great you interviewed so again I just think it's having that story of again being allies simply supporting one another Again if you have insecurities or you have your own projections like really just dealing with what you're doing first and foremost obviously you and I both are here for those conversations for that type of community But again I just feel like. It's something that we shouldn't be afraid of I know that there's very such colour I WANNA say opposites oppositions happening in our world today and To my point again if you're coming from a place of good hearted intention you make your Wants and needs known of. Hey I want to learn more I don't think that there's anything wrong with that but again like you're you're mentioning earlier. Just be very conscious of how when and why you're asking on people obviously are wanting to come from a good place you Wanna learn and support each other But again just just be conscious of what you're doing how you're doing it And again just come from a place of love writing if you are very kind Coming from a place of of love and and wanting to be understood as well as understanding others. Don't really think there's any place you could go wrong you know. Maybe you could say something wrong or ask something different on a different way But again if you come from a place of I want to understand. I want to be better. No we're all growing we're all we've all made mistakes. So that kind of place of vulnerability and authenticity goes a long way awesome. A now we know where you are get people in Guinea Problem. So yeah we linked to your show day on the show notes or just check it out. Website all the thing. We'll do good stuff I know that you're putting out some great content out there so I definitely want people to find out more about it than who you are and what you do. The things. Thank likewise a very much appreciated. This effort has been wonderful to follow in participate in so I really appreciate all the great things. You're doing my pleasure. Thanks for coming to the show. Absolutely thank.

Susan Ceo Engineer. Madigan Konkan engineer youtube INSTA Hector Rian facebook Guinea Problem
"senior manager" Discussed on Latinos Who Tech

Latinos Who Tech

08:05 min | 1 year ago

"senior manager" Discussed on Latinos Who Tech

"You know a again from those two or three people that listen to this a probably two of them happen to be men so imagine that you have a a younger remain T- Happens to be male and you want to give them some advice again and they ask you know Rian what can I do to make the women in my team feel more heard included more respect that so they feel that they're an integral part of my team? What can I do every day every week? You know what the what do you think I should. Yeah I would say again. Obviously we're talking about kind of listening like you said. GotTa stretch out empathy muscle again. Be Self aware I doing that. Inner work is is a huge one But then again kind of that back to the seek to understand part. The very practical part is very Simply just don't try to be a knight in shining armor right so again if you see that Maybe have a conversation one on one with the woman to better understand Oregon. Lgbtq or person of color whatever it is as you feel like this person again is either marginalized or being you know. Walked over whatever it is. I'm just saying like Hey I noticed this You know and let me know if I'm making this up. But it was something that burroughs brought to my attention. I feel like you know X Y and Z. Or you know someone had mentioned something in. I felt uncomfortable for you. Is that something that you WanNa talk about or does this happen often again? Just acknowledging someone in Sharing your own experiences of what your thinking or saying is sometimes especially as me. Personally I would say man. Am I making this up lake? You know people are telling me I'm to direct people are telling me I'm too aggressive or I'm bossy and it wasn't until like another coworker of mine was okay. I noticed like so. And so you know your boss seems a little impatient with you like. Are you getting vibe to or is it just you know? Is it just me? I'm like I'm really glad he said something as I got. I was going crazy like I wasn't trying to make up a story on for me. Personally I never want to be a victim of that but know if someone else notices it. It helps me saying okay. No there is something here right so even just bring that to the forefront. So that's something again one of just sharing from them not saying like. Hey you're you're over talking her right because then you take that power from her or again that person to stand up for themselves Another one is obviously man's planning And I know it's different ways about it again like you're talking about early. I know there's good intention there but a lot of times I would say something and even my fiance again like we're both serving and ship roles both volunteers before I was working fulltime. And I have you know this really great idea or feedback from other people and I would mention it and kind of like would fall on deaf ears and so then he would bring it back around two minutes later to be like oriented really great point. He wouldn't say brand really very point he would say rick reiterate what I said and everyone was like this is just so great and afterward like it became very frustrating to me because what they did you realize all you did was reiterate what. I said he was a cab but like you know no one picked up on it and I thought it was really great idea and like Abbie. You didn't give me credit either. You know what I mean. So it's that type of thing of even though you may be trying to do something again well or make sure that that ideas heard is really Kind of narrowing down on making sure you give credit to wear. It's do And if someone is trying to talk and she gets talked over or you see someone that maybe even more introverted. It can be again. You know man on man and someone just not as aggressive as someone else in saying no I thought so and so had something to say like in. We hear him out Again making kind of space for everyone to talk at the table Another thing that I've actually been trained on to be a facilitator is you do. Have these powerful voices that they always have opinions or they're always willing to speak up. There's always usually someone that's were quieter. They take more time to think out. What THEY WANNA say? Or they're good and so when you kind of notice around the room. Hey David you haven't said anything today. Is there anything you'd like to say or bring to the table In kind of one. I want to be careful that you know. You don't put people on the spot that they're like all you know. Embarrassed or nervous But kind of making sure that you're being very inclusive making force that effort And then well that kind of third practical. Just make sure that you educate yourself right if if you're aware that again there's not many women in your fielder in a male dominated field or you notice that there's not You know any type of resources or education or these type of training. You're mentioning you know. There's articles all over the place like just do a couple of research you know. My thing is at least do some type of learning registration one hour a day. And it's been mind boggling just to listen to a podcast or You know just just look up articles right. Even Google just sends me all kinds of random stuff like saying we noticed you like learning about this time of being And those type of things and just really being cognizant Putting forth effort makes a huge difference. Because then you're kind of expanding your self awareness your life experience outside of just what you know and considering other options. That's all great and the I would actually challenge people to either are considering having tea or a mentor. A actually trying to seek out a one that happens to be the opposite gender from them or somebody bad a happens to be. I think I'm when you when you recommend for you want somebody they have you know some skin in the game or somebody that has the job. Do WanNa happy ten years Somebody that went through some similar struggles do it But I would actually encourage people to. Hey why not try to actually look for a mentor? That happens to be a woman offers. Leeann where T was. I find that when you WANNA practices conversations and you wouldn't you want to actually Seek out though. The limits of your assumptions. It's helpful you know dog. Somebody real right that it's not somebody that they from an article from a podcast of Youtube video. There's a an electoral petition. The show as well as I showed it article so much Man's planning article. It's actually no chart join Nuha. I'm sure you've seen it strong you how to if it's manslaughter or not. And he basically it comes down to this. She Accu to explain it. Is She dead? Man's land you're you're you're saying so Yeah I mean that's A. That's a huge staying over the phone east tough particularly tough and You know if you've gotten this far in the podcast in a week part of her job it's to Khomeini's over the phone on some things. We can't league with people in their end of the line. So it's tough you know so leveraging things like I am or things like that and actually ask people a brand. Is there anything else you want to mention or is there something else that we want to share something on this topic? You know so like sticking out there. Quieter People Benza. That stuff wow but yeah I will be super frustrated too. We've somebody to credit for one of my idea probably know that was like the mentor And I would even challenge to the next point of Sangley. Yes get someone different even more so like have a variety right so you know I personally advise my own. Mentese to have like a personal board of Advisors. I'm your personal board of directors in so different types of mentors for different fields for different things you know I have a personal life mentor and then a professional life mentor and then Entrepreneurial Life Mentor. It's all like there's so many different I I wanna say as a human a and we're so round right like we're a big round character. There's so many pieces in facets to us to just think like. Oh you're gonNA have all the answers to everything I need in life. That's kind of silly so I could give great advice on again being a woman.

Rian Oregon burroughs Sangley Accu Google Youtube Abbie Mentese rick Leeann David Khomeini
"senior manager" Discussed on Latinos Who Tech

Latinos Who Tech

08:41 min | 1 year ago

"senior manager" Discussed on Latinos Who Tech

"Build that own emotional intelligence within yourself really start painting the picture because then you realize what you are and what you're not the thing that you are versus the things that you're not there are other people that are opposite. Maybe some people that are three quarters. You know maybe the people that are just a quarter of what you're like in so kind of understanding the bigger spectrum and then kind of acknowledging what those differentiator are really kind of played them perspective. Oh these are the things I'm you know not privy to that. I need to be aware of or any. Need to slow down and be considerate of been your for for input. Actually Funny Enough. You were talking about values and those one were values. Who Actually did this assessment that? What am I France My friend Peter he actually quoted it up and essentially a list of the fifty a more common values so things like learning family relationships health. Annul those things and essentially think almost like a campaign board I know you're during throughout guile rights or anything ties Andrew Love. That's so essentially. Those are the fifty but then beneath the big your top ten and then you need to move them forward And then you need to move it to your top five and you can only be like pig five. Any Mike might five are learning kindness convenience passion on freedom of the things that a value the most and the one were values that I have and funny now like Like wealth are not there right or things like health you can also then after the this assessment. I took As actually many retreat. You know idea. I live in California right so I actually I over a long weekend. I went to the beach and I was thinking about okay. So what does this mean anyway? And I realized that that explains a lot of things sooner because I do it all these things like I. I work long hours and On sometimes there's a project in Europe when you get to fly to mild pound two weeks and concessions for customers. I'm in was yet again because I don't you know again. I don't prioritize my my health as much as they probably ship or things like. Well write a story. I was at visa conference at work. We sales conference and the people are going around these top till our asking. You know just having a nice nice conversation when somebody asks me. Hey what are you into right now? And I mentioned that I'm really to walk casting and I mentioned that attack and the very next question got asked me was well. How do you make money? Yeah so so I clearly know what they value right there in sales right so curious about you know. How do you make the sustainable So it's a funny enough I'll I'll actually L. Go ahead and put on the show notes people. Can they have fun doing it? And maybe find out about their values. Maybe they're blind spots because these these games might my blind spots. Are Those things that I'm looking at? Muslims like my health. Or maybe another one of your values. Maybe THAT WE DON'T SHARE. You know so yeah. Yeah and but if I did a similar assessment and so I kind of just started in junior point. I kind of just started from the list and I would check off things that like. Oh this you know seems like really important to me I find myself. Doing more of these are also picked about like ten to fifteen then like you said I narrowed them down the five so my five our gross also concerned I guess encompasses learning adventure inhabits Authenticity is huge for me Even just to put a name to it like mental resilience that includes extreme toughness Servant leadership is a huge one for me in that encompasses impact compassion meaningful work. And then my last one is acknowledgement and even back encompassed compass. I kind of recognition achievement. Fame influence respect success in wealth. And it's like we were saying right away. I think wealth but it's more so it's not even about having the money or you know the money to do things it's more of the acknowledgement to say like I met a certain level or you know to acknowledge the work that I've done so again like you're saying kind of the more you narrow it down and really get to the root of it. It's like oh it's not really like having the money part it's more about the recognition you receive you know because you have the money or because you are invited places or you know what I mean. It's that kind of your legal holding the trophy like that. It's not more of the trophy. It's more of the acknowledgement of the work right. So that's why the the servant leadership right the impact the meaningful work getting the recognition of kind of that legacy. Because you did this. This is the result of it So in a trophy is kind of like that outward facing it's much more for me like hey these are the lives you impacted or because you did this work. This is what this equals. Got It so asa aspiring ally on the I need to ask you again so you mentioned you know an ally is the behavior qualities are looking for but maybe a the have any stories or a guy examples of people that were Alex to you like how they help you and And again I want to give the two or three people that listen to this an Ivy L. O. Maybe I should do that. Yeah I think it's a really good point especially to your point of examples For me I'll say I I didn't have as many as I would like I do think a consistent behavior or effort that I've seen that helped is You know what everyone needs and we talk about it especially through ship of needing a mentor. A sponsor in an advocate So I would openly readily seek out anyone who is willing to give advice willing to sit with me especially You know women of leadership or people of Color and higher leadership Because I felt again like. I'm an anomaly. Your arm anomaly. Like I can talk to you about things more openly and again. I'm not afraid like I said. I don't mind being confrontational very in touch with my feelings. And I wear my heart on my sleeve so me knowing that about myself I always went in just very vulnerable authentic and honest and that has always served me really well granted. I kinda catch people off guard. Sometimes they're gonNA expect me to be forthcoming but I would say again. I've been very grateful. And quite frankly into starting to blessed and honored enough to have people that have served as mentors sponsors and advocates You know of one in particular was a director of engineering and he took a chance on me when I was an intern at the international aerospace company and he was a higher again director of engineering a white male but he really saw in me and so I would say that. I know I'm really eager to change things. It's really hard for me to be patient so just having those type of conversations where I feel like my bosses and understand me or I just need some type of project to really make me challenge me to make me feel like I'm growing In so he would help me kind of maneuver through ways and I would go through them with my list of tasks and say this is boring. This is boring. This is boring. I like more of this kind of stuff In so just putting forth kind of this is what I'm interested in. This is what I WANNA learn. Ended up Helping me oversee a five hundred thousand dollar three D. Printer and it was the first in the entire company All the others. We were the first pilot for all the other locations and three D. Printing you know jigs and fixtures and assembly jigs and tools and so it was really cool because it is essentially became inspector gadget on top of being near at the time. And so it's those type of things we're just sitting down having someone there to listen to understand to hear me out helped me kind of create this unofficial role or responsibility that I was really interested in And so it's those type of thing kind of seeking out one again as a woman or an ally to kind of be that for someone In additionally again just talked about it earlier but listening part Much more is actually having an effort to seek to understand. It's one thing to hear someone out but it's another to really put forth effort.

director of engineering Europe Andrew Love California Peter D. Printer Mike Alex intern
"senior manager" Discussed on Latinos Who Tech

Latinos Who Tech

08:51 min | 1 year ago

"senior manager" Discussed on Latinos Who Tech

"Welcome to Latinos who tech. My name is Olga Casinos. I'm an engineer. And I work in Silicon Valley I am originally from Kaz Venezuela a navy calling the US home for the last ten years when it comes to Latinas in the US. We are sixty million people. But we're only three percent of the workers in science or Engineering Profession. Silicon Valley of had the opportunity to meet some remarkable professionals. That working attacking Lebanon's like me with this podcast. I want to bring you a collection of their stories. And how they got the job in tech in the first place and if they have to start all over again what would they do differently? I want to share with you career advice on how to get a job in tech dealing passer syndrome. How to find your drive? When you're the only one in the rump. This Latina so attack. This episode of Latinos attack is brought to you by audible. Audibles the world's premium platform for audiobooks with over one hundred and fifty thousand. Titles if you're like me you're passionate about learning new things but finding the time to read maybe difficult. All your books are great alternative. You can get a free thirty day. Trial plus a free by going to audible trial the COM slash Latinos. Gosport them since they support us. Thank you so Briana. Welcome to Latinos attack. Thank you. I'm excited to be here so tell me your story. Oh Wow aren't even start I guess for me. I grew up a by a single mom. The oldest of three kids and I like that really shaped me. I'm super grateful to be four generations that Hannah so to be raised with You know my own independence to like. Live your own life. Do Your own thing. I'm so grateful my Mama said you know. Go as far as you can dream big. You know I'll live vicariously through you and support you in any way I can And so it's very I want to say kind of the opposite of how we hear. The story of most women are taught to be calm and quiet and collected in. My mom was like go out and play in the rain and get dirty and I'm super grateful for having such a wise woman. Raised me to be so strong and independent and to be raised and dream big I know when I was growing up like any little kid. They say you know. What are you going to be when you grow up? But now it's going to help people. I want to be a doctor and you know but I've been seeing since I was three so I just I would have entertained. People and I want people to feel like loved heard and seen how I love pictures and I love that you can capture moments. You know and I would love to be a photographer. I really WANNA teach early and I love learning and I'm obsessed and so even the growing up both my mom and grandma on older my memorial with semi not the kitchen table. And saying well you can. Actually you know. Go to school to be a doctor. Because that's the highest degree. You need on spend time doing now. You know invest in yourself. You know you'd be a doctor from Monday through Friday and then you can be a singer on the weekends right Friday night. Gigs on the weekends at your home. But whenever you're traveling around the world helping people you can teach them about the cultures take pictures of where your ads so they kind of just helped me understand that you know you're only limited by what your own beliefs are Insiders always thought like anything is possible in so intern with as my life continued to evolve continued to keep pushing myself and challenging. And I would notice that I obviously would score high in math and science and it was those two fields really just challenged me whereas I love writing stories. I love being creative. But that's funny. Came easy to me so math and science. It was just something that I had to climb that mountain to achieve and that sense of accomplishment when I finally got that problem really meant a lot to me and so I continued on I guess I've been seeing on threes on a chose a path to go in high school. I took a hand instrument. Draft class absolutely fell in love. I can't draw. Stick people to save my life but I draw three dimensional isometric view of something Wish we kind of blew me away after that. I kind of just started asking questions. Know what. What can I do to do this? How does this relate to like any kind of career choice And My hand instrument drafting teacher had ended up telling the engineering is really. I was really obsessed with cars and engines so curious about how things worked levers police years. I'll go crazy for it all Towards I started pursuing mechanical engineering at ended up having to go to college. I want it thousand miles away from home. Put on academic probation And but even that like I've done a lot of internships so I'm a very hands on Learner You know conceptual learning was very difficult for me. And so I knew I wasn't GonNa get straight as in college and I continued to pursue more internships and Co ops and so by the time I graduated I had already about three three and a half years of experience in different industries but Iowa's really drawn to manufacturing how things were made the process improvement manufacturing engineering industrial engineering and ended up finding my way through again different avenues Essentially grading rotational program for an International Aerospace Company got laid off ceremony consulting firm Then went into automotive manufacturing and then kind of found that transition of doing exactly what I love to do between kind of the idea and concept of new industry new technology implementation to actually assembly lines and what that looks like so now. I'm doing it fulltime for non profit from against essentially. How do we train people? What's the ideas? And then how do we actually get that Down to the local level so again like my passion for people in processes and really challenging myself continued to be a consistent throughout my entire life and not for any non for profit Checked which way the two people that listen to this are well acquainted with chat and how much I am you know. I think that the whole the lifetime members like us. We are the ship cheerleaders. If you will because a every time that I meet somebody that happens to be Hispanic Latino whatever you WANNA call it at work on. They mentioned that. Oh Yeah what is this shop thing or these ace ace HP thing? Oh okay. I need to I a couple of causing coming. How much time do you have? A best kept secret you know. I wish I would have known about it sooner. Beato that this this awesome. Thank you for sharing that and So so you need mechanical. In school he asks. And that's why I said if I would have known. What manufacturing or national engineering was. I wouldn't have had to torture myself with you. Know he transferred thermal system designed but I made it through long in turmoil path but I made it dissolve them. Yeah and then. Once you're ending donaire you know nobody can take that away from you. That way of thinking analytically and You know ruining running towards the problems instead of away from them. That's that's pretty unique so yes very much so even just a way of thinking. Yeah Yeah it's like You know and again we can be something as simple as okay. I gotTa do my laundry and tried to figure out like okay. How can minimize the number of trips down to the that's really cool and I know I have to bring you in because There's the old being an ally and the you know again you know we. We know that mentoring important. Also having not being a sponsor where people but there's been an ally and the ultimately I think that a lot of people are linked with myself is that we hear this word ally being thrown around at our workplace battle. Yeah we need to be better allies for you know a underrepresented minorities in especially in stem. Well women people of Color You know it'd be Q. People so what have you so I wanNA exploiting Savio. You know asked the asa man as I I was like. How can they be better ally to those women around me gene check because again full disclosure? I was actually invited well workshop for Shipping Conference and the in the beginning. That workshop was straightforward. It's about work. Mike balance how to say no and I bring my say. Note the people everyday including.

US Olga Casinos Kaz Venezuela engineer Lebanon Briana Savio Hannah intern Mike Iowa International Aerospace Compan
Put the Human  Back Into Marketing

Enterprise NOW! Podcast

09:32 min | 1 year ago

Put the Human Back Into Marketing

"All right Irgun. Can I get it. Oh Yeah Oh yeah yeah nice. Nice first of all like we do every single time. Thank you so much for taking the time to share your knowledge and wisdom is them with the enterprises. We certainly do appreciate it. I'm glad to be here. LC It's a privilege to be on your show and to have a conversation with the enterprises this now. The second question I always like to ask is for you to tell us about yourself now when I say that I mean feel free to go all all the way back to the day it all started or you can start more current day. Tell us about yourself okay. Well one of the things that drives me is innovation vacation and that will started. There's a photograph of May as a straight year old with a little camera bulks because we were having family portraits done and as a little oh very active and the camera box was the way to keep me kind of focused and keep me occupied while the photographer Agrippa was setting up the studio and ever since then. I've been interested in photography. I've been taking photos ever since I can remember when of into university city are studied chemistry and my first job was in photographic film and also that was Navonna for me but very soon after at the photographic film industry was completely disrupted by digital photography and I experienced firsthand. How a disruptive chief transformation like that and how the response which was to conduct at first panic but then to be an Australian bury the heads in the sand eventually lead to the demise of companies? Like AGFA who was working for like Kodak and so for me that was a lesson in an approach business and had a really big clear about water. It is you provide for your target audience. So in that case the companies believed L. providing film and photographic pipe about really without providing was a Maine's pfoa capturing memories as soon as. They were better ways to do that. More convenient opinion wise in this case then suddenly at products and services become redundant so the idea of innovation was always still is always forefront of my mind. I spent twenty years in the corporate world at the intersection of technology and manufacturing and marketing and also working with people and so the idea of how people behave in certain situations. And how does that impact on all of those aspects was always of interest to me in twelve years ago so then years ago I got fed up with the corporate world decided it was time to start something of my own. And that's when I started my business and overbid always focused on bringing that idea dear of innovation in marketing but the human aspect of it into the small business arena awesome awesome. So I'm going to take a step back and learn learned a little bit more about you. What's what's your favorite thing to do mentioned photography so that would have to be there pretty high up and the other thing that I d fall back due to his cycling? So it's Tuesday morning martime here. It's very early in the morning but already been out for a morning bike ride in a little park nearby. Hi with some hills in it and lots of Kangaroos and Koalas in the park as well got it. So how do you use your gifts or talents your superpower to help others what we do at another busy is essentially we help put the human back into marketing. How we do that is teaching teaching people to nail down to connect with their ideal customers to realize that it's not the product or service that they're selling as such? I have left to help their audio. Customers achieved a goal and that marketing is just not in the front part of the customer journey in not during the customer Rod through the full customer journey so even after the style. We're still marketing and building on those relationships. Got It now. You mentioned a little bit before you being in Corporate America for twenty years and he kinda got fed up with it and launched now in start your own business. What was the biggest trigger? What was the straw that broke the camel's back? Well actually spend a year or so in corporate corporate America. I was working for an American company for a lot of that time but by sting Australia and running a bunch of different locations internationally particularly throughout Asia Asia. I guess one of the things that was always challenging for Maven the travel we're going so travel was fantastic and also it was great to be able both to interact with people in different cultures and different locations and saline environments and learn about how people operated in those different environments but it it was a big strain on my family law fan personal life as well spending a lot of time in aircraft and queuing up in a hotel chickens and queuing up in yep accused and so on. I think the thing that broke the camel's back though the store was at one point I mean there were a bunch of reorganizations is Asians in the late nineties and then in nearly two thousand and one point I was one of only two people that were allowed into into visit another big corporation. It was one of our biggest customers and the relationship had deteriorated to the point. Where there there are only two of us that this company would actually live on site and would accept meetings from because we had personal relationships but the rest of the company? They they said. No we don't want to see any of the sales paper. We don't see any of the marketing papal even the senior managers now. We don't WanNa say them right now. So the culture of all of our company had deteriorated changed to the point that customers were not being traded ride anymore and I was always driven driven by working with customers in different locations. But then you know seeing the difference that we could make to customers so I guess when I realized that things have deteriorated to that point that was kind of the straw that broke the camel's back on. I realized I'm no longer enjoying this doesn't align with my values anymore that The really common theme enjoyment and being fulfilled. And when it's no longer fun is no longer fulfilling no matter how many people I talk talk to. That's the thing that gets people that point where they're like okay. Something's gotTa give. Yeah that's right. It becomes a real chore. I saw probably we spent ninety five percent of that twenty plus he is enjoying young to work. Yeah really being excited to get out and tackle the dice activities Eddie's but at the end it was like getting out of bed in the morning and dreading going to work and I know something's got to happen here. Got It so talk a little bit about your process. Maybe you did but most people. There's a thought process that happens when they decide that they're going to shift and do something different. What was your process? Yeah that's a good question. I guess I looked into one of the things that I'm I am. Good at. And what could I bring to the table. Full Small Business and also I'm GonNa go completely to the opposite end of the spectrum so local Michael and small business and I knew that there was a need day for putting some more structure into the business putting voting structure into their marketing actually investing in the marketing. So I'd outlined all the things I thought I was good at and that could help them with an in started putting together packages Marketing programs to go out and talk to people and to bring people on board so it was a little bit of planning and then starting to test in the marketplace. What would work and an early on those interesting because early on by probably struggled a little bit in terms of both getting people to understand that the head to be more systematic about? They marketing that I had to be more strategic and also at the time the global financial crisis had just hit so everybody was looking to tighten the bell and marketing was one of the first things that they so it could be put on the back burner and I wasn't really good at convincing people at that was probably the last thing that I should save money on at this point in time but a certainly that was a big challenge and what happened. was that in those days. Lotta people didn't have websites so I build some logged whipsawed saint-marc corporate career. And I said well I can help you with websites as well. So whipsawed was kind of a Trojan horse to get into businesses to then help them set up. Marketing Marketing Strategies around the website was one of the tools that marketing strategy. Obviously so that was the Trojan horse to get

Irgun Agfa Asia Asia Corporate America Kodak Agrippa Navonna America Maine Michael L. Sting Australia Eddie
"senior manager" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:33 min | 2 years ago

"senior manager" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Year and I'm a senior manager with my company and my wife and my wife has a half million dollars in a four oh one K. that doesn't help the negotiating noche negotiation process that X. rays the expectations of the kidnappers so we typically recommend is is you don't have financial conversations at all with that with your your captors that's how you daily says your instincts that you want to trade away everything just to get your life back you'll do anything you have to understand if it's a kidnapping for ransom my son and I was still alive it's a business deal and they need you alive to make their money and usually dances you're gonna get out just a matter of coming to a price after member that you have to remember that your role in that business deal is to beat the hostage to do what you need to to survive to avoid panic what WBEZ Chicago it's this American life I'm IRA glass today on a radio show held hostage we have three stories for you of people who are forced by circumstance to be the hostage and how they cope with what that means we're gonna begin with people held in the traditional way nav the ticket to the jungle but we also have people in our show who are taken hostage in much less literal ways one man can't get out from under the thumb of one of his neighbors the man held hostage by love and I know it sounds really corny but believe me it is not what you think stay with us headline captive audience so it is it is it is a re run.

senior manager kidnapping Chicago million dollars one K
"senior manager" Discussed on The Dan Bongino Show

The Dan Bongino Show

03:09 min | 2 years ago

"senior manager" Discussed on The Dan Bongino Show

"I mean folks think about what I'm telling you right now, the lead investigator for the FBI. In this case, a senior manager at headquarters who is making contact daily with not only the, the rector, the deputy director, but it cadre of upper level officials, senior management of the FBI who is investigating Donald Trump is texting his love interest who's an FBI lawyer about a coordinated DOJ media leaks strategy. Now to give you both sides of this, if you saw Sean Hannity less Andy McCarthy, who's a former sun and district in New York assistant United States attorney who have a lot of respect for he urged caution a bit and said, just to be clear on this, he said, we don't have all the facts yet, and I don't want to get, you know me. I don't like to get out ahead of stop because if you're proven wrong, you know, obviously hurts your credibility. I refused to do that. It's a simple calculation on my part about getting you the facts and not putting you in a bad spot either. So I do want to give you both sides and I'll tell you, I feel. That's a bad tax. Joe. If you're investigating me and you're texting your girlfriend at the time about a coordinated strategy to release information about a Pfizer warned about Carter page ladies and gentlemen, you know how sensitive that information is. We could be talking about potential criminality here, serious criminality among stroke in page depending on what exactly they leak. This could be very, very serious this revelation. It also brings the Justice department into the fold, and the argument that this was just a few rogue FBI agents here now goes out what you could throw that argument. I when it's silly, but the left always has an excuse, right, right. But McCarthy did say this and he is right. There is a strategy in law enforcement in general, and he brought up, he's right. He's even the terminology uses right? They call it tickling the wire where sometimes information will be leaked out to the media in an effort to maybe tease out who the bad guy is. You get what I'm saying. I mean, I'm trying to think I'll give you an example from the protection. And when I was a secret service said, and I was doing a motorcade and I'm not going to say what country, but we had gotten information that these media people had gotten an advance hold of our motorcade route, which is obviously a bad thing because if a terrorist is it was not a particularly dangerous country, but it was a country I was concerned about because of some past there that the media had gotten a hold of our motorcade route. So I worked with some people. Let's just say to leak information to the media through channels that was actually inaccurate was the wrong and sure enough. They printed the wrong motorcade route news, which was great. Everybody was like, hey, look at a motorcade. I was the wrong one now. That was done intentionally dumped to throw any potential attacker who would think about setting up at advance on our motorcade route off the set. So tickling the wire there is he's right. It's not. It's not common, I wouldn't say, but it does happen. So McCarthy says, listen, everybody take a breath for a second. And let's find out if that's, in fact what they were doing now, again, much respect to and the alum. I disagree with them, but I actually, he's not even saying, I think he skeptical to, he's just saying, take a breath. So I agree with him on that. We should always take a breath. I'm just saying, based on the available evidence, I think it's pretty clear what happened here. Why Joe?.

Andy McCarthy FBI Joe Sean Hannity Justice department Donald Trump senior manager investigator New York deputy director assistant United States attorn Carter
"senior manager" Discussed on AP News

AP News

02:03 min | 3 years ago

"senior manager" Discussed on AP News

"Plans for delivery delays after Brexit AP correspondent Charles de LA desma reports the pharmaceutical group says. Uncertainty in the Brexit negotiations has led to planning for no, deal scenario, with a senior manager making it clear that patient, safety is the company's main priority, concern is growing in Britain about a no, deal Brexit abruptly ending forty years of cohesion and triggering tariffs I'm boulder checks that could delay shipments of everything from food and fuel to clothing on cars the larger fear, is that Britain could drop out of Europe wide agreements the Devon areas. Such as aviation and prescription drugs. Even, the dirt on the grounds making climate change worse according. To a study. Published in the journal nature plans capture massive amounts of carbon and pump it into the soil where it. Usually stays for Hundreds or thousands of years observations taken from across the globe show as temperatures have warmed Beccaria and fungi. In the soil are becoming more active study says these turbocharged microbes are feeding on dead leaves. And plants and releasing more heat trapping carbon dioxide into the, air researchers, have analyzed sensor readings soil measurements plant growth data, and satellite observations and what's the, most comprehensive study yet of the climate change, impacts of soil scientists say is the world continues to warm the soil will release even more carbon that it's been holding Australian golfer Jared Lyles opted not to seek. Further treatment in his long fight against leukemia Lyle who's. Suffered recurrences of the disease since first being diagnosed as a teenager will receive palliative care at home in a post on. Lyles Facebook page his wife, says vile, who's thirty six has reached his. Limit and that he and his doctors had agreed a positive outcome was no longer, achievable Lyles wife says he's given everything. He's got to give and his poor.

Jared Lyles Britain Charles de LA desma Lyle Brexit senior manager Europe Devon leukemia forty years
"senior manager" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:35 min | 3 years ago

"senior manager" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"And i'm susanna palmer from bloomberg world headquarters as we've been reporting the art all night festival in trenton is the scene of a mass shooting this morning the mercer county prosecutor says at least one person is dead and twenty were injured including four critically when two suspects opened fire during the crowded festival that showcases local art it happened about three this morning the prosecutor says one of the suspects that thirty three year old man was killed the yield curve is a big deal had you might want to be watching the treasury market yield curve which has been flattening and moving toward inversion a signal that has historically preceded recessions will be in focus this week traders will be on the lookout for any signals from policymakers who have speeches lined up in the us and at a european central bank conference in portugal the main event is an appearance by fed chair jerome powell but also this week the saint louis feds james bullard and the atlanta fed's rafael bostick both of whom have expressed concern about the risk of inversion we'll speak the ten year note was last quoted out yield of two point nine two percent when you watch baseball on tv you probably watch more for the graphic that shows you whether the pitches on target then you do the empire but that may change for a while is bloomberg's joan doniger reports the reason a fight over ownership of the technology a week after opening day sports media technology sued mlb advanced media for patent infringement and trade secret debt sports media claims major league baseball digital media arm poached a senior manager violated a.

joan doniger fed portugal mercer county bloomberg world senior manager mlb susanna palmer bloomberg baseball rafael bostick atlanta james bullard jerome powell prosecutor trenton thirty three year nine two percent
"senior manager" Discussed on WSB-AM

WSB-AM

01:31 min | 3 years ago

"senior manager" Discussed on WSB-AM

"And the senior manager food nutrition outreach with dairy alliance appreciate the info was wonderful to be here okay now that we are informed about the best dairy products for our kids especially for the summer for adults as well you know it is graduation season and were often thinking of what do we give to the graduate sometimes a nice book will inspire as well as educate and one that would be a great gift is called i've been thinking reflections prayers and meditations for a meaningful life the author is maria shriver mother of four peabody award winning emmy award winning journalist and producers she's written numerous books many number one on the new york times bestseller list and we had a chance to talk about what she's been thinking about i on her mind her family proud of all four of our children and i know their dad does to a about our four children they're healthy they're kind of they're loving and they bring so much joy to my life so that has been my greatest purpose is my greatest purpose and my work you mentioned with alzheimer's is also oh my purpose and i think living meaningful life you wanna have some purpose in your life that's larger than yourself that's what i say to my kids all the time it's cool to have ambition it's cool to you know think about what your career but you've got to find something that's bigger than you they get you up in the morning and that makes you feel good about what you're putting out into the world how important have you found gratitude to be in your life.

peabody award emmy award alzheimer senior manager maria shriver new york times
"senior manager" Discussed on Inside the Spa Business | Spa

Inside the Spa Business | Spa

02:20 min | 3 years ago

"senior manager" Discussed on Inside the Spa Business | Spa

"Word to describe these current relationship that i have with my car mental or frankly any of the mentors that i've had over the course of my life but i do believe that as you grow involve this essentially different mental qualities and attributes become important depending on what stage of your life you're at that usually means that you need a different person to fill that mental role so it's kind of half to identify any one person that is being that big influence on my life the reality is i think there's four professional mentos in life intels really that have guided me and got me to the point where i am today all right that's great so what was your most difficult or your worst business decision well that's another interesting question trent i guess the most difficult and ultimately what turned out the probably be the best decision that i've made was to demoted a senior manager in my division at the sydney two thousand olympics now this is a guy that was twenty years my senior he was a former olympian himself he had lots and lots of political connections thought with just a few months to go before we went into games time i knew that he wouldn't be able to get his job done bring in someone new at such a late stage of course was going to be pretty risky but i figured that finally was pretty much guaranteed if i didn't make the change so there was a risk if i bought someone else in that they would fail but i just felt if i kept going with this guy that finally was pretty much assured now as it turned out i was able to find elissa role for him in the village so he was still part of his home olympics which i think is a really important thing because you know working at his home olympics meant the world and if if he had not been able to be part of that it would have absolutely crushed the guy oh and incidentally the guy that i board in did a fantastic job and it was very very tough decision at the time because again this was a guy that was he was an olympian he was part of our national team once upon a time and this was his home olympics it's the dream of.

senior manager sydney elissa twenty years
"senior manager" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

The Lawfare Podcast

01:47 min | 3 years ago

"senior manager" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

"This these programs were to the best of your understanding approved by the commander in chief legally approved by the attorney general and supported by the director of the cia who i point out at the time was the former democratic staff director of this committee is that correct that's correct senator you said that you were not a senior manager when those programs work right is that correct that's correct was john brennan a member of the senior intelligence service and the deputy executive director at the time a senior manager in your opinion senator i believe mr brennan was the deputy exter of the agency at that time and you'd consider that i senior manager physician at the cia i believe it's the number four position for john brennan who was confirmed to be the director by the following members of this committee senator warner senator feinstein center heinrich senator collins center kings and or mansion senator wyden and senator rubio let's turn the question about the tapes that were destroyed in two thousand five did any lawyer at any time in any organization of the federal government say there was a legal prohibition to destroy this types senator they did not they were very consistent that there was no legal requirement to preserve the tapes because of the written record and it's your it's your testimony that there is a written record that fully documents whatever may or may not have happened senator yes and there were two reviews done of the written record by the office of general counsel and the office of the inspector general in other words the cia has record no different from the federal court system which keeps transcripts and allow sketch drawings but does not allow video recordings and federal courtroom is that correct.

cia staff director senator senior manager deputy executive director john brennan senator wyden federal government general counsel attorney senator warner senator feinste senator rubio
"senior manager" Discussed on The Dan Bongino Show

The Dan Bongino Show

01:38 min | 3 years ago

"senior manager" Discussed on The Dan Bongino Show

"So not only to mccabe not recused himself from the clinton investigation he was a senior manager at the fbi while they they attempted to go through the pfizer court to spy on american citizens with information they never verified and he acknowledged the transcribe testimony right folks this is incompetence at at at a pakalitha level joe if this were you and i in the private sector you know is good as i not only would he bit as well as i do not only would andy mccabe been fired his salary probably would have been clawed back to you think gosh finally the flint prosecution andy mccabe is an upper level manager at the fbi when mike flynn is prosecuted by false statements despite the fact that the f b i agents interviewing flynn acknowledged along with jim komi that flynn was not lying that he was likely truthful during the interview flynn is then subsequently prosecuted for lying to federal agents how is that either said he was being truthful or he wasn't they said on the record he was being truthful jim qomi said it himself well it turns out mccabe and flynn have a past flynn snuck up for someone who he felt was being targeted by mccabe for various reasons and mccabe doesn't like flint i wanna know his role in that as well mccain's role in the flint prosecution i want to know mccabe's role with the fbi agents who interviewed him did he influence them what did he tell them to say did he tell them the same thing.

senior manager fbi pfizer court mike flynn jim komi jim qomi mccain clinton andy mccabe flint
"senior manager" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

WLS-AM 890

02:28 min | 3 years ago

"senior manager" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

"Okay so hours before he was gonna make the the announcement to to the uh alderman american voice the first public opposition to the plan from o'hare's airline carriers american airlines is excited about seeing o'hare transformed into an airport that sets the global standard in airline passenger experience in efficient operation and after eighteen months of multilateral transparency go she asians we were looking forward to supporting the new lease said leslie scott the airline senior manager of global communications but american cannot sign the lease in its current form because of a secret prevision who inserted at the last minute awarding additional gates to united yet just put that in there it will have probably won't read the whole thing the turns out they did it's unclear whether the city would move forward with a new lease agreement if american refuses to sign on in december emanuel and all their in passed an ordinance setting higher airport fees and charges for airlines if the current 35year lease where to expiry may without a new one in place the move was made to provide an incentive for the airlines to reach an agreement on a new lease to avoid paying even higher fees than a new lease would contemplate all right well i'm sure they'll get it worked out yeah for sure kudos to absorb i'm sure they have lawyers somebody read through that stuff all the way right yeah yeah hey was this thing it here before about this is that the extra gates for united i don't recall her yeah that's right here we've got our gwee recall somebody right here in page one hundred and five yeah i know i know i i guess it's good i don't i mean i don't know they say the airlines of pain for i feel is can make it a real hassle to go to the damning report it doesn't mean it's already pretty much of a hassle discos you gotta get halfnaked i am get through to the other side but but with all the construction and everything man a nightmare yeah well whatever blood may be in the longterm than it ends up in super awesome yeah aaand fifty minutes from now i like o'hare i everybody has though airport my like it i.

o'hare leslie scott senior manager eighteen months fifty minutes 35year
"senior manager" Discussed on Risky Business

Risky Business

01:59 min | 3 years ago

"senior manager" Discussed on Risky Business

"That was at him while or they with a check of the week security news okay we have one announcement this week at last season is hiring two rawls one in sydney and one in mountain view they're both security engineering leadership roles one with a local skirt and one global they are looking for a security team lead for sydney it is a small but growing team you'll be exposed to massive scale smart people big personal responsibility conferences and you'll get to travel the bay area gig is in mountain view it is for a senior manager of global security engineering this role is the global late for the entire product security team that includes the bay area austin and sydney help shape at lessons capability work with smart people get support from the sea to your and executive visibility if you are interested in that more information on these roles do email shawntel parma see palme at last in dot com that's the p i l m e r at a blessing dot com cp i l m e r at at lesson dot com of also linked through through the job ads in this week's show notes and you can check them out there okay it is time for this week's patriot of you now and this is about as bread and butter infosec as a gets travis mcpake is a senior security engineer on the net flicks cloud security same and he's been doing the rounds recently talking about a tool named repo kid it's a tool that he developed that helps organizations aws permissions amazon web services permissions are sorry complicated that it's quite difficult to know where to even start when you want to lock them down sowed netflixing came up with a simple approach give development teams all the privileges that they likely two years and then just nuke the ones that are left unused after a certain period here's travis talking about repo kit aws has a really powerful role based access control system identity and access management for those familiar with aw.

rawls sydney senior manager palme travis mcpake engineer aws executive two years
"senior manager" Discussed on WJR 760

WJR 760

01:52 min | 3 years ago

"senior manager" Discussed on WJR 760

"Of volkswagen senior manager who pleaded guilty to covering up diesel emissions cheating is due back in court on wednesday correspondent jan johnson reports oliver schmidt we'll be back in detroit federal court where prosecutors will argue that the former executive in charge of vw is engineering and environmental office in michigan followed a script of deception around the cheat the use of software to create phony emissions test results on nearly six hundred thousand vehicles prosecutors want him to spend eight years in jail defence lawyers are recommending no more than forty months his lawyers say schmidt accepts full responsibility but they also say he's not as much to blame as of there's i'm jan johnson colin kaepernick as the winner of these sports illustrated muhammad ali legacy award correspondent john stolnis has more ollie's widow says the former forty nine ers quarterback is getting this year's award for using sports as a means to change the world she prays capper nick as being a man who stands for his beliefs and social justice and racial equality unwavered by personal sacrifices ever since cap exterted kneeling during the national anthem last year the magazine says he's inspired other nfl players to do the same in the name of social change however even as multiple teams had quarterback injuries this season he remained unsigned throughout the year i'm john stolnis and after more than forty years upon tiak silver dong will be imploded later this morning the eighty two thousand plus stadium was a home for the detroit lions and the piston's according to the the first implosion will break the metal beams that are used to keep the roof inflated at the perimeter of the stadium the rest of the demolition will be conducted in phases and i just want to mention just got a really nice call from a listener who shared some of his wonderful memories about that stadia murder wjr news time six.

senior manager oliver schmidt executive vw colin kaepernick john stolnis ollie nick detroit lions jan johnson detroit michigan social justice nfl murder forty months eight years forty years
"senior manager" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

01:40 min | 4 years ago

"senior manager" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"Here's is on the panel it will be a emceed by salima salazar news anchor of telemundo washington dc sharon boulevard chairman of the fairfax county board of supervisors colonel edwin rossler junior chief of police for affects county police department second lieutenant almost smith fairfax county sheriff's office a dalia paul chick fairfax county school board member gustavo taurus executive director casa nicolas cats senior manager of legal services casa and simon sandovol motion berg immigrant advocacy programme legal director at the legal aid justice center let me tell you what this is because they've been doing this in california as well and congressmen have been hosting these things this is not a community for him this is not a town hall this is a howto of voided deportation lesson that's what this is going to be look at who's on the panel look at the words there you know your rights no your rights and ask questions about law enforcement and immigration policies you're not on this panel are you does anyone who truly represents your interests and your position on illegal immigration in your county in your state in your region are they represented here no they're not your represented here though triple eight six thirty w m a l tom in chantilly your first stop tom.

chairman senior manager director california law enforcement tom salima salazar fairfax county colonel edwin rossler dalia paul gustavo taurus executive director simon sandovol chantilly eight six thirty w