30 Burst results for "Senior Lecturer"

How 'Bout Dem Apple Seeds

Short Wave

03:33 min | 6 d ago

How 'Bout Dem Apple Seeds

"Okay thomas we are talking about apple's today. Why don't you tell our listeners. Even got started down this weird little apple path so a few weeks ago i saw video of a dude eating apple from the bottom. And you know. I it up to the pitch me and at the time all i wanted to find out from the team was whom amongst us was with me in eating the entire. It was just way to start to get the conversation going. Yeah i remember. And i was horrified to find out so many members of our team eat the whole apple. We were pretty divided down the middle. Yeah that's right and the discussion led to the possible dangers of eating the apple seeds. Some of us had heard they might be toxic. Some of us hadn't so here we are chatting away about them apples and the science behind whether or not you can eat the core why we are here. Today is pretty cool. Yeah totally and i found a food. Scientists to help explain it all could also My name is islami outs. For last shoddy. I am senior lecturer in the department of food. Science outsider jackets ally investment technology. Islamia is a few scientists beast in nigeria and she told me on the one hand apples. Are these magical fruits. That are really nutritious. And good for you apple's Poplar fruits us are reaching nutrients such as anti oxidants minera house vitamese dietary fiber is an auditor nutrients but their seats are different than their flesh. Yeah exactly what i'd always heard. Is that apple. Seeds have like some amount of cyanide in them you know like generally not something that is good for humans i mean yes and no i asked islam yacht to explain it and it's a little more complicated seeds that is in the center of harpool copy above causing poisoning because the seed contains it compounds. That is called. I mean. I lean mick. Dolan is a compound that's found and lots of natural plants and things that humans eat such as apples but also peaches apricots and almonds. They're is a similar compound and cassava he staple in nigeria and on its own mattie in seeds a midland is usually harmless to people no concerns there but what is potentially concerning is when digestive enzymes in our bodies come in contact with the michelin and when they combine the enzyme breaks away the sugars in the dylan and leaves cyanide which could potentially lead to cyanide poisoning. What do you mean. Potentially thomas say more. Well the conditions have to be just right mattie for this to be more of a concern for starters the midland in apple seeds is encased by pretty tough outer layer in order to expose them make the land to our digestive enzymes have to chew those seeds really really. Well okay i get it and even whole eating monsters like you. Thomas are generally crushing those seeds down to a fine pace with your teeth right exactly. Mattie as much as i love that tidal more importantly though there's not enough apple seeds in one or two apples to really show in effect on our bodies the amount of cyanide that does get formed if at all our livers are pretty good at filtering out those hawks

Apple Department Of Food Islamia Minera House Nigeria Thomas Dolan Mick Mattie
Authorship Attribution of Lennon McCartney Songs

Data Skeptic

06:31 min | 6 months ago

Authorship Attribution of Lennon McCartney Songs

"Mark Glickman and I'm at Harvard University as a senior lecturer in statistics, statistics is a topic that the audience really loves hearing about before we get into the main topic. Can you give us a little bit of background on the areas of stats that you studied or maybe those that interest you the most? Yeah, well. What got me into statistics in the first place? Actually was my interest in the Game Chess I've always been interested in how chess players get rated when they play in tournaments in other. Other words when you go to a tournament, you get a numerical rating. Where if you have two players have ratings, you could actually determine the profitability that player defeats at other, and that was something that I was always interested in these chess rating systems, and I ended up getting really into statistics and the mathematical aspects of these kinds of systems and I developed a couple systems that are in use these days, especially in online gaming called the Licko system. So that's really got me into statistics in. In, the first place and I really have a passion for teaching, so that's a big part of my statistics life, and then much more recently got into the intersection between statistics and music, and this Beatles authorship attribution project is one of the bits of work also got involved with a student who is really the primary driver of this work on basically how to use statistically generates music that sounds like Corrales, and so we have a paper. That's GonNa, be coming very shortly in that area so. So, yes, a music's become a much bigger focus in my statistics like these days. Is there anything obviously interest could drive it but I'm curious if there's any computational component to it may be the availability of computers to run big simulations, and that sort of thing has that influenced the ability to ask interesting questions along these lines? Yeah, generally it helps I. mean I tend not to gravitate to problems which can only be solved by having the appropriate hardware to be able to crank through the data? Having access to good computing definitely makes a big difference I think we can take for granted that any listener must be aware of the Beatles and their influence on music. Regardless of what they like should they could a few, but tell us a little bit more background for those that don't know the discography. What were the types of problems you were looking to? To approach this whole project essentially started when I met my main collaborator for this project Jason Brown. When the two of US happened to be at this conference in Prince, Edward Island! We just happened to be talking. After I gave a talk some material. Actually that's related to rating systems for chess players, and we just happened to stumble on our mutual interest. Interest in music, and in the Beatles, and he was telling me that he had gained a little bit of infamy about fifteen years ago, where he used essentially a forty-eight analysis, decomposing the sounds from the starting court of a hard day's night to figure out the actual instrumentation of the cord, because that really been something that was in pretty serious dispute so. So he published a little article audit and got him some attention, and he was telling me since then one of the things that he was particularly interested in was being able to represent Sohn's particularly Beatles songs in particular format in his area of math, which is graph theories, essentially representing music in the form of essentially graphs or networks and he wanted to. Be Able to use it to be able to distinguish authorship of different Beatles songs like maybe there'd be stylistic differences that would be evident in these representations, anyone really making a lot of headway and whole problem of being able to sing wish authorship is something that's much more firmly in the wheelhouse of a statistician, so I told him it sounds like he probably something I would want to be heavily involved in and so we ended up starting this collaboration, and that was kind of started it all, so we tried lots of different sorts of things. Things to take the music and be able to figure out. How can you predict authorship from musical features, and that's essentially what led us down the path to the work that eventually got published so from my perspective, wearing my data scientist hat, I would say you have a fixed data set that is partially labeled. Does that feel like the right framing for you? The main question of interest really and just to take a step back is that there are a handful of songs by the Beatles and again there's nothing about this problem that has to. To be specific to be spent for our interests there handful songs by the Beatles that or of disputed authorship, and so the idea is that you start off with a data set where the labels which is to say the authorship of Lennon McCartney songs is known that's known because the Beatles Bayside interviews in various information that's been gathered over the years is of note authorship, so we have a data set where the labels are no, and then in addition to that we have for all of those songs. We have a whole bunch of features A. A whole bunch of information about various musical aspects of the songs and idea is to form a statistical model that uses those features to predict the labels, and then once you establish that relationship then you apply to the songs of disputed authorship to see the predictions going to be based on that relationship, so for non composers who might be listening? Perhaps they could be intimidated by this problem. Saying music is all about creativity and unpredictability in these sorts of things. Is this truly assault problem from that point of view well? Yes, solvable a loaded word. I mean we certainly made our best attempt by Best Ibiza? After making lots of attempts that were not terribly predictive, we finally stumbled on said features and a statistical approach that seems to do a pretty reasonable job. Making predictions, the simple answer I suppose is yes, it's possible at solvable in the sense that there is information that you can extract. That is predictive of other ships. I could be pretty. Pretty concrete about this one thing that we knew before going into this work, and this is something that has been well known by musicologists studying. Beatles, music, which is that Paul? McCartney songs in particular tend to have melodies that tend to move around a lot like Paul McCartney, had a musical vocal range, fairly wide and part of that tended to be reflected in his moving melody by contrast John Lennon. had a reasonable vocal range tended to write melodies that didn't move around very much like he used a lot of repeated notes, or the vocal movements would stay very close and pitch, and that's characteristic of a lot of John Lennon songs, and so we knew even going into the problem that you know. musicologists have identified differences in the way that each of these songwriters would write music, so we knew that there were features that could be quantified and picked up. Up and used as distinguish irs in these classification models.

Beatles Chess Paul Mccartney Harvard University Mark Glickman United States Senior Lecturer John Lennon Edward Island Mccartney Lennon Mccartney Jason Brown Sohn Corrales IRS Assault Scientist
How the Pandemic Has Changed the Way We Sleep

Coronavirus Daily Briefing

03:43 min | 8 months ago

How the Pandemic Has Changed the Way We Sleep

"According to preliminary results of a study of sixteen hundred people from sixty countries, forty six percents of people reported poor sleep during the pandemic. That's up from just twenty five percent before the pandemic insomnia and vivid weird dreams, both caused by the increased stress of the time we're living through has been evident anecdotally and as indicated by a fourteen percent uptick in sleep. Medication Prescriptions Melatonin sales in over the counter supplement for the natural hormone that induces sleepiness are up forty four percents. Philip Musket a professor of Psychiatry at Columbia University Medical Center said he's avoiding prescribing medications to patients preferring to offer sleep hygiene tips. He's seen that actually staying asleep is the biggest problem for most people and says some of the primary factors causing that is that people are lacking in structure and exercise. Stain active can help you sleep more soundly and boost your immune system Dr Musk's also advises sticking to a regular sleep schedule and avoiding naps during the day. The good news according to Kathy Goldstein physician at the University of Michigan and an associate professor of neurology at the Schools Sleep Disorders Center is that what most people are experiencing is acute insomnia or quitting the Wall Street Journal having difficulty for or staying asleep a few times a week for three months or less and quotes, the third of people will experience acute insomnia at some point in their lives usually caused by some stressor. stressor in their life like say a pandemic the key doctor. Goldstein says though is not letting the issue. Become a chronic one quote. It's important to avoid associating your bed or bedroom with a place where you were awake. Experts recommend that if you can't fall asleep or wake up in the middle of the night and are unable to go back to sleep after twenty minutes get out of bed and do something, relaxing and quotes. Natasha Bouillon a Phoenix based family physician at one medical, says most people's sleep problems right now either stem from a lack of normal schedule or general anxiety about the pandemic. Some tips she recommends mindfulness through meditation, exercise or cognitive behavioral therapy. To maintain a consistent sleep schedule, turn devices off an hour before going to sleep and make your sleeping space a device free zone, consider even ditching your smartphones alarm and getting an actual alarm clock, as for anyone, experiencing vivid dreams or nightmares Melinda Jackson, a senior lecturer at the Turner Institute for Brain and Mental Health at Monash University in Melbourne, says quote. During Times of stress, there's a release of narrow chemicals that can trigger these vivid dreams and nightmares in some people end quotes. And, Dearly Barrett a dream researcher at Harvard Medical School notes that waking up frequently throughout the night can also cause people to remember their dreams better. Contribute to the sense that your dreams are more vivid than usual. guardless of how? Your sleep has been disrupted. Or why here are a few more sleep? Hygiene tips to leave with quoting the Wall Street Journal eat at regular times than snacking day. Avoid, napping or compensating for poor night of sleep by going to bed, unusually early limit caffeine and avoid alcohol avoid electronic devices one to two hours before going to sleep, but if you do use a blue light filter and try to look at content that is not stressful. Get Bright Light in the morning. Try to find a workspace that isn't in your bedroom and stop working at a specific our and make time for relaxing activities end quote.

Schools Sleep Disorders Center Philip Musket Wall Street Journal Natasha Bouillon Kathy Goldstein Melatonin Columbia University Medical Ce Associate Professor Of Neurolo Professor Of Psychiatry Harvard Medical School Dr Musk University Of Michigan Dearly Barrett Caffeine Phoenix Melinda Jackson Family Physician
Coronavirus: Trump says China wants him to lose re-election

Monocle 24: The Globalist

04:12 min | 9 months ago

Coronavirus: Trump says China wants him to lose re-election

"The US President Donald Trump has said. He believes join us. Handling of corona virus proves it wants to make him lose his reelection bid in. November trump has been blaming China for the global pandemic since. The outbreak began to unpack all this. I'm joined by Isabel. Hilton the editor of China. Dialogue unto Bike Load Harrington who senior lecturer in American politics to Demonstrate University. Welcome both back to monocle. Twenty four glow. If I may start with you what is it? Trump is doing is trying to find someone to blame for his poor polling numbers and also for the difficult economic situation the. Us is facing. Now yes I think that would be a lot to do with it. M A as as I've been watching all of this unfold. I DID WONDER EM. You know how he would try to frame the blame. I suppose you could say because obviously the the party would be to deflect any blame away from himself and I I did think they were a number of options you know he could have gone for perhaps blaming the previous administration. That's always convenient 'em but that's a bit too historic. No so no and he could have blamed the the Democrats example or any of the Democrats would again that sort of puts attention onto opponents which you might not want to do and so the the the kind most substantial source of flame I suppose in perhaps the most obvious from his perspective would be to blame the Chinese and obviously U. S. China relationship was already A complex and and strange shall we say and but it's obviously gone to new heights. No but trump is you know looking towards Novembre realizing that you know this now is going to be the defining issue of his presidency or via four year. Or perhaps more and I'm he needs to start fighting back so he has now. I guess I have to ask this question from you. Do you think there is any credibility whatsoever to Donald? Trump's latest claim that he seen evidence corona virus actually originated in Chinese laboratory. Well all I can say is you know. I really moments of of of dangerous stress for for for the world like this. We can only listen to experts and scientists and you know people who who sort of this kind of thing for a living so I would be slow to take the president's words on board based on that and now code ninety nine deeds initially give Donald trump and approval bump but things have changed quite a lot sooner seventeen they have and you know. I suppose a very convenient response to that might be. You can say well I don't believe the polls which is a you know something that he came out with the other day now. Obviously you know. He's had his sorts of 'EM AUNTIE EM mainstream media platform since day one and his supporters at really embraced that I think it's part of his appeal that you know he's He's other he is outside that Sort of Knowing the news bubble if he kind of makes his own news and so so choosing to not believe the polls is very convenient. I do have to say though. I mean when you look at his daily pulled raising generally speaking. They're pretty consistent you know. He's in the low forty s all the time. This current crisis hasn't really moved out in in any meaningful way and I think you know He. He lost a little bit of support way back early on in his presidency near the start but ever since then his supporters have remained. I would say unconditionally loyal and I think things would have to change quite a lot between now and November. And maybe they will you know economically if nothing else am before his his his loyal and support base will step away from him and then obviously his opponents sort of has his own em issues and shortcomings so trump would probably be very very keen to get back on the campaign trail as soon as possible. Because that's where he really shines those rallies are wearing these people come in you know when they have a very sort of a A positive connection I suppose he's being deprived the moment

Donald Trump United States China President Trump Isabel Demonstrate University Harrington Editor Senior Lecturer
Science, Interrupted - lives, loves, labs upended by COVID19

Science Friction

08:20 min | 9 months ago

Science, Interrupted - lives, loves, labs upended by COVID19

"Welcome to science friction on the Tash Mitchell and this is science interrupted and possibly radio interrupted because I have a puppy snoring very audibly and loudly at my fate right now working from home folks. It's tremendously difficult to think of not of not finishing the work. It's tremendously difficult booking with. Todd's is always a race against time as your money formation but the majority of the information are actually Mike. God really this pandemic has swift in Lancaster. Nami hasn't gotten caught us. All by complete surprise wherein collective state of shock really and for many scientists so much at stake use of experiments field work results. Clinical trials patients students the lives of lab animals the consequences for so many Deeply personal and in some cases could affect the lives of thousands of others and other species too so today on the show. Three scientists with three. Clemson's how are you? How are you going? Yeah yeah good bevy. What's been over and I met this morning by spin. Had this zone call with a bunch of other people from Perth and she was basically lap. Hold us on. He's a roller coaster. Look to Paula. Magni won fame lab Australia competition last year. And she's a senior lecturer in forensic science at Murdoch University in Perth at my husband across line pharmacist in Perth so possibly meeting people affected by Kobe. Nine hundred every single day but right now Paul easing Singapore where she also works as deputy dean of Murdoch University's campus there. Her baby daughter with her and Shayna husband don't know when they'll be able to be reunited. He was going to be concerned. Who are going to be concerned as well but this is probably the best option for the moment. We hope that these are going to be only for a while but for the moment it is what it is and not say his daughter for very many many months. Yeah so they can see each other only by by video call. That is a huge gift. Imagine these happening ten years ago or more could be better than years ago but the situation is changing. So much isn't it? It's still very unclear what's going to happen with international flights around the world. Yeah absolutely impossible to make any predictions at the moment. Also because Australia is getting way better especially Western Australia. Because he's very much aware from every everybody else. Singapore is experiencing a second important peak of cases compared to other countries. We are leaving this situation pretty pretty well. Syncopal learned a lot from this SARS situation and we didn't have many cases at all until a few weeks ago when they borders. Were going to be closed. Many people from all over the world wanted to come back to Singapore and they came back or seek your Italian and the saints. Coming out of Italy of Bain very very distressing during this pandemic rot from early on. What does that make food for you and your family in Italy? I speak with them every day and I make sure that they have everything they need. I've managed to the to do online shopping for them from Singapore to have them home. My grandmother she turned ninety seven last week. And the she's safe and sound in a healthcare facility but this is the first time in live in which he doesn't see my mom my Auntie for more than two days in a row and they edge facilities at being locked down so yeah. It's an interesting learning curve for for the family and there's also a big exercise Of Trust for the words day in the facilities Singapore has now gone into a lockdown and polar and colleagues having to move really fast to put their university courses online. She's also supporting students around the world with their projects now influx and Maija grant application processes of import on pause to then this Horon Research. You'll work as a forensic scientist into an expert on many crime scene investigations in Italy. You're now doing forensic science research here in Australia. And you shared this curious photo with me of what you describe as your babies back in the land in Perth in Western Australia. And it had me totally intrigued. What is it a fraud all? So my baby's baby Bob Nichols not people say barnacles as babies about Research I USED NICHOLS FOR CLEVELAND. Investigation when aboard US found in a in aquatic environments in the Ocean. So because bunny goes at annoying. They attach on anything that he's flogging. It is underwater and they stuck on that we can identify what they Ya. So where is the body confront? From how long the bodies in water and also the journey the talk the body from the primary campsie what was dumped in the ocean to the place where the body was found so they can be very interesting but it is not that to do this kind of research. We need to have colonies of Barnacles in in the lab so we keep having them in in Aquaria but the they eat small because Kobe algae so we had to grow the algae as well. You can now go to the supermarket and Buy Balaji and beside that. I work input on seeking to. Malaysia is whether it is the study of insects and we have colonies of flos is in as well is very difficult to keep up with them with the colonies at the moment when a when they laboratories have been shot because often of the issue that is going on. It's incredible work so you've got. These baby barnacles back in the lab in Perth. And will they die because the I guess? Barnacles barnacles one concern but there are labs all over the world with experimental animals of all shapes sizes and varieties and species from Retz to mice and onwards barnacles to that possibly going to be compromised or cold. Because of this global shutdown. I will say maybe the research would be compromised. The life of the of the animal is probably not because all the university have the ethical necessity of looking after all the animals that they have so all. The university have in place measures to look after all the animals in the different labs. I was a bit dramatic because I miss my babies. I guess when I think about my Banoco sometimes you feel like what he's the. Utd All my job in the big scheme in the big picture of things really for researchers. Like me probe's is a big wakeup call about the the importance of your search but at the same time that the world is big and many other things are important on a different scale. So I remember the first had with Bundy cars and the head. The mother of this guy that was found on the shore there was crying on this loss and I was the only personal gather information that could give a piece bring justice to this family bring closure to the victim so these another victim. He's not a cove in nineteen victim but my research he's

Perth Singapore Australia Italy Western Australia Ocean Murdoch University Tash Mitchell Nami Lancaster Clemson Todd Paula Mike UTD Shayna Magni United States Syncopal Bob Nichols
"senior lecturer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:47 min | 10 months ago

"senior lecturer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Is a senior lecturer in the school of sports health and exercise science where she ran me through some breathing exercises that will quite grueling and also involved a fair amount of drooling this device can be used to train your inspiration muscles your breathing muscles I'm basically if I take this to Paul this is the valve and you can only breed if you are not files but the way you write to not valve is by putting in a certain amount of effort so it's a bit like blowing up a really hard to believe yes yeah I thought that is a form of breathing muscle training that's one of the original forms of freedom also trade at all schools yes I believe the size yeah yeah that will train your breathing muscles but what we could to try and get you today is thirty breaths what I'm usually gonna date is give you some to shape because so slippery yeah the K. right I think you'll pendants for they should be Kathy but you have to pop up I truly if it is not so easy yes we just got the code tied to simply the exercises I thought we were going to guys like nice relaxing yoga class actually he truly go does flux again key I'd love to see the level big depressing because you can hear the yeah going through the files to the remember just pools and then trying to get rid of me yeah we should bring about the aim of this warm up is to strengthen my breathing muscles the interesting thing is that the reason for doing it isn't just so that you can breathe in and out more powerfully or to make you better at throwing up billions for that matter it actually helps the other muscles in your body to do a better job this kind of a hierarchy in the body as to what areas get blood flow and hence oxygen in the nutrients that we made in the breathing muscles are really important enough so if you'll say you're running ready ready halt and your lexicon I want more oxygen if your breathing muscles Russo saying I want more oxygen your breathing muscles gonna have priority so what happens is they still got blood fly away from your working legs so one of the things that happens with breathing muscle training he's we were chiefs that conflict if you like so you can sort of train your breathing muscles to become more efficient yes and then that means that there's more oxygen available for the rest of your body it's not just about having strong last night and I just have a knock on effects on exercise performance excellent goods so that's the first to go so now I've done my woman time to retest my breathing prowess before the warm up my high school was one for seven that's a bit like the weight I can lift with my in spiritual muscles I thought I was actually pretty good but Mitch told me her high school is over two hundred pool con only get anywhere near that five one okay.

senior lecturer
Espresso May Be Better Ground Coarser

60-Second Science

03:14 min | 1 year ago

Espresso May Be Better Ground Coarser

"Making a cup of coffee isn't exactly rocket science but a new study shows that a background in math and analytical chemistry doesn't hurt because researchers who applied their skills in materials science and modeling to Brewing Espresso have made a groundbreaking discovery contrary to popular belief using fewer beans and of course grind. We'll give you a more consistent shot. Their work appears in the Journal. Matter if you're a coffee AFICIONADO. You've no doubt noticed that some days you may get a great espresso other days not so much even with the same coffee machine the same settings to understand that variability the researchers developed a mathematical model to explore. How coffee is extracted or dissolved as water passes through the bed of grounds basically. What we did was to start by writing down some equations which apply to just a single ground. Jamie foster a senior lecturer in mathematics and Physics at the University of Portsmouth so less intimidating task because in a real Kofi bed you've got millions and millions of politics Packed together in this very complicated way and so more track to the problem is down the equations on a single ground to model the entire coffee bed foster and his colleagues copied that equation millions of times stirred in a bit more math and then poured on the theoretical water. The model tells us what we should expect in an ideal situation where all of the copies being contacted by all of the water equally. Christopher Hendin a computational chemists at the University of Oregon who also took part in the study and indeed the model describes reality very well for particular grind settings where there's a sufficient amount of large particles so that the water can flow freely through that bed. But when you grind sufficiently fine. That's when we started to see in real life a divergence from the expectation that the model was telling us with the fine grind. Some shots were stronger than predicted but some were considerably weaker which flies in the face of conventional wisdom thinking. If you want a strong a cup of coffee as well outgrowing it. Fine because By doing that will have smaller politics in grounds. Unassuming Apostolos will have a higher surface area and dishonest Extraction from the grains but what the researchers found is if you call them overdue. The grinding will ends up. Happening is the associate The clog up the gaps where the waters trying to flow on that actually hampers the extraction role than helping in the same is true for the amount of coffee. You start with so that less. Can counter intuitively end up tasting more since this article has come out. There has been a tremendous amount of activity on twitter arguing discussing just general excitement and interest in the project and independent of whether this helps make more reproducible. Coffee or not. This is a tremendous success that we have got millions of people to have read a scientific article in engaged with Science Butts. Great Success for scientific literacy and we can all drink to that

Jamie Foster Twitter University Of Portsmouth Christopher Hendin Senior Lecturer University Of Oregon Kofi
House Rules Committee meets to set terms of impeachment debate

Monocle 24: The Globalist

08:02 min | 1 year ago

House Rules Committee meets to set terms of impeachment debate

"US President Donald Trump is facing two articles of impeachment abuse of power and obstruction of Congress. The House Rules Committee will meet today to discuss next step for a full house. Vote to impeach trump. Possibly as early as tomorrow well here to tell us more about his cloud Harrington senior lecturer in American politics the month. That university took us through the time. Fine Line that we can expect now. Well Good morning and yet so there's GonNa be a a significant vote this week as you mentioned where the house would have to consider the two articles of impeachment and so that's pretty much a given that the votes will be am to to move forward. Not least because the the Democrats have a pretty comfortable majority in the house. So that's that's kind of that for the time being and then there would probably be a short period. Were were they at turn away from it. Because of Christmas and New Year and that and as it stands and January seven is the date. That is at pencilled saluting for a Senate trial to begin so as the media coverage previously that the the idea that a Senate Charles is actually actually going to ask you to consider the greater good or and the actual facts is is looking as number by the day as as the kind of the you know the partisan sites sites hunker down so it's just a question of of a wait and see to see you know maybe over Christmas there'd be some reflections by those people who would be in that kind of juror position and in the Senate to see you know they have to ask themselves. Are they going to vote just along party lines or will they actually look at the situation and untrained vote with their conscience. Because I mean we're seeing many moderate Democrats who came to office in two thousand sixteen. Change them lines there from vulnerable states previously held by Republicans but all willing to take the political risk to impeach. Do you think then that Republican senators will join them. I mean will. They sacrifice the dignity of the office and risk irreparably irreparably damaging the GOP to save trump's skin. When did they get fed up with this? Nelson's yes that's the question isn't it. I mean I've been looking to see what certain names or or cropping up and that that might possibly may be am cross party lines when the time come. The time comes and I mean there's a few names that wouldn't be that surprising. I mean Mitt. Romney would be an example. He's you know he's a very well known individual he's also am being critical of trump is is a sort of more of a traditional Republican 'em from the olden days when you know there was more integrity involved m other names at that have cropped up R. M. Susan Collins in Maine and Lisa Murkowski in Alaska. So there's sort of what I would call kind of sensible Republicans you know individuals who have a kind of a conservative political agenda but they are not signing up to D- chopping worldview. So there are some names. I'm On some of this as well and that might possibly consider but it's it's it's a big thing to do I mean crossing party lines is a big deal and obviously you could be left. Possibly an swinging being in the wind further down the line when you're party sort of looks and unreflecting and sees that you happen sorts of 'em Lonzo this. There is one other possibility which I think is deeply unlikely at this point but it is technically possible that the Senate could actually am not go forward with impeachment and actually go for a censure motion motion instead so that something that's being discussed around the margins. But I would say at this point. It's probably a case if the wind is now fully behind the full impeachment process. A what that means is that you know. Trump is very very likely to get off and I just don't know what sort of misses that sense to to everyone. Not least as the president Exactly that that that he is a he can deflect any of this will The the the Senate Majority Leader the Mitch. McConnell in the minority leader Chuck Schumer a planning to meet to talk about the shape of the Senate. Shell should it go ahead now. McConnell is said to want to shorter prevent trump himself apparently is privately pushing for a longer process that would give him the chance to stage a theatrical defense. I mean what what might that be is. It'll just move reality show for him. Well I think I mean he's obviously looking at this. As as I as. I think. Everyone's aware at this point wings and he likes to fight. You Know He. He enjoys the confrontation. He's he's very much about the theatrics you know. He's he's very savvy when it comes to this sort of the the television will aspect of all of this so the idea that this could be a long drawn out process is is not the worst thing for him because he's almost comfortably certain that at the end it will go in his favor with the Senate. I mean you had. Mr Collins sang very recently. I am a live on television that there was zero chance. That's the term that he used 'em that at the president would be removed from office. So this is before the trial is even happened. So that's the sorts of 'em part. He'll digging that. You're you're guessing and so in terms of the the the length of the trial you know the longer it goes on the more a lot of voters Democratic voters will start saying look you know what about twenty twenty. What about healthcare? What about my job? What about the economy etc and Trumpian in supporters will look at and say you know look at this which haunt you know? There's Argonne just getting it in the neck. Were so going to be out of there for him next November rooting firm. Because look at these neurons runs you know trying to get him out of office by any means necessary so a longer all is not necessarily the worst thing for president trump so the Democrats say that the child is rigged. Do you think that's true. Well I don't rigged is the right word but I suppose one would hope you a regular person or people such as ourselves with think that you know people going into a trial on participating as jurors which is basically what the senators would be the and in that process that they go in with an open mind base their decisions on the facts that are put in fun to them and try to keep preconceived notions and You Know Parson ideology and politics extroverted. But I mean even saying those words now it seems laughable than any of that can be the case so rigged in a way Yes yes I suppose Very quickly before we go the fact checkers databases reported to sing in the in the Washington. Post that As of December the tenth Trump has made fifteen thousand four hundred thirteen fourth own misleading claims. It's absolutely indisputable that he is Eliah area why to his supporters like supporters of Boris Johnson. Here in the UK NOT CA. I think it's a you know. There's a phrase from way back at at the beginning of his administration where it were. Somebody came up with the notion that his supporters take him seriously not literally and his opponents. Take him literally not seriously and I think that can account for the the many thousands of 'em lies because his supporters are like. Oh yeah whatever you know. He says stuff he tweets. That's just our guide. That's just how he is. He shoots from the hip you know who cares and so in a way it it. It almost enhances him in a lot of people's minds that that you know he's just he's a norm. Buster on a rule breaker on part of that is just saying what comes into his mouth at the time and then when he's challenged on a light he would go back until down and say it again and say it louder and bigger so there are those who think that this is an asset and then there are other maybe more kind of our regular voters who would have their head in their hands and and just kind of fear for their country at this point cloud. Thanks very much. Indeed that was cleared

Donald Trump Senate President Trump House Rules Committee United States Congress Harrington GOP Senior Lecturer Twenty Twenty Mcconnell Shell Mitt Chuck Schumer Romney Lisa Murkowski Nelson Mr Collins
D.C. Fontana Dead: Pioneering 'Star Trek' Writer Was 80

KNX Midday News with Brian Ping

00:28 sec | 1 year ago

D.C. Fontana Dead: Pioneering 'Star Trek' Writer Was 80

"Trailblazing figure behind Star Trek has died the American film institute's as writer and TV producer D. C. Fontana died yesterday after a brief illness also known as Dorothy Fontana she was credited for writing some of these series best episodes and played a major role in developing the character of Spock including his childhood back history the Hugo award nominee also served as a senior lecturer at the AFI she was eighty years old

American Film Institute Writer Dorothy Fontana Spock Senior Lecturer Eighty Years
Fired Up!

The Sustainable Futures Report

06:03 min | 1 year ago

Fired Up!

"But increasingly read comment while ago posted about the sustainable futures report. The correspondent was concerned that i was trying into politics. The truth is everything is political while we can all do something toward solving the climate crisis. It is only governments and politicians who can make the changes of the magnitude that will make a difference. We are talking about system change after all. I know that many of you listening thing to the sustainable futures report are not in the u._k. I think that even you would have noticed that you k- politics are in some turmoil at the moment in fact this has been going on for three years but it's finally approaching day new mall. I say finally but everything may well have changed by the time you hear this anyway. They situation is the new prime minister has sought and received the authority of the queen to prorogue or suspend parliament of course she couldn't refuse but that's another story. The point at issue is that this would allow the prime minister to govern without parliament and allow how him to complete brexit the u._k.'s departure from the e._u. As he chooses i happen to believe that leaving the ear would be a disaster. Komo concerned if this prime minister can sideline parliament than any prime minister can do it on any issue. That's the reason i spent tuesday in london with your for europe and the yorker remain voice clap. I hope you saw us and hurt us on the evening news on bbc you see i tv and channel. Brexit is a sideshow by comparison with the climate crisis while breaks. It dominates u._k. Politics antics little of significance will be done on climate change all on many other issues that we've been neglecting over the last three years worrying agreeing also is the fact that many permanent brexit tears pacifica's climate deniers if i'm being political in opposing them and so be it in the climate crisis news this week the amazon fires why they're not the only fires why they he may not be as bad as you think a why they may be much more serious in ways you don't expect the future of the consumer society professor ian boyd retiring chief scientific advisor defa has set out his thoughts which looked very much like system change to me and the flying prince. I'll all common offsets making his travel common neutral the fun as in the amazon have been making big news news over the last couple of weeks that destroying the rainforest sante threatening an area which produces twenty percent of the world's oxygen on the amazon amazon rainforest is the lungs of the earth. Isn't it well. Yes no i strongly recommend that you listen to more or less a statistics sticks programme on bbc radio four which is available online and has carried out a detailed analysis of the situation they spoke to daniel net stunt of the earth innovation institute who explained that the fire houses have been identified by satellites are not burning rainforest generally the rainforest doesn't burn because it's so damp and humid what can happen is that low level fis can burn the leaf litter on the forest i flow and this can scorch the trunks of the trees and callum off these files are not visible from space and their effects are only evident once the trees have died off which may take a euro reversed point then is that the fires may be more extensive than we know at present. The fires that we can see from space are carrying on land which is being cleared. It's common practice for farmers to burn off weeds. Where land has been recently cleared. The trees are left to dry out and then abundant. One of the major consequences of these files is smoke soot in the atmosphere leading millions of people to seek treatment for respiratory diseases smoke from the falls code sao paulo which is mulling one thousand miles away from the amazon to be plunged into an apocalyptic darkness in the nineteenth of august the new president of brazil k. A. bowl sonata has taken a very hard line on the amazon weakening the brazilian environment ministry and turning a blind eye to illegal logging and deforestation he the amazon as a resource to be exploited by minus farmers and loggers as reported recently when the brazilian satellite satellite monitoring agency revealed significant increases in the rate of deforestation. The president denied that it was true on the director of the agency was dismissed. Does the amazon produce twenty percent of the world oxygen. It depends how you calculate but according to daniel napster it consumes a lot as as well and the net effect is more or less neutral. He sees the most important function of the forest as cooling effect as every every drop of water transpired by the trees evaporates. It cools the atmosphere you the effect of this across the whole forest is enough to have an effect on the climate of the whole world. Let's not forget the consequences of the fires and the deforestation policies for the indigenous peoples of the amazon amazon basin. They see the homes that food sources their way of life destroyed tribes that have been wolf generations a coming together against a common enemy enemy. Surely the global community should take that pont in our own interest as well as this president bolsonaro initially initially suggested the ngos had deliberately set the forest on fire in order to embarrass the government rejected the twenty two million dollars that politicians titians attending the reason g seven summit in biarritz pledged to help fight the fis. Can the world afford to stand by and let this destruction attraction continue. It's claimed that attention to the amazon leads the world over the fact that there are far more fis in africa but it's not the same thing writing in courts africa kolin bill senior lecturer in ecology university of york says fire is an essential part of the savannah savannah. The first to know is that the impact of a wildfire depends more on wet and what it is burning than how big it is or indeed how many fines there are the vast majority of the african fires currently earning seemed to be in grasslands and exactly the places we expect to see fires of this time of these files are usually by cattle famous as part of their traditional management of the savannahs where the animals graze some files are started to to stimulate new growth of nutritious cross for their animals others are used to control the numbers of parasitic takes own manage the growth of thorny we scrub without fuzz many savannahs and the animals they support wouldn't exist and lighting them as a key management activity in many any of the iconic protected areas of africa for instance. The sarah getty in tanzania is known worldwide for safari animals and all inspiring hiring builder beasts migration and i'll work shows that around half of its grasslands each year most foss both in the amazon was an ad in africa therefore deliberately started by humans as part of land-management b._b._c. news reports wildfires ravaging parts of the anti with areas of siberia alaska greenland and canada engulfed in flames and smoke satellite images

Amazon Prime Minister Brexit President Trump Daniel Africa London BBC Biarritz Europe Sao Paulo Savannah Savannah Komo Siberia Alaska Greenland Tanzania Sarah Getty Earth Innovation Institute Bolsonaro
Japan wants you to say its leader's name correctly: Abe Shinzo

Monocle 24: The Briefing

04:16 min | 1 year ago

Japan wants you to say its leader's name correctly: Abe Shinzo

"At home. Japan's Prime Minister introduces himself as obey Sheen's, but in the west is, gene, so Ave. That's being the convention for at least a century. But Tokyo, now wants the west to follow Japan's way of doing things. Let's get more on this with Joe. Nielsen Reid who is a senior lecturer in modern Japan at Cambridge University, and an associate fellow at the London based think tank Chatham house Joan, get you tell us more, how exactly do the policymakers want to change name conventions, while this is an idea that has reportedly been floated by the foreign minister, taro Kono or Connell tarot, as in Japan corner vein is family name. And I think this is something of an experiment. There is a sense, in which some senior officials are exploring this idea, partly because of course the convention in Japan for years the standard practice fee like is being to use the family name. I and I think there's also a sense in which in the absence of the new era. Ray wa with the transition from one to another, perhaps Japan is starting to feel a bit more culturally self confident and wants to explore the option of making this change to reflect that growing confidence. And also, I think looking at the experience of career and China where the convention is, of course, again to use surname first. We talk about, for example. President moon Jae-in moon is the president's family name or Xi Jinping. Same idea. It's not unreasonable. I think the Japanese to want to explore this idea how long has flipping the name or. Into it. Is it a new idea? It's not something that's really been forefront, public discussion that has been some evidence that junior high school textbooks in English recently have started to adopt this convention departing from the western Newman other words, but it's not something that I think we've found has been the forefront of public debate in Japan and opinion polls seem to suggest that the Japanese public is pretty evenly divided about whether this is a good change or not. It's also I think driven by the reality that Japan will beginning a lot of international attention will, of course, be in June. Be hosting the G twenty summit in all soccer. We have the World Cup and the next year. Of course, we have the Olympics and looking ahead to twenty twenty the government, or at least some senior officials seem to be tested for this idea. But it's by no means clear up, whether this is something, the government is really pushing for or simply exploring this in a very tentative way laws are the best arguments for not changing the name order. I think it's just really a kind of practical question that this is being the way Japanese names of being. Used by western media in the past undoubtedly any change will involve a degree of. Potential. Confusion. And it's a reality, I think, for now that when, when westerners who aren't familiar with Japan grappling with Japanese name, sometimes they're not aware of the nuances, and aren't necessarily immediately aware of, which is the family name, which is the given name. I don't think this is as some people might suggest a turn towards more nationalistic Japan. But a Japan that what did you in the current context may be wants to feel that it's cultural identity gets a little bit of a boost? We saw that in the decision to pick Ray wa the first time that. Chinese characters have been explicitly taken from Japanese classical literature and used to signify new era. There's I think essentially which particular for conservatives in Japan. There's a growing confidence in the country and the desire to reflect that internationally. Exactly, you talk about radio indeed the Indians, this, this new imperial era. Can you tell us more about how that new air is at the moment being reflected in how the police feel about themselves on the country?

Japan Ray Wa Prime Minister Taro Kono Tokyo China Senior Lecturer Soccer Cambridge University Nielsen Reid JOE President Trump Sheen Xi Jinping Newman Olympics Joan London
"senior lecturer" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

Monocle 24: The Globalist

03:07 min | 1 year ago

"senior lecturer" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

"Is senior lecturer in American politics dome for university. She joins me on the line. Now, can you just explain this law, and where it sits within the US abortion legislation? Good morning. Well, yes, this is certainly a significant development as there has been also in Alabama just overnights 'em it, I think what's happening. Basically is there's a. Conservative push at the moment to get some really meaningful movement on tightening portions nationwide em, you know, the kind of the. Character and tone of the Trump administration is giving the religious right array strong sense that they have the win behind them. Now is the time to act and you can see this playing out in states like Georgia an Alabama. And these are probably slightly more extreme examples of Mississippi is not far behind of what's going on. But the I think the logic is that this will hopefully from their perspective increasingly become the norm. Does it apply? Does this lure apply even to victims of incest and rape? And it would and will do when it comes to pass a mean, it would be January twenty twenty when this comes into effect shouldn't do. So I mean, it's going to be challenged at significantly along the way, no, not least by organizations like the American Civil Liberties union and by Planned Parenthood and that so it's it's not a done deal. I would say at this point would shouldn't pass 'em as with the. Yellowhammer example, it wouldn't out. No am abortion Inc. In cases of rape, and incest and Hollywood, of course, has vowed to fight this. How significant is the power of the entertainment industry in Georgia. Well, it's significant enough in the sense that am Georgia jobs. Apparently, if you get those that are connected with the entertainment industry decade indirectly apprentice about ninety two thousand. I mean, that's significant. So people would sit up and take note at the idea of a boycott. But obviously, not everybody will sit up and take note. I mean, for example. When Christian evangelical would be fully behind this kind of education, not gonna care or Hollywood things. In fact, they would open almost may be pleased that the idea of of sticking it to the liberal elite. So there's that. But then the other side of it, of course, would be, you know, the economy is important to everybody and the idea that that the state would would be sort of economically damaged on the back of this will certainly matter to some. I mean, let's look at some examples because it has worked before particularly look perhaps LT BT activists concerned about discrimination for hotels, refusing to case if a gay weddings and so on. No it has worked before. I mean, the the the gay rights example is a good one. It's not quite as. Profoundly. Anger in juicing..

Georgia rape Alabama Hollywood American Civil Liberties union senior lecturer US abortion Inc Mississippi
Is there a difference between weather and climate?

Curiosity Daily

08:08 min | 2 years ago

Is there a difference between weather and climate?

"Do you know the difference between the terms weather and climate? It's an important distinction. If you follow science news, and we've gotten a lot of questions about it lately. So today, I've got you covered as reported by the conversation weather, basically refers to stuff happening, right? This second like cloud, cover and temperature. You know, the day to day conditions of the atmosphere. Climate is a more macro view. It describes the average atmospheric conditions over many years. In fact, the World Meteorological Organization says that figuring out a climate record. Takes a minimum of thirty years of data. This includes things like average annual rainfall overall direction of the wind or what time of year, you're most likely to see snow. Here's. An analogy that might help. It comes from Jennifer Fitchet, who's a senior lecturer in physical geography at the university of the Witwatersand. The climate is like your wardrobe. You got a winter coat and scarf, or when it's cold flip flops in shorts for when it's warm and everything in between whether is the individual item of clothing you choose to wear you change what you wear from day to day. If it snowing you put on boots, and if it's really hot you might wear sandals. The thing is everyone in the world doesn't have the same wardrobe. If you live right on the equator, then you probably don't have a winter coat, and that brings us back to weather and climate the conditions in one place are different from the conditions far away from wherever you are. Here's what that means for how we can understand climate projections and climate forecasts the weather forecast, you see on TV or on your phones weather app is there to help you figure out what to wear on the other hand climate projections. Tell you what scientists think the climate will be in forty fifty maybe a hundred years climate projections are a war. Warning that we might want to change up our wardrobe. Maybe we won't need such heavy coats. And maybe it's a good time to pick up some shorts or umbrellas or raincoats. There's no need to switch up your whole wardrobe overnight. Just take your time look ahead and plan and adapt and hopefully stay dry a sect is a real astronomical unit of measurement with cool origins. Yes. It measures distance not time. Yes. The term was used improperly in the original Star Wars. Yes. I will. Absolutely get to that in a few minutes. No, Ashley, you're not getting out of this one. I love Star Wars that I'm cost played Star Wars character. This is true. Well, we're all gonna love stores by the end of this. Here's the deal. One person is a quivalent to three points to six late years. That's nineteen trillion miles or thirty one trillion kilometers, if that seems excessive that's because it absolutely is. But when it comes to measuring astronomically large distances between. Objects that are beyond our solar system. Excessively large is just right. I said beyond our solar system, by the way for you to travel one parcel from earth. You would have to go from here to the sun and back two hundred six thousand two hundred sixty five times, I told you it was big the word purse that comes from two words Pera lax and our second para lacks describes when an object's location seems to have changed because your location changed. Astronomers use para lax to judge the distance of object in the sky, if you know, how far the earth has moved and you can measure how far the object moved across its starry backdrop you can judge distance. You actually use parallel to judge the distance of things all the time. You're too is see the world from slightly different angles, and your brain crunches, the numbers to tell you how far away everything is from you. The second half of Parsi refers to an arc second in arc. Second is part of a measurement of an angle. You know, how a circle is three hundred sixty degrees. Imaginer standing with a full view of the horizon around you if you sliced the horizon into three hundred sixty degrees each degree would be about twice the width of the full moon divide one of those degrees into sixty pieces, and you get the width of an arc minute divide. One of those up by sixty again, and you get an arc second. Putting it all together. A par sec is the Pera lacks of one arc second. In other words, if an object in the sky moves by one arc second when the earth moves by one astronomical unit. Then the object is one par cycle way to put that in perspective. Proxima centauri is the star. That's our closest neighbor, and it's one point three par away for more perspective the millennium falcon made the kessel run in twelve par sex, and I'm sorry pedants. But before you go criticizing stores for this, quote, unquote mistake, I you need to understand what the kessel run actually is you'll feed skip forward thirty seconds or so if you can't handle my nerdiness in Star Wars, Ken. In the kessel run is a route used by smugglers to transport in illicit substance from minds on the planet kessel through a region of space that belongs to the galactic empire. So it's an illegal smuggling route. And this route includes a cluster of black holes known as the Ma as you know, the shortest distance between two points is a straight line. So when Hans solo said he made the kessel run in twelve par sex. He was referring to his daring knish and piloting skills and the sophisticated computer on the money on falcon that he was able to use to navigate close to those black holes while not getting sucked in I was aware of this reading books from the Star Wars expanded universe. And I was a kid, but thanks to Disney. They are no longer canon. But they also address this in the twentieth. Eighteen films solo Star Wars story, which I still have not seen. But they address all of this after the movie happened. Does doesn't matter doesn't make just made it up afterward to make that line? Okay. To work. No, still works. That is art. That's how you craft a story. I think this is the biggest debate we've ever had in this. The kessel run. Obviously makes Cody happy, you know, who else is happy by most metrics Scandinavians, the annual world happiness report consistently rates the Nordic countries of Denmark, Norway, Sweden, Finland and Iceland among the top ten happiest nations. So today, we'll wrap up with some life philosophies from Nordic countries that might make you a little happier in your own life. I is hugging. The Danish concept of Hooda translates to something like coziness of the soul. It's the feeling you get when you're snuggled up under a blanket with a loved one drinking cocoa by the fire as a life philosophy. It's all about allowing yourself guilt free indulgences, especially when the world is dark and dreary anything from getting together with family and friends for a meal to spending time on your own reading a good book like from the Star Wars expanded universe to sand. The next philosophy is Logam logo is a Swedish word that roughly translates to just right or optimal. You probably heard the saying everything in moderation, including moderation. That's what logo is all about. Whether that's how much sugared add to a batch of cookies or how much of your life. You devote to your work. This philosophy urges a healthy balance. That doesn't swing too far in any direction and one other philosophy is see sue. It's a unique finish concept. That's about persisting through challenges until you reach the end the term roughly translates into English as a strength of will, determination perseverance and acting rationally in the face of adversity. It's not about courage in the moment. But the kind of courage that has to last over time after inspiration has sputtered out. And the real challenge has shown itself, you can read about these and other philosophies in our full right up on curiosity dot com and on our free curiosity app for Android an I o s but none of these pique your interest. Then you can always turn to fica. That's just another word for coffee break a new. Doesn't like coffee or breaks? Today's ad fiasco sewed was brought to you by our patrons special. Thanks to carry Greenwald. Anthony highland. Maximilian rate in Johnson and Julianne Gomez for your support on patriot. We really appreciate it. To learn more about how you can support curiosity daily, please. Visit patriarch dot com slash curiosity dot com. All spelled out. Join us against Moore for the award-winning curiosity daily. And learn something new and just a few par sex. I'm Cody Goth, and I'm Ashley Hamer, stay curious. On the Westwood One podcast network.

Kessel Ashley Hamer World Meteorological Organizat Cody Goth Westwood One Disney Jennifer Fitchet Senior Lecturer Witwatersand Greenwald Anthony Highland Proxima Hans Solo Moore Canon MA Logam
Japan's new defense guidelines highlight military ambitions

Monocle 24: The Globalist

04:38 min | 2 years ago

Japan's new defense guidelines highlight military ambitions

"Japan currently has an exclusively defense oriented, military, policy, and pacifist constitution. But now in the face of increased Chinese capability and aggression new guidelines of an issue, which may fundamentally change this. John Nelson right is a senior lecturer in East Asia at Cambridge University and an associate fellow at the Chatham house Asia program, John thanks for joining us this morning. The national defense program guidelines is a policy document that outlines the nation's defense objectives for the next decade. As such must address the new reality in the security landscape. And this was signed off today aircraft carriers seemed to be the most contentious part of this. Can you tell us what that contains? Yes. This is a commitment on the power to the Japanese government to reequip its existing destroys the clouds destroy to allow them to carry vertical takeoff aircraft in the past. They've used helicopters. And this is raise concerns and some quarters of this is effectively the beginning, Japan acquiring aircraft carriers the equivalent the government has been keen to challenge that association and the language that's being used describing these as so-called multi-purpose operation destroys reflects, I think sensitivity in Japan, and in the wider region about this enhancement of Japan's capabilities, but enhancement undoubtedly is these ships will not only have the capacity to be equipped with f thirty five fifth generation fighter planes purchased from the United States. But also, I understand. There will be some possibility that American planes might be deployed on these ships at some point. So there's no doubt that Japan is increasing its whose production capabilities, and it's increasing its digital work in a more flexible fashion with the United States to deal with the growing challenge particularly of China in the region. US driven. I mean aside from Trump's buy America policy Japan has a security treaty with the US which involves Japan providing defense in the US maintain strike capabilities. But I mean, neither in the present. At the present time have the firepower necessary to counter China the distance. This is why these these multipurpose vessels a needed. Is that correct? That's right. I mean, I think this is dealing with the basics reality. China's increasing defense capabilities in the East China Sea where of course, Japan and China have a territorial dispute over the so-called son, Cinco de L U islands. But also more broadly in the South China Sea. Where course, we know the China has been acquiring aggressive force protection capabilities. And of course, building its own out Fisher reefs as a means of asserting its maritime, dominance, Japan is worried about this. They point to China itself of courses, acquiring a aircraft. Carrier all of this. In addition with other elements in the national defense program guidelines designed to increase power capabilities not just aircraft carriers, but the acquisition acquisition of long range hypersonic missiles, all of this. I think is an attempt to deal with that basic news to TJ reality. Whether we should be concerned about it. I think is another question. Japan's defense constitution remains in place. Although prime minister, of course, is looking to revise it. And the attitude on the part of public opinion and critically, of course, other parties in Japan opposition parties and the government's own coalition partner. Komeito remain still very cautious validating the challenges that basic normative commitment to defensive security policy. Is the US in driving this? Well, the US is under Donald Trump. Of course, it has multiple objectives. You mentioned, of course, the economic relationship. That's hugely important. Mister obey is under real pressure from Donald Trump to sign a bilateral trade agreement. He's reluctant to do that. He's concerned that this will open up pressure on Japan to open up Integra, cultural sector, and as part of that we've seen in this new defense policy from Japan a commitment to buy American one hundred thirty five fighter planes at one hundred million dollars a piece that's a huge commitment in terms of financial outlays on the part of the Japanese government. The hope in Tokyo, this will offset some of that pressure from Donald Trump, whether willow not of course is another question.

Japan China United States Donald Trump Japanese Government South China Sea East China Sea East Asia Chatham House Asia Cambridge University Tokyo Senior Lecturer John Fisher Reefs Prime Minister TJ Komeito
"senior lecturer" Discussed on Unhappy Hour with Matt Bellassai

Unhappy Hour with Matt Bellassai

01:45 min | 2 years ago

"senior lecturer" Discussed on Unhappy Hour with Matt Bellassai

"By the British news site metro. I don't think we even have touchscreens that most McDonald's in the US. I don't know. But the second you start talking about that like our phones are just bricks of PU give it I'm not using my. I am using my phone to order food almost exclusively. There's poop everywhere. I happen more conscious about not no that's not true. I was gonna say I tracked everything in this in this one. I I do bring my phone into the bathroom. That's where I get my time in. Yeah. They this new site in the UK was like how about we test of the touchscreens at McDonalds. I think it's like a European thing at McDonalds they have tunnel wash their hands. Also that and you walk in you order on the touch screen, and then you pick it up and apparently most of those cuts green or just like covered in ship. So good for them. They quoted a senior lecturer in microbiology who said we were also prized how much gut and fecal bacteria. There was on the touch screens these caused the kind of infections that people pick up in hospitals who. This hospital levels of bacteria, just all over the touchscreens. Anyway, what have we learned today? Don't eat lettuce. Don't put the teacup on your grandma's coffee. Table don't masturbate at Starbucks and fucking don't touch the screen McDonald's and bats it. It's a lot of valuable lessons. You're welcome. And that's it for worse things. I yet ready to deck the.

McDonalds McDonald senior lecturer US UK
"senior lecturer" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

Newsradio 700 WLW

06:30 min | 2 years ago

"senior lecturer" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

"McDonald's right samples taken from the new machines. If if your local McDonald's doesn't have the the self order kiosk yet it soon will twenty what this year. Two thousand restaurants are supposed to be get them around the country all of our local ones. Now have the the self serve. Kiosks. Samples taken from the new machines that had been rolled out across the country. Every one of them had coliform. Aka traces of fecal matter. Senior lecturer in microbiology at London metropolitan university said we were all surprised how much gut and fecal bacteria was on the touchscreens. These caused the kind of infections that people get in the hospital. Wonderful. All right, for instance, intro caucus faciliate is part of the floor of gastrointestinal tracts of healthy, humans and other mammals. It is notorious in hospitals for causing hospital acquired infections. So here's the way it works. You as a diner? Waltz into McDonalds. Order your food on the touch screen you head over to the server pick up. Your order you go sit down probably without washing your hands. Boom. A screen at one branch was found to have staphylococcus bacteria that can cause blood poisoning and toxic shock syndrome. The doctor said seen staphylococcus on these machines is very concerning because it's so contagious. It starts around people's noses if they touched their nose with their fingers, and then transfer it to the touch screen someone else will pick it up. And if you happen to have an open cut. That can be dangerous. There's a lot of worries at the moment that staphylococcus is becoming resistant to antibiotics, however, it's it's still really dangerous in places like Africa where it causes toxic shock. The UK study involved swabs taken from eight. Mcdonald's restaurants six in London to in Birmingham. Listeria bacteria was found in Oxford Street in Holloway road branches. Listeria yet. Another rare bacterium we were shocked to find on the touch screen machines. As again, this can be very contagious and a problem for those with a weak immune system. Three quarters of the screams swabbed showed traces of the bacteria. Protests protagonists can be found in human and animal feces. It's also widely distributed in soil. It can cause urinary tract infections. It's also one of those hospital acquired infections. Which may be responsible for septicemia. You hear the term sepsis, right? Boy. So that's like I said I've read that. I'm gonna go wash my hands. Touchscreen technology is being used more and more in our daily lives. But these results show people should not eat right after touching those greens. They are highly susceptible to spreading disease. Someone can be very careful about their own hygiene throughout the day. But it could all be undone by just using a touch screen machine. One time. Now. Mcdonald's does clean the screens with disinfected. But the doctor said it could not have been strong enough. Whatever the disinfectant they're using. Maybe need to use something stronger than the headline itself says to found on every touch screen. Oh boy. All right. Let me get back to the calls here. Bad news. What's happening? Hey. Good morning. Steve thanks for taking my call on your bustle late in the morning. You know that help department card has touchscreens have dispenser rival Elisha. Cash loves that you can put on before you actually get makes your choices. The Bank machines any kind of McDonald's machines or anything like that advice lousy, you slide them on and you dispose them propose after you put on to order your food and cost for them. But they're gonna have you are you saying? Are you saying they need to because I I've never seen any gloves next to any kind of order. What's I say? Yeah. Exactly. Your county sheriff. So you get the accident a crime scene loves, you know, they're gonna have to have a glove to censor next to all ATM's and the banks any kind of a train fingerprint while eight singer forever kings on your your dot com. Actually, just a scanner. No. I mean, that's sort of coverage. It goes aboard help implement that required. Burnished people. What's cash laws, whatever facility of as those even backs have a dispenser there? But whereas I mean side. Your car in gloves smell out of the machine. You're right machine. But I was I was gonna call their last night. Stay span got me wired up last night. I'll get in behind him. You know? I got back off to ride a up. You talk about that. Eddie, you're talking about architects, must be a democrat calls a factory or something. But the most sensible. If they.

Mcdonald McDonald staphylococcus septicemia London metropolitan university Senior lecturer Africa Listeria UK Eddie London Steve Birmingham Three quarters
"senior lecturer" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

03:38 min | 2 years ago

"senior lecturer" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"Yeah. And he was not visiting his mama or his Papa. If I may he spent the weekend aid, California. The bad who wants to be governor of Maryland spent the weekend in California. He was a senior lecturer owner. No, he's so sorry. I can't get the details on what he was doing out there. But I can tell you this. It has nothing to do with the race for governor in Maryland, unless it was a fundraising swing or something like that. But he chose voluntarily to go out there. Now, I'm sure it's going to have something to do with his parents and the illegality of their interracial marriage fifty years ago. I'm sure that that's why he was out there. And now I'm gonna get yelled at and I'm going to be called names. And all those things we'd love to have. We was the last time. We spend jealous to come on. We ask them all the time. In the meantime, he doesn't want to and he won't, but we will probably have governor, HOGAN and or. Lieutenant governor Rutherford on as we are in the final stretch here. I'm trying to you know, the Baltimore Sun did write this. Yeah. It doesn't say why he's out there. It doesn't say why he's out there. That's very strange. The Baltimore Sun right up doesn't give any details. As to why he decided to go. California. Oh. We're here at teachers have blasted detail. We're hosting our last fundraiser two thousand eighteen this coming weekend for Ben jealous who's running for governor of Maryland wrote. It is it's a fundraiser. He went out there to raise money. So he's raising California money in California to run for governor in Maryland, we're hosting our last fundraiser two thousand eighteen this coming weekend. For Ben jealous is running for governor of Maryland wrote, Sarah fence key, a senior lecturer at California college of the arts in a blog post promoting the fundraiser. I've heard a lot about Ben over the last year, you may have to he's the former head of the double ACP, a Rhode scholar investor with capper cattle, capital and native son of Baltimore Baltimore. But he couldn't go to the ravens game. I wonder if he went to the Rams forty Niners game while he was up there. Jealous campaign spokeswoman Jerusalem DEM SaaS said that that by the way, that's the closest that Ben jealous gets to being supportive of Jerusalem. The hiring someone named Jerusalem said the democrat has held numerous events route Maryland, but occasionally does fundraisers in California where he has connections. Yeah. Good luck. With that. Ben, Debbie listening in the great state what a day for Michigan football Saturday, Debbie. Are you flying high on that great wolverine win? Well. Are you a Spartan that was a tough game for Michigan state, Debbie? What do you what do you say? Well, first of all, I just quit real quick tell you that we love W M A L, listen to you all day long. And you're the frosting on the ice cake for the day that is so sweet to say, we are America's talk radio station. W? Okay. What I like to see the president to is to call Tigris back for emergency session to fit to fix the immigration laws. At least the ones that he can sit picks a little bitter. They're like the feet on the ground thing. And then one day this week make a presidential address from the Oval Office and address the nation, and let us know. Exactly. In in details. What he plans on doing because you were getting so much misinformation from all over the place, and the people that only listen to the mainstream media are not getting the right information, Debbie, you are very wise. And actually that I not only it.

Maryland Ben Lieutenant governor Rutherford California Debbie Baltimore senior lecturer Jerusalem DEM Baltimore Baltimore California college Michigan HOGAN Oval Office Jerusalem ravens Rams Rhode America president
"senior lecturer" Discussed on Inside Europe

Inside Europe

03:48 min | 2 years ago

"senior lecturer" Discussed on Inside Europe

"Well, that depends how you define free says Giampaolo senior lecturer in retailing at alliance, Manchester business school. Well, I don't think there's any such thing as free personally because everything to be paid for the only things voice in the price of the goods. So the picking in the depose on the delivery. The cost of the vehicles all have to find their way somewhat into the price of the product. It's the customer pays for the price of product. What we've got a selling the UK is this notional myth of free deliveries of his these very high thresholds to get that and having delivers on times to take advantage of this notion of a free delivery of them list different in they have these fixed routes and fixed times, and therefore the customer has to adopt that behavior, which a good number of people in the Netherlands are apparently prepared to do. If you give him. I work during most of the day now I can do my shopping online and then just to liberate and I can twos my own time, which is great. And they're very friendly. Also. This free services? Well, yeah, it's free service. We live near the supermarkets, but this is actually it's cheaper and it's better service. So is it too constraining having to be home at a certain time? I can use like ten moments in a week, so there's always a good time. One in twenty inhabitants of Amazon are now doing the grocery shopping with picnic, the companies delivering regularly to one hundred and fifty thousand customers in all with the same number on a waiting list. While company expands capacity to meet the increased demand, they are claims Michelle moolah, expanding the rates of five percents week and have the supermarkets worried the potential that there is for online groceries is us. And if it goes ten percent or maybe twenty percent and wine or to thirty percent, then it will shake up completely his business. The soup. Oh, markets are built on a fixed cost model as so they need old of the lost. Ten percent of a supermarket turnover makes older profitability because the have the buildings to have too high rents. There have storage facilities basically in the supermarket that have all the food waste. So they are sort of addicted to this volume. The volume flows away to their own line business or somebody else's. Then the profitability is at stake. With Graeme hole on the way back to the DEP. Oh, where he's going to load up again for another round. Unlike go to the supermarket, tell him looking at the stuff I'm gonna by seeing the people to about says, Bram. Unlike most things when they go online there is perhaps actually more social contact for his customers than when they were supermarket shopping because he gets to know little bit the people he delivered to, especially. Especially elderly people. They liked when you make time for them to little chance and less winter was extremely Colt. In that I had a couple of invited me in for a couple of ship was really nice. Sweet. Yes. Jill north, some d-w Amersfoort. Thank you. John. You're listening to inside Europe, bringing you the big stories from Europe every week. If you like to contact the show, we'd love to hear from you. Our Email address is Europe d. w. dot com. You can also.

Europe Bram Manchester business school Giampaolo senior lecturer UK Amazon Michelle moolah Amersfoort DEP Netherlands Graeme John Jill north thirty percent twenty percent Ten percent
"senior lecturer" Discussed on News Radio 690 KTSM

News Radio 690 KTSM

16:32 min | 2 years ago

"senior lecturer" Discussed on News Radio 690 KTSM

"Welcome back to coast to coast AM. I am Lisa gar is science and spirituality truly blending is. That what our world really needs. And is that the way we're going to make sense of our world. This is definitely the case. According to my guests Steve Taylor who is a senior lecturer in psychology Leeds, Beckett university in the UK. He has his books have been published in nineteen languages and articles in essays have appeared in over fifty academic, journals and magazines and newspapers his latest book is called spiritual. Science welcome to the show. Steve. Hi, lisa. Hi, such a great pleasure to speak with you at a really interested in this topic. And I'm excited because finally. It's not just the material world any longer is it safe. No. He's not the the stunted material explanation of the will just doesn't work anymore. Yeah. There were seventy things which can't be explained immaterial tunes. And I think more and more scientists are beginning to realize as we as we uncover more knowledge about the world becomes clearer and clearer that you know, to spend model can I explain the world. Well, the the normal materialistic approach to science has served for very long time. And I'd like it if you could tell us why that will no longer work. Yeah. Well, I kind of on a very superficial level the materialistic model works. It helps us to develop technology. It helps us to explore the world around us. But party question of deepening, knowledge, more and more discoveries in genetics and evolution and the effect of the mind and the body, you know, the way that the cbo's that works. So the way that the the brain changes. And there was also as a result of mental activity. And yeah. These discoveries. Make it clear that the distended, Melissa simplistic. But I think he's also a question is then you know, we're we're at a point in human history. You know, we've been exploiting the world's resources so long. We've been trying to accumulate more more possessions to make us happier and happier, and it kind of parallel level become more and more evident than national working that we need to kind of shift in the way that we see the world we need a shift in the way that we relate to the wolves in order to live more harmonious. Yes. And I think it creates more polarity. If you really look at things as so black and white without any a any gray in between where we're really not allowed to blur. Those lines in that materialistic, view and. Go ahead. Yeah. So so, yeah, I mean, I think that's one of the things that we're beginning to realize there was kind of that was an assumption in the standard materialistic muddle, the human beings a separate to the world, what kind of isolated entities moving through space and the body is separate then disease. And that we mind is separate than the body. Exactly. Yeah. Yeah. There were different kinds of separation the separation of the mind and the body the Judaism of the mind and the body, but also the Judaism between os in the world. You know, the world is a machine, and we machines, and we're just moving through this empty space, but it's become more evident that know reality we are intimately interconnected. We we participate in the world. And run consciousness affects the world. And influences the world all the time. Just as I wrote in mind influences, a buddy all the time. Yes. Yes. And so this when we start to look at things in a different way, we start to come up realized that it's everywhere that everything is completely interconnected. And when I mentioned earlier that the consciousness is fundamentally outside of the brain and the mind even on I had a near death experience. And I experienced this firsthand of how consciousness. Is all around us. And I experienced the sense of complete interconnectivity and oneness and how possible that really truly isn't. Once you see that in your mind's eye, you can never unsee it. And. I'm sorry. And there's a constant pursuit for it, which I'm sure you understand. So tell me a little bit about the consciousness is outside the mind. Yeah, you're right. Yeah. Wouldn't you experienced that? You know, it changes your will forever. The way you see wolf forever. I mean, the standard of us the world which most people to join schools sitting in in Europe is that Matt's is a fundamental reality of the world, and you can explain everything in terms of matter. The mind is the result of brain activity, and and everything can be explaining SIMS of the in terms of material particles, like atoms interactions of Acton atoms and south, but yeah, my my view is. The fundamental reality of the world is actually consciousness I sometimes called the spirit for the mental consciousness. And that means that the material does not produce the mind is actually the other way round and mind or consciousness produces the material world produces a mind. So he produces the brain because consciousness is a fundamental reality. It's kind of it's a source of everything. And in some way, what we perceive as matter arises from consciousness. So you know, we'll didn't start accidentally the universe. Didn't start accidentally arose naturally from the kind of dynamic potential of consciousness. And and that means that consciousness is everywhere around us us. It's an every asked him about the space around us. It's in everything we see. And so, you know, we are we are interconnected with other human beings street us network of consciousness, we are interconnected with other living beings and through this network of consciousness, I'm with the whole universe. Everything is the manifestation of consciousness, just as we it doesn't it makes perfect sense. If you have this incredible brain that's connected by all of us neurological activity, and and this weaving of this wonderful infrastructure of the veins in the blood system and the body's innate ability to create homies days. Why would it just stop inside the skin what would possibly think about nature to? I mean, why would we just stop at the first second third dimension? Nature's Spar more creative than that. I believe we. Yeah. You're right. We experience it all the time. Every every day we experienced the kind of indignation. We though the people even when we experience, you know, embassy. Oh, compassion. Right. Comes from this connection between us, and we we can send other people's suffering or the people's pain because we are part of them. You know, we share the same consciousnesses then. So when we impose to to to help people to be out terrific people that stems from the sun Baynton interconnection between from the shed consciousness between us can you share some of these studies that are being done to validate this what we're talking about. Yeah. Well, one interesting area is even kind of the standard dilution is that and the kind of stunned nonreligious model is it through mutations random mutations and natural selection. But more and more violence are they to feel that that model kinda explain the creativity of pollution or the creativity of life? It kinda explained the way that new forms can come into being. And there's a lot of interesting research showing that mutations happen exactly when they are needed in response to challenges in the environment. So they they kinda naturally there's a kind of natural creativity in life itself, which is dynamic. We should just that you know, nature is not competing random pattern in nature. There's a kind of dynamic trace it potential, and I think that's that's created. That's connected. Consciousnesses wasn't consciousness has this dynamic potential, which naturally encourages lifeforms to become more complex respond to challenges. And that's just one example of how the kind of. In a recent scientific findings found, you know, bacteria mutate themselves, very very quickly in response to change their environment. Much more quickly than could be possible. Through accidental randomness would about through thoughts and intentions. Well, yeah. I mean, that's a lot more research showing that human beings can affects Acura, I'll buddies, you know, health through intention Russell, it's in the fact just so interesting because a lot of conventional scientists just think it's a matter of belief. You know, if you believe that you will you feel better then you feel better. It's just a question of vast south-east section almost but it's much more than that. You know, the the placebo effects and recent studies into the effect of shown that real heating does take place. Neurological. Studies have shown that the areas of the brain associated with pain can be deactivated through through hypnosis or through. Through belief and intention meditation. Yeah. Now. I mean, I I like the fact that you combined that science needs spirituality, and that's the one of the subtitles science needs spirituality to make sense of the world. Are there? A large number of scientists that are starting to believe the same way. And I wouldn't say it's a large number, but it certainly grabbing growing that's good. Definitely a sort of a movement in that direction. It's a movement. Sorry. It's a movement, which is good. It's a movement. Yeah. I mean, just the way I was thinking about evolution as a movement of scientists conventional mainstream. Scientists who they've developed a movement called the third way in eve Lucien, and that's why I developed tentative to creationism on one hand and an alternative to Neo Darwinism. So kind of a third way more complex in new wants wave and standing what's it called the third? What the third way of? So it's a combination of creationism and big bang theory. Not really combination. It's kind of it's an alternative to them that they think that that both of those ways too simplistic, and that they kind of explain well, the deniro don't want isn't that when you muddled con explained the creativity of life and the way that new locations new life forms can come into being in a very rapid and very rapid way. Fascinating. Now. What do you believe? What do I believe I believe, you know, I I have nothing near death experience, and like you, but I've had a lot of spiritual experience the highest state of consciousness. Through meditation or just one painlessly in concert with nature and in different situations. And my own experiences. Tell me that there is this this fundamental consciousness that the fundamental route of universe is this kind of or inspiring web of shed being if you like, and it's a it's a quality of bliss in my experience. And and it feels like coming home just not you said with your new experience, it feels like coming home when you go into this fundamental consciousness. So the spirit you could say it makes you feel you. It's like reading a sign of relief. You know, you you you say to yourself. Wow. This is the way things really are. This is the the fundamental truth of life, this harmony and this bliss. And. Yeah, once you feel it has a tremendous you could say, no exit quality tremendous sort of sense of revelation. You know, you know, somehow that this is the way things really are. And so, you know, it changes your life, and you you can never see the world. Material way again, right? It's just like looking out at the vast -ness of the ocean. And if you haven't seen it for a long time, and you know, that it connects to another piece of land far far away, you know, that it does you can't see it from the perspective you're at. Right. Yeah. They're supposed to realizing that you a wave on the ocean. You know, I think in order consciousness. There's a tendency to think that you gonna separate tournaments being like almost like a wave that. That's the God that is part of the ocean. But when you have this experience experiences like, yeah, I am connected to the ocean. I'm one with the whole notion, and I'm one with all the other ways. So the all the people in other living beings around me world, I'm role manifestations of the same ocean. Okay. Well, if we think about it, though, think about the massive devastation that's happening to our ocean right now, and the radiation that's pouring into the ocean. By the tons across the ocean. It's either how do you when you really connect into this could be a good feeling. But if you also think about it, there's a lot there's a lot there that is not going, right? Well, that's true. And that comes from the sense of separation. You know, we have the sense of separation between the mind and the body, but probably, you know, equally seriously, we have this sense of separation between us and nature. You know? Continue the theme separation and many human beings do feel themselves to be separate from the world around the separate from nature, and they also feel the desire to dominate nation. I think that comes from separatist, separates or something. Then in some way, you feel threatened by it kind of overwhelmed by almost and you feel the desire to dominate tend to exploit it to have a sense of power and control. I think that that explains our relationship to nature and the way that we destroy and pollute nature so easily. Yes. And makes sense. Many indigenous groups who have much healthier relationships nature than we do. Yes. They don't feel separate to it. They feel bonded to nature. And I know they feel empathic because nature is part of that being the landscape is part of that being do they feel a strong desire to to look after nature to respect as if it's whereas if we're one, but in in your book, you talk about pans spiritism. What is that? Well, Penn spiritism is my alternative you have the will to materialism. There's actually a philosophy called Penn psyches, and we literally means all mind, and the basic idea of Penn psyches in is that old material particles have a mental element to them. So even the tiniest atom has a little sort of flicker of consciousness in. Incense material particles a conscious and that explains why consciousness comes from because consciousness was always. So he's there in every article, but my my view is slightly different. Not because. And what I call spiritism consciousness is not just in articles. He's not just a matter. It's actually in everything in space as well. It fills space and consciousness. I gave gave birth to Matt gave birth to the whole universe old material things of that sort of consciousness. So so pen spiritism, basically means Holy Spirit, and my spirit everywhere. And you see some of the the world's spiritual traditions can do a dancer Brahmin..

Lisa gar Steve Taylor Matt Penn UK Europe Melissa simplistic senior lecturer Acura Leeds cbo Beckett university Lucien deniro Russell one hand
Authorities say Palestinian lecturer shot dead in Malaysia

Democracy Now

02:41 min | 2 years ago

Authorities say Palestinian lecturer shot dead in Malaysia

"The united states walked out of classes for another coordinated day of action against gun violence in afghanistan a suicide bomber struck a voter registration center in the capital kabul sunday killing at least fifty seven people injuring one hundred nineteen others the attack came just days after authorities began opening voter id distribution centers ahead of october elections isis later claimed responsibility for the bombing which appeared to target members of the shia has our minority community later sunday six people were killed in baghlan province when their vehicle hit a roadside bomb in the gaza strip israeli military snipers shot and killed four palestinians friday as they protested near the heavily militarized border cordoning off the palestinian territory from the outside world among the dead was fifteen year old mohammad who was shot in the head this is the boy's mother you muhammad was standing an armed forces were armed and we're taking cover they bring in reinforcements to kill the boys in gaza they don't get to grow up and get the right israeli forces have killed thirty six palestinians since protests against the israeli occupation began on march thirtieth meanwhile the number of palestinians injured by israeli bullets as top seventeen hundred the group medicine sell frontier or doctors without borders warns most of those shot will be left with serious longterm physical disabilities in kuala lumpur malaysia a palestinian man was shot and killed saturday by two assailants who fired fourteen rounds before speeding away on a motorcycle the victim thirty five year old father batch was a senior lecturer at the university of kuala lumpur who specialized in engineering and who've been living in malaysia for the past decade malaysia deputy prime minister said the killers had european features and said they were linked to a foreign intelligence agency in the gaza strip members of bosch's family blamed the israeli spy agency mossad for carrying out the killing in syria government forces have stepped up a massive campaign of airstrikes and artillery fire on the last opposition held districts around the capital mascots among areas taking heavy fire is the camp home to palestinian refugees which has been held by isis since two thousand fifteen chris gunness spokesperson for unra the un relief agency for palestinian refugees warned of humanitarian catastrophe inside the camp yarmouk was a refugee camp transformed into a death camp akin to one of the.

Bosch UN Chris Gunness Syria Baghlan Afghanistan Mossad United States Prime Minister Malaysia Kuala Lumpur Senior Lecturer Gaza Mohammad Kabul Thirty Five Year Fifteen Year
"senior lecturer" Discussed on Science in Action

Science in Action

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"senior lecturer" Discussed on Science in Action

"The coastal areas and and also builds resiliency in times of drought because you're capturing that water putting it underground you know the water cycle is badly broken we see all these ways in which it is rivers running dry ground water being depleted watersheds being degraded but if you look around the world there are very hopeful signs that if we choose to weaken fix this and build resiliency against climate change so i think we can do it if we put our minds too fond repulsed though director of the global water policy project graham eastern senior lecturer in primary care routes imperial college london joins me graham 25 leases his war consumption is going to go down to another factually of course a lot more than we need to drink a day but they must be over important health reasons to worry yes so as well as the old various importance of drinking enough and using this fool preventing dehydration some of the is going to be needed for flushing toilets so they will third has been trying to maintain the sewer system by using minimal flow but there's still may be a risk of a breakdown in sanitation because many viruses protozoa bacteria are transmitted in feces and the health risk is that people may not be able to dispose of feces normally they'll result leaving it just outside and then there's the risk of environmental contamination and infections like dysentry dr rare and vomiting illnesses like ecoli shigella viral hepatitis and saw of course and also waters needed for washing yes at people must make sure they have enough water to wash their hands and food the key thing about washing hands is that eighty percent of all infections are transmitted father hands and we know that up to 25 percent of respert tree infections could be prevented so things like flew kohl's new mona's and particularly people who have low immunity for whatever reason small babies the elderly people with hiv or people who are malnourished so it's not the hydration that's the promise over sort of knockon effects of the infrastructure hygiene some i mean if people are going to be watching round of water collection points is that going to be.

director senior lecturer imperial college london kohl vomiting shigella eighty percent 25 percent
"senior lecturer" Discussed on The Anthill

The Anthill

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"senior lecturer" Discussed on The Anthill

"Rating virtual realities or cyberspace's in which people could meet and communicate outside their real lives examining its cultural and artistic impact at the time was treaty barbara now a senior lecturer in media and portsmouth university and 1990 aiways amateur student undergraduates at sintra sit mountains college of art in london where i was dating a final degree and diving glued work uh looking at the body and technology and when i started seeing virtual reality i saw while witness be absolutely fantastic to look at virtual digital space and see what happens when you've become immersed in it because it's kind of like being immersed in a painting it would be like creating an image that you could go into a walk around so i thought wouldn't it be fabulous to look virtual space digital space as a place for artistic creativity and why not look cut something like sort of sexual interactivities within that virtual space opportunity for any sort of sexual interactive as he was limited by the fact that the hardware allowed only an audio visual experience to bring other senses into the virtue environment a sensor equip device known as a date glove was developed one on the hand with versions for the entire body it allows the handle body to be represented in virtual reality and to send and receive sensory we feedback to and from the simulation initially and you're looking at ordinary sort of actual spaces which didn't have any particular tila t to late i'm anti had people like zhao alania he started creating his a data gloves he started getting ideas all of will maybe i can be in this virtual space and i can stop feeling things then it gives the whole sexual arena another sort of free saw when you can stop playing around with touchiness and feeling us and then you know you could put on a bodysuit and look.

senior lecturer portsmouth university sintra
"senior lecturer" Discussed on CBC Radio - Spark

CBC Radio - Spark

01:36 min | 3 years ago

"senior lecturer" Discussed on CBC Radio - Spark

"I without it being considered infringing solely five themed south on songs or a hundred or even songs to do machinelearning algorithms that is not going to be considering a frenchman infringement ally want be sued in the future by the create or one although psalms because i am french their copyright just because i'm teaching the computer because it's a condition of how the ai learns that it needs to be exposed to all of these enormous number of examples and yes do you think there's any likelihood that a eyes would eventually be able to claim intellectual property rights them uh we're getting into the role of science fair we would have to locate m rights to machines to begin with i think that were quite far away from that i also think the deresenek resolve why not if the recovering a violinist artificial intelligence although the likes them are being envisaged by people like cair elon musk who keeps warning also bob bus artificial intelligence at some point if it gets to that we'll have to decide whether or not gus machines are going to be subject to have rights on thanks so much for your insights on this thanks for having me andrei squad moves is a senior lecturer in intellectual property law at the university of sussex and if you wanna try making music with an a oh my like we did just head over to the spark website cdcgovdoing spark and we will show you how.

artificial intelligence senior lecturer bob university of sussex
"senior lecturer" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

02:01 min | 3 years ago

"senior lecturer" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Today is matthew rothman he is head of quantitative research at credit suisse as well as a senior lecturer at mit sloan school of management so let's talk a little bit about building a quarantine your hired credit suisse to help put a team together what goes into that how do you first began to assemble clung team i think the first thing that you need if uh if you're going to be a quant is a combination of data and technology is so you need to kind of go out in figure out what are the big databases that you need where you can get your information and what is ju diversified information set going to be what you think your edges and go about procuring that so you're building hardware and software your hiring programmers you amorous guy you have to hire data scientists of people who are going to really then overuse term but people going to really understand how to managing curate in store your data and then you have to find researchers who know what to really do with that data and where to find in where to find those in gems of signals and come up with ideas and the f you need people can communicate it so this isn't anything that gets put together very quickly this is a long process as this is a law long process when when credit suisse come soon and says hey matthew we want to build the quantum do you say it's going to take a five years two years how how do you put them into the proper mindset for this i see probably got to give me twelve to eighteen months and think that i'm going to be in a dark cave and you're gonna see nothing from me and i'm going to be asking eu forbid checks invent and and hiring illegal and kind of lay out of business plan very carefully and can detail the costs in exactly what i need and you gotta make sure that they're in it and get in get the asked because the heavy ask but what you can get out of it is pretty cool at the end of the day the competition for the really skilled fill in the blank programmers researchers data scientists i think about the the just a giant collection.

senior lecturer credit suisse matthew rothman mit sloan school of management eighteen months five years two years
"senior lecturer" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:58 min | 3 years ago

"senior lecturer" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Is nephew rothman he is head of quantitative research at credit suisse as well as a senior lecturer at mit sloan school of management so let's hope to help building a quarantine your hired at credit suisse to help put a team together what does into that how do you first began to assemble clump team i think the first thing that you need if if you're going to be a quant there is a combination of data and technology is so you need to go out and figure out word of the big databases that you need where you going to get your information and what is your diversified information set going to be what you think your edges and go about procuring vat so you're building hardware and software your hiring programmers you amorous guy you have to hire data scientists of people who are going to really and overuse term but people are going to really understand how to managing curate and store your data and then you have to find researchers who know what to really do with that data and we're define and where to find those hit in gems of signals and come up with ideas and the actually need people can communicate it so this isn't anything that gets put together very quickly this is a long process as this is a long process when when credit suisse comes june says hey matthew we want to build the quantity and do you say it's going to take a five years two years how how do you put them into the proper mindset for this i see probably gotta give me twelve to eighteen months and think that i'm going to be in a dark cave and you're gonna see nothing from me and i'm going to be asking you forbid checks invent and hiring people and kind of lay out a business plan very carefully and can detail the costs in exactly what i need and got to make sure that there in it and get in get the asked because debbie asked but what you can get out of it is pretty cool at the end of the day the competition for the really skills old fill in the blank programmers researchers data scientists i think about.

rothman senior lecturer debbie mit sloan school of management eighteen months five years two years
"senior lecturer" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

02:12 min | 3 years ago

"senior lecturer" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Is matthew rothman he is head of quantitative research at credit suisse as well as a senior lecturer at mit sloan school of management so let's to help building a quarantine your hired credit suisse two to help put a team together what does into that how do you first began to assemble quantum i think the first thing that you need if uh if you're going to be a quant is a combination of data and technology is so you need to go out and figure out what are the big databases that you need where you can get your information and what you're jude diversified information set going to be what you think your edges and go about procuring that so you're building hardware and software your hiring programmers you can irish amorous guy you have to hire data scientists of people who are going to really and overuse true but people are going to really understand how to managing curate and store your data and then you have to find researchers who know what to really do with that data and where to find in where to find those hitting gems of signals and come up with ideas in the afternoon people can communicate it so this isn't anything that gets put together very quickly this is a long process as this is a long process when when credit suisse comes to says hey matthew we want to build the quantity do you say it's going to take a five years two years how how do you put them into the proper mindset for this i see probably gotta give me twelve to eighteen months and think that i'm going to be in a dark cave and you're gonna see nothing from me and i'm going to be asking you forbid checks invent and hiring people and kind of lay out of business plan very carefully and can detail the cost him exactly what i mean you got to make sure that there in it and get in get the asked because the heavy asked but what you can get out of it is pretty cool at the end of the day the competition for the really skilled fill in the blank programmers researchers data scientists i think of about the the just a giant collection of ph ds at renaissance technologies long before the rest of wall street started thinking in those terms that's gotta be you said big checks that's got to be a serious commitment made by the firm.

matthew rothman senior lecturer renaissance technologies mit sloan school of management eighteen months five years two years
"senior lecturer" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:53 min | 3 years ago

"senior lecturer" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Special guest today is matthew rothman he is head of quantitative research at credit suisse as well as a senior lecturer at mit sloan school of management so let's talk a little bit about building a quarantine your hired credit suisse to to help put a team together what goes into that how do you first began to assemble quarantine i think the first thing that you need if o'clock if you're going to be a quant is a combination of data and technology is so you need to kind of go out and figure out what are the big databases that you need where you can get your information and why is your diversified information set going to be what you think your edges and go about procuring vat so you're building hardware and software your hiring programmers you hiring amorous guy you have to hire data scientists of people who are going to really then overuse term but people are going to really understand how to managing curate and story your data and then you have to find researchers who know what to really do with that data and where to find in where to find those hit in gems of signals and come up with ideas in the afternoon people can communicate it so this isn't anything that gets put together very quickly this is a long process as this is a long process when when credit suisse comes to you and says hey matthew we want to build quantum do you say it's going to take a five years two years how how do you put them into the proper mindset for this i see probably got to give me twelve to eighteen months and think that i'm going to be in a dark cave phnom and you're gonna see nothing from me and i'm going to be asking you forbid checks invent and and hiring people and kind of lay out of business plan very carefully and can detail the costs in exactly what i need and you gotta make sure that they're in it and get in get the asked because the heavy asked but what you can get out of it is pretty cool at the end of the day the competition for the really skill fill in the.

senior lecturer credit suisse matthew rothman mit sloan school of management eighteen months five years two years
"senior lecturer" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"senior lecturer" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"My special guest today is matthew rothman he is head of quantitative research at credit suisse as well as a senior lecturer at mit sloan school of management so let's talk a little to help building a kwan team your hired credit suisse two to help put a team together what goes into that how do you first began to assemble clump team i think the first thing that you need if uh if you're going to be a quant is a combination of data and technology so you need to kind of go out in figure out what are the big databases that you need where you can get your information and what is your diversified information set going to be what you think your edges and go about procuring that so you're building hardware and software your hiring programmers you amorous guy you have to hire data scientists of people who are going to really than overuse term but people going to really understand how to managing curate and story your data and then you have to find researchers who know what to really do with that data were defined in where to find those hitting gems of signals and come up with ideas in the afternoon people can communicate it so this isn't anything that gets put together very quickly this is a long process as this is a law on process when when credit suisse come soon says hey matthew we want to build quantum do you say it's going to take a five years two years how how do you put them into the proper mindset for this i see probably gotta give me twelve to eighteen months and think that i'm going to be in a dark cave and you're gonna see nothing from me and i'm going to be asking you for big jackson invent and and hiring people and kind of lay out a business plan very carefully and can detail the costs in exactly what i need and you gotta make sure that there are in it and get in get the asked because the heavy asked but what you can get out of it is pretty cool at the end of the day the competition for the really skilled fill in the blank programmers researchers data scientists i think about the the just a giant collection.

senior lecturer matthew rothman mit sloan school of management eighteen months five years two years
"senior lecturer" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

02:01 min | 3 years ago

"senior lecturer" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Today is matthew rothman he is head of quantitative research at credit suisse as well as a senior lecturer at mit sloan school of management so let's talk a little bit about building a quarantine your hired credit suisse us to help put a team together what goes into that how do you first began to assemble team i think the first thing that you need if uh if you're going to be a quant is a combination of data and technology is so you need to go out and figure out what are the big databases that you need where you can get your in from mission what is ju diversified information set going to be what you think your edges and go about procuring that so you you're building hardware and software your hiring programmers you can amorous guy you have to hire data scientists people who are going to really then overuse term but people are going to really understand how to managing curate story your data and then you have to find researchers who know what to really do with that data and we're define where to find those in gems of signals and come up with ideas and the f you need people can communicate it so this isn't anything that gets put together very quickly this is a long process as this is a long process when when credit suisse comes to says hey matthew we want to build quantum do you say it's going to take five years two years how how do you put them into the proper mindset for this i see probably gotta give me twelve to eighteen months and think that i'm going to be in a dark cave and you're gonna see nothing from me and i'm going to be asking you forbid checks and and and hiring people and kind of lay out of business plan very carefully and can detail the costs in exactly what i need and got to make sure that there and get in get the asked because it's a heavy asked but what you can get out of it is pretty cool at the end of the day the competition for the really skill old fill in the blank programmers researchers data scientists i think of about the the just a giant collection.

senior lecturer matthew rothman mit sloan school of management eighteen months five years two years
"senior lecturer" Discussed on The Science Show

The Science Show

01:58 min | 3 years ago

"senior lecturer" Discussed on The Science Show

"Yeah well how did you start out our started in biology and then that became passer disciplined studied in high school if you wanted to get into something hard to gain admission to and how to the failing once admitted like they arts i was thinking medicine show you began in biology yes and followed the winds of change through better institutions and more senior roles via by our climatology biometric elegy bio ecology biogeography by our move forward g biology or more follivy biotechnology nanotechnology your nanotechnology lab did so well it had to move into smaller premises correct so that trajectory one you tenure yes by then i was attended lecturer live ally next i discovered the humanities were on the ascendancy is the top three levels of the national grant awarding agencies would dominated by arts graduates so i transform myself into a psycho biologist and then by turns into a cycle of linguist anti pronouncement a psycho pathologist anti pronouncement lear psycho physiologist penultimate layer psychopharmacologists into to lay ultimately became a psychologist now the next step is an echo psychologist while i special analyzing mean right now and you're sending pera annoyed paranoid we were talking about promotion universities playing mind games got me to senior lecturer level then accelerated through various adjourned demonstration clinical joint khan joint visiting appointments are became an associate professor reader professor and dean by going the usual fuzzy thinking route sociology anthropology prehistory relativism postmodernism and business administration and then.

pera professor lecturer senior lecturer associate professor