35 Burst results for "Senior Executive"

Hong Kong's pro-democracy Apple Daily facing shut-down under pressure from China

NPR News Now

00:18 sec | 6 hrs ago

Hong Kong's pro-democracy Apple Daily facing shut-down under pressure from China

"Says it's days away from going out of business. The move comes a week after hong kong police froze the paper assets and arrested senior executives on charges of violating the territory's new national security laws. the paper's founder. Jimmy lai is being detained on similar charges. Canadian prime minister justin

Hong Kong Jimmy Lai Prime Minister Justin
Apple Daily, Hong Kong's Last Pro-Democracy Newspaper, Going Dark

Pod Save the World

00:30 sec | 6 hrs ago

Apple Daily, Hong Kong's Last Pro-Democracy Newspaper, Going Dark

"The news out of hong kong also keeps getting worse so reuters broke the story that apple daily which is one of the last pro. Democracy independent media sources in hong kong is probably gonna stop publishing. So we've talked about this a bit. Before apple daily's founder. Jimmy lai was arrested under hong kong's relatively new national security law that just basically criminalized descent in democracy itself so last week authorities then froze apple daily's assets in charge some of its senior executives under that same national security law so things becoming untenable for

Hong Kong Jimmy Lai Apple Reuters
China Steps Up Antitrust Pressure on Internet Firms

WSJ Tech News Briefing

00:31 sec | 2 d ago

China Steps Up Antitrust Pressure on Internet Firms

"Chinese regulators are stepping up their scrutiny of dozens of domestic internet companies for possible antitrust violations. People familiar with matter. Say government agencies have paid surprise visits to some companies in recent weeks during which agents have questioned senior executives downloaded contracts and financial records and collected emails and internal communications. The moves come amid a broader crackdown. On china's internet jackets as the government works to rein in their influence. The regulators involved in the recent visits didn't respond to requests for comment.

China
Oktopost's VP of Marketing, Natalie Binns, on the State of B2B Marketing

B2B Marketing Now

02:18 min | 6 d ago

Oktopost's VP of Marketing, Natalie Binns, on the State of B2B Marketing

"It comes to be mocked Is very different based to be to see An ended in a something. The you know. We've kind of evolving the time and it's become Segment and i think one of the things that people are really going to be looking at the challenges. Okay we're coming out off. The pandemic people are desperate to go out and meet family and friends. You know but how is that. Going to be taken from a business perspective you know. How comfortable are we meeting strangers. How how likely always get back into this face to face engagement Another thing isn't this isn't a new thing. From the pandemic we were kind of getting very heavy on digital before i mean obviously. The percentage just massively shifted in the last twelve to eighteen months. swear it's pretty much been under percentage so but you know. I think that there was a bit of fatigue when it came to face to face event certainly in in previous years the the results that we would get out of doing trade shows or smaller events were getting lesser in lhasa and perhaps lesser of the senior executives were attending some of these events sending on some of that team to kind of gather information but the way in which you know customers have been buying is changed the time and i wonder how much that sach she gonna flip the way in that. Because we've kind of had this kind of gap annot my sabbatical in going to events. How much is it going to be. Okay i'm kind of sick of online searching now as she wants to deal with a real human And i'd like to be taken out for lunch. And i'd like to go to a sporting event oron i'd like to go and sit and listen Broth than vise day. Where i'm perhaps multitasking. And i've got kids running around whatever aside. I think the challenge is. How much do you go back to the good old days if you like a field marketing and you know events marketing versus you know still kind of prioritizing

Lhasa
The Road Ahead for Photography Businesses, with Zenfolio

This Week in Photo

01:57 min | Last month

The Road Ahead for Photography Businesses, with Zenfolio

"Today we're going to give you guys some insight. You got a player that is smack. Dab in the middle of the photography industry has decided and agreed to join me on the show to talk about some of their findings with regard to what the heck is happening as has happened in the photography industry. how has it evolved. Hasn't gone lebed isn't gonna write going up and down whatever we're gonna talk about that and here to talk about. It are some senior executives from a little company. You may have heard of called zinn. Folio john and pamela. Welcome to the show. guys frederick. Thanks great to be here. Yeah you're you're a completely welcome. Thank you for doing this. I know time is short. And i want to make sure we maximize all your time on this show Let's let's do some introduction before we dive in tamil. Let's start with you. what what is your major function. Ads in folio absolutely so. I'm in charge of all things. Customer customer support customer success. I lead an amazing team who are primarily the tigers themselves which really makes us unique in that when we're talking the and helping them with their business we have a really unique point of view of completely understanding what it's like to be a small business owner and to be a photographer with clients Having certain expectations. yeah yeah. Those expectations change a lot right as the industry shifts changes. I've been in it for several a couple of decades now and a lot of things changed with. We're gonna talk about in this interview. So absolutely i mean i think about when i got married and how long it was to get my wedding photos back and now it's very common in wedding wedding photography to even have pictures of the ceremony showing during the reception on as a slide show. So it's kinda like that's gone from an eight week. Lead time to you need to be ready

Folio John Zinn Pamela Frederick Tigers
Jennifer Eggers: The Resilience Framework

Leadership and Loyalty

02:02 min | 2 months ago

Jennifer Eggers: The Resilience Framework

"August today. Is jennifer eggos. Jennifer eggers works with leading organizations at some of the most real recognizable brands in the world to build resilience and to improve that capability and their capacity to adapt so they can emerge from disruption more effectively and faster. She is the founder of leader of leader shift insights and the author of international bestseller resilience. It's not about bouncing back. Ladies and gentlemen please put your hands together and helped me to welcome the author all the best. Thank you so much. I can't say i've ever been just like the thank you. You're very welcome. I'm jazzed good. I'm glad to hear it so where we always liked to start. Is this place which is in this of influences and everybody claiming to be an influence. Who is somebody that we might not think of my not recognize who has been a major influence on you and your leadership. Yeah it's a great question. And i'm glad i get to answer it so my dad I'm sure people don't know who he is. But he was a senior executive for a commercial Tree company actually. And what. I really admired about him is he was able to juggle managing hundreds of man in these hundred hundreds of crews all over the country And then he would go from there to a board. Meeting are negotiating with a really tough union and so you know back then they had one guy that would go from the board to the union to the men what you know today that would be twenty five different people even at all that But he he took a very Employee focused

Jennifer Eggos Jennifer Eggers
Biden Meets With CEOs on Semiconductor Shortage, Says US Must Invest

WSJ What's News

00:29 sec | 2 months ago

Biden Meets With CEOs on Semiconductor Shortage, Says US Must Invest

"President biden met with top officials and senior executives from ford general motors intel alphabet and others today to discuss the global semiconductor shortage. He touted his two point three trillion dollar infrastructure plan which includes fifty billion dollars for the american semiconductor industry. That would go toward building factories and research and design and has bipartisan support. Chips are used across industries but supply has dwindled with growing demand for products says covid nineteen has shifted work and consumer behavior

President Biden Ford General Motors Intel
More Than 100 Corporate Leaders Meet to Discuss State Voting Laws

WSJ What's News

01:34 min | 2 months ago

More Than 100 Corporate Leaders Meet to Discuss State Voting Laws

"Voting rights have become a hot button issue including among business leaders this weekend. Dozens of ceos and other senior leaders met on zoom to discuss how they should respond to new voting laws proposed for texas and other states according to people on the call. Wsj's emily glaser has the details. So there are more than one hundred ceos and other senior executives that joined this zoom on saturday afternoon with the express purpose of talking about voting rights and in the beginning there was a lot of background about what the georgia legislation other state legislation and bills include about. Whether or not they were strict voter access and then kenneth chenault the former. Ceo of american express longtime corporate board director as well as kenneth frazier. Ceo of merck really made their pitch to these ceo's and other business executives of what their new statement is going to say how they believe it's non-partisan it's all about ensuring voter access for all and really urged the ceo's to add their names and so As part of the call kennedy channel told the executives that several companies had signalled that they would sign on including pepsi. co pay. Pal t. rowe price and has so across industries a lot of large companies. And you know what we heard from our sources that even during this zoom ceo's of different companies like amc and cyberport core technologies. Were saying i'm in. I'm in

Emily Glaser Kenneth Chenault Kenneth Frazier WSJ Texas Kennedy Channel American Express Merck Georgia Pepsi Rowe Cyberport Core Technologies AMC
Trump Paid $750 in Federal Income Taxes in 2017

The Report

01:55 min | 2 months ago

Trump Paid $750 in Federal Income Taxes in 2017

"The new york times obtaining information on president trump's tax returns the times reporting the president pages. Seven hundred fifty dollars in taxes in twenty sixteen and again in his first year in office in two thousand twenty. A report from the new york times revealed that president trump paid virtually no personal income taxes for many years. Trump's assertions about his finances were less than truthful. Some part of the tax return information was disclosed in twenty twenty and it turned out he had paid virtually no federal tax. I think two consecutive years. That didn't seem to have much of an impact certainly on his quote unquote bays totally fake news. Now actually pay tax but and you'll see that as soon as my tax returns it's under order. They've been underwater for took nearly four years and a slew of corroborating witnesses to highlight even one piece of the president's byzantine finances and then the president weaved all this away from the podium which only made things more difficult for voters. Here was the evidence. The president was misleading the public claiming to be a billionaire while paying less in taxes than almost anyone. The president claimed that all that was made up fake news but there was no way for the public to know for sure because he still refused to provide those tax returns. It is certainly true. That had the returns been released. There would have been follow up questions that were possible that without the returns could never have been asked because the return cisco's a good bit of information that the annual financial disclosure reports that presence and other senior executive branch officials and candidates have to file. Don't they don't provide that more granular information and therefore they don't raise the kinds of questions that he would be required to answer.

President Trump The New York Times The Times Donald Trump Cisco
Jamie Kern Lima on How We Can Go From Underestimated To Unstoppable

Dose of Leadership

06:37 min | 4 months ago

Jamie Kern Lima on How We Can Go From Underestimated To Unstoppable

"Jamie kern lima on dose of leadership. This is amazing. Welcome to the show. Richard thank you so much and excited to be here to share this special moment with you your whole community to you. So it's an honor. Thank yo i gotta tell you. This is an amazing piece of work. You should be extremely proud of yourself for this. I don't need to tell you that. But i mean just from a reader. Just read this. And i've read it and i told you in the prerecording i got this. You guys fed ex this to me monday. I think got it. And i got it last night so i read it nine pm here. It is the next day. I finished it at one pm. Amazing book i just i love it. It made look. I'll be honest with you. It made me cry. I've never cried in book. it made me cry. Maybe he never cried. Okay not in a not in a book like this. I mean maybe in a fictional book. Or something yeah. It's an amazing story. Thank you so much. It's and you know it's been a journey. I think everyone of us has has a story. And i think you know just all of us are kind of on this journey. I think of. I mean for me. It's really it's really you know. So many people think oh. Is this a book about how you went from. Denny's waitress to leading a business. A billion dollar businesses like that's part of it but it's really a story of a girl who went from not believing herself to believing ourself and like not trusting myself to list like to learning how to hear my own gut instinct and learning how to trust it And just learning how to break through all that self doubt that. Hold us back so often and why i wrote. It is really like for a lot of years. I would get these. Dm's on instagram. Where people say. Oh i saw your your story Like hat like was it. Like did you just get lucky. Or because all that's out there is kinda like the headlines. And i realized oh if i don't share if i never share the real story behind the story like how it all happened years and years of rejection opposition and all those things than it's like so many other people out there that maybe are trying to launch their own dream or maybe they're trying to be a better leader or whatever it might be are gonna feel alone and their struggles if they're just reading like the highlight reel of people's success is online and so this is the first time ever but i just i took everything and kinda like throughout that filter out the window and just poured everything i had every personal and professional life lesson i've ever learned and my hope is just. It's absurd for anyone else out there who's really on that journey of like breaking through that self-doubt in and an on that journey to becoming the person they're created a bi. No i mean it's it's it's it's a prescription boards a recipe that you've kind of attacked life with anyway. What thing that's really kind of. Come out of this show and all these conversations when people ask me well. What are the biggest lessons that you've learned from talking to all these people and your book hits all of these these points that you know the prescription that is needed so that is in such lacking in everywhere we look. Is this authenticity. This transparency there's vulnerability which lends itself yet to be courageous. If you're gonna do those things because we suck adams human beings you know what we're bombarded with from our limiting beliefs are doubts. The pop culture the the social media now that just even feeds on that. I mean everybody deals with this head trash this limiting beliefs. These self doubt. It's a constant battle. You still battle with the today. I it with everybody that had on. The show has said that. And that's been a big moment for me on this show and a relief a sense of relief and reading. Your book is kind of the same feeling. That god is when you read it and because you're so authentic you're so transparent you're so vulnerable in this book and you have been in your whole. That's why you've been so successful and entrepreneur in in your brandon's accessible because of those things what do you think when you hear me say that that authenticity transparency vulnerably. That's the currency that's needed right. It is and it's scary for so many of us. I think that you know you look at so many of the studies out there that show. How like it's impossible to have a real human connection if you show up as your representative who you think people want you to be in the and the only real way to have a human connection as show like only parts parts the messy parts but a lot of people who know that awesome miss that connection of like our relationship with our customers also needs to be an authentic one our relationship with our teams and our employees also needs to be an authentic one and we ended up putting so much pressure on ourselves right social media your point to that too but we think all i a leader acts this way or we learn these things and we end up showing up is our own representative and then you know what i've learned and i don't wanna like jump too far ahead give anything up because there's so many crazy stories in the spot but wanted the leadership lessons i would say and life lessons frankly that i after which is three years of rejection a crazy story we finally got one shot on qvc. I can talk about only only if you want to but but you know being on. Kabc for united about a thousand shows live myself. And so i've met tens of thousands of entrepreneurs and brand founders and senior executives. That will go on the television for their company. And it's like all the years when i look back at. What is the commonality between the people that made it and those didn't because most people in the space they they get one shot on air and they never come back because they don't have the sales goal or maybe they they come back twice or three and then they're gone so i've seen thousands of people leave and then like what's the commonality between the ones that lasts and literally. It's not who's smarter. It's not who's more qualified or more accomplished. The people that will lasted were the ones that were the same off air in the green room as they were on here for better or worse like some were wild and crazy in quirky in somewhere very conservative and quiet and like but they were the same and it's because that live on air to one hundred million homes you can't fake authenticity and the only way for customers to connect as when you show up as you you fully are in the thing that one of the things i talk about in the book is In believe it is this lesson. I learn which is that like authenticity. Alone doesn't guarantee success in authenticity. Guaranty's failure

Jamie Kern Lima Denny Richard Kabc Adams Brandon QVC Guaranty
Tencent says exec being probed over links to 'personal' corruption allegations

WSJ What's News

00:38 sec | 4 months ago

Tencent says exec being probed over links to 'personal' corruption allegations

"An executive of ten cent china's most valuable publicly listed company has been held by chinese authorities as part of a high profile corruption. Probe according to people familiar with the matter. Jiang fung has been under investigation for alleged unauthorized sharing of personal. With a former official tencent operates the social media app. We chat which is ubiquitous in china. A spokesperson for ten cents and jiang has never held a senior executive position or managerial posts in the company. It could be determined. Were jiang is now and he couldn't be reached for comment. Chinese authorities having confirmed that jiang is under investigation

Jiang Fung China Tencent Jiang
Jeff Bezos steps down as Amazon CEO

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

03:21 min | 4 months ago

Jeff Bezos steps down as Amazon CEO

"Amazon's founder and ceo. Jeff bezos announced this week that he is going to become executive chairman of the company and the new ceo will be andy jesse. Currently the head of amazon web services amazon is twenty six years old. and obviously it's massive and has ideas to do everything from package delivery to television production too smart. Microwaves to artificial intelligence. And obviously it's huge an incredibly profitable cloud business amazon's ambition and reach is legendary but with betas taking on a new role. Could that change. It's a topic for quality assurance where we take a look at big tech story. Stone is a senior executive editor for bloomberg. He's written one book on amazon and has another one coming out this spring. I asked him if amazon might start to focus more on the gold. Mine of its cloud amazon actually has kind of two of those gold mines. You mentioned one. aws the other one is advertising. And it's been this kind of quiet force gobbling up market share in online advertising. And you know for the last ten years. It's investors have been wholly on board with amazon not returning that money to shareholders not showing you know a big profit although they've been getting better in that regard but investing and inventing new things to the extent that its shareholders continue to allow that to happen amazon. Continue to do it now. jeff bezos. He's going to continue to be active in the big decisions and working on new projects and executive chairman. There's a role that carry some meaning. He's still going to be andy jesse's boss in many ways andy jesse seems formed in the same mould as jeff visas and yet. There are real critiques about the company's treatment of its workers it's wages its approach to climate not even with and i trust. Do we have a sense of whether jazzy might be more responsive to some of those critiques. Right are we going to see a softer gentler amazon. Like a tim. Cook to steve jobs. That's right and in some respects. Maybe chelsea's is while he's sort of cleaved from jeff bezos rib and a lot of ways. He's also different. I mean he's more politically active at the same time amazon. Aws under andy. Jesse sold its face. Recognition software to law enforcement agencies and only paused for a year. When the blm movement became very loud and vocal. So i don't suspect it. I much change particularly with a very loud voice on the board with a lot of sentiment changing. Is that not a good thing. Should jesse be more open to change. Will shareholders have less tolerance for business. As usual i think they're gonna have to start listening more to the voices not only of their frontline employees in the warehouses who do have some real grievances particularly amid the pandemic but to the contractor workforce almost kind of invisible constituency who tries to amazon vans and drop software packages like a lot of companies amazon kind of indulgence itself of this contractor workforce where the healthcare protections fifteen dollar an hour wage protections don't exist and so i think yes i mean they're going to increasingly if they want to get to that next level of growth. Have to listen to some of these concerns brad. Stone is a senior executive editor for bloomberg

Amazon Andy Jesse Jeff Bezos Bloomberg Stone Steve Jobs Jeff Chelsea BLM Cook Jesse Andy Brad
Dr. Jennifer Aaker and Naomi Bagdonas: "Humor creates a window into authenticity and trust."

Skimm'd from The Couch

06:26 min | 5 months ago

Dr. Jennifer Aaker and Naomi Bagdonas: "Humor creates a window into authenticity and trust."

"Cheddar. I'm really curious. Because one of the first example he said was she was kind of living this double life she was. You know this serious business professional by day and had this you know literally humorous lifestyle by night and weekends at. I'm curious gentlemen like in your studies. How common is that not necessarily common that people have you know a improv career on the side. But how common is it that people turn off some of their personality within the workplace. Such a good question you know with our students in even executives that we teach we find it know it to be incredibly common. In fact i would say that. Youtube seem to be exceptions to the rule. I think the only story is not only communist. I think there's a lot of reasons for that. We often believe that certain characteristics about ourselves like our sense of humor having some levity or even smiling or being a human have no place in the workforce because if we take our work seriously we should take ourselves seriously in a book. We dive into these four deadly myths associated with you mark and if you put the word deadly in front of it makes it sound more cornets. That's just a little scientific for you guys but the first one is you know the serious business daily math. That here's somebody has no place in the in the workforce or any place that takes yourself seriously but research shows that even just laughing has unparalleled effects on our chemistry and our behavior so it literally when you laugh together. It changes the chemistry of your rain to make you more prime connection more creative and more resourceful and more resilient stress very cafe at i in. It's really important to me to be around people that i can laugh with and i know you talk about it. Believe it's four different types of humor that that you sort of. Can you tell us what the four r. I wanted to gauge where we fit. Carl wants to know how funny she is. Yes of because. I have no problem saying i'm funny okay. The only described humor types. And then i'll take a whakatane now and carly all right. So we've got four humor styles the standup the magnet the sniper and the sweetheart so standups natural entertainers outgoing not afraid to ruffle feathers to get a laugh. Like to roast like to tease big personalities next is the magnet similarly outgoing but magnets tend to keep things positive warm uplifting. They avoid controversial. Humor the radiate charisma. They're the ones buying around of drinks at the bar while laughing next. We have these sniper so snipers are a little bit more introverted. And their style. Tends to be edgy sarcastic nuanced. so it's sort of they say they have an acquired taste and they're not afraid to cross a line in pursuit of laugh so really good at zerorez and with deadpan delivery. And then lastly we have sweetheart so again. A little bit understated in their delivery earnest and honest they again tend to use humor. That's more uplifting that brings people together. They would never make someone else the target of their job if they thought it might hurt feelings but they're not the ones that want the limelight and they're going to be on stage so those are four. Okay so this is. This is a best gas carly in the back of your mind. You should be thinking what you jan. Y'all as you should be thinking. What partly thing i got it. Okay all right so this is our best. Guess jandiyal you are likely a sweetheart and carly is part madinat and parts neighbor. Okay and when i say we i mean alex. Alex told assist so out on our team. Yeah alex get off camera. You need to be put on the spot now. Alex's terrified now yeah. I think that what's interesting about. This is my humor in the workplace is very different than my humor. I said i. I was gonna say that my humor style. Four the podcast or in the office is probably more sweetheart. But i think in in reality. It's definitely more sniper. Yes that is true. She's like midwest work muir bjork and carly. I don't know what this falls into but like any like seventh grade boy. Category link found. You guy humor okay. You always say that. Like i say that i like to eat like a child like i twelve year. Old boy Gushers stuff like that. Okay i think i am sniper. But i think at work i've probably do straddle i actually don't know which i'd straddle i think either stratas sniper in stand up or sniper polystyrene stand up. I would agree with that. I mean how often is that when you guys come across this. That humor types vary depending on what the audience yacht that. This is common actually at super healthy so in particular. it's really important to recognize. There's a powerful relationship between humor and status and so what we find. Is that as people get higher in status. Your humor style needs to shift and this is because one of the principles of of comedy is never punched down. Basically never make fun of someone who's of lower status than you and when particular we find for people who are senior executives in organizations is they tend to have more teasing biting edgy humor outside of the office but when they come into the office they really have to use humor. That's more uplifting. Because if they don't that people who are more junior on their team might take it the wrong way or might have hurt feelings so we often find that that's the case especially with senior folks and then the reality is just like anything else the appropriateness of what we say at home versus what we say at work is different. You know we have different responsibilities. We have different relationships with our colleagues than we do with our families. And so it's it's actually really good that you're not making all the jokes around the boardroom that you are around the dinner

Jandiyal Muir Bjork Youtube Alex Carl Carly Midwest
3 ways companies can support grieving employees

TED Talks Daily

05:03 min | 6 months ago

3 ways companies can support grieving employees

"About three years ago. I lost my daughter. She was sexually assaulted and murdered. She was my only child and was just nineteen as the shock wore off and the all consuming greed to core. I lost all meaning and purpose alive and my daughter spoke to me. She asked me to keep living. If i am not avow she will have. One less heart continued to with dad. My partner susan. And i started our desperate climb out of this deep hole of pro my loss in the back to the land of the living with grief we unexpectedly found a rather unlikely and bitty helpful ally my work at first. I wasn't doing trudy pressure. Go back to work. I i had a lot of self doubt as a senior executive responsible for thousands of employees and billions of dollars after all the trauma is my mind still sharp and creative enough for the job. Can i still relate to people. Can i get past their resentment and regret. i felt about all the time spent working instead of Being with my daughter. Is it fair to leave. Susan home alone dealing with han grief and pain at the end. I made the decision to go back to work. And i am very glad i did. We all experience grief and loss in our lives for most of us that means at some point getting up and going back to work while living with the grief on those days we will continue to carry the incredible burden of sadness but also i hope that work itself and restore us that much needed feeling of purpose for me. Work started out as a just a product distraction but evolved to being truly therapeutic and meaningful in so many ways and might return to work proved to be a good thing for the company as well. I know i'm not indispensable but retaining my expertise proved to be video beneficial and my return helped all the teams. Avoid disruptions and and distractions. When you lose the most precious thing in your life. You gain a lot of humility and have very different perspective. Free of egos and agendas and i think i may better corker and later because of that for all the good that came from you though might re entry into work from his who steady hard. The biggest challenge was having to separate my personal and professional apps completely. You know okay to cry at an early in the morning but slap a smile on the face promptly at eight o'clock and active as it is a santa's before until the workdays over leaving in two completely different worlds at the same time and all the hiding and and pretending that went with it it was. It was exhausting. It and made me feel very alone overtime. I worked through those struggles. And i gained the conference and the acceptance to bring my whole work and as a direct result of that i found joya gaining it shooting that hard journey back to work. I learn the power of having a culture of empathy in the workplace not sympathy not compassion but empathy. I came to believe that a workplace where empathy is a core part of the culture that is a joyful and productive workplace and that workplace inspires a great deal of loyalty. I believe that are three things. A company can do to create a nurture a culture and with the in the workplace in general and support a grieving employee like myself in particular one is to have policies that led unemployed deal with their loss in ps without worrying about administrative logistics. Second per wide. Return to work therapy to the employee as an integral part of the health benefits package and third provide training for all employees on how to support each other

Trudy Susan Corker Joya
3 ways companies can support grieving employees

TED Talks Daily

04:56 min | 6 months ago

3 ways companies can support grieving employees

"About three years ago. I lost my daughter. She was sexually assaulted and murdered. She was my only child and was just nineteen as the shock wore off and the all consuming greed to core. I lost all meaning and purpose alive and my daughter spoke to me. She asked me to keep living. If i am not avow she will have. One less heart continued to with dad. My partner susan. And i started our desperate climb out of this deep hole of pro my loss in the back to the land of the living with grief we unexpectedly found a rather unlikely and bitty helpful ally my work at first. I wasn't doing trudy pressure. Go back to work. I i had a lot of self doubt as a senior executive responsible for thousands of employees and billions of dollars after all the trauma is my mind still sharp and creative enough for the job. Can i still relate to people. Can i get past their resentment and regret. i felt about all the time spent working instead of Being with my daughter. Is it fair to leave. Susan home alone dealing with han grief and pain at the end. I made the decision to go back to work. And i am very glad i did. We all experience grief and loss in our lives for most of us that means at some point getting up and going back to work while living with the grief on those days we will continue to carry the incredible burden of sadness but also i hope that work itself and restore us that much needed feeling of purpose for me. Work started out as a just a product distraction but evolved to being truly therapeutic and meaningful in so many ways and might return to work proved to be a good thing for the company as well. I know i'm not indispensable but retaining my expertise proved to be video beneficial and my return helped all the teams. Avoid disruptions and and distractions. When you lose the most precious thing in your life. You gain a lot of humility and have very different perspective. Free of egos and agendas and i think i may better corker and later because of that for all the good that came from you though might re entry into work from his who steady hard. The biggest challenge was having to separate my personal and professional apps completely. You know okay to cry at an early in the morning but slap a smile on the face promptly at eight o'clock and active as it is a santa's before until the workdays over leaving in two completely different worlds at the same time and all the hiding and and pretending that went with it it was. It was exhausting. It and made me feel very alone overtime. I worked through those struggles. And i gained the conference and the acceptance to bring my whole work and as a direct result of that i found joya gaining it shooting that hard journey back to work. I learn the power of having a culture of empathy in the workplace not sympathy not compassion but empathy. I came to believe that a workplace where empathy is a core part of the culture that is a joyful and productive workplace and that workplace inspires a great deal of loyalty. I believe that are three things. A company can do to create a nurture a culture and with the in the workplace in general and support a grieving employee like myself in particular one is to have policies that led unemployed deal with their loss in ps without worrying about administrative logistics. Second per wide. Return to work therapy to the employee as an integral part of the health benefits package

Trudy Susan Corker Joya
Fishing holds key to Brexit trade deal as talks drag on

Bloomberg Daybreak

05:10 min | 7 months ago

Fishing holds key to Brexit trade deal as talks drag on

"We want to get you the latest on Exit now because hopes for a breakthrough on a trade deal seemed to be on again off again, almost by the minute. So for the latest, we're joined now by David Merrit, senior executive editor for Bloomberg News. And David. I've been watching, I think along with you. The flurry of headlines have seen in just the last hour on where things stand in the Brexit negotiations. Get us up to speed if you could. Yeah, that's right on an office is definitely the right way to describe it in the market, certain reactions that pound whip soaring around. I think it just reflects the really frenetic nature. Off the talks as we really are into this final stretch here, and officials on both sides briefing various bits of the media that things are looking good things looking bad, the most recent reports saying something is imminent this weekend that came out of this morning when there was a bit of uncertainty, the French threatening a veto if they didn't like this deal, saying there was still significant gaps. So you know who to believe. I think what we do know they're still in the room. The pace of the talks really has intensified. What we may need over the weekend is a final political push. That means Boris Johnson, prime minister having a phone call, perhaps with ocean of underlying the president, the European Commission so really broken those final compromises. Both sides probably need to give a few more inches to get this deal done Most of it, though most of the Texas there so we will be waiting. It could come this weekend, but I have. We're afraid I've given up painting, and he did. Deadlines on this, you know, they're only deadline. That really matters is probably the end of transition, and that's December 31st. Right. So we got, I guess just a few more weeks before that comes along. But do we have any indications at this point that we are going to get that top level meeting any time soon between the prime minister and the president of the Sea? We have don't have confirmation, but suddenly things look to be heading that way. And I think it's worth taking a step back here. You know, no. The reporting on the ground, both in Brussels and in London, despite some of the official comments that come out about prom Rooms, disagreements tensions. Those things are kind of normal at this station negotiation. What's really going on behind the scenes, we're told is that career progress is being made. But there are these still fundamental gaps is all the things we know about the fishing access the level playing field that they're calling state aid rules on there needs to be a bit of a barge, Mr Barnier and Mr Frost, the chief negotiators, they cannot do that themselves. They're going to need instruction from their bosses. That's the prime minister and the president the commission, so those two are gonna have to come together at some point. Maybe we're being set up for that as well. There's going to be a grand political gesture. Ultimately, to get this thing over the line. The incentive is there. Neither side wants to be blamed, of course for talks breaking down and for there to be any more economic disruption at this point in time, so we're gonna have to wait and find out the confirmation, But I think that would be the moment to look for over the weekend. All right, well, it is very interesting, though, that France really seems like it's taken an outsize role in these negotiations. I mean, what are the chances that France really could veto a deal of this? Stage of the game. Well, Mr Macron, the President Franz has got slight form on this, of course in not only in the Brexit talks and other big moments in European negotiations, the French going on record today. Say they, Yes, they would trash this deal if they didn't like it. They have actually said this fairly consistently, though, throughout this process, and the French had this big interest in the fishing. Uh, part of this question and also on this kind of state aid that the fairness between the two economies. It's our closest trading partner, the biggest one with Britain, so that relationship is very key. French officials have been touring from the fishing villages in northern France to make a big show of how they are ready for no deal. If it has to happen, But if no deal does happen, those fishing villages are going to be really impacted that they're not allowed to go in. They take the majority of the fish out of the English Channel. If that is stop, that's a big domestic problem. Mr Macron, But he has to be seen to be making us that It's his style, of course, and we've seen it before to make a bit of a stand at this moment in time. But as I said previously the expectations despite what people are saying in public, and he may well be talking to his domestic market, they're more than globally. Ultimately, the people in the room seemed to be making lots of progress. Only about a minute left in our conversation in just a few weeks left until that hard Brexit deadline as you mentioned, is there a sense that some of the sticking points here are just on the Margins or are both sides far enough? Apart from each other that this really could fall apart in the next couple of weeks? I mean, absolutely could fall apart. You know, the history of Britain in the year I'm afraid is ones of both parties talking at cross purposes and on these fundamental questions of sovereignty and who is going to adjudicate over the rules, you know, there is still a significant gap. Someone's got to budge. Someone's gonna blink. Both sides have got big domestic reasons why that is politically difficult for them to do so. Mr Johnson depends on the votes. You people got to me in that landslide last year to get Brexit done in a meaningful way, as he put it. So, yes, the there is a possibility that things fall apart. Both sides of preparing for that New Year's Eve is the deadline, Britain would fall back to the World Trade Organization rules. That means tariffs quotas back backed up Lori's at Dover, potential food shortages on the supermarket shelves and Britain it could be fairly chaotic. They want to try and avoid it, but there still remains a significant chance that that might happen in just a few weeks

David Merrit Mr Macron Mr Barnier Mr Frost Bloomberg News Boris Johnson France European Commission Brexit Brussels David Texas Franz Britain London English Channel Mr Johnson World Trade Organization Lori Dover
Another Halo Infinite Director Leaves The Project

Kinda Funny Games Daily

01:51 min | 8 months ago

Another Halo Infinite Director Leaves The Project

"Turbulence continues on Microsoft Corp.'s Halo Infinite video game with the departure of the. Projects Director Christly who oversaw production of Halo infinite at three or four three industries, which is developing the game for Microsoft is no longer working on it. He confirmed a Bloomberg News on Wednesday lease the second top director on the project to leave in the past two years. Quote I've stepped back from infant and I am looking at future opportunities. Lee, said I believe in the team and I'm confident they will deliver a great game in which is a good time to step away for me to step away. The highly anticipated. Next installment was originally slated to come out alongside Microsoft's launch of its next generation xbox cities council in November. The game was delayed in early August however following poor fan reception to an early public version lease role was sidelined a few weeks later as Microsoft. Veteran Joe Staton to lead the single player campaign and another senior executive Pierre Heintz to run multiplayer Lee has been three or four three industries since two, thousand, eight a year after its founding overseeing the halo series since two thousand sixteen, his title Has Been Partner Studio head quote Christly remains a Microsoft employee and while you step back from Halo. Infinite right now we appreciate all he has done for the project to date Microsoft said in the email statement. The development of Halo Infant has been rocky in August, twenty, nineteen, three or four three industries lost its creative director Tim Longo, an executive producer Mary Olson at the time. The company said that quote, the overall creative vision and production of the game remains led by Chris Lee and quote. Pushing the Games. Release beyond November was blow for Microsoft which was relying on the game to help sell new xbox consoles in the holiday season retail boxes for the xbox series. Still feature artwork of master chief. The main character of Halo Halo doesn't currently have a release date, but three four three has said it will be out next year.

Microsoft Corp. Chris Lee Christly Director Projects Director Joe Staton Bloomberg Mary Olson Senior Executive Tim Longo Pierre Heintz Executive Producer Partner
Feds fine Citigroup $400 million over faulty risk management

BTV Simulcast

00:23 sec | 9 months ago

Feds fine Citigroup $400 million over faulty risk management

"Is to pay a $400 million fine of a deficiencies in risk management and controls. The regulator says City must now seek clearance before making any new acquisitions. Adding that more cards may be imposed. The bank failed to address its shortcomings. The Fed is also demanding city reveals how it's fixing risk management problems will hold senior executives account of all

FED
"senior executive" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

Outcomes Rocket

07:11 min | 10 months ago

"senior executive" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

"They GONNA stop because if they can't trust the information, they're saying that he's GonNa decide to go. Back to pipe, and so with finding that it's this combination of technology talent that's critical. So use the technology where you can get his officiant as you possibly change but then if there's a gap, so you've got an insurer that still completely type of com handle electronic enquiries in have a backup team that can get on the fun with that insurer enclosed caps and taking up to August. Yeah not a one size fits all you gotta do Combo of Tech and talent. Absolutely. Yeah. No, that's interesting. So as you think about how you guys are improving outcomes in, you know making business better it's so clear now I appreciate you walking us through that. What's one of the biggest setbacks you've experienced and a key learning that emerged from that sure I. I think probably the one of the biggest surprises for me was discovering that the biggest competitor in we had to adoption was the fax machine. This libere technology that we must be daily remember it's still despite which unification technology healthcare and so that that was a big surprise in the other piece was attention. So when we think about the software that we also to doctor's office said, the specialist writes the prescription is usually a team of office stuff involved in processing all of this pipe work out the I should get started. So we're really trying to help back team of office. And those folks are so hard working and you go into one of these officers and even if you've got an appointment team both it's there was in the field as well as a team on the find calling on these offices and helping them to get educated about a software and how to use it, and we found that just getting attention is is incredibly difficult and so what we have to do is not just provide a solution that's going to help them. Along run it, it's gotta be immediately apparent to them that it's GonNa, make life easier, and so we found that once they start using the software and they get they love it. In fact, we've been doing product market fit surveys am funny. Really high percentage of folks to be really hard disappointed was no longer available says great use. Yes. No product market fit but I would go to get on it and and that's been the challenge. So for example, we have A. A reverse Haitian solution that loads the patient risks like it's. So this says you know all of these patients because typically at the end of the year, you got going check everybody's insurance again and I think particularly in in the current situation as well. We saw people changing their job situation's constantly to evaluate whether insurance has changed and so that loading that patient looks like a to do list of me makes life a lot easier because nagging go okay I'll go to govern and check this set of patients to see whether their insurance China working at anything we can do to make an started easier is really the big lesson that's so interesting, and so what's been the key to adoption them? Yet really really this sort of looking at the redesign. So can we import data? Can we look at every aspect of getting started log in registration etc, and just trying to find ways to reduce that amount of effort because if it if it looks like it's going to be hotter than scooping on a piece of paper in fact, they not gonNA, do it and So that's really the challenge is is continuing to refine that that front end Ui and and trying to help them to just give it a guy so that they can understand how they lost can be a little bit easier and the patients can get better results. Yeah. That's a good call out reducing the friction thinking about the overall workflow. How can it? Meet, year than scribbling on paper. You know it some I do facts through my phone now like new rare instance an you know they've got these facts apps now. Yeah. Yeah, and so I'm wondering if you know you mentioned that fax machines are one of the biggest competitors is there a software optimization where you use digital facts technologies to make the overall process simpler? Yeah and that's be one area that we think looking at because it's GonNa. Take a while to the people over from facts instance. So that's your the money to buy by the way. I don't. Amazon to get whatever I want tomorrow. Yeah. So What of course? Many. Between the healthcare and at other districts right? Vagit. Koga at airplane. You know they alighted say. Can. I have a slight tomorrow on the airline says, well, I don't know when I have no idea how much it's GonNa cost you. So, looking at digital technology. Yeah. especially. Periods hike is a you know we were talking earlier about this problem of somebody's falls come in with missing information. So can we can we take those vaccine electrically use optical character recognition soon to read our keep hospitalized forms and load that information in so it makes it easier for staff but it will say if there are issues and get on top of straight away straight back to the providers of. Painting on Shia form missing EXA why can FELETI and send it back? That's powerful. That's that could be really powerful. Right? Especially, if that is the case, right? He put on one away. Fax Machine let's digitized at least. Yeah. Yeah. funny is pandemic I. Mean It's not obviously it's a terrible situation, but we had office stop with hives and they've had no access to facts. Receiving Christie interest from providers, offices, and manufacturers in in the software tell my Gosh. Wow Amazing. Well, you know what these things while very challenging and and painful also pushes to be better and. Faster, so you know hope it's helped you guys and and so what what are you most excited about today rich I would say needs it's really this next generation patient supports said continuing to find wise that we can leverage. Much amazing innovation happening in digital health and I think particularly now missing a lot with virtual healthy remote patient monitoring and growing on the backs of telehealth and so that's one key pace. I think the other areas really the continue ever wish by spice and how do we leverage tiring get smarter? So you know when you look at I support solutions today, it's been very much a one-size-fits-all approach. You know every patient is sign and I'm just very excited about how we can get smart and say, let's really assess each patient as unique individual and right sizes supports I need and monitor how they doing justice. As we as they go three and that's exciting. It is. Yeah I mean for example, would looking at social determinants, the health and saying we blade that deny typically nestled welcome coal to assess patient and see what the challenges up if we can blend that with died or about social determinants of health, we provide that noticed.

patient monitoring China Amazon Koga Christie
"senior executive" Discussed on KNST AM 790

KNST AM 790

10:57 min | 2 years ago

"senior executive" Discussed on KNST AM 790

"Years in law enforcement and senior executive positions and technology sectors in two thousand twelve he was an invited speaker at the two thousand twelve national association of search and rescue annual conference in Tahoe. The presentation was the findings of his report detailed heads in his first book missing four one one David Politis back on coast to coast. Hello, david. How're you doing George? Good. I'm looking forward to this. And gosh, it just doesn't stop doesn't. You know, it just keeps rolling, unfortunately. And it's it's a sad reality of our life. I I'm I'm thinking that we beginning to hone in on what's happening to these people. And it's not a very good thing. What's your take well for the viewers? You don't know. There was I did a two hour special for the history channel aired on January fifth, and it chronicled my work, and I was very fortunate to get two hours on their we delved into a couple of cases, we interviewed Dr Brandenburg, a physicist and. In the cases that we worked the people essentially vanished into nothingness one was on the side of mount Shasta, the guys who is with could see miles from where they last saw their partner, and he was a ten minute. Walk ahead of them with no obstructions. No, nothing, and he just disappeared. In that special. We went deep into it. And kind of looked at all the variables. There's no animal predation up that high. There's none of these things. And really, it's it's a big conundrum Brandenburg came up with the idea that it might be related to a portal, which was interesting and something we looked into and. It's. Who knows really what's going on right now. I want to really delve into that in our second hour with you David wouldn't we take phone calls as well? But the your latest Bigfoot book, tell us about this another incredible story. So this one I kind of fell into I'm still one hundred percent committed to the missing people side of the fence. They're unrelated topics, and in this I wrote two other Bigfoot bucks Hooper project and tribal Bigfoot, and those I used affadavits on the witnesses meaning that they had to sign an affidavit under penalty of perjury for what they saw. And we brought in a noted FBI trained forensic artists to draw the sketches of what the people saw in this book I stumbled into it kind of threw back door. I I was doing the archival searches on missing people, and I was going back to the seventeen hundreds. And I noticed that there were articles in the newspapers about something that we would know as. Bigfoot or sasquatch but back in the seventeen eighteen hundreds. It was called the wild, man. And yeah, there's there's a lot of maybe side stories about people living off, the grid, etc. That would be called wild men. But these that I that I started to cut out years ago. Were about a large by Ted hair all over the body enormous in size long arms etcetera. And I I got put up a thanks to Tom Powell another Bigfoot researcher out of Oregon. He really when I saw his presentation about how all of the things in our world may be tied together. Meaning mounds giants Bigfoot I started to pay attention to that. After after I saw his presentation, and I started to accumulate these stories and not only was I finding wild men stories from hundreds of years ago, but also finding stories about how farmers ranchers and fishermen were founding giant skeletons. And at the beginning, I kind of find me I'll maybe this is just hocus pocus. But there were too many of them. Yeah. And the phenomenal thing to me was in many of the stories they talked about turning over the skeleton to the Smithsonian. And other instances, they turn them over to state museums. And I know other researchers that have followed this up in the Smithsonian claims, they don't have any giant skeletons from North America. But there were too many to say how could this be happening? This has got to be true. And then in the stories that I was accumulating, it seemed like the descriptions of the wild, man. They would call him giants many times. And then in the articles about the giant skeletons. They would say, yeah, the skeletons where between seven and nine feet tall. And sometimes they had articles of pottery other times they had articles of tools near them. And at other times it was jewelry. And this sociation date time in -cation. What I did was is a very simple book. And I kind of wrote it with the pessimist in mind because I have a few friends that are like that the pessimist or the skeptic David both. Okay. I think both and. The first article that I actually pulled that I put in on one of the very first pages with somebody. That we probably I know, you know, I'm George, but I think the rest of the audience probably knows them as well. And that's jock fillet. Very very smart, man. Great researcher and in he put out a a book. About three years ago. And it was about the the Ford movement of UFO research. Well, he had a story in there from September seventeenth sixteen eighty and it was a short cook. Here's what it said. It said a large black cloud like mass landed in a field, releasing a huge hair covered being that was seen briefly. And then disappeared. And I know that there's a lot of people in the world that think well, maybe the Bigfoot is related to some kind of tear UFO comes up. A lot. It does doesn't it? Yeah. And that was really the first article I put in just to make people think and then from there there was an article may twenty eighth seventeen seventy two in the Maryland gazette that also talks about a fully hair covered bipeds that you, and I would know his big foot, and I took great restraint in putting other articles that may have been construed as an April gorilla, and these were really only Bigfoot related topics that the funny thing about it was is that as I'm accumulating these. And then putting them in the book, and I'm looking at them. And really the book is ninety nine percent just articles dates and the location where the article was pulled and it's a table top size book. And so really as people start to browse through. It you start to think this all true. But no all the articles are true. And it's hard to believe that the history of this goes back as far as the does. Well, the fact that goes back so far, and it's documented is fascinating all by itself. Exactly, I mean, obviously, people were having these issues and encountering these beings. And you'd think well, maybe it's only in a certain part of the country and in reality, it goes coast to coast, and I've articles in there from California. Articles from the east coast articles from Canada. And they all kind of fit what we know as the bipeds. What did the article state that? Yeah. It has extremely long arms giant in size is a few articles in there that imply that there might have been some aggression one where it killed the dog some other ones where they confront people. But in reality, it's a lot of Monday type behavior where they're seen by people doing certain things, and then they're running away. And in fact, I found some articles in there about a wild woman. And I thought that was pretty rare in the same same sort of description hair all over the body, but they could tell it was a woman and one of the notes, I put in there that I I added was that I think it's telling that back in the seventeen hundreds they named this a wild, man. Didn't give it an animal connotation, they give human type Konitz. I need the stories come from native Americans. David almost none. Really? Yeah. These are these are frontline newspapers. I mean, big newspapers New York, Boston Chicago. These aren't like third and fourth tier lot of them are mainstream big papers presented this handled it as a straight news article. They did. Interesting. So no forty and push or anything like that. No. I think that the frustrating part of this like a lot of things that are discussed on your show is that nobody wants to say where the skeletons are found or where this evidence might be it seems as though they just disappeared. Has anybody reported being hurt by these creatures? There's a couple of times where a carriage was going across a road a forest, and they talk about almost hitting one. And it almost sounds like it's a defense mechanism and there's confrontation. You know, it's very rare. And I wrote my to Bigfoot books before I ever came into the the missing person arena in those big foot books and at the time, I was doing the Bigfoot research fulltime there were almost no articles about Bigfoot, injuring anything or anybody. And then as soon as my books come out about missing people in the woods people start coming up with these stories, and I hear I've heard a ton of them. But I want everyone to think about this. When you hear one of these stories on a podcast or you read something on a website. And there's no names. There's no dates don't believe it. That's a good point. David stay with us. We're gonna take a quick break. We'll be back in a moment with David Politis is website linked up at coast to coast AM dot com. We're talking about his latest work Bigfoot wild men and giants don't forget to watch our TV show beyond belief with George Noory. Just log. Gone to beyond belief dot com..

David Politis George Noory researcher Dr Brandenburg mount Shasta FBI perjury senior executive Tahoe Canada national association of search Maryland North America Ted Oregon -cation physicist Tom Powell partner
"senior executive" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

11:36 min | 2 years ago

"senior executive" Discussed on 710 WOR

"In law enforcement and senior executive positions, and technology sectors and two thousand twelve he was an invited speaker at the two thousand twelve national association of search and rescue annual conference in Tahoe. The presentation was the findings of his report detailed heads in his first book missing four one one David Politis back on coast to coast. Hello, david. How're you doing George? Good. I'm looking forward to this. And gosh, it just doesn't stop doesn't. You know, it just keeps rolling, unfortunately. And it's it's a sad reality of our life. I I'm I'm thinking that we beginning to hone in on what's happening to these people. And it's not a very good thing. What's your take well for the viewers who don't know? There was I did a two hour special for the history channel aired on January fifth, and it of my work. I was very fortunate to get two hours on their we delved into a couple of cases, we interviewed Dr Brandenburg, a physicist. And in the cases that we worked the people essentially vanished into nothingness one was on the side of mount Shasta, the guys who was with could see miles from where they last saw their partner, and he was a ten minute. Walk ahead of them with no obstructions. No, nothing, and he just disappeared in that special. We went deep into it. And kind of looked at all the variables. Nls. There's no animal predation up that high. There's none of these things. And really, it's it's a big conundrum Brandenburg came up with the idea that it might be related to a portal, which was interesting and something we looked into and. It's. Who knows really what's going on right now. I want to really delve into that in our second hour with you David wouldn't we take phone calls as well? But your latest Bigfoot book, tell us about this another incredible story. So this I kind of fell into I'm still one hundred percent committed to the missing people side of the fence. They're unrelated topics in this. I wrote two other Bigfoot books the Hooper project and tribal Bigfoot, and those I used affidavits on the witnesses meaning that they had to sign an affidavit under penalty of perjury for what they saw. And we brought in a noted FBI trained forensic artists to draw the sketches of what the people saw in this book I stumbled into it kind through a back door. I I was doing the archival searches on missing people, and I was going back to the seventeen hundreds. And I noticed that there were articles in the newspapers about something that we would know as. Bigfoot or sasquatch but back in the seventeen eighteen hundreds it was called the wild, man. And there's a lot of maybe side stories about people living off, the grid, etc. That would be called wild men. But these that I that I started to cut out years ago. Were about a large by Ted hair, all over the body enormous in size, long, arms, etc. And I I to put up a thanks to Tom Powell and another big foot researcher out of Oregon that he really when I saw his presentation about how all of the things in our world may be tied together. Meaning mounds giants Bigfoot I started to pay attention to that. After after I saw his presentation, and I started to accumulate these stories and not only was I finding wild men stories from hundreds of years ago. But I was also finding stories about how farmers ranchers and fishermen were founding giant skeletons. And at the beginning, I kind of me, I'll maybe this is just hocus pocus. There were too many of the them. And the phenomenal thing to me was in many of the stories they talked about turning over the skeleton to the Smithsonian. And other instances, they turn them over to state museums. And I know other researchers that have followed this up in the Smithsonian claims, they don't have any giant skeletons from North America. But there were too many to say how could this be happening? This has gotta be true. And then in the stories that I was accumulated, it seemed like the descriptions of the wild men. They would call him giants many times. And then in the articles about the giant skeletons. They would say, yeah, the skeletons where between seven and nine feet tall. And sometimes they had articles of pottery and other times they had articles of tools near them and other times it was jewelry. And the sociation date time in. Location. What I did was is a very simple book kind of wrote it with the pessimist in mind because I have a few friends that are like that the pessimist or the skeptic David both. Okay. I think both and. The first article that I actually pulled that I put in on that one of the very first pages with somebody. That we probably I know, you know, George, but I think the rest of the audience probably knows him as well. And that's jock fillet. Very very smart, man. Great researcher and in he put out a a book. About three years ago. And it was about the the Ford movement of UFO research. Well, he had a story in there from September seventeenth sixteen eighty and it was a short cook. Here's what it said. It said a large black cloud like mass landed in a field, releasing a huge hair covered being that was seen briefly. And then disappeared. And I know that there's a lot of people in the world that think well, maybe the Bigfoot is related to some kind of UT or UFO comes up a lot. It does doesn't it? And that was really the first article I put in just to make people think and then from there there was an article may twenty eighth seventeen seventy two in the Maryland gazette that also talks about a fully hair covered bipeds that you, and I would know his big foot, and I took great restraint in putting an other articles that may have been construed as an April gorilla, and these were really only Bigfoot related topics that the funny thing about it was is that as I'm accumulating days in it. And I'm putting them in the book, and I'm looking at them. And really the book is ninety nine percent just articles dates and the location where the article was pulled and it's a table top size book. And so really as people start to browse through. It you start to think this all true. But no all the articles are true. And it's hard to believe that the history of this goes back as far as the does. Well, the fact that it goes back so far, and it's documented is fascinating all by itself. Exactly, I mean, obviously, people were having these issues and encountering these beings. And you'd think well, maybe it's only in a certain part of the country and in reality, it goes coast to coast, and I've articles in there from California articles from the east coast articles from Canada, and they all kind of fit what we know as the bipeds what at the articles state that. Yeah, it has extremely long arms giant inside is is a few articles in there that imply that there might have been some aggression one where it killed the dog some other ones where they confront people. But in reality there, it's a lot of mundane type behavior where they're seen by people doing certain things, and then they're running away. And in fact, I found some articles in there about a wild woman. And I thought that was pretty rare in the same same. Sort of description hair all over the body, but they could tell it was a woman and one of the notes I put in there that I added was that I think it's telling. That back in the seventeen hundreds they named this a wild, man. Didn't give it an animal connotation, they gave it a human type Konitz the stories come from native Americans. David almost none really. Now. These are these are frontline newspapers. I mean, big newspapers New York, Boston, Chicago, these aren't like third and fourth year. A lot of them are mainstream. Big papers, the presented this handled it as a straight news article. They did. Interesting. So no forty push or anything like that. No. And I think that the frustrating part of this like a lot of things that are discussed on your show is that nobody wants to say where the skeletons are found or where this evidence might be it seems as though they just disappeared. Has anybody reported being hurt by these creatures? There's a couple of times where a carriage was going across a road in a forest, and they talk about almost hitting one. And it almost sounds like it's a defense mechanism and there's confrontation. You know, it's very rare. And I wrote my to Bigfoot books before I ever came into the the missing person arena, and in those big foot books and at the time, I was doing the Bigfoot research fulltime there were almost no articles about Bigfoot, injuring anything or anybody. And then as soon as my books come out about missing people in the woods people start coming up with these stories, and I hear I've heard a ton of them. But I want everyone to think about this that when you hear one of these stories on a podcast or you read something on a website. And there's no names. There's no dates don't believe it. That's a good point. David stay with us. We're gonna take a quick break. We'll be back in a moment with David Politis is website linked up at coast to coast AM dot com. We're talking about his latest work Bigfoot wild man and giants. Don't forget to watch our TV show beyond belief with George Noory, just log onto beyond belief dot com. Message and data rates. Texting.

David Politis George Noory Dr Brandenburg researcher mount Shasta FBI perjury Ted hair senior executive Tahoe national association of search Maryland North America Oregon physicist Tom Powell partner UT
"senior executive" Discussed on KSFO-AM

KSFO-AM

03:29 min | 3 years ago

"senior executive" Discussed on KSFO-AM

"A lot about the spss's senior executive service program that was created in i think is nineteen seventy eight with the when president carter redid redid the civil service act and write this sas program is by and large there are senior executives in the government but i think they call them a class or something that's a certain group of people that are more political there political appointees are deputy directors there directors and special prosecutors for instance all of them are mcs and they're at a level where there there is no overwatch there is no accountability they they somehow elude punishment whenever they do things and then miller to the politicians that they work closely with and our wouldn't even say that they work for because a lot of these sesar's are thomas they do the bidding but they're doing it on their own free will they they they just do not and are not held to our laws they don't even consider them and so i guess the question is peter where did this start how long ago can we trace this back is this something that goes back to the political parties when they were created this go back to one of the downfalls of the founding fathers were they were elitists themselves they were they were highly educated individuals did it come from there or is this something that is more recent with the flow of socialism and marxism in a resurgence of that well i think that's a great question i think it's a more recent phenomenon the early problem the the first one hundred hundred twentyfive years american political history the concern was always about government employees and the fact that you had patronage and you had people that were you know running the post office or running these other government agencies that were just you know they might be the cousin or the nephew of the mayor or a senator or of a governor and so they came up with the idea of the civil service that we need to have sort of a professional class of people in government that are working okay that kind of makes sense we don't want cronyism dominating our political system but the problem when they created the civil service system and then the sas the senior executive service that you talked about nineteen seventy eight is you now created a class of people that were isolated not just from the crony impulses that you know they happen to be related to somebody in power and they were doing favors they now became an offense insulated also from in the american people and the attitudes have really changed too there was a book released a couple of years ago by two scholars from johns hopkins university and what they found they did a survey of senior unelected officials these are sds officials and other people in the bureaucracy and what they found was stunning when they asked him a series of very basic questions one of the question was if the american people want a certain policy enacted but you are personally opposed to it will you carry out the policy or will you seek to undermine it and actually a majority of cs of sas people said they would work to undermine think about that doc and they're they're they're saying we will not go with.

senior executive one hundred hundred twentyfive
"senior executive" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

03:31 min | 3 years ago

"senior executive" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"A lot about the senior executive service program that was created in nineteen seventy eight with the when president carter redid redid their civil service act and write this program is by and large there are senior executives in the government but i think they call them a classy or something that's a certain group of people that are more political there political appointees or deputy directors there directors and special prosecutors for instance all of them are sas and they're at a level where there there is no overwatch there is no accountability they they somehow allude punishment whenever they do things and similar to the politicians they work closely with and i wouldn't even say that they work for because a lot of these sesar's are thomas they do the bidding but they're doing it on their own free will they they they just do not and are not held to our laws they don't even consider them and so i guess the question is peter where did this start how long ago can we trace this back is this something that goes back to the political parties when they were created this go back to one of the downfalls of the founding fathers were they were elitists themselves they were they were highly educated individuals did it come from there or is this something that is more recent with the flow of socialism and marxism in a resurgence of that well i think that's a great question i think it's a more recent phenomenon you know the the early problem the first one hundred hundred twentyfive years american political history the concern was always about government employees and the fact that you had patronage and you had people that were you know running the post office or running these other government agencies that were just you know they might even cousin or the nephew of the mayor or of a senator or a governor and so they came up with the idea of the civil service that we need to have sort of a professional class of people in government that are working okay that kind of makes sense we don't want cronyism dominating our political system but the problem when they created a civil service system and then the sas the senior executive service that you talked about nine hundred seventy eight is you now created a class of people that were isolated not just from the crony impulses that they happen to be related to somebody in power and they they were doing favors they now became in sense insulated also from the american people and the attitudes have really changed there was a book released a couple of years ago by two scholars from johns hopkins university and what they found that they did a survey of senior unelected officials these are sas officials and other people in the bureaucracy and what they found was stunning when they asked him a series of very basic questions one of the question was if the american people want in certain policy enacted but you are personally opposed to it will you carry out the policy or will you seek to undermine it and actually a majority of cs of sas people said they would work to undermine think about that back and they're saying we will not go with the popular will that's a problem.

senior executive one hundred hundred twentyfive
"senior executive" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

KDWN 720AM

02:45 min | 3 years ago

"senior executive" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

"Want to ask you about so i talk a lot about the sas a senior executive service program that was created in i think is nineteen seventy eight with the when president carter redid redid the civil service act and write this sas program is by and large there are senior executives in the government but i think they call them a class c or something that's a certain group of people that are more political there political appointees are deputy directors there directors and special prosecutors for instance all of them are sas and they're at a level where there there is no overwatch there is no accountability they they somehow elude punishment whenever they do things and similar to the politicians that they work closely with and our wouldn't even say they work for because a lot of these are thomas they do the bidding but they're doing it on their own free will they they they just do not and are not held to our laws they don't even consider them and so the question is peter where did this start how long ago can we trace this back is this something that goes back to the political parties when they were created this go back to one of the downfalls of the founding fathers were they were elitists themselves they were they were highly educated individuals did it come from there or is this something that is more recent with the flow of socialism and marxism in a resurgence of that well i think that's a great question i think it's a more recent phenomenon you know the the early problem the the first one hundred one hundred twenty five years american political history the concern was always about government employees and the fact that you had patronage and you had people that were you know running the post office or running these other government agencies that were just you know they might a cousin or the nephew of the mayor or senator or a governor and so they came up with the idea of the civil service that we need to have sort of a professional class of people in government that are working okay that kind of makes sense we don't want cronyism dominating our political system but the problem when they created a civil service system and then the sef the senior executive service that you talked about in nineteen seventy eight is you now created a class of people that were isolated not just from the crony impulses that they happen to be related to somebody in power and they they were doing sabres they now became a sense insulated also from the.

carter senior executive president peter senator cronyism one hundred one hundred twenty
"senior executive" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

KTLK 1130 AM

03:07 min | 3 years ago

"senior executive" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

"There talking to but why did his name just said jump outta me the guy from no no the the guy from the white house it's always given the president jimmy jimmy kosta yeah t two or the biggest i don't know these guys are just pungent liars but anyway getting and they go right back into what you're talking about but here's the thing i want to ask you about so i talk a lot about the senior executive service program that was created in nineteen seventy eight with the when president carter redid redid the civil service act and write this sas program is by and large there are senior executives in the government but i think they call them a classy or something that's a certain group of people that are more political there political appointees are deputy directors directors and special prosecutors for instance all of them are sas and they're at a level where there there is no overwatch there is no accountability they they somehow elude punishment whenever they do things and similar to the politicians that they work closely with and i wouldn't even say that they work for because a lot of these sesar's are thomas they do the bidding but they're doing it on their own free will they they they just do not and are not held to our laws they don't even consider them and so i guess the question is peter where did this start how long ago can we trace this back is this something that goes back to the political parties when they were created this go back to one of the downfalls of the founding fathers were they were elitists themselves they were they were highly educated individuals did it come from there or is this something that is more recent with the flow of socialism and marxism in a resurgence of that well i think that's a great question i think it's a more recent phenomenon you know the the early problem the the first one hundred hundred twenty five years american political history the concern was always about government employees and the fact that you had patronage and you had people that were you know running the post office or running these other government agencies that were just you know they might be the cousin or the nephew of the mayor or of a senator or a governor and so they came up with the idea of the civil service that we need to have sort of a professional class of people in government that are working okay that kind of makes sense we don't want cronyism dominating our political system but the problem when they created the civil service system and then the sas the senior executive service that you talked about nineteen seventy eight is you now created a class of people that were isolated not just from the crony impulses that they happen to be related to somebody in power and they were doing favors they now became an offense insulated also from the.

one hundred hundred twenty fiv
"senior executive" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

04:33 min | 3 years ago

"senior executive" Discussed on KTRH

"A lot about the senior executive service program that was created in i think is hundred seventy eight with the when president carter redid redid the civil service act and write this program is by and large there are senior executives in the government but i think they call them a classy or something that's a certain group of people that are more political there political appointees are deputy directors there directors and special prosecutors for instance all of them are sas and they're at a level where there there is no overwatch there is no accountability they they somehow elude punishment whenever they do things and similar to the politicians that they work closely with and i wouldn't even say they work for because a lot of these sesar's are thomas they do the bidding but they're doing it on their own free will they they they just do not and are not held to our laws they don't even consider them and so i guess the question is peter where did this start how long ago can we trace this back is this something that goes back to the political parties when they were created this go back to one of the downfalls of the founding fathers were th they were elitists themselves they were they were highly educated individuals did it come from there or is this something that is more recent with the flow of socialism and marxism in a resurgence of that well i think that's a great question i think it's a more recent phenomenon you know the the early problem the the first one hundred hundred twentyfive years american political history the concern was always about government employees and the fact that you had patronage and you had people that were you know running the post office or running these other government agencies that were just you know they might be the cousin or the nephew of the mayor or of a senator or a governor and so they came up with the idea of the civil service that we need to have sort of a professional class of people in government that are working okay that kind of makes sense we don't want cronyism dominating our political system but the problem when they created the civil service system and then the sis the senior executive service that you talked about nineteen seventy eight is you now created a class of people that were isolated not just from the crony impulses that they happen to be related to somebody in power and they we're doing favors they now became in a sense insulated also from the american people and the attitudes have really changed there was a book released a couple of years ago by two scholars from johns hopkins university and what they found they did a survey of senior unelected officials these are sas officials and other people in the bureaucracy and what they found was stunning when they asked him a series of very basic questions one of the question was if the american people want a certain policy enacted but you are personally opposed to it will you carry out the policy or will you seek to undermine it and actually a majority of cs of sas people said they would work to undermine it think about that doc and they're they're they're saying we will not go with the popular will that's a problem and and there's a difference i think between the the leaders some of the founding fathers which was based on the fact that they were highly educated highly informed but they recognized that concentrated powers bad thing the problem with progressives who are elite is they believe concentrated power is necessary for them to accomplish their agenda so it leads to the abuse of power so it's a recent phenomenon this this is a recent phenomenon and the deep state which has been discussed you know here of late the last couple of years is really a reflection of an idea that goes back thirty years ago from the reagan administration where there were same discussions of wrong reagan was elected to carry out certain policies and the state department for example bureaucrats would try to work to undermine it they disagreed with what reagan was elected to do and they tried to take matters into their own hands so it's a major problem and i think it's probably the biggest fight that donald trump is going to have is president is the battle against the.

senior executive one hundred hundred twentyfive thirty years
"senior executive" Discussed on WSB-AM

WSB-AM

02:24 min | 3 years ago

"senior executive" Discussed on WSB-AM

"To you on wsb renters warehouse for our final news roundup and information overload this is john and the gillam back in for sean hannity you know and i was just having a conversation with lauren just a second ago that you know perception is reality some things look weird to people and they look great to others and that you know whether it be you know you're looking at the g report or whatever you know if you don't have knowledge of what is actually going on then you may actually think that something is you know great when actually there's a problem there and you may think that this report is complete when in fact it's not and what i've been talking about all day is this sas the senior executive level service and how this is truly the deep state what i don't wanna leave this ad i was just talking to michael jank after interviewed him a second ago and it's important to note that the the senior executive service the mccabe the molars the commes political appointees like hillary clinton lois lerner over in the in the irs when that nonsense was going on they there's no overwatch for these people and for the people that are political appointees there's no overwatch for these people and they're all political you don't get to that rank without being political they get recycled and retreaded you see them coming back and forth with little or no overwatch but it's important for you to realize also that there are other people that are not senior executive service but that are in close contact with with them and do their dirty work it's like every other organs is criminal enterprise the people the top direct things and then they have other people that are loyal to them and or in certain cases they have high ranking people who actually go out and do investigations or do certain things to get information or in the case of steel where they have sources that i've been saying this for two years now they have sources that will create just like an entrapment case create information for them so i wanted to bring on you know i've been talking about this ad nauseam but somebody who's been i think doing a very good job on fox news.

john sean hannity hillary clinton irs lauren senior executive michael jank lois lerner fox two years
"senior executive" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

02:26 min | 3 years ago

"senior executive" Discussed on 710 WOR

"And more bold inspired solutions for america right here for our final news roundup and information overload this is john the gillam back in for sean hannity and i was just having a conversation with lauren just a second ago that you know perception is reality some things look weird to people and they look great to others and that you know whether it be you know you're looking at the energy report or whatever you know if you don't have knowledge of what is actually going on then you may actually think that something is great when actually there's a problem there and you may think that this report is complete when in fact it's not and what i've been talking about all day is this sas the senior executive level service and how this is truly the deep state but i don't wanna leave this ad i was just talking to michael jack after interviewed him a second ago and it's important to note that the senior executive service the maccabees their molars the commes political appointees like hillary clinton lois lerner over in the in the irs when that nonsense was going on they there's no overwatch for these people and for the people that are political appointees there's no overwatch for these people and they're all political you don't get to that rank without being political they get recycled and retreaded you see them coming back and forth with little or no overwatch but it's important for you to realize also that there are other people that are not senior executive service but that are in close contact with with them and do their dirty work it's like every other organized criminal enterprise the people at the top direct things and then they have other people that are loyal to them and or in certain cases they have high ranking people who actually go out and do investigations or do certain things to get information or in the case of steel where they have sources that i've been saying this for two years now they have sources that will create just like an intrepid in case create information for them so i wanted to bring on you know i've been talking about this ad nauseam but somebody who's been i think doing a very good job on fox news.

sean hannity hillary clinton irs america john lauren senior executive michael jack lois lerner fox two years
"senior executive" Discussed on Elvis Duran and the Morning Show

Elvis Duran and the Morning Show

01:34 min | 3 years ago

"senior executive" Discussed on Elvis Duran and the Morning Show

"History in the morning show so i think we've exhausted everything today there's nothing left i don't have another ounce of anything lipton we do need another daniel report we'll get into that right now it's a little late or early i can't tell our senior executive producer nate has totally lost track of time and he's like the only connection we have to structure you back on the rails on point of this thing right here but you keep ignoring me pointing at that thing right there ooh did you get that hey what's up they're a great team brought it up i haven't i have an issue with our executive producer seniors that's what i magazine you see this is where this came from brody and scary were executive our executive produce yes when they came in you gotta go ahead to be one notch higher yeah so he's senior executive producer well my issue with our senior executive producer is that elvis like you and i were sitting there like great team we really want to do our topic train but nate could not keep us on track and now we don't get you the topic train right this really wanted to do it and get it done today you know nate had you only show on track we'd be able to get done right elvis you wanna be upset about something can we talk about international house burgers for just i'm not going there we'll know why i'm not going to go to a house of pancakes burger i'm gonna go to mcdonald's or i'm going to go to a place okay.

nate executive producer mcdonald daniel senior executive executive producer
"senior executive" Discussed on The Win with Heather Havenwood

The Win with Heather Havenwood

01:58 min | 3 years ago

"senior executive" Discussed on The Win with Heather Havenwood

"We don't want to ask for senior executives too much but the fact of the matter is when they're hired for see this is what gets off mistaken when you're hired accompanies a senior executive we know that in their your sponsors do your job in your job but you're sponsors to get back to the company help the company grow right touring and you're helping that person that you're mentoring retain become inspired become reinvigorated become work cited at more ideas become innovative you're doing something that's exponential for the company so the good stuff i think what we forget is that it's retention tool so there's good stuff otaphilly because people are mentoring even these reverse mentoring program which is like the old codgers someone that's young new that no snapchat snapshots these things that are happening that are really great the other side that we bring is we go into companies and we say we need some level of sustainability for mentoring yeah what is that look all the way through our is it going to be because remember mentoring could go on forever but if you're gonna create a program and you're gonna create formality around it which really recommend and you create a container for for six months nine months twelve months whenever the gration is then the responsibility of us is to make sure that you've got an tainer of learning development growth nurturing for you and if the river if relation doesn't work we gotta get fast on it to switch up the partnership because just because i've got a great senior executive in great had tension secutive they may not match gap and let's say don't mesh then you don't pull them both.

senior executive twelve months nine months six months
"senior executive" Discussed on Breach

Breach

01:44 min | 3 years ago

"senior executive" Discussed on Breach

"On top of yahoos identity crisis add a revolving door of leadership before twenty twelve they have an interim ceo ross levinson project over for someone named scott on and he we scott has a vision for the company but doesn't work well with the activist shareholders those guys do some digging a minor amount of investigation found out this thompson seems to have misled prior employers and yahoo about his engineering degree and i'm being played here he he said that he had an engineering degree from a school that did not offer an engineering degree so this is one of those moments i contend it's a comedy ripped right out of a workplace sitcom the news breaks about scott thomsen lying about having an engineering degree while the whole leadership team is on an offsite meeting with scott thompson senior executive team started kind of like look from person to person as they sort of like lit up and realize what was going on everyone in the same meeting reading the same article on their phones about their ceo while they're ceo is talking and then finally someone rush into the room and whispered in scott thompson's ear and he fled and they're all like oh my god this company is about to change in a big way before scott thomsen was interim ceo tim morse brought in after they fired ceo carol bartz she'd been there two years and had a colorful tenure as ceo she had a proclivity for embarrassing verbal gaffes she swore like a sailor and ended up really offending yahoos chinese investment alibaba who they really needed so all that means by the time or is the stepped in in two thousand twelve that was probably third maybe fourth ceo.

scott ceo scott thompson scott thomsen tim morse carol bartz alibaba interim ceo ross levinson yahoo senior executive two years
"senior executive" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

02:09 min | 3 years ago

"senior executive" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"For the day and the week ahead around the world helping us do that in new york is john the senior executive editor for bloomberg news online from hong kong were joined by adrian awry news director in asia and in our london bureau european who's director david merit john you're sitting right here next to me so let's start right here in the us with lawmakers in the house and senate getting ready to work compromise a tax overhaul legislation what are we looking for from those efforts while a conference really robin typically what happens now is the the two houses the and has representatives uh elect the members so wish they will do today and they then reconcile in the large differences in in the the bill the goal is to get a tax plan tax reform plan before president trump by christmas so uh a lot has to happen and one of the things that has happened is in agreement on the corporate tax rate may be out there were cut out for them staying in the us john tell us about the sixty seven billion dollar takeover of aetna by cbs is gonna face antitrust issues it will bob only because of this uh justice department uh the time warner at t time warner a deal which is a vertical integration neil two companies from different industries typically those vertical deals would get approved but that one has been held up now the justice department here's a a pharmacy in other phones e benefit manager buying health insurer typically that will get approved really will depend on which agency reviews it whether to the federal trade commission or the justice department federal trade more likely to approve justice there could be some uh holed up there okay over to our europeanism director david merit now david all eyes appear to be on brussels that's where uk prime minister theresa may's having lunch with european commission president janklow yorker younger ob david is this crucial yes absolutely it's it's really a crunch day as for for brexit and a huge focus on this launch it starting in about ten minutes time spring described as one of the most expensive lunches in the history of the.

senior executive european commission prime minister uk david merit warner bob corporate tax president senate london adrian bloomberg new york theresa brussels health insurer cbs christmas the house us asia director hong kong editor sixty seven billion dollar ten minutes
"senior executive" Discussed on Marketing Over Coffee

Marketing Over Coffee

02:13 min | 3 years ago

"senior executive" Discussed on Marketing Over Coffee

"Differentiation the group word is different most people position themselves as saying they say i'm a toxic that's not what greg did with gregg said was i'm a tax accountant four silicon valley senior executives with stock options because it turns out that silicon valley senior executives with stock options have a set of tax needs and planning needs that the rest of the world does it in so he becomes known in silicon valley as the goto guy if you are a senior executive workday like company with stock options so gray intuitively understood that for him to be successful he needed to be a category designer of course john he didn't he wouldn't have called at right but he understood that he needed to make himself different and let the world know what his niece was and so if you think about it on a personal level what i love about what greg did is in i don't know if you've heard this term before i love this term he niece down that is to say he laser focused and he was not for most people that walked in his first door in so by being known for this very small micro need each he became the category gang so recently we've seen a lot of stuff with companies just becoming so huge and kind of ignoring the street and being able to influence government in ways that never seen before what do you think about the role of the company over the next decade earlier what do you think's gonna happen there john i think we're at the beginning of a new kind of arab thinking about the company you know albert einstein famously said the problems of today are not going to be solved at the same level of thinking that created them in you know if you think about how some companies have done horrible things to the environment or you think about just the evil illegal things dead martin's carelli did with drug prices or seems like wells fargo keeps getting caught for doing nefarious things to their customers and of course the evil bastards at volkswagen lied as they destroyed the environment for years.

greg gregg john martin volkswagen accountant senior executive albert einstein wells fargo
"senior executive" Discussed on Marketing Over Coffee

Marketing Over Coffee

02:13 min | 3 years ago

"senior executive" Discussed on Marketing Over Coffee

"Differentiation the group word is different most people position themselves as saying they say i'm a toxic that's not what greg did with gregg said was i'm a tax accountant four silicon valley senior executives with stock options because it turns out that silicon valley senior executives with stock options have a set of tax needs and planning needs that the rest of the world does it in so he becomes known in silicon valley as the goto guy if you are a senior executive workday like company with stock options so gray intuitively understood that for him to be successful he needed to be a category designer of course john he didn't he wouldn't have called at right but he understood that he needed to make himself different and let the world know what his niece was and so if you think about it on a personal level what i love about what greg did is in i don't know if you've heard this term before i love this term he niece down that is to say he laser focused and he was not for most people that walked in his first door in so by being known for this very small micro need each he became the category gang so recently we've seen a lot of stuff with companies just becoming so huge and kind of ignoring the street and being able to influence government in ways that never seen before what do you think about the role of the company over the next decade earlier what do you think's gonna happen there john i think we're at the beginning of a new kind of arab thinking about the company you know albert einstein famously said the problems of today are not going to be solved at the same level of thinking that created them in you know if you think about how some companies have done horrible things to the environment or you think about just the evil illegal things dead martin's carelli did with drug prices or seems like wells fargo keeps getting caught for doing nefarious things to their customers and of course the evil bastards at volkswagen lied as they destroyed the environment for years.

greg gregg john martin volkswagen accountant senior executive albert einstein wells fargo
"senior executive" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

01:36 min | 4 years ago

"senior executive" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"A regular on the program he is to be a senior executive with at though he was vice president market is i repeat all and finally decide to hell with this attack with us part of my life and you know morgan them but i wanna do something better with my life he's got some really great projects by not right now the tar bell thing and and and why that will get him back on the verge of talk about this but he points out polls show that a growing number of americans are are warming after the idea of single payer healthcare and what is most rallies what is relevant is that most of us have lost faith in private health insurers want the government to do more and then he taught is looking at this poll from june they just you know the the the results pugh sir did textile crunch the numbers all that sort of thing sixty percent of those surveyed said the federal government has the responsibility to provide coverage to all americans sixty percent and he says we've seen similar results in years past he says is a former head of corporate communications for the global health insurance companies cigna i said that i was saying i'm sorry he says i saw surveys on a regular basis the consistently showed a sizable pracise your americans i'll private health insurance companies and very low regard and would be happy not to have to deal with them and in fact only nineteen percent of americans in this is back in two thousand seven viewed health insurance companies favorably and the same poll showed seventy seven percent of americans thought congress christian quote do something about the unreasonable clause of.

senior executive federal government health insurance companies vice president morgan head of corporate communicatio sixty percent seventy seven percent nineteen percent