25 Burst results for "Senior Engineer"

Senior Engineer at Uniswap, Noah Zinsmeister, Explains Liquidity Pools

Software Engineering Daily

01:25 min | 5 months ago

Senior Engineer at Uniswap, Noah Zinsmeister, Explains Liquidity Pools

"No welcome to the show. Thanks for having me jeff. You're on unit. Swap yuna swap is a liquidity pool. Can you explain what that means definitely so it uses some traditional financial words by a very traditional setting so what a liquidity pool is is a smart contract which is a piece of code that lives on the therion blockchain and this smart contract dictates how people can interact with it and the rules that people have to abide by if they want to participate with it and so a liquidity pool allows users to come to the table with some assets to assets in our case in sap and they can give those assets to the smart contract the smart contract then make them available for trading so other users can come to the smart contracts in one asset in exchange for another at some price and again the pool dictates both house. The user you know the price the user is getting when they're trading asset for us at be as the rewards and the you know the potential upside for the liquidity provider. And so there you know. There's there's fees that are being collected in the assets that are being traded and so those. Those fees accrue as additional tokens at the liquidity provider and then withdraw at a later date and so ultimately a liquidity smart contract. Where on the rules of the system are dictated not by an individual or an institution but rather just by code and then participants are free to interact with it in a way that they see fit.

Jeff
Moving Machine Learning Into the Data Pipeline at Cherre

Data Engineering Podcast

02:03 min | 5 months ago

Moving Machine Learning Into the Data Pipeline at Cherre

"Hi by us on tiles on a data scientist cherry. Do you remember how you first got involved in the area of data management sites good of interesting routes in my career first and foremost physicists. In my condemning track originally was aimed for working in optics tonics when i finished my started working as a tonic designer for not to go communications company and then one day one of former post. Docs invited checkout chevy's office. He started working there at school. People come to get health and it was really kind of an immediate hits so jerry really met all the criteria that i have where it's still again. Perspective projects specifically the working on a really challenging problem defining domain model for bela states. There were working on high impact issue and it was work with smart people really smart people right so type. Problems is very challenging. And then what you're doing really to think about the real estate industry state as it is right now so the would be kind of what speed trading or is dead for the stock. Market's really changing the way the real estate market's looking at tech. So all that looked good. I joined sherry and they learned about the domain afield state so then who is one of the founders and learn about functional and object oriented programming test driven design micro services from medicine. Sterling is a senior engineer i learned about. Nlp knowledge grass from the awesome john madden or head of machine learning engineering. Who you've answered before. And zoya from ron beckerman bizarre. Cdo in data science professor. So it's been really great working all these people. It's been an awesome learning experience

Chevy Jerry Sherry John Madden Ron Beckerman Sterling Zoya
"senior engineer" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

01:58 min | 10 months ago

"senior engineer" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"A member of Penn Fed injured by N C away. I did. What? Bless you, gentlemen. God bless you. If you haven't got to have some of May God bless you. God bless you, gentlemen. God bless you. If you haven't got to have a mug, May God bless you. If you haven't got a thing for me. May God Morning Glory, America Bones or high Canada. We finally found it. Adam is back. And of course I'm Qu it inside the Beltway. Good morning. I was looking on Monday. Tuesday Wednesday Thursday for the last verse of Christmas is coming and And overwhelmed Bannon overwhelmed Harley and Dwayne in the weather center. You many of you do not know that Dwayne has been taking night school in meteorology. He's now our official meteorologist. He's in the weather center. And Dwayne today was telling me that they couldn't find it. And Adam came in the senior engineer after couple days off and immediately found exactly what we're looking for. Can we play it again? Plus, you do if you haven't got got you got you shut him down. Plus, if you haven't got half a mark, E think the needle stuck. If you haven't got a things for me, may God so I didn't even know.

Dwayne Adam Penn senior engineer Canada America Bannon Harley
Who killed Mohsen Fakhrizadeh?

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

06:16 min | 10 months ago

Who killed Mohsen Fakhrizadeh?

"We start with breaking news. And iran's defense ministry has confirmed that one of the country's top nuclear scientists has been assassinated two diff- of muslim fucker. Saudi is very much proving to be one of those stories in which people will see whatever confirmations of their own prejudices and suspicions they wished to it might reasonably be argued that this description applies in the online epoch in particular to pretty much every story but it is especially the case with stories set in the middle east and which may would depending wh one prefers to believe may not involve israel. So it's best to start with what we know for certain. We know that molson fucker. Zodda was a renowned nuclear physicist a senior engineering of iran's nuclear program and a brigadier general in iran's islamic revolution regard core. He is believed to have been deleted of what was known as project amid the program. Iran established in the late nineteen eighty s to explore the prospects of iranian nuclear weapon and closed in two thousand three according to the international atomic energy agency. We know that he was killed. Last friday near absorbed a small town seventy kilometers east of tehran. And that he was buried with full state on. Who's on sunday law. Main hobby lobby. No optic not that big van owen ruling to the questions of precisely how he was killed by whom there is a bewildering smorgasbord of answers. While it seems clear enough that Was shot dead as the car in which he was. Travelling was the object of an ambush. There are conflicting reports of this assassination being conducted by a posse of live operators. Some of whom may or may not have died at the scene and or by some species of remote controlled weapon monotony iran bit who we bid and me. The enemies of iran have to know that the iranian nation and the country's officials a brave and intrepid enough to respond to this criminal action. As on a has dan in dommage in our yet caught on era by-pass off pigs around as to who might have done it. Iranian officialdom and iranian media have been quick to blame either israel or the mujahedeen e. Cock a curious cultish iranian rebel group which has been a persistent irritant to the islamic republic. And who currently appear to be based between iraq. France and albania. The has also been an amount of copy pasted umbrage directed at the united states or as president hassan rohani of iran prefers to address it the global arrogance on record. Israeli sources have feigned bafflement though the new york times has quoted an unnamed senior. Israeli official is suggesting that the world should thank israel. Four reside is demise. The mujahideen have been reticent. As of this broadcast the iran has yet to present any concrete evidence of their assertions. And if and when they do it will likely be impossible for any independent observers to verify them and iran does reflexively blame israel for pretty much anything it is only a couple of years since former head of iran's military major general signed fear is a body accused of running a network of spy lizards. But it's not like there isn't something of a circumstantial case to answer this year. Several sites in iran which might or might not have been related to iran's nuclear program was struck by explosions which did not appear coincidental and at least four other iranian. Nuclear scientists have met violent ends since two thousand ten to killed by car bombs one by a motorcycle. Bomb one shot dead. In most instances iran blamed israel and israel denied involvement while also making it as clear as it could be regarded even the faintest prospect of a nuclear armed iran as intolerable almost ziff inviting tehran to take the hint and a is at least arguable. Most infact saudis college was marked in two thousand eighteen when israeli intelligence highsted from a warehouse in tehran thousands of files pertaining to iran's nuclear program when israeli prime minister benjamin netanyahu announced his feet. He mentioned zadeh by name. A key. part of the plan was to form new organizations to continue the work. This is how dr moosa farkas the of project about put remember that name a day so along with the questions of who and how there is another why in particular wine now whoever killed most fuck resolve will have known that iran would feel obliged to retaliate or at least threatened to retaliate. And that this would make any kind of diplomacy with tehran difficult. Whoever killed muslims will also have understood that a window to such engagement might have been about to open interior. Vashon sean medicare dishman salvage assassination shows. The enemies are experiencing anxious weeks feeling. That the pressure's fading away. And the world circumstances a change a heart. The camby share shadow. It's johnny you're gonna with the swearing in of a new american president who has sounded keen on returning the us to the two thousand fifteen nuclear deal with iran out of which the current president flounced of the possible consequences. All fockers ought is death to seem reasonably certain one that iran's nuclear ambitions whatever they may actually be will have been hinted at least some ought to that. Compromise with iran will be less likely someone somewhere will be considering this a win win

Iran Israel Defense Ministry Zodda Van Owen Tehran President Hassan Rohani International Atomic Energy Ag Middle East Albania Israeli Intelligence Prime Minister Benjamin Netany Zadeh Dr Moosa Farkas New York Times Iraq France Ziff Sean Medicare
"senior engineer" Discussed on Developer Tea

Developer Tea

04:56 min | 1 year ago

"senior engineer" Discussed on Developer Tea

"So. . We've already talked about some of the advantages of being a beginner, , and hopefully this makes a lot of sense righted. . It essentially is just talking about how your unique scenario your unique perspective as a beginner has some intrinsic value and you just have to take a hold of that intrinsic value and here's the important part. . This is a perspective that is hard to gain. . Again in other words, , it's very hard to return to being a beginner. . Particularly a beginner in a given subject. . Of course, , you can continuously make yourself a beginner in multiple subjects, , but it's very hard to, , for example, , go back and be a beginning. . A beginner engineer again, , if you've been an engineer for ten years. . So I WANNA take a little bit more time to talk about some of the other advantages of being a beginner. . The first one is the license to acts like a beginner. . Think about this if you are ten years or fifteen years into your career and you ask a question that. . You would expect to begin or to ask. . It's very possible that someone unfortunately look at you a little bit sideways. . They don't expect someone with a lot of experience to ask a question they would expect from a beginner so. . There's a little bit less trepidation of failure as a beginner. . Once you've kind of walks down that path, , you're a senior engineer or principal engineer or something like that. . then. . It's. . Less expected. . Naturally. Less . expected that you would have a catastrophic failure in something that you're trying to do. . That's not necessarily saying that this is the way it should be to be clear. . This is more a commentary on the average workplace or the average experience. . But as a beginner, , you're less likely to have a fear of failure because you're kind of expected to have more failures than people who have more experience than you. . You also have kind of a licensed to ask questions that supposedly everyone already knows the answer to. . And this can make you a much better engineer because it's very likely that even though there's this facade that everybody knows the answer to these questions not everybody does there's a lot of information that. . We. . Kind of expect that the people have but they in fact, , have a lot of gaps in their knowledge. . And speaking of gaps another strength is that you haven't adapted to those gaps. You . haven't found ways of operating without that knowledge. . So you can see the gaps very clearly, , which means that you have a very clear gap that you can fix. . This is an opportunity because it means that you have a more solid understanding in the long run. . And you can create very good resources for the next beginner right if there's a huge gap in the on boarding process or maybe in the stack, let's , say. . That giving companies using than you coming in, , you have the clearest picture of those gaps and you can fix it for the next person that's coming in. . You can also learn good habits from day one as a beginner. . This is a huge advantage because is very easy to get stuck in bad habits in this can happen pretty quickly. . If you start with good habits on day one as a beginner, , then you're much more likely to stick with them and that's GonNa pay you back in spades over the course of whatever your tenure. . Beginner as finally. . No one has a predetermined expectation of how you might act. . This goes back to you not having a political lean or no allegiance to any group but on the other hand, , other people don't know they don't have any expectation for how you might be. . So they're not going to prepare for that. . They're not going to have some predetermined. . From? ? You. . So. . Here's the reality. . There are so many advantages to being a beginner and here's my encouragement for those of you who are starting out brand new fresh, , whatever you're starting out as whether you are starting a new job. . Maybe you are a a brand new student you're starting at a new school maybe you're in a brand new relationship whatever it is a beginner has remember that there are advantages to being a beginner. . You might feel a little bit uncomfortable right now but you're gonNA, , just change the type of discomfort that you have so. . Embrace the time that you have as a beginner likely that once you're no longer a beginner, , you will hope you'll wish you could return to that time. . When you were a beginner, , you could change the way you did a few things. . And really enjoy that time when you have it.

engineer senior engineer principal
The Unique Advantages of Being a Beginner

Developer Tea

04:56 min | 1 year ago

The Unique Advantages of Being a Beginner

"So. We've already talked about some of the advantages of being a beginner, and hopefully this makes a lot of sense righted. It essentially is just talking about how your unique scenario your unique perspective as a beginner has some intrinsic value and you just have to take a hold of that intrinsic value and here's the important part. This is a perspective that is hard to gain. Again in other words, it's very hard to return to being a beginner. Particularly a beginner in a given subject. Of course, you can continuously make yourself a beginner in multiple subjects, but it's very hard to, for example, go back and be a beginning. A beginner engineer again, if you've been an engineer for ten years. So I WANNA take a little bit more time to talk about some of the other advantages of being a beginner. The first one is the license to acts like a beginner. Think about this if you are ten years or fifteen years into your career and you ask a question that. You would expect to begin or to ask. It's very possible that someone unfortunately look at you a little bit sideways. They don't expect someone with a lot of experience to ask a question they would expect from a beginner so. There's a little bit less trepidation of failure as a beginner. Once you've kind of walks down that path, you're a senior engineer or principal engineer or something like that. then. It's. Less expected. Naturally. Less expected that you would have a catastrophic failure in something that you're trying to do. That's not necessarily saying that this is the way it should be to be clear. This is more a commentary on the average workplace or the average experience. But as a beginner, you're less likely to have a fear of failure because you're kind of expected to have more failures than people who have more experience than you. You also have kind of a licensed to ask questions that supposedly everyone already knows the answer to. And this can make you a much better engineer because it's very likely that even though there's this facade that everybody knows the answer to these questions not everybody does there's a lot of information that. We. Kind of expect that the people have but they in fact, have a lot of gaps in their knowledge. And speaking of gaps another strength is that you haven't adapted to those gaps. You haven't found ways of operating without that knowledge. So you can see the gaps very clearly, which means that you have a very clear gap that you can fix. This is an opportunity because it means that you have a more solid understanding in the long run. And you can create very good resources for the next beginner right if there's a huge gap in the on boarding process or maybe in the stack, let's say. That giving companies using than you coming in, you have the clearest picture of those gaps and you can fix it for the next person that's coming in. You can also learn good habits from day one as a beginner. This is a huge advantage because is very easy to get stuck in bad habits in this can happen pretty quickly. If you start with good habits on day one as a beginner, then you're much more likely to stick with them and that's GonNa pay you back in spades over the course of whatever your tenure. Beginner as finally. No one has a predetermined expectation of how you might act. This goes back to you not having a political lean or no allegiance to any group but on the other hand, other people don't know they don't have any expectation for how you might be. So they're not going to prepare for that. They're not going to have some predetermined. From? You. So. Here's the reality. There are so many advantages to being a beginner and here's my encouragement for those of you who are starting out brand new fresh, whatever you're starting out as whether you are starting a new job. Maybe you are a a brand new student you're starting at a new school maybe you're in a brand new relationship whatever it is a beginner has remember that there are advantages to being a beginner. You might feel a little bit uncomfortable right now but you're gonNA, just change the type of discomfort that you have so. Embrace the time that you have as a beginner likely that once you're no longer a beginner, you will hope you'll wish you could return to that time. When you were a beginner, you could change the way you did a few things. And really enjoy that time when you have it.

Engineer Senior Engineer Principal
"senior engineer" Discussed on Learn to Code with Me

Learn to Code with Me

46:03 min | 1 year ago

"senior engineer" Discussed on Learn to Code with Me

"And we're back in today's episode. I speak with Michael, Pimentel. Michael Story is fascinating worked in the glassblowing industry specifically for film sets for nine years before he started teaching himself how to Code. And what makes him even more? Interesting is the fact that he doesn't have a college degree. Anti never went to a coding bootcamp. He is entirely self-taught. and. That is exactly what we're GONNA be talking about today. How he taught himself to code. WOW, working fulltime. How guys first job in tack and how he got more roles in the tech industry as time went on. If you tips for staying motivated while learning how to Code. This episode is for you enjoy. Hey. Michael. Thank you so much for coming on the show today. It will on six February I'm real excited to talk with you. You have like interesting. Self taught experience in. That's what I would like to dive into I. Could you share with us how you got started in software engineering? Absolutely so kind of Story kind of goes back to a few years ago when I was working for a company that made life for the film industry <hes> now working there as a manufacturer glassblowing really interesting work. Kind of working in a manufacturing type of shop warehouse, loud, working on a lay, that spun in a really hot environment I was there for a really long time and things just. Kinda didn't progress in terms of career. Wise and financially it was just really typical <hes> I live in California and California being one of the most expensive place live. It just wasn't sustainable. <hes> married and I have a child and that it just wasn't something that I could maintain so it kind of motivated me to start thinking I need to. Probably either go back to school or another another route career choice so i. can you know build to support and have a career that can provide general finance, support and everything like that, so it kind of led me to back to. My interest in computers and everything like that, so I started to do some online, searching and everything like that and it. Brought me to software development coding, you know some booming career choice that is really big right now and everything like that was like okay. Maybe I should go back to school for that, but at the time it really wasn't the best option I went acted. As a couple of glasses <unk> time, that's what I could afford at my community college, and then just got really difficult to maintain a full-time job and take one or two classes, and it got really expensive, because my wife was what was going to school in college and everything like that, so it was really difficult for us to support both less going especially you know. Not really knowing what I wanted to do. So I I did a lot of searching and I came across recode camp and recode camp. You know like when you get on their landing page. It's like learning one to code for free and always people learn this way and I was like wait three. This isn't make sense. This will usually scams off there. Start off Rian. Then you have to pay something and everything like that and you know to my surprise actually was free, and then so I started I jumped right in, and just started to go to the curriculum, and it sparked my interest and I was like. Wow, this is really cool. It's it kind of. Goes about in a way that. Gets you interested really quickly? You know with hd Mounsey assassin how you can get feedback on the webpage really quickly. Let's kind of how it started <hes> because I. Just I just couldn't go. That route was a canoe into school because it was just really expensive and I already had like a car loan, I couldn't get like student loan. It was just wasn't really practical. It's like cave. Do put myself some really extreme debt that I don't know if it's GonNa lead to something. That's GONNA pay in the end so I had to find another option and looked like learning to code on my own free resources when that resource beginning with recode camp was was the route I took. Awesome so I, want to backtrack a little bit to your. Your work before you got into coding, so you you okay? You said he was a manufacturing role. I haven't made notes that you were a glass blower which anti note that is for movies today shows. Definitely. What is it glasses? Sure okay, so a glass blower, typically like of someone like Google glass large usually someone that takes some raw material which consists of the materials, t make glass essentially depending on what what the? The. End Product is going to be different types of glass. Of course so basically you take them in you hit Heaton furnace, or with a really hot torture claim so that it becomes like in this malleable state, and then you shape it essentially so what I did there? We work on a leave, and we basically built like the light bulb globe. It's spun on a lathe and then you would really. Really hot with a hydrogen oxygen burners, two thousand degrees, and then you shape it based on certain dimensions so basically they would take that, and then we'd have a filament type that would basically you know, have some kind of chemical reaction than light up base off whatever the the fixture needed you know for the filming, so the specific light that they made there was an Hmo which is like a chemical. Name that I really don't know all the details into it, but it basically replicates the color of the sun so like if you see like on film sets, use those lights that kind of are the background that make everything look real, daytime and night-time filming. Those are the lights that we made when I worked there <hes> we're one of the few American companies still made them like with our hands, still as opposed to a machine meaning making them in a in a warehouse somewhere. But in a sense, essentially, that's what it was. We were just making them with a glassblowing. That's what I did while working there while I think nine or ten years. We Really, oh my goodness. Wow so start I'm surprised. It was that long because for people. Listening to this show were actually speaking through video so I can see you so I'm like. Wow doesn't look like he can hold a John. Young so young to have a job for that long. Then start another career. Okay? Wow, that awful. How did you get into that? Because that feels very niche, you're essentially making bulldogs. That camera crews in production crews are using on the sets of TV shows I mean. We were chatting before we recorded you live in California. I know like the entertainment industry is. In the movie industry in all of that is obviously very prominent out there is that kind of how that happened or It's interesting <hes> so actually the reason why I got into it is because my dad worked in that industry or like thirty years, and I had come out of working at John Juice and I was their. First job actually was working as a team member workup to insistent manager, and then eventually needed to make more money, because I got married at a really young so I. My dad ended up helping me getting the job there and you know I just ended up staying there for a really long time, but it's really how I got into. It was as my dad was in that industry longtime. He had connections and everything like that. Dot It. Did you go to a trade school or anything for glassblowing? No I actually just learned on the job. And still to this day is one of the most difficult things that I've ever done. Physically I for almost anything that can compare it to I think. Programming is its own challenge, but is like the hardest physical. Thing I've ever had to learn because it was like. If you don't do it right the first time, then you ruin it. So there's no going back and fixing it once. You kind of ruin it because the glass that we would work with you'd have to mix it with metals, and then once it's kind of melted to a certain point, you can't go back in extract those materials out of the glass, so it's Kinda ruined. If you don't do it, right is probably there really nerve, wracking or when I did that job. Yeah Wow, it also sounds like it could be dangerous if you're working as really like high temperatures. Absolutely I got burned really bad third degree burns I have degree burns like all my arm from it, but yeah, it was. It's definitely. Was I'm just curious. Did that have any role in your decision to look for a new job like I? Know you mentioned like the financial side, but were there other things, too? Yeah absolutely a that part being okay, so the big part, actually a aside from like the financial reasons that it just didn't pay that much. It was the work environments. It is in the Central Valley of California which in the summertime gets you know triple digits consistently and the warehouse that it is done is basically like a garage. It doesn't have an air condition. It doesn't have any of those things so the environment itself was. was just really really taxing. There's been a couple of times when I had gotten heat exhaustion, I got sent home because of it because like say it's one hundred, three, hundred ten, even outside inside that shop where you'd be working is a hundred twenty one hundred thirty degrees, and it was just unbearable is the if you've our to look back on some old twitter posts? I probably have pictures of like a thermometer in the area. And it's just like maxed out because it was just so hot, but yeah, that's that's probably WANNA be. A motivating factors to wanting to look for another job. It got to point where I was like. I need to get out of here. No matter what this job is just killing me physically, and you know a lot of other reasons <hes> you can imagine in an environment like that the people that you tend to work around kind of like really. Not The best work environment because you know on a lot of stress and you know tend not to <hes> get along very well when they're under a lot of stress is mentally and just everything that came along with that job, so it just became kind of like a hostile work environment as well so it was like a lot of. Factors that Kinda came into me like I have to get out of here you to find something else you know. Yeah well I mean that definitely makes sense. There's a few other people or one that is coming to mind that. We had on the show in a previous season. Whose name is Josh Camp? And he was a hope I. Stay this right a horse I think it's a horse fairer fairer, hope, number news right, but he would change the hooves on horses, which could also be really dangerous. Obviously, a horse kicks you and I believe it was an injury that ultimately led him to. You know look for other work in in what will link to that in the show notes for people listening now 'cause it. Was You know a few years back when we had on the show and any other episode, I believe it could have had a few where there was someone with a moron. Sick physically dangerous or physically labor job, and that's kind of what led them to to make a pretty big pivot because I can like working for you as a glass blower in those in that environment, physical <unk>, Super Super Hot. It's totally different from working as a software engineer. And when you started coding, you mentioned using Free Co camp in other free resources. Were you still working fulltime as the glass blower and you are learning outside of that? Yes I was so I would I had a fulltime job there, and because of the heat I would work really really early hours I try to go in his earliest possible as three in the morning. Get off at noon or whatever it was Leonard Twelve so that time that I would get off of course I'd already so exhausted. Matt jobs so I have to go home and sleep a little bit and then. The thing with those interesting with that is. It was hard for me to be going having a fulltime job like that. Maybe some people can relate to that. You know like a maybe just a fulltime job in general is exhausting, but this job probably pushed it because of the environment itself the hostility behind it. That kind of gave me more motivation to be like you know what I'm really tired right now. And I'm not really motivated to to learn coding complete, foreign and difficult, but when I get off work the way I did time, so you know wanting to leave that place so bad that it was just that extra boost motivation for me to learn and study and just do everything I needed to do to succeed in it on just because it was just so bad. I got desperate. Really desperate I just remember that <unk> I tend to forget that, but then when I do remember I'm like wow, it helps me to be like really grateful. You know to where I am now, and it was really hard working fulltime job in learning, because I did learn while working there probably about a year and a half, maybe almost two years I was learning. And <hes>. There was there were times when I would make huge progresses, but then. At the same time thinking like is this really possible? How do people get a job doing? It's like yeah. I can build a website, but there's more to it you like. Is this all I need to get a job type thing you know <hes>. But Yeah! It was it was hard and I. Don't want to say like Oh yeah. It's super easy because it. Wasn't especially having to work fulltime job in it's all I could just you know. Take days off now and everything like that. I had to work. But yeah. It was difficult. So you were. Doing ice, you said for like one and a half two years where you were doing boom things at the same time. appleaday mentioned this earlier, but you. Free Co camp. Did you use any other resources or you mentioned Community College? Were you taking classes there? Yeah so additional to recode camp so the there's a lot of other things that I did that helped me <hes> so free code camp opened up at the time. I haven't camp while, but at the time had lake. Away that you would join and beat up and it was through facebook. It was like face, looking need groups or something, and it was like find a recode camp. Meet up because I. Guess they had like an umbrella. Recode camp meet ups that you can join, and you would basically type in your city in order find the nearest one that was that was organized and everything like that, so I found one in my city and it was you know a few people apartment that would meet up in so I joined that group and I reached out on their. Pre Cochem does a really good job with trying to connect people, so it's like hey, introduce yourself in post on there, so that people can no, no your journey Cetera so i. did that and I ended up meeting up with the organizers of that? Meet Up. We met at starbucks talked about you know everything on learning this and that where you and Rico camped up thing so eventually, I got more involved in that met more people that were learning as well and then now it. Kinda led to Terry member Oh the Mita. Dot Com meet up. There was also the recode. KEMP MEDIA DOT COM for our area that was attached to that facebook group. And, he was like yeah. I just started this. Meet up group, so we can kind of be more broad for people that don't have facebook. We can just Kinda grow up there and he was like you WanNa, help me with that because you know. He was maintaining full job as well, and he needed someone to Kinda. Fill in that gap where he couldn't. You know sounds like yeah. Sure I could definitely help with that, so I helped him. <hes> kind of on the organization's portion of that. meet up and <hes> like. Hey, let's try to meet. Kind of swap the weeks you know will be on a Saturday one week and then. I'll take the next every type of thing we'd be out of starbucks. And then someone posted on the meet up of feed. Like hey does a hack upon coming up, you guys should come reach out and you know I think it was free, and it was in our area, so I went to the hacker thon and myself in a couple of other people that were in that group, and then we ended up a or ended meeting a few other people at that meet up. That were real professional programmers. At the <unk> thoughts I introduced myself to them and everything like that met some really really nice. And probably the most helpful in kind person was actually the the organizer of that Agathon. When. I met him and everything like that. He gave me his contact information in and said Hey, we should get together sometime. I'm Cha and he was a professional programmer, running his own business and everything like that, so eventually I stayed in contact with him, and I met up with him, and I told him my journey and what I'm trying to do, super supportive of us all about helping people in my situation, you know like make connections, and even even help them with an internship and everything like that, and that's Kinda weird kicked off actually where it went from me trying to learn to me, actually making connections in potentially those connections leading to jobs. That was huge. Actually <hes> so this person that ran out. Pakistan also ran his on meet up. and His name was a little bit more. Mature he had a organized large meet ups and organised like a speakers where he would teach people how to get started with a new technology and all that stuff you know, so. This percent met up with them, and they're willing to like. Hey, you WANNA work on a project with. Wow real project like that's what I need to experience with a project, so I met with him or opt in some of the people that worked with him, and he ended up working with a lot of other guys that <hes> or just people in general men and women that were like kind of doing their own thing that a little bit more advanced as As programmers they're building girl websites starting their own software business in lake, a consulting and everything like that. That's where kind of took off. Is that connection? You know I to a upon met some people, and then it led to more people that we're kind of in the same boat as me, and if they are more advanced, they're willing to help me. By struggled with something and everything like that. It was really a douse like typical in me being successful. Yeah that is a great story and Other interviews I've been doing this season. We invite the guests on, and we think they have a really interesting transformation. Story is kind of like who I've been really <hes>. Trying to get on the show this season and every single person that I've interviewed so far and there's been you know. Handful have all. Had this like really awesome Lake County. Component to their story and men like Kinda. Showing how supportive the tech community is in in various ways, and it sounds like you found that you know through this. Through connections through other connections with more experienced people in the field that helped catapult you forward in the they were able to help support you in various ways and maybe help if you're stuck as you said, build your first project and I think that's really cool I. Think it's really good for beginners to hear that because I know when I first started out in probably you, too. I would imagine it can be really intimidating and feel like very overwhelming, and you can feel really alone, and it's like it's almost. I haven't experienced like trying to break into other industries, but in a lot of ways I feel like even though texts seemed really intense in really hard I mean it is, but there's just such kind and helpful people like a friend, totally random side story, but she's not intact. She was trying to break into. The entertainment like film like Moodley TV shows. and. She had to work at an unpaid internship for like a year in really like claw her way up. She actually does really awesome. <unk> producing on really awesome documentaries now but. It was like really hard, very competitive very very. Very like you know and I feel like the tech community is so different from that like it's. People are Super Helpful yeah definitely. I've heard that as well. I'm not sure if it's if it's like the demand in this industry that were like trying to get into maybe people, maybe a logical gotten to it, and they kind of see you know all the hard work that. It takes. I, guess that they want to help other people as well or like coming from something like my background and everything like that. They kind of want to help people as well, but yeah, I noticed that as well as a lot of really helpful people, even before I started going through the ups and everything I joined twitter, and that's when I found like just like a free code cannot co Newbie A. PODCAST are their Hashtag in general dislike just to get help and everything like that, and when I when I reached out that way, just random people that were professionals judgment like hey. I think I'll struggling with. Like centering Adib or CSS, something something kind of silly. You know I needed help with it and some random person was like. Hey, Gimme, your hub Repo <hes> albeit with that was like. Wow, some random person that realize but more Santander worked at Microsoft or something like that and are willing to help I didn't even know this person <hes>, but yeah, definitely noticed that about the industry's is a lot of willing people to help you regardless. Of Your background and everything like that. Yeah another guest I. Literally just had on the podcast said that she had so many breakthroughs. A CAITLIN for people listening to the show and in episode Caitlin. She was talking about how she had so many breakthroughs on twitter <hes> asking for help in people that she didn't even know. Offering to help her in various capacities, I feel like twitter is such a good. Well, it's funny. Because social media like every platform kind of has its own. Little like corner or whatever it could be really good for certain things and I feel like asking for help. Like in that way. Twitter is awesome because people will jump in people. It's almost like a forum, but it's not, but people are very like. Communicate unlike you know instagram or something, which is mostly about the photos and it's. It's not the same kind of. Environment just different. Anyway, it's it's interesting. Yeah so switching gears a tiny bit I would like to hear about how the new ended up getting your first full-time real position. Yeah absolutely. So it was when our meet up grew so when I met this person a friend. His name is nate a probably. Give him recognition there because <hes> east been so huge in my in my career as a friend and generally slow parental today we kind of joined are meet ups and we grew into this big. Meet Up. And it was like three hundred people. We grew to over three hundred people, and then we. He had connections with someone that was really involved in trying to grow the tech scene in the Central Valley of California. Washable, probably think though in California. It's like tech everywhere. Tech is huge, but that's really isolated towards like Silicon Valley Bay area, and when you go to the outskirts where I live, it's like farms and orchards in just really like farmland in. The outskirts of all the techie over the hill and there's all the big central. Silicon Valley everything like that, but out here it's it's completely different. There's still a lot of factories out here and everything like that, so tech isn't the big thing out here, so he was trying to person. He tried to basically bring tech out this way like hey companies. There's a talent out here as well so he was a part of that big that this big movement. That's still going on today so anyways. We ended up getting a space with his help, and he supported he. He got funding for it and we moved our meet up there. And, we were able to go reach out to the computer. Science professors ask some of the community colleges. They are able to come out. We reached out to people that talk computer science in the high schools I reach people on facebook I went out trying to like introduce myself to all these people, so we can grow all his these groups that are people better in software or coating to hey, come to this, Mita because we can all grow with the tech in the valley, so we had this large event whereas kicking off are merging of our beat ups, and we had I think. Over one hundred fifty people like almost two hundred people from professors in computer science to high school teachers in computer science to people, learning and everything like that so I went up there and I was speaking in front of it, and I was basically motivating other people that were in my position like hey. You guys? Should really you know? I was trying to leaning towards free code camp like if you guys want to learn to cope because those people that were like thinking about it, you know not really that much into it, so I kind of wanted to focus on those people because that's where they had the experience of coming from so was like. Hey, you know it's not that hard to get into it. There's some really really great resources that are free. That doesn't cost anything you know. MEET UPS like this a lot of great connections here and people willing to help you. If you're struggling every twenty five solves talking. They're all that and at that. Meet up was a few other. That worked at companies nearby when Consulting Agency <hes> the the banks have some of their software people out in the Central Valley as well and a couple of of the people that were there were friends with my friend, nate, a one that have basically helped me out and everything that always connections. He introduced me to one of guys there and he said Hey <hes> his company's hiring. I want you. I want to introduce you to Michael and this is after all is kind of getting already getting. Getting experience with building some projects and everything and my friend was like. Yeah, he knows what he's doing now. He he's employable. He's definitely has experience with building front, and back and software and everything so introduced me to a friend of his name of Josh and he worked for a company that basically did consulting for like probations, law enforcement software. They did software for E N NJ Gallo, a lot of big companies, so they're really established there around for like twenty years so I met with him. And then he was like where we're actually looking for someone. More junior developer is like Amir number. We eventually had coffee. Just Kinda. Talk and everything like that and we just hit it off. We kind of our personalities. Kind of you know He. We liked hanging out and everything like that, so that kind of started like a friendship, you know. We talked for about a year and. And you'd help you with stuff like that and I was like. Hey, and he's like our company is kind of in the middle of Lake, you know hiring, but they kinda. Put a freeze on that everything like that, so after about a year when I. When I met him, he finally called me up one day, and the funny story is that I was getting to a point. In in learning how to Code and currently working where I was almost ready to give up, because it felt like I was putting effort and then. I wasn't getting any any reward from like. If I was applying everywhere and I wouldn't get any kind of response to resume. I reached out to people to help with resume all these things. Did I did a lot? Maybe not everything that could have just because I didn't know, but I felt like I was getting any hits on my resume or If I. DID GET A call. It was like you know I didn't know how to do some kind of algorithm that I didn't learn or memorize or whatever it was, so I was getting really discouraged, almost going to be like. Maybe I do need to go to school at unity at degree. Maybe I need to just join a boot camp or or joint something that is going to make me be more appealing to employers so I was looking. and. Just kind of getting really discouraged at that time. But the funny thing is that I got a call for my friend Josh and he goes. Hey, we have this contract coming up. We need to hire a developer and I've been talking to my boss about you and we'd like to bring you on. He's like. Of course we'll interview you and everything like that and he's like. Are you interested in? He's like. Like I'm almost one hundred percent, sure they've we bring you on because you know like I know you and I know your work, and I can help you and everything like that and I was like. Are you kidding me? And when he told me that I was thrilled, I was actually really scared. Same time this is reality is like real software coding. In, part of me was going to say no like I do this. This is too much like the difference between working on side projects that you know like whatever no one's really going to care about versus working on software that people use so I. I got really scared. <hes> I even once. My wife and I was like I. Don't know if I can do this like I'm GonNa. Quit my job and I go do this and then I fail. I can't go back to that job. I can't do that, you know. This is a big decision. You know I've been here for nine years or whatever it was. So ultimately, my my wife convinced me and was like you need to do this. People don't get good things unless they take some kind of risk. Regardless, you should try you know. So I call it my friend. I told him I concerns and Josh was like you know you're just trying to scare yourself out of. It Dude so just take it from me. I'm going to be there to help you, so don't worry us to take this. Just, take it you know and I was like. Okay, let's set up the interview and everything like that and goes all right, so set the interview and. They hired me. And that was basically it I started there with no professional experience. It was all because of someone was willing to help me know again back to that. You know this industry is always really helpful people that are willing to take a chance on you and help me help you and everything, and and and of course there's a lot of challenges you know working in in actually writing real software and everything like that, but in the long run it really helped me in was just huge into getting my job, and then after that first job. Of course, my resume after that just everyone always cared to look at it. You know I I didn't have nearly as. Much difficulty looking for next role after that I think it's like once you get your first job regardless of its junior level, or whatever in in this industry it kind of goes downhill OCTA that you actually get considered. You know you'll get your resume looked at. You'll get that first interview and everything like that. Yeah Wow, so. How long did you work there at the first job? And then what what kind? You don't have to get like super detailed, but like what kind of work redoing essentially. There year, so I started off working on a back end actually of in node framework, or on the no runtime. Basically, the contract was migrating some. It's funny because I went from like barely learning it in writing mostly front end to writing some back in code and the PRI, the contract was basically taking some old enterprise services that were written in Java and then rewriting them on no gs lambda, so that that was what I was doing for like the first four months <hes> and after that contract and they moved on to another. Another project and it was more full stack. It was job script. It was using angular on the front end <hes> no on the back end and <hes> some sequel server, but I got the rightful stack of front end back in using Java javascript note and everything like that. It was really fun. 'cause I got to work on two different big projects <hes> there and I learned so much. That's where my whole stack experience kind of took off I got I got to learn so much and the people that I worked with worse huge. It was just I can't even express how thankful I am to people that I work with there and I still am friends with them. That helped me explained things a broke things down. And having been able to understand these other languages. Yeah Wow and I know you recently got a laid off due to cove in nineteen. was that from this same <unk> employer or was this another job you had gotten after leaving that company? Another story so I was there at that company for about a year, and then towards the end my wife and I found out. We're GONNA. Have Child and so I needed to. That company was great for it was actually a bump in salary than I currently made up. My Company <hes> the light, Bulb Company, but it's I still needed to. I needed to progress I needed to move on and grow my career, and financially so I started to look I started. You know I even asked my boss at the time. I was like Hey <hes>. I have a child, the ways or any chance that I can move up or anything like that, and you give me feedback, and it was like yeah, definitely, in whatever amount of time so I took that and say okay, that's CREPE. <unk> should start looking in see by even get my resume considered now that experience so I started to look, and then I got hired at a start up in the bay area and Silicon Valley. And I was there for almost a year way so i. don't want I. Don't want to interrupt you, but was at working remotely or you move there. I actually had hybrid role, so I would go into the office like an hour and a half commute two days a week. And then worked from home the other days, but yeah, it was a there. I got a taste of the whole silicon valley. Feel of how software companies ran, and my skills went up even higher because of that environment, but yeah, so I was there for about a year and <hes>. It was a startup that wasn't able to get another round of funding, so actually we all. They started laying people off. <hes> fortunately they didn't lay the soccer team like right away, but since we found that out, we started to look all the engineers that worked at that company, or like Oh they're not getting. Funding is a good chance. They're gonNA lay people off, so we all started looking and I got hired at the Credit Union and I. was there for about a year? or about a year exactly actually, and due to the pandemic and everything like that they started to kind of restructure, reorganize everything and effected a lot of teams, including my own team and <hes>. We're a part of that layoffs will. But yeah, it was. It was kind of <hes> something that I. Could. Imagine obviously has affected a lot of people everywhere, and it feels like it's just one of those times. That no-one can have planned for, but yeah. I've been a part of that have been affected by that as well. Yes, so justice like for myself in the listeners, so you basically had three different jobs like intech at this point in each for about a year. Give or take, so you essentially now have like three years of like fulltime software engineering experience. And the most recent position that <hes> you've got furloughed related offer a <unk>. Is that a credit union? And what were you doing there so? It's interesting. 'cause you've such like different experience like from like like a consulting firm to a tech startup to credit union like I imagined that the experiences at each one were quite different like the environment of in the way people work in south. Absolutely <hes> so. Go working at a credit union, it's a pretty large credit union and the way things are done there as opposed to the other companies that I worked at. Worse it significantly different so look the startup that I worked at. They were pretty large. Start up there actually around for ten years they had employed over three hundred people. The engineering team was fifty engineers <unk> people and. They operated like they were a big tech company and everything like that, so but at the same time I had the experience of being able to shift. To project same time like there's times when I was working on a mobile APP and one for one sprint I'd be working on a whole two weeks on a mobile APP, and then I'd be pivoted to work on their web APP, clients. Front end code, and then after that I'd be working on some hardware code completely different working on a proprietary algorithm that needs to be converted in red on a mobile APP. It was different stuff all the time, and it was really exciting, but also really nerve wracking because of the context, switching a lot and learning new languages at the same time. So that was I learned a lot by lot of the fast paced stuff at that start up, and then when I got to the Credit Union. There was a little bit more relaxed because those only one product that I worked on essentially. <hes>. Korb, inking APP and there I had a team of eight engineers that were dedicated for this core banking APP. I got brought on as a senior engineer there, and then that that role kind of pivoted towards a lead developer. I was on that project for about four months. And then my a boss. Promoted to the lead developer of that team so essentially there was a lot different roles because for one it was one project, and it was a mobile APP. I had experience with mobile APP at the other company, but not to this extent, it was just a huge mobile APP. And the primary, the primary objective being handling with people's money was probably a significant factor to the change of of like a importance of the application that part probably. At a lot to the stress when I worked knowing that you're working on something that deals with people's money and five hundred thousand active members <hes> so that was a big learning experience. And I do. I learned a lot of new stuff learned new languages learned how to do a lot of things that you wouldn't typically do web development, but yeah, it was a lot of differences in structure, probably a lot of different departments that you have to work with before you can get approval in changing something like maybe typically and. Change some piece of code that would maybe look slightly different, because it just makes more sense while at the Credit Union. It wasn't that simple. You had to get a lot of approvals and a lot of test. Writing to make sure lingers securer in a rented to different avenues. You know which was different. Yeah, that yeah makes <unk> dealing with financial information. You know sensitive data, and all that would be quite different. I imagined so now that your <hes> you by the time episode airs, you could already be in a new job, but. Being active in your job search now. What kind of company aiming to work out? What do you want to stay in like? The financial industry are trying to go back to a startup or maybe a consulting firm that you get to work all these different projects. Yeah, what were you? What did you like the most I guess? Let's see. Probably a ideally would wouldn't stay in the financial industry just because. All the little differences in how delayed development can be due to all those hoops. You have to jump through, but probably most fun I had was. Working in consulting agency. Because working so many different things. Different projects everything like that, but a lot of them had their own pros and cons. You know in terms of like. What I would prefer probably something that is more established due to. More stability just because of everything. That's going on right now. <hes> I've heard a lot of people have lost their jobs regardless of the industry even in software <hes>, I would probably prefer stability. If I could choose <hes> regardless of the industry but <hes>. Yeah. It's probably it's probably more geared towards that. You know what I can find that it is more stable and everything like that. I do have a few other avenues in alert. You know companies that I'm going through right now so I am confident that something will end soon. That's probably the good part is that they're still a high demand for software engineers and everything like that, so there's a lot of good <hes> a good places that are hiring right now and everything like that. But. They do specific Yeah Yeah Gotcha so I'm. Kind of jumping around here, but I really wanted to ask this question, and it goes back to your glassblowing experience. I was wondering if there was anything from that or your position before a Jumba juice that you. Were able to transfer or in some way to you in your job, your new job as a software developer. Probably the thing that. I don't know if it helped me, but there's a few different things probably so working probably in an environment that required me to have a lot of perseverance, probably aided to my benefit, and in general and just work ethic. It helps me <hes>. To be able to deal with probably stresses and deadlines <unk> Challenges in my current role because I dealt with that a lot on any. Of can can relate to that. Is You know working in a place like that or just any kind of work that requires them to give a little bit extra is required, just laken. Succeed or do well their job. It probably just helps helped with those areas <hes> in work ethic to work hard enduro ally and everything like that <hes>, but also know what I want going forward, and what I don't want in a career or or next role. Also of a big part of that. Working at that company helped me in was. Probably having difficult conversations with my employer I had a lot of those at that company <hes> and it prepared me to be able to deal with those difficult situations. A lot better at all night, other roles a and what I mean, my difficult situations, probably dealing with difficult people <hes> another one being having a conversation with your superiors about compensation <hes>. You know asking for what you feel like. You deserve and everything like that I've had a lot of those, and they didn't go so well at that company that I feel really confident and know how to approach those types of people or Whenever those conversations need to happen, you know. It can be difficult for a lot of people, but I think have so much experience with it that it's. It's kind of more fluid and how to do in the right way. It's aided a lot in that in in my career going forward. Yeah that makes sense and like. I, I can only imagine like the stressors you deal with being in an environment with the glassblowing like Super Hot. You said you were sent home from heat exhaustion, the stress like literally the physical danger bringing yourself. It's like working from home as a software engineer or <unk> star office in Silicon. Valley is like the stress level would be so much less like the. They compare Cinderella the stressors you're dealing with compared to maybe like the ones at the other place. Yeah, like whole other scar accord whole other thing, right? We are like running at time and there's one last question I want to ask before we wrap this out and it's just if you could share any like final advice to people listening right now. Who are just starting out? Maybe they were where you were like. You know four or five years ago. Whenever whenever you got your start. What advice would you give them? All. Let's see so I. Think for one perseverence when things feel like it's difficult, it may be difficult at first, but the more and more you do it in the more and more you practice. You'll eventually understand it some complicated things that I. That I could not have imagined when I first started of doing I'm able to thoroughly explain. They seem like almost simple. Now I think the more and more you do it. The the more natural feel, and it'll be really simple. Just just keep on doing it and things easier. <hes> also in your journey and learning. It's really important to try to reach out to people <hes> to make connections go to meet UPS ask questions. Because those are going to be the areas where where you're gonNA find a connection that can help you find that career and ultimately <unk> successful in in this career field. But those are probably the two biggest ones is. Now I know it's hard at first, but it gets easier, and it gets fun on the challenges they start to face. Get really exciting, and it's really rewarding. Ultimately you know all hard work will pay off as long as you just keep to it. And it will pay off so yeah, awesome, great advice in a great way to end this interview. Thank you so much again for coming on. Where can people find you online? Yeah absolutely. Probably a mitre twitter, a twitter handle is mit p. j are eight eight. Or my website is just a my name, my first name Michael or implemental. Dial my personal, Mitchell my last name.

Credit Union lead developer Korb software developer senior engineer
From Glassblower to Software Developer using Free Coding Resources with Michael Pimentel

Learn to Code with Me

46:03 min | 1 year ago

From Glassblower to Software Developer using Free Coding Resources with Michael Pimentel

"And we're back in today's episode. I speak with Michael, Pimentel. Michael Story is fascinating worked in the glassblowing industry specifically for film sets for nine years before he started teaching himself how to Code. And what makes him even more? Interesting is the fact that he doesn't have a college degree. Anti never went to a coding bootcamp. He is entirely self-taught. and. That is exactly what we're GONNA be talking about today. How he taught himself to code. WOW, working fulltime. How guys first job in tack and how he got more roles in the tech industry as time went on. If you tips for staying motivated while learning how to Code. This episode is for you enjoy. Hey. Michael. Thank you so much for coming on the show today. It will on six February I'm real excited to talk with you. You have like interesting. Self taught experience in. That's what I would like to dive into I. Could you share with us how you got started in software engineering? Absolutely so kind of Story kind of goes back to a few years ago when I was working for a company that made life for the film industry now working there as a manufacturer glassblowing really interesting work. Kind of working in a manufacturing type of shop warehouse, loud, working on a lay, that spun in a really hot environment I was there for a really long time and things just. Kinda didn't progress in terms of career. Wise and financially it was just really typical I live in California and California being one of the most expensive place live. It just wasn't sustainable. married and I have a child and that it just wasn't something that I could maintain so it kind of motivated me to start thinking I need to. Probably either go back to school or another another route career choice so i. can you know build to support and have a career that can provide general finance, support and everything like that, so it kind of led me to back to. My interest in computers and everything like that, so I started to do some online, searching and everything like that and it. Brought me to software development coding, you know some booming career choice that is really big right now and everything like that was like okay. Maybe I should go back to school for that, but at the time it really wasn't the best option I went acted. As a couple of glasses time, that's what I could afford at my community college, and then just got really difficult to maintain a full-time job and take one or two classes, and it got really expensive, because my wife was what was going to school in college and everything like that, so it was really difficult for us to support both less going especially you know. Not really knowing what I wanted to do. So I I did a lot of searching and I came across recode camp and recode camp. You know like when you get on their landing page. It's like learning one to code for free and always people learn this way and I was like wait three. This isn't make sense. This will usually scams off there. Start off Rian. Then you have to pay something and everything like that and you know to my surprise actually was free, and then so I started I jumped right in, and just started to go to the curriculum, and it sparked my interest and I was like. Wow, this is really cool. It's it kind of. Goes about in a way that. Gets you interested really quickly? You know with hd Mounsey assassin how you can get feedback on the webpage really quickly. Let's kind of how it started because I. Just I just couldn't go. That route was a canoe into school because it was just really expensive and I already had like a car loan, I couldn't get like student loan. It was just wasn't really practical. It's like cave. Do put myself some really extreme debt that I don't know if it's GonNa lead to something. That's GONNA pay in the end so I had to find another option and looked like learning to code on my own free resources when that resource beginning with recode camp was was the route I took. Awesome so I, want to backtrack a little bit to your. Your work before you got into coding, so you you okay? You said he was a manufacturing role. I haven't made notes that you were a glass blower which anti note that is for movies today shows. Definitely. What is it glasses? Sure okay, so a glass blower, typically like of someone like Google glass large usually someone that takes some raw material which consists of the materials, t make glass essentially depending on what what the? The. End Product is going to be different types of glass. Of course so basically you take them in you hit Heaton furnace, or with a really hot torture claim so that it becomes like in this malleable state, and then you shape it essentially so what I did there? We work on a leave, and we basically built like the light bulb globe. It's spun on a lathe and then you would really. Really hot with a hydrogen oxygen burners, two thousand degrees, and then you shape it based on certain dimensions so basically they would take that, and then we'd have a filament type that would basically you know, have some kind of chemical reaction than light up base off whatever the the fixture needed you know for the filming, so the specific light that they made there was an Hmo which is like a chemical. Name that I really don't know all the details into it, but it basically replicates the color of the sun so like if you see like on film sets, use those lights that kind of are the background that make everything look real, daytime and night-time filming. Those are the lights that we made when I worked there we're one of the few American companies still made them like with our hands, still as opposed to a machine meaning making them in a in a warehouse somewhere. But in a sense, essentially, that's what it was. We were just making them with a glassblowing. That's what I did while working there while I think nine or ten years. We Really, oh my goodness. Wow so start I'm surprised. It was that long because for people. Listening to this show were actually speaking through video so I can see you so I'm like. Wow doesn't look like he can hold a John. Young so young to have a job for that long. Then start another career. Okay? Wow, that awful. How did you get into that? Because that feels very niche, you're essentially making bulldogs. That camera crews in production crews are using on the sets of TV shows I mean. We were chatting before we recorded you live in California. I know like the entertainment industry is. In the movie industry in all of that is obviously very prominent out there is that kind of how that happened or It's interesting so actually the reason why I got into it is because my dad worked in that industry or like thirty years, and I had come out of working at John Juice and I was their. First job actually was working as a team member workup to insistent manager, and then eventually needed to make more money, because I got married at a really young so I. My dad ended up helping me getting the job there and you know I just ended up staying there for a really long time, but it's really how I got into. It was as my dad was in that industry longtime. He had connections and everything like that. Dot It. Did you go to a trade school or anything for glassblowing? No I actually just learned on the job. And still to this day is one of the most difficult things that I've ever done. Physically I for almost anything that can compare it to I think. Programming is its own challenge, but is like the hardest physical. Thing I've ever had to learn because it was like. If you don't do it right the first time, then you ruin it. So there's no going back and fixing it once. You kind of ruin it because the glass that we would work with you'd have to mix it with metals, and then once it's kind of melted to a certain point, you can't go back in extract those materials out of the glass, so it's Kinda ruined. If you don't do it, right is probably there really nerve, wracking or when I did that job. Yeah Wow, it also sounds like it could be dangerous if you're working as really like high temperatures. Absolutely I got burned really bad third degree burns I have degree burns like all my arm from it, but yeah, it was. It's definitely. Was I'm just curious. Did that have any role in your decision to look for a new job like I? Know you mentioned like the financial side, but were there other things, too? Yeah absolutely a that part being okay, so the big part, actually a aside from like the financial reasons that it just didn't pay that much. It was the work environments. It is in the Central Valley of California which in the summertime gets you know triple digits consistently and the warehouse that it is done is basically like a garage. It doesn't have an air condition. It doesn't have any of those things so the environment itself was. was just really really taxing. There's been a couple of times when I had gotten heat exhaustion, I got sent home because of it because like say it's one hundred, three, hundred ten, even outside inside that shop where you'd be working is a hundred twenty one hundred thirty degrees, and it was just unbearable is the if you've our to look back on some old twitter posts? I probably have pictures of like a thermometer in the area. And it's just like maxed out because it was just so hot, but yeah, that's that's probably WANNA be. A motivating factors to wanting to look for another job. It got to point where I was like. I need to get out of here. No matter what this job is just killing me physically, and you know a lot of other reasons you can imagine in an environment like that the people that you tend to work around kind of like really. Not The best work environment because you know on a lot of stress and you know tend not to get along very well when they're under a lot of stress is mentally and just everything that came along with that job, so it just became kind of like a hostile work environment as well so it was like a lot of. Factors that Kinda came into me like I have to get out of here you to find something else you know. Yeah well I mean that definitely makes sense. There's a few other people or one that is coming to mind that. We had on the show in a previous season. Whose name is Josh Camp? And he was a hope I. Stay this right a horse I think it's a horse fairer fairer, hope, number news right, but he would change the hooves on horses, which could also be really dangerous. Obviously, a horse kicks you and I believe it was an injury that ultimately led him to. You know look for other work in in what will link to that in the show notes for people listening now 'cause it. Was You know a few years back when we had on the show and any other episode, I believe it could have had a few where there was someone with a moron. Sick physically dangerous or physically labor job, and that's kind of what led them to to make a pretty big pivot because I can like working for you as a glass blower in those in that environment, physical Super Super Hot. It's totally different from working as a software engineer. And when you started coding, you mentioned using Free Co camp in other free resources. Were you still working fulltime as the glass blower and you are learning outside of that? Yes I was so I would I had a fulltime job there, and because of the heat I would work really really early hours I try to go in his earliest possible as three in the morning. Get off at noon or whatever it was Leonard Twelve so that time that I would get off of course I'd already so exhausted. Matt jobs so I have to go home and sleep a little bit and then. The thing with those interesting with that is. It was hard for me to be going having a fulltime job like that. Maybe some people can relate to that. You know like a maybe just a fulltime job in general is exhausting, but this job probably pushed it because of the environment itself the hostility behind it. That kind of gave me more motivation to be like you know what I'm really tired right now. And I'm not really motivated to to learn coding complete, foreign and difficult, but when I get off work the way I did time, so you know wanting to leave that place so bad that it was just that extra boost motivation for me to learn and study and just do everything I needed to do to succeed in it on just because it was just so bad. I got desperate. Really desperate I just remember that I tend to forget that, but then when I do remember I'm like wow, it helps me to be like really grateful. You know to where I am now, and it was really hard working fulltime job in learning, because I did learn while working there probably about a year and a half, maybe almost two years I was learning. And There was there were times when I would make huge progresses, but then. At the same time thinking like is this really possible? How do people get a job doing? It's like yeah. I can build a website, but there's more to it you like. Is this all I need to get a job type thing you know But Yeah! It was it was hard and I. Don't want to say like Oh yeah. It's super easy because it. Wasn't especially having to work fulltime job in it's all I could just you know. Take days off now and everything like that. I had to work. But yeah. It was difficult. So you were. Doing ice, you said for like one and a half two years where you were doing boom things at the same time. appleaday mentioned this earlier, but you. Free Co camp. Did you use any other resources or you mentioned Community College? Were you taking classes there? Yeah so additional to recode camp so the there's a lot of other things that I did that helped me so free code camp opened up at the time. I haven't camp while, but at the time had lake. Away that you would join and beat up and it was through facebook. It was like face, looking need groups or something, and it was like find a recode camp. Meet up because I. Guess they had like an umbrella. Recode camp meet ups that you can join, and you would basically type in your city in order find the nearest one that was that was organized and everything like that, so I found one in my city and it was you know a few people apartment that would meet up in so I joined that group and I reached out on their. Pre Cochem does a really good job with trying to connect people, so it's like hey, introduce yourself in post on there, so that people can no, no your journey Cetera so i. did that and I ended up meeting up with the organizers of that? Meet Up. We met at starbucks talked about you know everything on learning this and that where you and Rico camped up thing so eventually, I got more involved in that met more people that were learning as well and then now it. Kinda led to Terry member Oh the Mita. Dot Com meet up. There was also the recode. KEMP MEDIA DOT COM for our area that was attached to that facebook group. And, he was like yeah. I just started this. Meet up group, so we can kind of be more broad for people that don't have facebook. We can just Kinda grow up there and he was like you WanNa, help me with that because you know. He was maintaining full job as well, and he needed someone to Kinda. Fill in that gap where he couldn't. You know sounds like yeah. Sure I could definitely help with that, so I helped him. kind of on the organization's portion of that. meet up and like. Hey, let's try to meet. Kind of swap the weeks you know will be on a Saturday one week and then. I'll take the next every type of thing we'd be out of starbucks. And then someone posted on the meet up of feed. Like hey does a hack upon coming up, you guys should come reach out and you know I think it was free, and it was in our area, so I went to the hacker thon and myself in a couple of other people that were in that group, and then we ended up a or ended meeting a few other people at that meet up. That were real professional programmers. At the thoughts I introduced myself to them and everything like that met some really really nice. And probably the most helpful in kind person was actually the the organizer of that Agathon. When. I met him and everything like that. He gave me his contact information in and said Hey, we should get together sometime. I'm Cha and he was a professional programmer, running his own business and everything like that, so eventually I stayed in contact with him, and I met up with him, and I told him my journey and what I'm trying to do, super supportive of us all about helping people in my situation, you know like make connections, and even even help them with an internship and everything like that, and that's Kinda weird kicked off actually where it went from me trying to learn to me, actually making connections in potentially those connections leading to jobs. That was huge. Actually so this person that ran out. Pakistan also ran his on meet up. and His name was a little bit more. Mature he had a organized large meet ups and organised like a speakers where he would teach people how to get started with a new technology and all that stuff you know, so. This percent met up with them, and they're willing to like. Hey, you WANNA work on a project with. Wow real project like that's what I need to experience with a project, so I met with him or opt in some of the people that worked with him, and he ended up working with a lot of other guys that or just people in general men and women that were like kind of doing their own thing that a little bit more advanced as As programmers they're building girl websites starting their own software business in lake, a consulting and everything like that. That's where kind of took off. Is that connection? You know I to a upon met some people, and then it led to more people that we're kind of in the same boat as me, and if they are more advanced, they're willing to help me. By struggled with something and everything like that. It was really a douse like typical in me being successful. Yeah that is a great story and Other interviews I've been doing this season. We invite the guests on, and we think they have a really interesting transformation. Story is kind of like who I've been really Trying to get on the show this season and every single person that I've interviewed so far and there's been you know. Handful have all. Had this like really awesome Lake County. Component to their story and men like Kinda. Showing how supportive the tech community is in in various ways, and it sounds like you found that you know through this. Through connections through other connections with more experienced people in the field that helped catapult you forward in the they were able to help support you in various ways and maybe help if you're stuck as you said, build your first project and I think that's really cool I. Think it's really good for beginners to hear that because I know when I first started out in probably you, too. I would imagine it can be really intimidating and feel like very overwhelming, and you can feel really alone, and it's like it's almost. I haven't experienced like trying to break into other industries, but in a lot of ways I feel like even though texts seemed really intense in really hard I mean it is, but there's just such kind and helpful people like a friend, totally random side story, but she's not intact. She was trying to break into. The entertainment like film like Moodley TV shows. and. She had to work at an unpaid internship for like a year in really like claw her way up. She actually does really awesome. producing on really awesome documentaries now but. It was like really hard, very competitive very very. Very like you know and I feel like the tech community is so different from that like it's. People are Super Helpful yeah definitely. I've heard that as well. I'm not sure if it's if it's like the demand in this industry that were like trying to get into maybe people, maybe a logical gotten to it, and they kind of see you know all the hard work that. It takes. I, guess that they want to help other people as well or like coming from something like my background and everything like that. They kind of want to help people as well, but yeah, I noticed that as well as a lot of really helpful people, even before I started going through the ups and everything I joined twitter, and that's when I found like just like a free code cannot co Newbie A. PODCAST are their Hashtag in general dislike just to get help and everything like that, and when I when I reached out that way, just random people that were professionals judgment like hey. I think I'll struggling with. Like centering Adib or CSS, something something kind of silly. You know I needed help with it and some random person was like. Hey, Gimme, your hub Repo albeit with that was like. Wow, some random person that realize but more Santander worked at Microsoft or something like that and are willing to help I didn't even know this person but yeah, definitely noticed that about the industry's is a lot of willing people to help you regardless. Of Your background and everything like that. Yeah another guest I. Literally just had on the podcast said that she had so many breakthroughs. A CAITLIN for people listening to the show and in episode Caitlin. She was talking about how she had so many breakthroughs on twitter asking for help in people that she didn't even know. Offering to help her in various capacities, I feel like twitter is such a good. Well, it's funny. Because social media like every platform kind of has its own. Little like corner or whatever it could be really good for certain things and I feel like asking for help. Like in that way. Twitter is awesome because people will jump in people. It's almost like a forum, but it's not, but people are very like. Communicate unlike you know instagram or something, which is mostly about the photos and it's. It's not the same kind of. Environment just different. Anyway, it's it's interesting. Yeah so switching gears a tiny bit I would like to hear about how the new ended up getting your first full-time real position. Yeah absolutely. So it was when our meet up grew so when I met this person a friend. His name is nate a probably. Give him recognition there because east been so huge in my in my career as a friend and generally slow parental today we kind of joined are meet ups and we grew into this big. Meet Up. And it was like three hundred people. We grew to over three hundred people, and then we. He had connections with someone that was really involved in trying to grow the tech scene in the Central Valley of California. Washable, probably think though in California. It's like tech everywhere. Tech is huge, but that's really isolated towards like Silicon Valley Bay area, and when you go to the outskirts where I live, it's like farms and orchards in just really like farmland in. The outskirts of all the techie over the hill and there's all the big central. Silicon Valley everything like that, but out here it's it's completely different. There's still a lot of factories out here and everything like that, so tech isn't the big thing out here, so he was trying to person. He tried to basically bring tech out this way like hey companies. There's a talent out here as well so he was a part of that big that this big movement. That's still going on today so anyways. We ended up getting a space with his help, and he supported he. He got funding for it and we moved our meet up there. And, we were able to go reach out to the computer. Science professors ask some of the community colleges. They are able to come out. We reached out to people that talk computer science in the high schools I reach people on facebook I went out trying to like introduce myself to all these people, so we can grow all his these groups that are people better in software or coating to hey, come to this, Mita because we can all grow with the tech in the valley, so we had this large event whereas kicking off are merging of our beat ups, and we had I think. Over one hundred fifty people like almost two hundred people from professors in computer science to high school teachers in computer science to people, learning and everything like that so I went up there and I was speaking in front of it, and I was basically motivating other people that were in my position like hey. You guys? Should really you know? I was trying to leaning towards free code camp like if you guys want to learn to cope because those people that were like thinking about it, you know not really that much into it, so I kind of wanted to focus on those people because that's where they had the experience of coming from so was like. Hey, you know it's not that hard to get into it. There's some really really great resources that are free. That doesn't cost anything you know. MEET UPS like this a lot of great connections here and people willing to help you. If you're struggling every twenty five solves talking. They're all that and at that. Meet up was a few other. That worked at companies nearby when Consulting Agency the the banks have some of their software people out in the Central Valley as well and a couple of of the people that were there were friends with my friend, nate, a one that have basically helped me out and everything that always connections. He introduced me to one of guys there and he said Hey his company's hiring. I want you. I want to introduce you to Michael and this is after all is kind of getting already getting. Getting experience with building some projects and everything and my friend was like. Yeah, he knows what he's doing now. He he's employable. He's definitely has experience with building front, and back and software and everything so introduced me to a friend of his name of Josh and he worked for a company that basically did consulting for like probations, law enforcement software. They did software for E N NJ Gallo, a lot of big companies, so they're really established there around for like twenty years so I met with him. And then he was like where we're actually looking for someone. More junior developer is like Amir number. We eventually had coffee. Just Kinda. Talk and everything like that and we just hit it off. We kind of our personalities. Kind of you know He. We liked hanging out and everything like that, so that kind of started like a friendship, you know. We talked for about a year and. And you'd help you with stuff like that and I was like. Hey, and he's like our company is kind of in the middle of Lake, you know hiring, but they kinda. Put a freeze on that everything like that, so after about a year when I. When I met him, he finally called me up one day, and the funny story is that I was getting to a point. In in learning how to Code and currently working where I was almost ready to give up, because it felt like I was putting effort and then. I wasn't getting any any reward from like. If I was applying everywhere and I wouldn't get any kind of response to resume. I reached out to people to help with resume all these things. Did I did a lot? Maybe not everything that could have just because I didn't know, but I felt like I was getting any hits on my resume or If I. DID GET A call. It was like you know I didn't know how to do some kind of algorithm that I didn't learn or memorize or whatever it was, so I was getting really discouraged, almost going to be like. Maybe I do need to go to school at unity at degree. Maybe I need to just join a boot camp or or joint something that is going to make me be more appealing to employers so I was looking. and. Just kind of getting really discouraged at that time. But the funny thing is that I got a call for my friend Josh and he goes. Hey, we have this contract coming up. We need to hire a developer and I've been talking to my boss about you and we'd like to bring you on. He's like. Of course we'll interview you and everything like that and he's like. Are you interested in? He's like. Like I'm almost one hundred percent, sure they've we bring you on because you know like I know you and I know your work, and I can help you and everything like that and I was like. Are you kidding me? And when he told me that I was thrilled, I was actually really scared. Same time this is reality is like real software coding. In, part of me was going to say no like I do this. This is too much like the difference between working on side projects that you know like whatever no one's really going to care about versus working on software that people use so I. I got really scared. I even once. My wife and I was like I. Don't know if I can do this like I'm GonNa. Quit my job and I go do this and then I fail. I can't go back to that job. I can't do that, you know. This is a big decision. You know I've been here for nine years or whatever it was. So ultimately, my my wife convinced me and was like you need to do this. People don't get good things unless they take some kind of risk. Regardless, you should try you know. So I call it my friend. I told him I concerns and Josh was like you know you're just trying to scare yourself out of. It Dude so just take it from me. I'm going to be there to help you, so don't worry us to take this. Just, take it you know and I was like. Okay, let's set up the interview and everything like that and goes all right, so set the interview and. They hired me. And that was basically it I started there with no professional experience. It was all because of someone was willing to help me know again back to that. You know this industry is always really helpful people that are willing to take a chance on you and help me help you and everything, and and and of course there's a lot of challenges you know working in in actually writing real software and everything like that, but in the long run it really helped me in was just huge into getting my job, and then after that first job. Of course, my resume after that just everyone always cared to look at it. You know I I didn't have nearly as. Much difficulty looking for next role after that I think it's like once you get your first job regardless of its junior level, or whatever in in this industry it kind of goes downhill OCTA that you actually get considered. You know you'll get your resume looked at. You'll get that first interview and everything like that. Yeah Wow, so. How long did you work there at the first job? And then what what kind? You don't have to get like super detailed, but like what kind of work redoing essentially. There year, so I started off working on a back end actually of in node framework, or on the no runtime. Basically, the contract was migrating some. It's funny because I went from like barely learning it in writing mostly front end to writing some back in code and the PRI, the contract was basically taking some old enterprise services that were written in Java and then rewriting them on no gs lambda, so that that was what I was doing for like the first four months and after that contract and they moved on to another. Another project and it was more full stack. It was job script. It was using angular on the front end no on the back end and some sequel server, but I got the rightful stack of front end back in using Java javascript note and everything like that. It was really fun. 'cause I got to work on two different big projects there and I learned so much. That's where my whole stack experience kind of took off I got I got to learn so much and the people that I worked with worse huge. It was just I can't even express how thankful I am to people that I work with there and I still am friends with them. That helped me explained things a broke things down. And having been able to understand these other languages. Yeah Wow and I know you recently got a laid off due to cove in nineteen. was that from this same employer or was this another job you had gotten after leaving that company? Another story so I was there at that company for about a year, and then towards the end my wife and I found out. We're GONNA. Have Child and so I needed to. That company was great for it was actually a bump in salary than I currently made up. My Company the light, Bulb Company, but it's I still needed to. I needed to progress I needed to move on and grow my career, and financially so I started to look I started. You know I even asked my boss at the time. I was like Hey I have a child, the ways or any chance that I can move up or anything like that, and you give me feedback, and it was like yeah, definitely, in whatever amount of time so I took that and say okay, that's CREPE. should start looking in see by even get my resume considered now that experience so I started to look, and then I got hired at a start up in the bay area and Silicon Valley. And I was there for almost a year way so i. don't want I. Don't want to interrupt you, but was at working remotely or you move there. I actually had hybrid role, so I would go into the office like an hour and a half commute two days a week. And then worked from home the other days, but yeah, it was a there. I got a taste of the whole silicon valley. Feel of how software companies ran, and my skills went up even higher because of that environment, but yeah, so I was there for about a year and It was a startup that wasn't able to get another round of funding, so actually we all. They started laying people off. fortunately they didn't lay the soccer team like right away, but since we found that out, we started to look all the engineers that worked at that company, or like Oh they're not getting. Funding is a good chance. They're gonNA lay people off, so we all started looking and I got hired at the Credit Union and I. was there for about a year? or about a year exactly actually, and due to the pandemic and everything like that they started to kind of restructure, reorganize everything and effected a lot of teams, including my own team and We're a part of that layoffs will. But yeah, it was. It was kind of something that I. Could. Imagine obviously has affected a lot of people everywhere, and it feels like it's just one of those times. That no-one can have planned for, but yeah. I've been a part of that have been affected by that as well. Yes, so justice like for myself in the listeners, so you basically had three different jobs like intech at this point in each for about a year. Give or take, so you essentially now have like three years of like fulltime software engineering experience. And the most recent position that you've got furloughed related offer a Is that a credit union? And what were you doing there so? It's interesting. 'cause you've such like different experience like from like like a consulting firm to a tech startup to credit union like I imagined that the experiences at each one were quite different like the environment of in the way people work in south. Absolutely so. Go working at a credit union, it's a pretty large credit union and the way things are done there as opposed to the other companies that I worked at. Worse it significantly different so look the startup that I worked at. They were pretty large. Start up there actually around for ten years they had employed over three hundred people. The engineering team was fifty engineers people and. They operated like they were a big tech company and everything like that, so but at the same time I had the experience of being able to shift. To project same time like there's times when I was working on a mobile APP and one for one sprint I'd be working on a whole two weeks on a mobile APP, and then I'd be pivoted to work on their web APP, clients. Front end code, and then after that I'd be working on some hardware code completely different working on a proprietary algorithm that needs to be converted in red on a mobile APP. It was different stuff all the time, and it was really exciting, but also really nerve wracking because of the context, switching a lot and learning new languages at the same time. So that was I learned a lot by lot of the fast paced stuff at that start up, and then when I got to the Credit Union. There was a little bit more relaxed because those only one product that I worked on essentially. Korb, inking APP and there I had a team of eight engineers that were dedicated for this core banking APP. I got brought on as a senior engineer there, and then that that role kind of pivoted towards a lead developer. I was on that project for about four months. And then my a boss. Promoted to the lead developer of that team so essentially there was a lot different roles because for one it was one project, and it was a mobile APP. I had experience with mobile APP at the other company, but not to this extent, it was just a huge mobile APP. And the primary, the primary objective being handling with people's money was probably a significant factor to the change of of like a importance of the application that part probably. At a lot to the stress when I worked knowing that you're working on something that deals with people's money and five hundred thousand active members so that was a big learning experience. And I do. I learned a lot of new stuff learned new languages learned how to do a lot of things that you wouldn't typically do web development, but yeah, it was a lot of differences in structure, probably a lot of different departments that you have to work with before you can get approval in changing something like maybe typically and. Change some piece of code that would maybe look slightly different, because it just makes more sense while at the Credit Union. It wasn't that simple. You had to get a lot of approvals and a lot of test. Writing to make sure lingers securer in a rented to different avenues. You know which was different. Yeah, that yeah makes dealing with financial information. You know sensitive data, and all that would be quite different. I imagined so now that your you by the time episode airs, you could already be in a new job, but. Being active in your job search now. What kind of company aiming to work out? What do you want to stay in like? The financial industry are trying to go back to a startup or maybe a consulting firm that you get to work all these different projects. Yeah, what were you? What did you like the most I guess? Let's see. Probably a ideally would wouldn't stay in the financial industry just because. All the little differences in how delayed development can be due to all those hoops. You have to jump through, but probably most fun I had was. Working in consulting agency. Because working so many different things. Different projects everything like that, but a lot of them had their own pros and cons. You know in terms of like. What I would prefer probably something that is more established due to. More stability just because of everything. That's going on right now. I've heard a lot of people have lost their jobs regardless of the industry even in software I would probably prefer stability. If I could choose regardless of the industry but Yeah. It's probably it's probably more geared towards that. You know what I can find that it is more stable and everything like that. I do have a few other avenues in alert. You know companies that I'm going through right now so I am confident that something will end soon. That's probably the good part is that they're still a high demand for software engineers and everything like that, so there's a lot of good a good places that are hiring right now and everything like that. But. They do specific Yeah Yeah Gotcha so I'm. Kind of jumping around here, but I really wanted to ask this question, and it goes back to your glassblowing experience. I was wondering if there was anything from that or your position before a Jumba juice that you. Were able to transfer or in some way to you in your job, your new job as a software developer. Probably the thing that. I don't know if it helped me, but there's a few different things probably so working probably in an environment that required me to have a lot of perseverance, probably aided to my benefit, and in general and just work ethic. It helps me To be able to deal with probably stresses and deadlines Challenges in my current role because I dealt with that a lot on any. Of can can relate to that. Is You know working in a place like that or just any kind of work that requires them to give a little bit extra is required, just laken. Succeed or do well their job. It probably just helps helped with those areas in work ethic to work hard enduro ally and everything like that but also know what I want going forward, and what I don't want in a career or or next role. Also of a big part of that. Working at that company helped me in was. Probably having difficult conversations with my employer I had a lot of those at that company and it prepared me to be able to deal with those difficult situations. A lot better at all night, other roles a and what I mean, my difficult situations, probably dealing with difficult people another one being having a conversation with your superiors about compensation You know asking for what you feel like. You deserve and everything like that I've had a lot of those, and they didn't go so well at that company that I feel really confident and know how to approach those types of people or Whenever those conversations need to happen, you know. It can be difficult for a lot of people, but I think have so much experience with it that it's. It's kind of more fluid and how to do in the right way. It's aided a lot in that in in my career going forward. Yeah that makes sense and like. I, I can only imagine like the stressors you deal with being in an environment with the glassblowing like Super Hot. You said you were sent home from heat exhaustion, the stress like literally the physical danger bringing yourself. It's like working from home as a software engineer or star office in Silicon. Valley is like the stress level would be so much less like the. They compare Cinderella the stressors you're dealing with compared to maybe like the ones at the other place. Yeah, like whole other scar accord whole other thing, right? We are like running at time and there's one last question I want to ask before we wrap this out and it's just if you could share any like final advice to people listening right now. Who are just starting out? Maybe they were where you were like. You know four or five years ago. Whenever whenever you got your start. What advice would you give them? All. Let's see so I. Think for one perseverence when things feel like it's difficult, it may be difficult at first, but the more and more you do it in the more and more you practice. You'll eventually understand it some complicated things that I. That I could not have imagined when I first started of doing I'm able to thoroughly explain. They seem like almost simple. Now I think the more and more you do it. The the more natural feel, and it'll be really simple. Just just keep on doing it and things easier. also in your journey and learning. It's really important to try to reach out to people to make connections go to meet UPS ask questions. Because those are going to be the areas where where you're gonNA find a connection that can help you find that career and ultimately successful in in this career field. But those are probably the two biggest ones is. Now I know it's hard at first, but it gets easier, and it gets fun on the challenges they start to face. Get really exciting, and it's really rewarding. Ultimately you know all hard work will pay off as long as you just keep to it. And it will pay off so yeah, awesome, great advice in a great way to end this interview. Thank you so much again for coming on. Where can people find you online? Yeah absolutely. Probably a mitre twitter, a twitter handle is mit p. j are eight eight. Or my website is just a my name, my first name Michael or implemental. Dial my personal, Mitchell my last name.

Twitter California Michael Story Credit Union Josh Camp Facebook Central Valley Software Engineer Silicon Valley Mita Starbucks Hostile Work Environment Mounsey Google Pakistan End Product
Boeing On The Hot Seat

Aviation Week's Check 6 Podcast

07:50 min | 2 years ago

Boeing On The Hot Seat

"OPEAN Aviation Safety Agency Patrick key has a big say and when the Max is certified and our business editor Michael Bruno will round out today's discussion with his views on where Boeing just another case of congressional grandstanding yes so there was certainly I was chairman Peter defazio surprised us by sharing slides featuring documents including communications our emails and text messages problems with the Max and with the flight control system acid from twenty fifteen from a senior engineer developing the a seven thirty seven Max accident sequence another in which a general manager retired general manager he expressed his view that workers Michael Mistakes and he went as far as to say in the letter to Muhlenberg to step foot on a Boeing Max aircraft and this is a guy who had worked for the company Burke. Yeah I think what Ben's pointing out we're probably the two biggest revelations kind of what not what Boeing knew and when but what Boeing had been but also in public relations about what Boeing had been telling people once the what Boeing said it was is now out there and perhaps it gets over to Europe yen's what it what did Patrick key confirm that won't be far behind the FAA and and on Adair aren't any last minute problems that we don't know of and that open items one of the one of being how cockpit they're not there yet had suggested the introduction of third there is still a not yet agreement on the training requirements issue even for your lines which have typically smaller and we have to agree on this as far as I understood him that understanding return to service in the US and it could be many months after that before returns the service in Europe he decides in January that the maximum can return each country each member-state lifting the flight bands and a question that needs to be resolved so there is a lot of training this is some some member states have told him already so there will already be some exceptions that will delay that about what it means for the certification of future aircraft worldwide. Yeah I mean that's the that's a really really important

Boeing Peter Defazio Michael Bruno General Manager Europe Michael Mistakes Adair Senior Engineer FAA Business Editor Muhlenberg Chairman Patrick United States Burke BEN
Dee Tuck Discuss Getting Into Software Engineer

Revision Path

11:09 min | 2 years ago

Dee Tuck Discuss Getting Into Software Engineer

"A D.. Tuck back and I am an engineer manager at abstract so what does being. An engineering manager entail at abstract. What's a what's a normal daylight for you? Oh man lots of meetings lots of meetings yes so I hardly run run two teams run. The I run the platform squad. God and in an enterprise admits and so at participating a lot of meetings with With product in our in our stakeholders. I'm also responsible for for running our agile methodologies so such as all our scrum meeting so I'll also act as a scrum master as well so I spend a lot of time in meetings and a lot of time in Jere. Oh and you've been in the role now for about a year so enlisted year. Yeah so I started. I started abstract January January of this year but I've been an engineering manager for about About two years nice. What attracted you to the company? So I came across abstract during a time from where my my previous company decided to outsource their engineering department. And so I was just I was just kind of looking came across abstract on linked in and I was just like I read the job description for the engineering manager role and like right there at the top. It talked about diversity inclusion and I was just like wow this this is different and so I just kind of dug into it and I really looked on linked in and I really saw that there were a lot of people did that you know look like me as I was like okay this it does. This is a little different and so so yeah I was able to reach out reach out to want to recruiters and the rest is history there now. You're you're running two squads like you said what's the biggest challenge with your role. I mean it sounds like a lot. Managing teams yes so definitely early mcalinden is booked right at definitely say time. Time is a big challenge with me. You know Kinda Kinda having having a lot of meetings things whether it's with the weather's with Martine our with our product managers. It's definitely a task to balance both but I think I'm doing pretty good job. Edit and so as the engineering manager you're also hiring for both of these teams. I'm assuming that right. Yes now how is is it when it comes to kind of recruiting and retaining talent because you just like you said you looked on linked in your Deny you saw people that looked like you and that made you interested in it. How is I guess the process and you have to go too far in the weeds on this? But how is the process for recruiting and retaining talent for you. We get a lot of applications and so definitely have to like spend time you know screen candidates but one of the things about one of the things about abstract and one of the things that I- enjoys that. Ah We are very intentional. And like in recruiting diverse talent and whether that be sponsoring lesbians and Tech Afro Tag Tag are any of the other the base tech conferences. Where we're usually there and so I usually try to jump on board with our recruiting team to kind of get out there and be candidates face to face and so I think one of the things that I that I can say When you think about like DNA and tech and you know and hire is that you have have to be intentional about it and so in a lot a lot of times that means putting money out there to actually do it like you know descended sending your employees that he's to these different different conferences to Kinda get out there and mingle with people so and I should also mention just for transparency for people that are listening abstract has sponsored provision path? Also there but I think it's it's a it's a good thing about being intentional I would say this was maybe about four so years ago I was doing consultant back when I had my studio and there will be a lot of companies big name companies that are so afraid of even when a dipping being their toe into the whole diversity and inclusion topic for fear of getting it wrong or saying the wrong thing saying I remember one client particular. I'M NOT GONNA name but one client particular. Big Media. Company was like yeah. We really want to try to recruit more you know black creative talent designers and developers. There's and I asked them if they had thought about just like going to like an Hvac job fair and it was like you could see people's minds exploding at the thought like we. We never thought of that. Yeah like go where they are like beret relationships and like you said the intentional about it. That's sort of what it takes. Yes Yep Yep it does is another thing too is is is a lot of a lot of companies will focus on hiring senior engineers. And I just honestly I honestly honestly think that there's a there's a conflict there right so if you're if you want to focus on ideas and inclusive hiring right if you only focus on hiring those who have you know ten years of experience then like it's going to be hard it's Nepalese definitely. Just going to be hard so so things like definitely opening up the gates to be able to support but those who are coming out of BOOT camp. This is definitely the way to go now. For Deny there's one company it's actually. I don't even remember. The name of the company was but what what I could tell us that it's clear they were just trying to find like black and brown versions of who their ideal employee would be and often times that a person may not exist because of a number of different circumstances socio economic circumstances education etc that they're just not going to be in that same pipeline or level of who you would really want but if you're being intentional about diversity and you know you're able to kind of determine what the base things you need what are like nice to have sorts of things right find that that probably makes the process a lot easier from recruiting standpoint. Yep Yep now I would say part of that you know is the recruitment but also oh retaining so like how diverse I say diversity and inclusion are like two sides of the same coin like it's one thing to bring diverse people land. But how do you keep them. Can you talk a little bit about sort of what the culture is like at abstracts. Yes so I definitely agree with you. Were saying like there's there's kind of like two sides of that coin right. I once read like diversity is inviting people to the party inclusive is playing music that they danced you right so yeah one. One one thing think of abstract I can definitely say. Is that like there. There are events that support you know different backgrounds. One of the things that we just did. Recently in the San Francisco office is is that we had a Latin and tech tech event and so really just making sure that like every everyone feels feels included One of the things that yeah I thought was like super cool when I got to abstract is that like is that we have a a people of Color Slack Channel Right that was like coach shock for me right. 'cause like I you know I'm usually I'm I'm usually the I'm usually the only one at my company. I'm usually the first first black or I you know. LGBT bt. Like it's I'm always. I've always been the first you know because I've moved around the south And so it's just definitely just stuff like that to just like Bill like okay. Here's a space for you. Connect with your people and like like I say abstract is very intentional. is in supporting different. You know the backgrounds in groups of people. Yeah now. Let's let's switch gears because you're talking about the south here you're located in Nashville. Is that where you grew up. No so I'm I'm originally. I'm originally from Cincinnati Ohio. Yep some born in born and raised in Cincinnati Ohio. I left Cincinnati yet at eighteen manner and went to Tuskegee Tas to study computer science and so after after graduating from Tuskegee actually kind of stayed stated Alabama. For about four years. I just moved around. Missile defense companies there so So yeah then I found my way to Nashville it was I guess tech and that sort of stuff a big part of your childhood growing up where you're exposed to an early I would say I would say I would say say yes and no right so one would be one of the things that like really like made me like fond of computers. Is that like my uncle. He used to work at a pioneer. Right Yeah the Audio Audio Company. So just he was just kind of like a super cool guy right. He always had a nice car He you know flu. He was the first person I knew that ever flew out the country. He's going to Japan all the time and so he was. He was also the first person who had a personal computer right. And all my all my weekends I would like spend my time upstairs and his he. He bought a two story house from our for my grandmother. He moved upstairs and she moved downstairs. And so I spend weekends at my grandma's India. I would spend hours upon hours just sitting at his computer. I mean I was. I was in there like changing all the settings things I mean. I don't know what I was doing. Computer head like windows ninety five on it. I mean I was I was just doing. I was doing everything like I. Just I would stay there for Hours upon hours and then one day I came down I came downstairs in my in. My grandpa was sitting on the couch and he was just like you know. What are you doing upstairs like? What are you doing up there and I was like you know? I'm on a computer. And he was just like he was just like us up. They are for like nine hours. Ten hours you know. He's he's a he's an older guy he's just kind of like so like like what are you doing. I was like look. I'm just on the computer. I have fun. He was like you know what when I retire. I'M GONNA I'm GonNa buy you a computer and so I was like cool in like an I'd never said anything about it. But soon as he retired he called me and was just like. Hey I you know I wanNA take you to circuit city in by you computer and like at that at that moment hours like static and so I think the the engineer was born in media. At that point I became like the family. tech specialist. I was going around fixing people's computers and printers ranters and Yes that that that's kind of how it started and also to like the schools that are schools at win. Two they expose US attack through through Nebbi National National Society of Black Engineers and then there was some. There was some other programs that like I stayed in contact with it so oh but even when I got to college you know I'll be. I'll be honest like I thought I was going when I when I signed up for computer science like I thought I was going to be like fixing computers installing all in word like. I didn't know anything about coding. Though that doubt thing like I didn't have any experience in my childhood that you know where I was actually like developing things so yeah when I got to college it was definitely a whole new ballgame

Engineering Manager Engineer Cincinnati Nashville Jere Big Media Ohio United States Martine Japan Nebbi National National Societ Consultant India Bill San Francisco Alabama
"senior engineer" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

01:46 min | 2 years ago

"senior engineer" Discussed on WGN Radio

"A senior engineer filed an internal ethical complaint this year alleging that when Boeing seven thirty seven MAX aircraft is being developed the company rejected a proposed safety system he believes that system which malfunctioned in The Lion Erin Ethiopian airlines crashes could have been detected and prevented Boeing just moments ago releasing a statement on the report saying Boeing offers its employees a number of channels for raising concerns and complaints and has a rigorous process is in place well to ensure that such complaints received thorough consideration and protect the confidentiality of employees to make them accordingly Boeing does not have a comment on the substance or existence of such internal complaints breaking news out of Hartford Connecticut where officials are confirming a Collings foundation World War two aircraft crash this morning a fire and rescue operation currently under way the airport has been closed it's unclear at this point how many people were aboard and what may have caused the crash the plane was a private aircraft not military once again that in Hartford Connecticut Bernie Sanders campaign canceling all events for now he was hospitalized yesterday with a blockage in his artery to stand seven inserted Sanders campaign saying that he experienced some chest can't discomfort during a campaign event yesterday he said to be conversing and in good spirits but will be resting over the next couple days almost four hundred workers at Mount Sinai hospital have voted to authorize a strike they made the announcement at a rally outside of the hospital this morning they say they're pushing for fair treatment on the job higher wages and better health care ninety seven percent of workers represented by S. CI you voted to authorize a strike they include people who clean and sanitize rooms and secretaries like Alice Jones she says she's worked at the hospital for almost thirty years and still can't make ends.

senior engineer Boeing Hartford Connecticut Mount Sinai hospital Alice Jones MAX Collings foundation World War Hartford Connecticut Bernie Sanders ninety seven percent thirty years
Tech Lead Engineer: Herding Cats & Drinks

Front End Happy Hour

10:36 min | 2 years ago

Tech Lead Engineer: Herding Cats & Drinks

"We often talk about our growth path as engineers. One of those pass could be attack need engineer in today's episode. We're joined by I Tony Edwards to help talk with us about the role and responsibilities of a tech lead engineer. Tony can even brief introduction of who you are what you do and in what your favorite happy hour beverages sure I'm Tony. I'm a Sophomore Inter net flicks. I spend about twenty percent of my time coding favorites vagrancy my favorite happy hour beverage is a Manhattan Bliss. You're eighty percent of your time. Doing I help run. Projects and attend meetings readings all right okay interesting. We will definitely be getting into more on that before we do. Let's give introduction of today's panelists jam. You're started off Jamyang senior software engineer Netflix Stacy London senior front and Engineer Atlassian and also a feature lead for the last year plus on a project which isn't discussed later. I'm definitely curious on that High Mars Julian. I'm a front end software engineer at AIRBNB so a little different than nomad had lost and yet. I'm not a netflix anymore. So I'm a little bit sad yeah a little bit sad and I'm Ryan Burgess. I may suffer engineering manager at Net applets in each episode of the Front Unhappy Our podcast. We loved choose a keyword. If it's mentioned it all in the episode we will all take a drink. What do we decide today's keyword. It is projects so we say the word project projects new all take a drink her. Let's jump in. How would you describe what attack lead role engineer love listening listening like that out of attending meetings the little writing code some architect? Ing squishy socks thing softens architect teens not necessarily really soft yeah. It's not but ultimately gotta lean on your fellow engineers but it's important that you set so the broad strokes folks so a lot more like planning and off front work but then letting other engineers run with something yeah you gotTa Transfer People for sure all right anything else that odds that definition. I think it's an interesting I did ask for definition in the first place because I think every company will execute it very very differently and so it's interesting to hear obviously everyone's perspective here. I think we all have a slightly different definition in mind where the like coating to sort of management management ratios might be very very different depending on where you work. I think that's a fair point is they're completely different. Depending on the company say a lead engineer sewing that is honest honest with themselves about the amount of coding they do. Tony said Yeah. I feel like your son no matter what as a tech lead you're likely coating less. I think in general is engineers in years. We overestimate how much coding we do like Oh. You're you're seeing yourself engineering. It's cutting your your pilots seventy eighty percent of the time and it's probably more like sixty percent of the time we we we got a lot of meetings yeah. I I do think as you become more senior and more complexity of your role that grows hashing that's really funny as your coating actually goes down. That's definitely the way I've seen it in in my house yeah and I like put enough. I've had a conversation with our director about this much. Hey you know I it turns out. I'm starting most of my time. I'm doing network which is like writing. Docs meetings and organizing people in wrangling different projects and like. I don't feel like I'm doing my job. He's like that. Is Your job like your job to get stuff done. No matter what it takes sometimes coating more often than not it's not coating and that's kind of what lead engineers do by the way for the word projects as Mars for wholeness countable thin sharp. I think so I mentioned Fisher lead with the introductions and that's a role. I guess I really haven't heard of that particular. Taylor role until I got to a LASSEN and it's not official like role as in like senior engineer and like a future leader or anything like it's an addendum addendum. It's like a thing that you do as senior or you actually be any level and do that particular role but it's like somebody that let's say you take a team. That's pretty big and you break them up into smaller. smaller teams to work on a particular feature so like maybe on on screen. There's like some small. thing like you're building. They are a card that does X. That's a feature you feature lead it and what that really means. You're trying to help the product manager and the designer figure out anything that needs to happen to get that done from like the technical side so they're gonNA define. Maybe what the product manager and the designer according to define like you know what is and what it should look like and you're gonNA figure out the how and it doesn't mean that you wouldn't figure out how with let's say let's say you're on a future team and you have other senior engineers or junior all levels that you're working with. They're gonNA also figure out how to build this thing but you might run interference or maybe make make it so they don't have to go otas many meetings as you do about the technical implementation. see figure stuff out. Maybe a little bit more so that they can just like go and bills and and not have to be distracted too much. I think that's that's one way to think about it. A switch that up by future too is meaning is you could be the the lead on this feature and insulin so it could be on the lead on the next feature like is it something that's kind of interchangeable totally on insult for the last year more than like a future lead on a huge each screen Bisley redoing the entire poll request experience and that is a massive thing. That's like many many many many many features and actually actually to be honest it was it was too much that was me like almost never coating and doing a lot of like interference in all sorts of stuff and recently. We decided to break that up so now we we have many feature lead. You know people from different levels not all senior. I'm just taking over and owning a little piece of that page in working through plus really Likud. I didn't actually know to feature lead was but it sounds very similar to like attack lead lead engineer whatever it is it's very similar but is very narrow focus on on this particular feature year leading this ever yeah. It's really cool. I think another area that we miss maybe defining on how to describe attack lead. They feel like you're dealing a lot more with cross functional teams. I feel like as an engineer. You're always working really closely with your team. Maybe maybe you're working with the PM the designer but oftentimes there's other requirements come across cross functionally. There's like other engineering other disciplines that need to be brought brought in and you might be that person on goes in Shepherd's that and brings a technical perspective to it. He drew clarify cross functional for those who don't speak Silicon Valley. I don't know if it's is just silicon valley but I've not heard that too much. Okay that's fair. I mean cross functional to me means different functions of the business so that might actually be like like I mentioned PM design but it could also be even cross functional engineering teams. There's like A. Ui Team is a back end team Thurs networking team. There's like who knows what your project needs but you might actually be involved in a lot of those discussions where you're talking about okay how does the the back in interface with the Ui how does the backend interface with a database and those are the types of conversations where I feel like a tech lead might be involved. It's some of those meetings that you may not. I have to have all your engineers involved in like if you're a front end engineer you may not want your entire team there but you wanNA representative and to me that someone who is tackling exactly that can represent your team in those discussions that are broader function of the Costume Sean seeds that good jump. That's okay. I'll take it a home uh-huh affair all right well since it's okay. How could you make it better. I would simplify it right I would I would say it comes as different parts of the business that may not be. It's more than one product area so start with you. Did I think you compile all right now. That was project. Project Project Tares when you're a tech lead. You're the ambassador for engineers and you may be the first point of contact that he was ever had with with your team and so it's really important to make really good impression and if you're trying to get something done obviously that's why you're at a meeting with. This person is really important. He said good context high. Make make sure to explain why what you're doing is important because why should why should they help you. You gotTA show them. Show them the lights instead of make them light. It's very you can get people to do what you want by making them do what he wants or from top down. Maybe you can depend on organization do a top down thing but much better to get them to buy into there. You have to convince people that this is a great idea. That's like psychology right like that's that's like that's. I think what's been interesting choosing to about some of the definitions of this very outward facing and there's a lot of metal work involved but there it's been alluded to before here like internally also at least looking internally within your team. engineers are really really good resources for decision making so we've talked architect eating and making decisions based on unlike technologies to move forward with given the long term context in the projects cutoff line. I think there is external and internal responsibilities as house while put yeah. I guess what kind of skills like we kinda talk about some of the responsibilities but like what kind of skills goes into Vena technically you have. I've been around the block engineering wise. You have to see and you have to have failed. You have to have succeeded. You'll have to have done something of a biggest cope before I I like the failure part because you really do learn from all your past failures of like these are the types of questions. I need to ask front so that my team doesn't fail again. I if you don't if you haven't had that experience you might get engineers that are in that that team that you're on there like this is amazing technical challenge. I can't wait to go down a rabbit hole and work on this thing forever and you're like man. Maybe that there might be a different solution. That doesn't happen before I like the I've been around the block that is added to your point failure that is such a big part is like learning what not to do just as important as learning what you should

Engineer Lead Engineer Tony Edwards Software Engineer Senior Engineer Manhattan Bliss Engineer Atlassian Netflix Engineering Manager Product Manager A. Ui Team Airbnb Ryan Burgess Silicon Valley Stacy London Jamyang Director Fisher Shepherd
"senior engineer" Discussed on Front End Happy Hour

Front End Happy Hour

03:51 min | 3 years ago

"senior engineer" Discussed on Front End Happy Hour

"Just like warning for everyone and to watch it. But I don't do scary movies or shows like Gemma, I'm not a horror fan, but I really liked it. It was good. It's I I'm almost finished. But I can already say like, it's it's fantastic. I watched the gym because you know, I'm scared like everybody else. I would not recommend watching before bed. You will dear self service. But it's fantastic. It's really were checking out even if you're not in a horror. My second pick is an album that I randomly came across called A L the cut air Cyrus vanishes. Rusty, it is all in Spanish Spanish Spanish, not Mexican Spanish is most people knew familiar with by artist name Rosalia. But it is just fantastic. I it's it's like one of those albums like hit me in the right place at the right time. It's not something normally list. To. But it's worth checking out just a coli different like John riff music. And I normally listen to but it's pretty good. And my last pick is a sci-fi book called the fifth season. See Ryan knotting knotting said I'm reading it right now. It is amazing. It is fantastic. For those who don't know it won the Hugo award. So there's three books in all three of them at won the Hugo award, which is like, I don't I don't know to the Emmys for scifi books. It's like the most prestigious than you can get for scifi book, and is every single book has one which tells you something author I won't give anything away, but it's worth reading. I definitely second that pick. It's really really good book. I'll have to check it out. All right since react hooks came up. If you're very interested in learning just a quick introduction to what react took are. And why they're applicable and why you might wanna use them. Our good friend. Harry Woolf has a great video series that he is always talking about. What's new in great in Java script land? He has. Good video on react hooks. So I I highly recommend checking that out if you're like, what are they talking about? This is perfect Terry does a good job explaining it. He does also late goal a step beyond figure like why you shouldn't use reactive. He has a couple videos. The first one is the introduction. And then I believe the next one is a little more in depth on it. So in like, eight minutes, you get the introduction. And then I believe his next week was a little more into why hooks are good or not. I can't remember they might be might be combining them a bit. But at least you have a high level of understanding on why you might wanna use hooks. It isn't alpha just to. Yeah. I was at Facebook. The other day did say the next think patch version will probably have folks in the next full wreck seventeen will be something completely different. So it's it's like fairly safe. But however as always is an alpha things change, not saying go use it. But it's good to have a good understanding of why you might want to use it or start to think about maybe why. So that's. Something since it came up in this episode. I'm like, hey, this is perfect time to plug that. And then I saw an interesting Ted talk the other day, it's called how I'm fighting bias in algorithms, really, really great talk and made me think about us as engineers building algorithms and thinking about this is like, yeah, we can be putting our bias. Whether it be in diversity or just the way our thoughts could be actually applying into these algorithms, and we should be aware of it. And so the speaker joy, she does a very good job of kind of like just making you think about that. And it's a great talk. So I highly recommend watching that before we end the episode. I wanna thank Lauren for joining us again for her second episode. It was a pleasure again having you on where can people get in touch with you? Thanks for having me the best way. To reach me is on Twitter. My handle is sugar pie with an undisclosed at the end right on where can people get in touch with you panel. A-list gem on Twitter at gem young Ryan. I'm bitter.

Harry Woolf Rusty Lauren Ryan Twitter Terry Gemma Facebook John Ted eight minutes
"senior engineer" Discussed on Front End Happy Hour

Front End Happy Hour

03:08 min | 3 years ago

"senior engineer" Discussed on Front End Happy Hour

"All right. So at the end of each episode, we like to share picks of things that we found interesting like to share with our listeners. A let's go around the table and chair today's picks Lauren I wanna start with pick for conference. So this conference was j s which was held. In Paris this year. I was one of the speakers, and it was probably like my favorite conference. I've spoken at very interesting format and some really great speakers. Of course. That's my pick. So check out their recording. Which will be coming license. Awesome. I'm excited. See it. And I mean going to Paris for conferences, always good to. Yep. Ryan, what do you have for us? So my first one relates to think it was the last episode where I talked to the types episode, right? Talked about my switch to VS code from them and one of the plug ins that have been using lately is called code runner, and you can basically just highlight arbitrary code and run it. It'll give you the output in your council in VS code. That's pretty sweet it works with a lot of different languages as well it works with Java. Scrip- groovy Java, a number of languages and believe it or not my second pick is going to be Reebok sagas. And actually had this pick before we've talked about him on the show. But yes, go check out Reebok sagas. If you're using redux, these are actually pretty powerful concept, and it's basically just a middleware that sits on top of reeboks. And as dispatch actions are dispatched, it listens to them, and you can do arbitrary things to your actions, and it's all implemented as generator functions, which makes it super powerful in super expressive. Awesome gem Woody have random question in the middle pick. Sorry is asking the difference between acing function and a generator in an interview is that valid job script interview in twenty eight teen is that a good question or not before ever answers. What value? Do you get from the answer to understand their technical depth? Maybe not saying something I'd ask. But I'm curious if that's a fair question or not I think I would ask someone. Why they would pick one over the other. I like that. And give an example of you know, where you would implement one of their one of them are something like that sit answered it. Yeah. I think if it's for a very Jarvis JavaScript specific position. I think it's valid because I imagining more like, you know, if it's a more generalists than maybe that's too much into Java scrip- specifics. But if it's a JavaScript, I think it's a fine question. Yeah. I would also ask it the same. We Ryan would you know, what are the differences? Why would you choose one over the other? What are the pain points? If you know that these bring you over regular function. Once you get the full stream of consciousness here. I have three picks today. I fix is. A Netflix original the haunting hill house, it is I'm not a horror fan at all like, and this is a pretty scary..

Ryan Paris Reebok Lauren Netflix Jarvis
"senior engineer" Discussed on Front End Happy Hour

Front End Happy Hour

03:04 min | 3 years ago

"senior engineer" Discussed on Front End Happy Hour

"The light TD tests everything that's one design style. If you go that way, not a huge fan of that one. But like teach their own, but I've also seen people that write test for everything when I say like, okay is this is this test actually doing anything like? Yeah. You add some code. But is it necessary? It'll versus there's people that right? No tests and don't see the value in that. And I think a senior engineer understands when to write test one to like this. We can actually get away with it. That's something we probably don't talk about too often in terms of differentiator. But the the best engineers, I know like no when and where to apply tests always think of it as like when to cut corners and went to not cut corners it it's okay to cut some corners. But knowing when invested time because like you could spend all day every day making the perfect function. And it's like who cares? Like just get it out the door. Like what what value did that ad? But then there's times when you want to make sure that it scaling properly and think. Holistically? I think knowing when to spend the effort when not to and that same goes for the tests is like you can write every single line of code has a test. Sure. That's maybe the right thing to do it certain scenarios. But it may not be always the right thing to do hearing, Jim talk. I sadly was silently recalled this quote from Star Wars like only the sift sift deal in absolutes. And then I feel like that. So. That's true. Right. It's I think it goes back to that. Same example used about the light if every if all you have is a hammer then everything is now. Like, it's what what I'm hearing is. You know, there's a lot of nuance to being a senior engineer. And you know, it's understanding that not everything is black and white. It's not taking things too extreme like I have to write test for everything. But knowing when you shouldn't. And when you should do it something that hasn't come up too much is does a senior engineer have to be a mentor to other engineers is that a requirement to being a senior engineer. I don't think so because net flicks were all considered senior engineers, right? And we don't do a whole lot of mentoring here. So I don't know if we would all any of us would fit that that Bill. I mean, we do help each other out and collaborate a lot. But I don't know if I would consider that mentorship. Yeah. I know I saw that actually in in some to the tweet, and I can see how some people would say that. And I think it could depend on the company, but I think it doesn't have to be an official mentor. You know, you don't have to be more experienced and then. Be working with a junior engineer to say, okay. We'll that's like makes you senior. 'cause you're mentoring someone with less experience. But I think at the end of the day were all helping and learning from each other letters. Cheers be I'm I'm with you Reina's. I don't know if that necessarily is a requirement. Yeah. I actually slightly off tangent. I was at a conference called calibrate for such a conference is really great conference for new engineering managers. And I recall, I don't recall exactly, which talk it was..

senior engineer junior engineer Reina Jim official
"senior engineer" Discussed on Front End Happy Hour

Front End Happy Hour

03:19 min | 3 years ago

"senior engineer" Discussed on Front End Happy Hour

"That got sixty two likes seventy two hour. A 'cause that's a pretty damn gaffe description of it while done, I can we just end the episode now. Disolve that Aldana Larne from pulling that one out of there. I think a price where you said this before on OG right on a different ups. Oh, but it's like the more senior get the the more you look through move code actually because like the more code. There is the more bugs there are in the more direction. And like, essentially, it's like had do as little as possible. It had to be lazy as possible and not just solve the immediate problem today. Think about like well this works today. But it's going to be a pain in the butt tomorrow or next week or something like that. That's a good differentiator of senior junior. I don't think I can take credit for saying that I don't think I've said that episode, but you know, voting I mean, I've seen gem say onstage that you write less code. Yeah. Hopefully, that's kind of the goal then today. Ideally, I would delete more code than I that. I had while still maintaining functionality like that would be my angle cold Gulf, basically, then no. So while avoiding clever code, I think. Sown mentioned that in the in this thread, which is really good. There's a lot of replies to f-. Anyone's check it out point actually, clever code. Yeah. That's actually very like going on the technical skills because you're trying to define like, I said technical depth. But that's a very good way as well as avoiding writing clever code and thinking strategically however, you gonna read this code six months from now, but how are your colleagues gonna read this and thinking about it could just come down to commenting and being a good citizen of your code base. Yeah. Kind of reminds me like very early on my career. Definitely remember being overly excited about things. Like, oh, design patterns, gang design pants. I now have to make everything in adapting hat. And I now looking in hindsight, it definitely I got into that territory of clever code trying to make the code. We to dry way to reusable even a point where there was no need for that. Right. And I look at that. And I see like that's like I've come far from that. But still a good reflection. Like we've all done that in our house. Oh, absolutely like, right. When you saw them get I've done that. And probably still make that mistake. Even though I'm like, I won't do that. I probably have still made that mistake. It's funny. You mentioned that. Because like I think a good differentiator is like you said maintainability and not not being clever thinking about the next six months next year, the next two years and not necessarily jumping on the latest bandwagon. I think a good change your can differentiate hype in substance or hopefully I unfortunately in front of development. Specially there's a ton of hype like a ton of hype and people jump on the bandwagon without thinking about the. -tations? So they use it. If someone asked me like, hey, gem, you're gonna use that new react hooks API. I'd be like, oh, you mean that wanted to now that is not released yet? No, I'm not going to build production code on that. What do you mean? You're not doing that yet. But to convert an act. I think of something funny. Like, what's a mash of types? Crippen flow wave scripts or something, I say, senior engineers know, the value of testing, and where went to apply it. There's.

Aldana Larne Crippen six months seventy two hour two years
"senior engineer" Discussed on Front End Happy Hour

Front End Happy Hour

02:53 min | 3 years ago

"senior engineer" Discussed on Front End Happy Hour

"So I think we said something like this before. But I think one of the things we say Netflix like have opinions, but not the opinionated. And like, that's if I am some you correctly that that's something. I would say like as a Mark of a good scene. Like, you understand what you know. You sorta know what you don't know. But like you're like, oh, yeah. I think it's because of this and I've had this experience. However, I could be wrong, and you're willing to let that go rather than Redick sagas the way to go for everything this is the only way, and there's no other way. I I like that point about is kind of like vulnerability ability to be wrong or be opened being wrong, or or different ideas. I think that's really. Important. Yeah. Especially in the field of front end development because that's as we know. It's changing very rapidly. So what is the best practice today could become an anti pattern tomorrow, you all touched on some things here too. That kinda stood out for me understanding that you don't know everything or that you can be wrong. But I think also the senior engineer also looks to other engineers to gather those opinions. So you might be biased that Redick sagas is the way to go. But like going to other engineers to share your thoughts and ideas on a I think this is the right approach. Here's word may fall apart. What do you think I think a lot of that is really important too is it's it's not just taking that Reebok saga and saying this is the best solution. I'm so bias towards it. And you can be biased but looking for others who may disagree and really coming out at to understand other people's perspectives. I think that can be very very useful. Yeah. And that's that's really tough. And learn you said earlier like humility is something that's really import. I think is a Mark of a good senior engineer to understand what you don't know. Samra? Like, hey, I'm not a strong this area. Hey, Ryan long. Could you could you to help me out in this? 'cause you know, a little bit more than I do. I think it's important in. I think what the the broke culture that we've had in software engineering for while like that has been less common. It's coming back now. But a lot of times people are like, oh, they didn't want to say, I don't know like you look bad. But I think a good seniors like they're aware of their capabilities that where the shortcomings, and that's you build a team around you of people that can bounce you out. Yeah. I think at the end of the day doesn't matter. How senior you are. You are learning all the time and learning from each other and seen different approaches. Cheers, right. Ryan, you you posted this tweet and one of the replies from rob O cell. Sorry. If I got you're very not pronouncing it, right? Let me just read out the tweet and see what you all think. So rob says in my opinion, the junior to mid journey. A gain in knowledge. You learn rules tech. How to the mid to senior journey is a gain in wisdom. You learn how to ask why? When to break rule, smartly, and how to deliver results, even if the solution isn't as fancy, wow..

Redick senior engineer Ryan long Netflix Reebok rob
"senior engineer" Discussed on Front End Happy Hour

Front End Happy Hour

03:49 min | 3 years ago

"senior engineer" Discussed on Front End Happy Hour

"They're kind of thinking how can this work for other things that are similar to this Lucien is almost like that saying, you know, if you have a hammer everything looks like a nail. So will you say like a senior engineer has not just the hammer like many tools in their two bucks. I like that. That's a good way to put it really good. It's actually kind of off on a tangent here, but I've been dealing with Reebok sagas lately. And I feel like I have a hammer every problem that I'm thinking about I'm like that's a reduction. Maybe not not senior anywhere. Maybe I've taken a setback because I feel like I have this hammer now, and I want to solve every problem sledgehammer at this point. Can we say that being senior as far as technical depth goes you should have mastery of like at least one programming language with that be fair to say, no, oh, I mean. Yes, I do agree a little bit. But can you really say that you mastered Java script? No like, I will never be a master of jobs. There's always something. I don't know some edge case like I'm always I could go to any interview in. It's fifty fifty if I pass it's not because I'm not talented because like there might be something. I just don't know. I've never had the experience to learn that thing. Cheers jeers. However, I would say that it's hard to call yourself senior. If you don't have at least one language you understand like the nuances at least am I like the best person in the world. Now, Friday, not even this room. However, like, I'm pretty good. I can say that. That John was scripts feel comfortable in the language know, the ins and outs. Yeah, you're not even in the even in Java scrip- community. I think about it is like you're not reliant on a framework. Yeah. I I know at the core of like how jobs works in like things that are happening like at a much lower level than just simple, libraries or frameworks or things like that. Which I think is where most people stop. They usually stop it. Like, I understand how reacts angular view whatever understand how it works, and they stopped there rather than like, okay? What's really going on? I think that's something separate seniors in years from people like coders, and there's nothing wrong with that too. And I I like the sing I don't recall who said as before by. I've heard this saying that, you know, you're not a reactive Alber. You're not an angular developer. You are JavaScript developer. Right. And hopefully, the skills that you're learning. Cheers. Cheers years in those respective frameworks. Are transferable to different frameworks like on my team. We actually have a lot of people from different backgrounds. Angular? React, amber divall, manage to learn different aspects of each remark in that has made them much stronger developers throwback to an early up. So when we did on the value of conferences. That's what conference are good. It's good. So that like I can go to react rallied have Lauren explained types of me. I'm not gonna understand that level. She does. However as senior junior, I have like a good overview of like, okay. This ah case where maybe we should look at types. It doesn't mean I'm an expert at them. But it means I have awareness of general, the technology in my current language or field and know that maybe we should investigate this more. This might actually be a solution for what we've been having problems with her ain't got to really valid point. Actually, when I was thinking about this episode, one of the things that kind of popped into my mind was as I've grown as an engineer. The way I've been more open to new ideas and open to feedback has really changed. I used to get much more defensive or much more silent. And why like? This framework and every other framework sucks. And now that I've got a little more experience and learned a lot more. Cheers cheers. I'm much more open to new approaches new things that I don't take feedback personally at all anymore, unless someone just call me a jerk on public quests, I think regular T people humble here..

senior engineer developer Reebok Lauren Lucien engineer John amber divall
"senior engineer" Discussed on Front End Happy Hour

Front End Happy Hour

04:17 min | 3 years ago

"senior engineer" Discussed on Front End Happy Hour

"Hour podcast. We are often ask what makes a senior software engineer. And really it's not an easy thing to answer their Awada. Interesting thoughts in responses. I actually recently tweeted this and really realize that there's not one clear answer. So I thought hey, why why not talk about this on an episode? So in this episode, we are joined by Lorentan to help us discuss our thoughts and make sure we tried to find what the senior software engineer is. But we'll see what happens Lauren. Do you wanna give us a brief introduction of who? You are what you do and what your favorite happy hour beverages. Hi, my name's Lauren. I am an engineering manager in the flex and I was previously on another episode of front and happy hour about type systems. I'd have to say my favorite beverage for happy hour is ciders. I'm big fan of all sorts of different ciders. But my favorite is Koperberg. Right. I know I feel like this is a missed because you told us last time, and I did not have one here for you today. So I okay that just means you have to come back to another upset. I'm very happy. Thanks for having. Let's go around and give introduction of today's panelists. Gem. You wanna start it off? Jim young senior software engineer net. Flicks. Reineck limbs offer engineer over here at Netflix. And I'm Ryan Burgess. I may suffer engineering manager at net flicks. And gem, actually, you have a buddy with you today to do the sexually Lawrence dogs all at her to do, sir. My dog's name is Zelda. She's a three year old Chihuahua and pomeranian, and she's very happily sitting on Jim's lap right now. I'm so happy right now. You may jumps perfect tee shirt. Yeah. You ran a dog TI stock. All right. And each episode the front end happy our podcast, we liked to choose a keyword that. If it's mentioned at all in the upside, we will all take a drink. What did we decide today's keyword is learn all, right? If any of a learn or learning, we will all take drink, right? Let's like jump right in in your opinion. Because like, honestly, I don't think anyone can define this. What do you think it means to be a senior engineer? What's what do you stand out as being a senior software engineer versus just being an software engineer. I think the point I wanna make I about being a senior software engineer. I think it has nothing to do with tenure. And how long you've been at engineer. I think there's a lot of other qualities that make up a software or senior software engineer and just how long you've been programming is not one of them. I think that's so true. I think we should touch on. That is I do not believe years of experience define it. I think it's too hard. Because at what point is someone hitting that senior software engineer. Is it at five years or is it a couple years? The only thing that I could may be defined as I think maybe years of experience like maybe there's not a true number, but someone with no experience probably not going to be a senior software engineer. Yeah. I kind of agree. I think latching onto the years of experience ten years, very slippery slope because then who gets to decide like, you know, isn't exactly five years before your unit engineer, but I think my perspective, and I realized so many different perspectives on what Martha senior engineer. But if I were to summarize it into one value for me, it'd be like leadership, and I say leadership firstly to highlight the difference between the leader and a manager. Like a manager is a role a leader is. A skill or like an intrinsic value that you see in someone and you don't have to be a manager to be a leader. But you know, if I hire a senior engineer my team, I expect him to be a leader in some regard. Right. Like, you know, it's really about that kind of influence extends beyond just their own code. But also in terms of how you level up everybody else on the team. That's a great quote Lorne through between manager and leader. I think in every industry, especially software, that's loss on people. They're like, oh, you're a manager. So you like manage people, but that's not the same as like Lena product organizing like writing documentation things like that. Like, that's leadership. And there's a difference that that's an excellent quote. Yeah. Steel. As far as tenure?.

software engineer senior engineer engineer engineering manager Jim young Zelda Ryan Burgess Lauren Lorentan Koperberg Netflix Lorne Lawrence five years three year ten years
"senior engineer" Discussed on Mixergy

Mixergy

02:04 min | 3 years ago

"senior engineer" Discussed on Mixergy

"I mean he is i don't know why what is i jobs while ski so if you google it it's the first thing on a his lincoln profiles the first one what is it some jaaz while ski j o z w o w s k i you'll see him cofounder demio lincoln all right and is it a fifty fifty partnership that you stuck with him yet so that was the initial i thought i got it i see i was looking up matt instead got why is no longer with the company so we bought him out so that's why he's no longer here originally yes it was a fifty fifty deal you oh he has his other company demio which has great depth team obviously networks communication software is not simple so we basically just posted a job and then had his head i don't even know what the role was some sort of senior engineer interview for us but i mean it's it's really not that difficult guys if you want to start a company like this you just go post a job you can use what what was the company your top towel we'll talk about them innovate yeah i just wanna make sure that we're staying on track or you can go to website lake top towel in it can look for any type of php developer that's really all you need java script is becoming a lot more prevalent these days i would say it's probably gonna take over but i mean even if you don't know what these means i if you don't know to php developers or java script i had no idea what it meant and now i run a company that doesn't fit the revenue that employs developers all you need an idea and if you go to these websites they will help you vet out great veterans who can bring your idea to life it doesn't have to be complicated all you need an mvp and for people who don't know what that is just a minimum viable product you start with the wheel and then joel mvp look like what is your first version look like oh god i thought it looked amazing but it looks terrible.

demio lincoln matt demio developer mvp google senior engineer joel
"senior engineer" Discussed on Man Points! Podcast

Man Points! Podcast

02:14 min | 3 years ago

"senior engineer" Discussed on Man Points! Podcast

"For me he's at one and a half to one west was that default was making click like crazy but you were just like get away now no no i was like i know what's going on out of my face but more up there in court may doing a protection detail for and we got to go their house to senior in barbara's house to know white house coming kenny buckboard catering their number two years office can say say that that five times so we're up there and jim jordan senior engineer both come out and agreed all of us and they're like hey thanks for coming out and doing this stuff they got the photographer from the white house out there taking snapshots and everything then here comes little barbara bush with the little pink camera like you got the white house for taga for taking these really bad ass pictures she's click in doing the grant like turn the nile the old film one click doing it again but it was so funny to see your do that and she's like boston chops their bus chaucer funny s p m texas are you enjoyed their sense of humor because you're from texas i also wear my national how actually they're not from garden to move your texas and aso but yeah pretty cool chick actually took score at the games i would see her in the game watching houston after games she said barbara we're like that tight but you'll see your back you're like looks like she's takes course i had asked when the security the secret service guys like the seib really like oh yeah she frigate take score throughout the entire game and she's good at it and it's not easy to take high level score on the books but she's a good game for baseball so you gotta run or you don't are you screw with us again you don't know how we can baseball speaking scored and track and if you do if you do just the home plate run right it's frigging bitch to do those things are you talking about the individual how many pitches how many well the way it's it's.

barbara kenny buckboard barbara bush taga boston texas baseball jim jordan senior engineer houston two years
"senior engineer" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

02:02 min | 4 years ago

"senior engineer" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"More complicated too you know you can maybe get to the same place but you have a single lot more and put a lot more work into keeping it there and even then you're going to have a really hard time getting it to to perform at the level you want um i think part of that is just sort of the mismatch between keyword indexes and machine logs and part of it is you know trying to run something yourself rather than an economy of scale of uh you know satisfying your thousands of people at once oca last question you describe one difficult engineering challenge that you've had to solve while building scale her i only get one lead you only get one i mean i this has been really fasten armitage i'd love to do other show about mike dive a little bit deeper 'cause i had all these questions about the architecture of scale are and how your storing logs higher to logrolling how you execute a query blah blah blah blah blah so maybe if you've got some senior engineer cto or or even leka 'sorry or who whoever like i said i definitely want to another show on on this topic but yeah maybe just give us yes some some anecdote that his representative of these challenges your one thing this maybe a a little bit off to the side of of what you're thinking about but you when we when we first launched as a paying service weary near getting our our first you'll production customers were really relying on us we're still a twoperson company both engineers by unita to birth in engineering team is not a great starting point to be littering so you and your cofounder exactly exactly and you know where people relying on us 247 end up you know we're both past the age if there ever is an age where it's fun getting page it at three am and so you know one challenge was how do we keep this thing running at the reliability that we want to have without you're getting woken up all the time and so i think we we were at a blog post about this a while back but we we had to put a lot of thought into you know making sure the system is.

armitage senior engineer cto representative unita oca
"senior engineer" Discussed on Geek News Central

Geek News Central

01:55 min | 4 years ago

"senior engineer" Discussed on Geek News Central

"We have to keep an eye on things we have to eat hold these internet service wires accountable and we need to make sure that equal access to the internet for all uh we'll see what happens but this i must admit us on notice a put for some it racing ahead spectrum come out they they called me they saw social media blasting and they came to the house in a broad the management came and i think they're most senior engineer turns out uh in my neighborhood the elite engineer for spectrum is on the same node that i am so i can be pretty assured my node is going to be probably looked after really while because he lives in the neighborhood so he was here along with the a manager and they brought me to at a site showed me a site that i've never seen before for speed test that was internal their internal network though was right here in the loop and basically the spectrum are timewarner whatever you know they they're network you always expect the fastest speeds in network right so um the test site isabelle church bid twelve miles from my house whoever it goes cable wise to get there and they showed me speeds of nine hundred thirty five and does nine eight eighty nine hundred on that internal network then back calling using flash with speed test dot net and they have had flash turned off for years i may browsers we had to enable it a flashed to like california we were seen in uh uh seven eighty eight hundred with the uploads of again.

social media the house senior engineer engineer california
"senior engineer" Discussed on Learn to Code with Me

Learn to Code with Me

01:32 min | 4 years ago

"senior engineer" Discussed on Learn to Code with Me

"Basically yeah you move from esti three at a c two testy three in se three is sometimes called senior engineer uh and then after that amazon his principal engineer at that point your kind of not really on like a typical likes crummer adult team your typically like for a whole project to lay you know maybe you're the principal at principal engineer for like i don't know like a specific device like the echo or something like that and so you kind of like handle like how we're gonna make sure this whole product comes out on time and i understand that this team is doing this one thing and this other teams doing these other thing and how can we kind of make that all come together uh and so at that point you may not immune may or may not be doing a lot of daytoday coating you may be doing more meetings in helping understand that this teams architecture is designed to work with southern teams architecture i'm you might actually be doing coating as well but maybe look bigger projects in south like okay i have is this just like totally fascinating tearing how different companies have it bank structured hey move up the ranks just like the different titles and i know akin it can vary so much i work in park management and i know at like microsoft for instance the title their first similar roles would be like a program manager which had another company could we totally different a program manager could be like i mean that's a very appropriate manager you could be working almost leg a not a tech company be a programme a commanding the program of a school or something right like the yeah the curriculum rounded or something like that so it's all it's all really interesting and okay so what about.

engineer principal microsoft program manager tech company senior engineer amazon
"senior engineer" Discussed on Front End Happy Hour

Front End Happy Hour

01:34 min | 4 years ago

"senior engineer" Discussed on Front End Happy Hour

"And i would just say be open to anything and everything that's going to happen on your team one of the best ways that i learned my previous company was actually mentoring new employees who came in and wall at first it seems like you know it's it's a little bit harder to get your work done sometimes being a leader or being a senior engineer isn't about you know shipping code all the time it's about being a mentor and being a resource for other people and i think that that's a great way to start having productive conversation sometimes difficult ones especially if you're trying to get them to a place they're the somebody your mentoring to a place that they are not currently and you can also find that things that you like to mentor about and then you can specialized some of your skills and digging deeper in then leading larger projects about that also in my experience i was thrown into it it was something i was excited about it was a new challenge but i was thrown in one thing i would see and i've said it to other people that have tried to be managers is you're trying like completely cut off from being an engineer it's really really hard but what happened to me was i was still shipping projects and so i was doing about 50 bean an engineer and 50 being a manager which meant i was not doing anything really well i was doing a really bad job at both because i was splitting my time andi think it's really important to just say okaynowi have this new job and a half to focus on it andi think that's difficult like it's really hard i still struggle the days romeikoi'm not coating as much like that's that's hard and specially is a software engineer that's what we that's why we're software engineers we love creating things and creating the code in doing that and that's that can be a difficult decision to give up.

senior engineer engineer software engineer software engineers