35 Burst results for "Senior Editor"

Ride Shares Road Ahead

Gadget Lab Podcast

04:59 min | 8 hrs ago

Ride Shares Road Ahead

"Hi everyone welcome to gadget lab. I'm lauren good. I'm a senior writer at wired join remotely by my co co-host word senior editor michael glory. Hey mike aloha. How're you doing today. Talk doing great. Thanks good and we're also joined by wired transportation writer ian marshall joining us. Dc arjan. Thanks so much for coming gadget lab. Thanks for having me. It's it's so good to to be with co workers for a moment. It's good to see you on the postage stamp. It's good to see you on zoom today. We're talking about how we got around this year. I mean not that we were able to get around this year because that would have been nice but how we actually moved from place to place and how ride sharing services like uber and lift an even scooter. Shares were affected by both the pandemic and legislation just nine or ten months ago. It was nearly impossible to imagine modern transportation without uber but when the pandemic hit it devastated demand for ride shares and meanwhile in california legislation like assembly bill five and the recently passed prop twenty two are likely to have big repercussions for gig workers. You know the people who actually dry for these companies and the laws will probably set a precedent for how the companies that rely on these workers. Do business arjan you. Cover these companies closely. How are they fairing. They are not doing great a probably not surprisingly so goober and lift notoriously. I debuted on the stock market last spring. It was like one of the big. I tech. Ipo's of like the modern sort of unicorn era and since then their stock prices have kind of struggled and they've struggled to actually make money. There are still lots of people pouring money into these companies. But they're still not really turning a profit and they're certainly not turning a profit. This year rides are still down in most places across the world in the us. At one point they were down seventy five eighty percent. We've heard from more. Recently the rights are kind of coming back in some places in some cities. But i think like the corona virus itself. They're been waves of people going out and about and things shutting down again. So they're they're not doing great. It's been a hard year for everyone and that includes uber and left right before the pandemic they made some changes to their businesses. Both of them shed parts of their business that they didn't want to deal with anymore and they made some acquisitions and moved into some new areas. how is how is that decision. Making played out is a great question. I think it sort of depends on Which things are talking about. So uber notoriously pulled out of some places around the world. They pulled out of asia sel part of their business to other companies over there And that's kind of part of them consolidating rearing up for this wall street. Ipo and then the other big thing that both uber and lyft moved into you in the last few years are scooters and bikes and sharing those things instead of just car rides and that has also proven to be a difficult business. It's actually doing a little bit better. During the pandemic it turns out that people are getting super into biking these days. It feels a lot safer to some people. We'll see whether those trends will keep up during the winter. I think it's going to be really hard for people to get around in places where it gets really cold and snowy unpleasant to be on a bike or scooter but those businesses in general are doing pretty well. That said uber sold its scooter and bike unit over the summer so i think those those two are complicated businesses. something else. That uber has gotten into lift signal. That it might get into. Soon is a food delivery. So uber eats is now one of the big food delivery businesses in the country. It's doing crazy business right now. Doing really really well but it also is not making money. It's kind of a trend here. There are a lot of people using these services there become verbs. people uber. like that. use kleenex It's a brand name. That's becomes something that we all use every day. But they still don't make money

Michael Glory Mike Aloha Ian Marshall Arjan Lauren California Asia United States Uber
"senior editor" Discussed on Mornings With Gail - 1310 KFKA

Mornings With Gail - 1310 KFKA

05:18 min | 2 weeks ago

"senior editor" Discussed on Mornings With Gail - 1310 KFKA

"Dot com shelby. Lease is a senior editor at national geographic. Kids books all right as i'm working through this One of my favorite stories. Because i'm a diver is talking about dolphins and i knew this intrinsically because i've had the great fortune just being out in the wild diving and you come across a pot of dolphins one time in hawaii. I got to swim with about two hundred spinner. Knows dolphins so it was. I didn't know you could cry underwater. But i did. I mean it was just so overpowering. I mean it was just magical. But they're so intelligent and they're so curious and they just kinda wanna hang out with you like the incredible mr limpet but they actually have their own language right. Make do you know. We've all heard dolphins chattering and Whistling and scientists have been studying fair. Sounds for quite a long time trying to decode what they're saying and there are a couple of species of dolphins but actually have names and scientists thinks the dolphins actually name themselves. They come up with a little signature whistle and then other dolphins refer to them by their signature whistle. It's absolutely amazing. you would be great on jeopardy. Did you ever think about so much eclectic knowledge. You've got yeah you know. It's really fun at cocktail parties at mentally when everyone else at the party is an attorney and i come up with cell phones have zero names and they kind of just stop and go wait. What exactly now. The other. Great thing about national geographic kids books is that they are beautifully illustrated and photographed. Tell us a little bit about the process from start to finish my second job as a book editor. So that's part of that's part of my joy of talking about books particularly national geographic kids books because they're so incredibly they are so fun you know we have an amazing team of photo editors whose job it is to find the images for everything we put in our books and You know we start right at the beginning with that. I'm going through the outline and marking fun not fun. They're going in their marketing photos. No photo So you actually part of deciding what goes into the book is. Can we get a photo of this. And sometimes that means contacting the one researcher in the world who has ever taken a photo of this I was actually working on a book recently. Where there a said was one basically researcher in the world who had a photo and unfortunately The woman had passed away a few years ago and his wife. Actually we contacted the university. They said well you know sorry. He retired passed away. Let's connect you with his wife..

national geographic kids senior editor researcher attorney hawaii Whistling editor
"senior editor" Discussed on Mornings With Gail - 1310 KFKA

Mornings With Gail - 1310 KFKA

04:08 min | 2 weeks ago

"senior editor" Discussed on Mornings With Gail - 1310 KFKA

"Geographic kids with one of their newest books it's also a weird wild and wonderful world with their release of the coolest stuff on earth a closer look at the weird wild and wonderful joined this morning by shelby. Lease senior editor at national geographic kids books and shelby. You must have the coolest job in the world. Well i certainly think so. All my goodness i how. How do these projects come together. Because these books are so incredible and every time i have the opportunity to talk to one of you you. You're one of your colleagues at national geographic kids. I never pass it up because these books are not only for the young for the young at heart. Oh absolutely you know. I was actually Flipping through the book the other day and notice my husband hovering over my shoulder behind me reading over my shoulder and going. Oh what took. So what is the process. Because you talk about an eclectic mix in these books. I mean here's the one. I mean you talk about heads rolling okay. Roman statues had interchangeable parts. The heads were swapped out whenever a new ruler was crowd. Come up with this stuff. It's actually a really fun process. And you know we start with hiring a writer. We've got some amazing writers who are top notch researchers. And it's really funny you know they'll send an outline and you'll go through the outline during though This really isn't fun enough. Or you know this could be more fun and you know they're they're all fascinating topics but trying to find the most eclectic interesting group of facts is can be a challenge. But you know when we say that awesome. we know. We've got a good mix absolutely because the bar is exceedingly high at nasa kids. What some of your favorite stories that come out of the coolest stuff on earth a closer look at the weird wild and wonderful one that took me completely off guard which anyone who has stood index to a dog shaking himself off will know Is that can actually shake off half a pound of water and learn up. Excuse me a whole lot of water in less than a second It i still get. Their skin is loosely attached to their skeleton and so once they get that rotation going and actually can create up to twelve times the force of gravity to shake all that water off so fast. So you know you're in good trenching and we can't shake off the water like yeah exactly. It's kind getting. It's kind of like getting hit by a canine soon. Nami and what's the deal with sand dunes. Sand dunes can whistle and sing yet. You know specifically out in the gobi desert in asia. The just absolutely remarkable sand dunes there happened to have the right kind of layering of san. You have that kind of packed sand underneath and loose dry sand on top and when the wind blows across it it causes all dry little sand particles to vibrate and cause singing sensation across the desert. And you know. It's somewhere that i would love to go one day. Just stand there and listen to it out but the best part about it is the way scientists actually figured out what was going on was they did what i think everyone would love to do. Is they just sat down to write on the fan and slid down on their bums to make it vibrate human ingenuity at work. Six forty one now thirteen ten. Kfi thirteen tannock af k. a..

gobi desert national geographic kids shelby senior editor Kfi nasa asia writer Nami
"senior editor" Discussed on Mornings With Gail - 1310 KFKA

Mornings With Gail - 1310 KFKA

03:29 min | 2 weeks ago

"senior editor" Discussed on Mornings With Gail - 1310 KFKA

"Of two hundred and nine patients to sort of say. It's promising. well that would be a bit of an understatement. The sows well again. More good news on the covid. Nineteen vaccine front as an oxford. Study confirms astra kovic shots response in the elderly. Six eleven. Now thirteen ten. Kfi may thirteen ten kfi k. A. dot com northern. Colorado's boy scott lot to get to this morning. we're gonna change gears. Lighten things up a just a bit. you know. I am such a huge fan of a natural natural geographic. A national geographic kids books. Because they're so i mean. They are for kids of all ages. I've learned so much from these books. So therefore once again the young and the young at heart. I mean amazingly written beautifully illustrated. The photographs are absolutely incredible. Well we're going to check in with shelby lease shelby. Lease is a senior editor at national geographic kids with a resume. Well a mile long. He's worked on titles ranging from welcome to mars and to the moon and backed by buzz aldrin dining with dinosaurs. I remember that one. It was hilarious. Romp through the well rather eclectic dining habits of dinosaurs. But he'll join us to talk about national geographic kids. Newest release the coolest stuff on earth. A closer look at the weird wild and wonderful and to say that this is an inclusive read once again would be a bit of an understatement because it takes a look at animals. Oh here's one. Us dollar bill full of hidden symbols related to the number thirteen. Another one. that caught my eye. Did you know that. Roman statues had interchangeable parts. I kid you not. The heads were swapped out whenever new real ruler was crowned. Talk about heads will roll. But i'll also have a copy of this book just in time for the holidays. It would make tremendous gift. So i'll have a copy of this new national geographic kids book the coolest stuff on earth a closer look at the weird wild and a wonderful one copy for one of you which i could take care of all of you but unfortunately i'm only privy to so many copies but once again when we talked with shelby lease senior editor at national geographic kids at six thirty five all right so it was with no small amounts of trepidation yesterday that i passed along the news about a couple of studies relative to mouthwash and covid nineteen so as to not even be remotely response for a run on mouthwash. If you're with us yesterday morning right around this time we told you that in limited studies mouthwash may show some some promise in the fight against covid nineteen the reasons why it will never.

national geographic kids shelby senior editor Kfi Us scott Colorado
The Other Big Apple

Gastropod

05:10 min | 3 weeks ago

The Other Big Apple

"Well i was kind of. I guess in inadvertent midwife that we at the at the fellowship that we did back in what year was two thousand thirteen although we agree time has ceased to have any meaning. And that is michael pollen of michael palin fame. He is indeed the advert midwife of guest or pod. Because nikki and i were together at uc berkeley that year in two thousand thirteen out of fellowship. Run by michael. That's how we met. And you discovered your shared love of science slash food. yeah it's one of the happier offspring of that fellowship. Obviously if you're into the stories behind food and farming as we both are michael's writing is pretty much at the top of your list. We've wanted to have him on the show for ever and this episode was the perfect excuse to revisit one of our favourite of his books. The botany of desire in the botany of desire michael traces the stories of four plants and their intimate relationships with humans. One of those plans is the apple tree. And i don't know about you. But when i think of apple trees the first person is of is johnny appleseed. This is a very american thing to think of. I'd never heard of until. I moved here so for our non american listeners. This is what americans are thinking of when they think of johnny appleseed well they would probably have the walt disney image johnny appleseed which is of this you know barefoot guy on the frontier bringing goodwill sweetness to people when people hear johnny appleseed. It's it's very wholesome. It's very Uncontroversial he's a disney character right very soft. But actually the the real. Johnny appleseed and i use that word advisedly because there's so much we don't know about him is much more interesting in his book. Michael traces janis path planting apples across the us. And we're going to do the same here but i. There weren't actually apple's growing here. Before europeans arrived there crab apples that were here in the sixteen hundreds but native people did not have sweet apples. This is amy traverse. Oh she's the author of the apple lovers cookbook and senior editor at yankee magazine. So apple's are we think of apples as this american fruit and american as apple pie and we identify closely with apples americans but it turns out. They're not they're from kazakhstan around town called alma mata which means father of the apple. I'ma autism now called amati and it's the largest city in kazakhstan. I've never been there but if you go. Apparently you will see whole forests of apple's fifty foot tall apple trees. Apple's coming up in the cracks of the sidewalks. It's like a weed there and these apple's most of them look nothing like our image of the apple. I mean there's some the size of there's there's big brown ones there's just this incredible range and they're apple trees that are kind of prostrate and grow along the ground and ones that grow vertically ones that have canopies. I mean it's just incredible diversity but a lot of apples weren't particularly sweet or delicious. At least not to humans. They were dry and hard so did survive the drop to the ground and often the flesh was kind of bitter acidic and tannock because these chemicals were preservatives that would also help to fight up worms and insects and that was all useful because the apples needed to be eaten by bears to spread their seeds. And if you would like to hear what the delight of a group of bear cubs that has just come across the pile of fallen apples. Sounds like which of course you would you need to be on our special supporters mailing list gastropod dot com slash support bears. Yes there are a lot of bears and kazahstan. They love apples but like humans they also prefer sweeter ones and larger ones and even retro ones. These big red sweet apples sometimes appeared in all the different ones that grew wild and bears chose those and help spread their seeds and so the bears hopes for just the kind of apple's that we wanted the large sweet red ones and so then people who tasted these bear approved. Apple's turned into apple fans to and not just the locals because that area of kazakhstan was right in the middle of the silk road. An incredibly important trading route that stretched all the way from china to europe magin stumbling across. I mean you're living in a world with no sugar ray or at least it's a very rare. That kind of sweetness is extremely rare and very fleeting and you stumble across a forest where you find these fruits that are sweet and that actually keep well. I mean not a lot of fruits that you might find in that same forest like apricots will rot very quickly whereas an apple would last for weeks or maybe months and so people would pocket them and bring them to the next trading ports or the next trading town and they really spread that way and they flourished wherever they spread. because apple's have a couple of botanical superpowers. Apples are unique in that they easily enter. Breed with the native crab will species of whatever region. They end up in. And so those crab apples within s- place in the genes that allowed to survive in their climate. So that's super useful. Those local crab apples had jeans. That would be perfectly suited to the local environment.

Apple Johnny Appleseed Michael Pollen Uc Berkeley Michael Kazakhstan Amy Traverse Michael Palin Nikki Tannock Walt Disney Kazahstan Yankee Disney Magin United States Bears Europe
Election Science Stakes: Environment

60-Second Science

02:37 min | Last month

Election Science Stakes: Environment

"The last episode of our pre election podcast series, we spoke about climate for this episode. I talked about other environmental issues with scientific American, senior editor, Mark Fischetti, who oversees our coverage on sustainability. Mark, what are some of the big environmental issues that are at stake in this election? Well, I think a lot of people focused on climate, which is certainly. Something to focus on but you know outside of that I, think in terms of the current administration I think a big focus. Really, should be looking at chemical pollution. There've been a number of regulations that have either been reversed or just struck down or overridden. By the trump administration that essentially allowed more pollution to be imposed on on air and water. So for a few few examples, right? So the protections that were taken down for wetlands that basically allow for Dumping Pesticides and other pollutants into the waterways There were regulations on emissions from power plants, not just about carbon dioxide bet also out heavy metal. So they're actually less restriction on mercury that power plants can emit hobble. Toxin in-in-in coal-fired Arena there's the regulations about disposal top waste that have been rollback to which will add levels of lead arsenic another contaminants like that team environment. So these are long standing toxins and other compounds that we know are are are bad for people in the environment and those things are being rolled back as well. Well, that's a key thing is the health aspect because even if you don't care that, there will ever be another tree or another bird human health is at stake with these things as well. Right meaning the birds in the trees in the squirrels in people all. All use the same water and air. In the same soil which we forget about that as as well. There were there some you know protections for soils and what kinds of. Chemicals can be using agriculture for that matter that been changed as well so that so then the question is would this be different under Biden and I think it would be because a lot of those regulations in the ones I kind of call that specifically they were most of them were put in place or or made tougher during the Obama Biden Administration. So I would think that the binding restriction will want to restore that.

Mark Fischetti Obama Biden Administration Biden Senior Editor
Why Buchanan County, Virginia’s election results are important

WSJ What's News

05:18 min | Last month

Why Buchanan County, Virginia’s election results are important

"Buchanan County gave President trump his biggest margin of victory in the two thousand sixteen presidential election nearly eighty percent voted for him compared to just over eighteen percent for Hillary Clinton. President trump has done little to expand his political base since then and to secure victory this time around, he'll need to maintain his base in working class comedies like the Canon. So how is support in Buchanan holding up this time around and what can you tell us about trump's base across the country? We turn now to our senior editor Bob Davis Hi Bob thanks for being here. Sure. Thanks for inviting me. So, tell us a little bit more about the canons economy which has relied heavily on coal mining has that changed during the pandemic what's going on there now? Will you know you voted Cannon County and you can read about the pandemic and people will tell you how it's affected them. But you don't honestly see it. It is a place where few people wear masks where people are back in their offices not in general not observing social distancing and it is a place where the pandemic has moved through the county just as it has in other places. So what? You see for the pandemic is, for instance, the high school which was went virtual in the spring they tried a mixture of in-person and virtual mostly in person for the full the issue there one reason an additional reason there to go in person compared to other places is you know it's it's a place that's full of mountains and valleys, and the the Internet reception's not very good in a lot of places so. That would argue to have kids come back and go to school in person. Well, when I was there, it happened that three kids tested positive and they wound up going off virtual. School. Which of course had the usual effect on parents who have to take care of the kids so I mean there's that and then the economy. The economy's slowing. As again as you would see around the country, the coal mines shut or slowed. During the spring, but they're back shopping is down retail sales are down and it's a place where the unemployment rate you know went up to eleven percent. It's now the most recent is around nine percent. So even a place that's used to having a weak economy. In What is clearly recession? President trump is still expected to win the county in this election, but a lot has changed for many of his supporters there're especially during the pandemic. Bob, can you tell us more about what you heard from them and how they're thinking about voting this time around sure I mean they are still overwhelmingly in favor of president trump overwhelmingly but. Then you have to define what is overwhelmingly mean in two thousand sixteen. He got eighty percent of the vote in the general election. So will he get eighty percent of the vote? Will he get seventy percent of the vote will as many people show up to vote for him? These are all questions that are uncertain at this point, the answers to which. Are, uncertain as I say the people there in general are still quite supportive but even his supporters wonder if other supporters are basically suffering from what you might call trump fatigue, the four years of controversy the pandemic which it's Cannon County as much as it hits, you know anywhere else you know all the controversies and so even his supporters wonder whether they'll get. As larger turn out, it doesn't mean necessarily vote for Joe Biden mean that they don't show up to vote another issue is that it's a place with the weak economy as I said and the number and people are leaving people the population there is being greatly reduced over the past twenty thirty years and even from two thousand, sixteen to two, thousand twenty, there are fewer people in the county. So there are fewer potential voters for the president. Did you talk to any voters who did vote for trump in two thousand sixteen and are now considering voting for? Biden. Yes. I spoke particularly to a couple. Francis and Rayburn. Minton who run a clinic in Grundy it's tucked away in a food city supermarket and they as are many people in that area they were Democrats. This is an area that until Brock Obama actually voted democratic in the presidential election like a Lotta places in West Virginia and in South West Virginia, and then they had voted for president trump largely. Because of his promises about the coal economy bring back know the local economy to stronger state and they now are voting against him because they are upset at the way they feel he is mismanaged the response to cove it. I mean they see it up front you know they do testing for covid and the they have arguments with patients, potential patients, potential customers who WANNA test but we're we're a mask and a attributed a lot of the resistance to wear masks to the president's often disdainful attitude toward mass square.

Donald Trump President Trump Cannon County Bob Davis Joe Biden Buchanan County Hillary Clinton Buchanan Senior Editor Brock Obama Canon Minton West Virginia Grundy Francis South West Virginia Rayburn
AOC met more than 400,000 young potential voters on their own turf: Twitch

On the Media

05:01 min | Last month

AOC met more than 400,000 young potential voters on their own turf: Twitch

"Holy cow On Tuesday this week, Congress person Alexandria Kaze O Cortez undertook a socially distant get out the vote effort through the streaming platform twitch. Her pitch opened the three hour plus event and closed it to first things first. If you are able to vote we are here I will vote dot com. Make sure that you make your voting plan and if you can't vote if you're under the age of 18 make sure you talk to someone that can vote and try toe direct them. Tie will vote dot com. And make sure that they get their voting plan in place. But 400,000 plus viewers hadn't pulled up posies first twitch stream to hear her pitch. They were mainly their toe. Watch her game. Oh, my God! Oh, my God. Oh, Mike, I knew it. The first term representatives first kill in the game among us, which has lately become popular among videogame streamers, some of whom joined her that evening. Rosie is that Is that weird to just call you AOC? No, Romeo. See Mike pence. OK, call me I Iove you guys. All right, though many have politicked on social media before. The old school playbook of the ground game and TV ads still dictate the 21st century campaign. But from the cove it era emerges a new playbook, according to the verge political reporter, mechanic Kelly and in that book Tuesdays Livestream marks a landmark event. McKenna. Welcome to the show. Hey, it's great to be here. So the stream was a massive success as Faras viewership goes, but it was also billed as a get out the vote effort. Do we know how successful that Wass At the peak point of the stream folks of the DNC were saying that they were getting the most referrals to the website? Two. I will vote dot com than they ever have. Do We know how money that Wass I was not able to get a specific figure. But during the vice presidential debate they bought fly will vote dot com And then when Taylor Swift Said that she was going to endorse Joe Biden they bought Taylor will vote dot com So there have been huge referrals to this link before and saying that the stream was bigger than say. That huge viral moment with the fly, and Taylor Swift, who is arguably one of the most famous celebrities in the world, says a lot Now, a lot of folks weren't going to sit through the entire thing. But there were moments that were clipped and put on Twitter or YouTube. Like when AOC talked about socialized medicine with H Bomber guy, you go to the doctor and you say I have this problem, and then they prescribe you medicine and then you just go pick it up. That's it. And then you go home. And you Google how much it would have cost in America. Oh, my God. Later he kills her. I'm actually a bit heartbroken, but, hey, life is cheap. Can you talk about that moment, so people and users on twitch our custom to diving in and out and jumping in the chat and chatting for a little bit and then maybe going watching on TV or some other video so unimportant part? Of the twitch culture is the clips function. And when people do catch something interesting those clips in those conversations Khun Go viral and reach even bigger audiences on Twitter on Facebook on YouTube than they ever could on twitch because which of course, is live. But these clips will last forever. Now. Polygon Senior Editor Patricia Hernandez wrote this week that it wasn't just about organizing and savvy. This was fandom. Those hundreds of thousands of viewers included thousands of stands, referring in this case to the AOC diehards. For people who you know, aren't as hep to the jive as I am. Stan is a term that's drawn from the title of an Eminem song. Right, Right. My girlfriend jealous because I've talked about 24 7, but you don't know him like I know you slim. No one does. You don't know what it was, like people like us growing up for me, man. I'll be the biggest fan. You'll ever lose yours, then. Yes, we could be together. When it comes Tio stand culture with pop culture and movies and television. Oftentimes people will draw fan art of their favor. Characters and people were doing that for a OSI in 2018, and she was re posting that fan art on her instagram page. So she has been building this community of people for a very, very long time. And that's why Tuesday's stream was so successful she already had this base. There are already people who stand each bomber guy. There are already people who stand Tucson piker and poking Manet and the other folks who are on there. There was just a bunch of communities colliding in a really interesting way. And then, of course,

AOC Mike Pence Taylor Swift Twitter Youtube Wass First Things First Congress Romeo Google Mckenna Rosie Tucson Reporter Stan Khun Go Joe Biden DNC
Where do words comes from? Find out in Washington, DC’s newly opened Planet Word museum

Consider This from NPR

03:10 min | Last month

Where do words comes from? Find out in Washington, DC’s newly opened Planet Word museum

"The. Much anticipated planet word. Open today in. DC. Yes. Yes. Back in twenty seventeen DC mayor Muriel Bowser, and a team of advisers picks philanthropist and Friedman to restore the historic Franklin school building a gorgeous building. By the way, millions of dollars have gone into restoring the national historic landmark much of it. Friedman's own money to create a place where people can explore are evolving language. Now, that restoration didn't happen without a couple of shall we call them hiccups along the way city officials halted construction for quite some time after discovering. That the project's developer violated DC's strict historic preservation rules but all of that is wrapped up now in the museum is officially open to the public WMU senior editor gay. Bullard got an early look at the museum and he's here to take us on a little tour as you turn off K.. Street and walk into the courtyard of planet word you're showered in language. There's an art exhibit in which Willow Tree made of speakers plays a mix of languages from around the world. Inside the historic Franklin school building has been given a thirty five, million dollar restoration the preserved stare tiling wainscoting and a few other flourishes Nantou the building century and a half of life. But the displays are exceedingly high tech I up a twenty foot high wall of carved words brought to life through powerful projectors and narration. The tells the history of the English language. The exhibit invites you to say a word from the wall like smog or sport to get a quick etymology lessons on. Board. Shorts. Burns over. In the next room, a giant globe of lights is surrounded by screens each with a friendly face of person who will teach you about their spoken or signed language. I tapped on Venezuela and got to try a regional tongue twister. And? Eric Kahn. Areas Cigar. A Nice in the gallery on humor, you can play word games or help and artificial intelligence right captions for new. Yorker. Cartoons according to my analysis. This caption about cannibalism mine database says that cannibalism is usually very serious, but sometimes, it can be funny to take something serious and pretend it is not serious. This is called dark humor in the library. Visitors can grab a book from the Shelf, set it on a table and be treated to an animation and narration explaining something about the text the technology can be dazzling but museum founder and Friedman says, it's in service of a larger purpose to reinvigorate excitement for literacy maybe with technology and with sort of the wow factor, we could make books and words and language sort of. Them and. With their imaginations captured visitors will think more about language for now the museum is working on virtual events for those who can't make an in person for those who can plan at word is open four free but you'll need to preregister for a time to get in admission is limited to twenty five people per hour.

Friedman Franklin School Building DC Muriel Bowser Bullard WMU Willow Tree Eric Kahn Venezuela Founder Senior Editor Developer
Biden Draws More Viewers Than Trump in Town Hall Ratings

KNX Midday News with Brian Ping

01:32 min | Last month

Biden Draws More Viewers Than Trump in Town Hall Ratings

"TV ratings air now infer the dueling town hall events last night featuring President Trump and Joe Biden. Looks like the wind goes to Biden. His event averaging 13.9 million viewers that was on ABC. The president over on NBC averaged 10.6 Million Variety, senior editor Brian Steinberg tells Can X, why he thinks Biden may have had the edge. In the ratings battle trumpet on TV all the time. Biden is not always treating you every every thought he has. Many people thought there was a chance to dig deeper to someone who they haven't heard much from every day on every second on every medium, you know, trumps pretty transparent and seems to feel like he can just just kind of spouts off Whenever you feel like it. Biden is less soul in there. Well, I've talked to the business who feeling and Biden Wantto win. There will be a less friendly news cycle in some sense because the president will not be making his boss known every possible at the president's Town hall event in Miami. He was asked about if he put a virus Tesco Corona virus test on the day of the first presidential debate. Do you take a test every single day? No, no, but I take a lot of okay. And you don't know if you took a test the day of the debate. Possibly I did possibly didn't But you know, the doctor is very accurate information that Joe Biden's event in Philadelphia. He said He thinks the president will take a test before the next debate scheduled for next week. Believe he will do that. Look, I'm going to buy buy. What the commission rules call for. I was prepared to debate him remotely, which was supposed to happen. And he said he wouldn't do that today. The president holding a rally in Florida Joe Biden's campaigning in

Joe Biden President Trump ABC Town Hall Brian Steinberg NBC Senior Editor Florida Miami Philadelphia
The iPhones 12

Gadget Lab Podcast

05:30 min | Last month

The iPhones 12

"Mike, yes Lauren Mike, are you going to upgrade your iphone? Well have an iphone. But it has five gene. Yeah, who cares? Let's see if we can answer that on this week's show. Hi Everyone. Welcome to gadget lab. I'm lauren good. I'm a senior writer at wired and I'm joined remotely by my Co host wired senior editor Michael Cholerae. He who does not have an iphone hello from Pixel land. And we're also joined by wired senior associate editor. Julian Chicago to who has like seventeen different phones on him right now. Hey Julie in below my desk has like six phones on right now so. So today we are talking about yet another apple event this week apple announced a new iphone twelve, actually four of them and a tiny smart speaker, and these are the first iphones with five G. which matters doesn't matter doesn't matter yet. We're GONNA talk about five G. later on in the show what you need to know about it the challenges and rolling it out across the US and whether you'll even be able to connect to five G. With the new IPHONE are calling. We'll night is going to join us later on for that but first, let's talk about the phones themselves. Jillian. Phone has championed edges. Let's get that out of the way. That's probably the most important thing here, right? Okay. But obviously, there's more than that what stood out to you most about the new iphones twelve as someone who takes a lot of photos and tests the cameras on phones a lot. A. Lot of their camera upgrades. We're the most exciting thing for me and and I really like how a lot of those camera upgrades are kind of for the most part. All across the entire lineup from the 699 iphone twelve mini, you're getting the same main camera that they improve the aperture on as the iphone twelve pro. But for the most part that iphone twelve pro, you get these new features like pro raw, which gives you the ability to edit. Raw photos and also get the benefits of apples, computational photography, and that is just someone something that's really exciting for someone who takes a lot of raw photos with my camera just gives you more granular control over photo editing and also the other thing is they're bringing night mode to every single lens that's on this phone. So finally, you can take a Selfie, at night and not have to worry about it being too terrible, looking or grainy. So overall I think the entire suite of camera features on the entire range is pretty exciting and pretty dramatically better than what you had last year on the iphone eleven. And tell us about some of the video improvements to yes. For the improvements, they added the ability to shoot HDR with Dolby Vision, which is you know apparently the only phone that can do this and basically lets you get this program cinematic looking effector or look. You could say with all of your videos at ten bits of it's like super high quality. It just looks really good. With the option to edit the colors and have really good cinematic looking video as well with the iphone twelve pro you there have this improved stabilization system that moves the sensor itself. So basically, in fact, you're getting something that feels and looks much more high quality than ever before, and again, this is somewhere where apple leads compared to every other phone manufacturer except maybe Samsung is pretty close. No one else does the ability to shoot video quality this well, and it's just every year. It just seems to be getting further and further away from other companies even like you. Google. Pixel phones that take really great photos Mike what did you make the event? You know my favorite thing that I saw this week was the mini, the small phone small phones in general are exciting to me. Our colleague Brian Barrett wrote this week that the arrival of the iphone twelve mini is a harbinger of good for the small phone community I think you know fabulous when they came out what was it like eight years ago or so we started seeing these gigantic phones and then. People really liked them and they started them in huge numbers. So phones just kept getting bigger and bigger and bigger. We've all been waiting for phones to get small again, phones have gotten smaller, but they haven't really gotten small enough, and now this year I think phones are starting to get just about small enough to satisfy the people who are looking for small phone I was out last week two weeks ago at A. Socially distanced event and I saw a guy with a Sony experience x to compact, which is like a really tiny. It's even smaller than the iphone mini android phone and I asked him about it. I went over to him six feet away and I said, Hey, what is that and he started going on and on about it and the way that he was talking about it was so passionate and I realize that. Like okay. You know what? There is a huge market. People are really really passionate about smartphones and people are GonNa flip when they see the mini I think coming until November So I, think for people who really want it. They're going to have to resist clicking that buy button for a couple of weeks

Phone Apple Lauren Mike United States Michael Cholerae Senior Editor Julian Chicago Senior Associate Jillian Julie Brian Barrett Google Dolby Vision Writer Samsung Editor
Health officials sound alarm over surge of virus cases

Brian Lehrer

03:25 min | Last month

Health officials sound alarm over surge of virus cases

"New York and New Jersey. Becoming Mohr Corona virus Positive again. One thing's for sure. We are becoming Mohr Corona virus nervous again. But the latest headlines tell a mixed story. Today's Corona virus Headlines on Gothamist Are these New York's positivity rape goes down, but hospitalizations rise That sounds confusing, will explain in a minute. Corona virus cases are up 15% nationwide another headline that has a relationship to this area. Laurel Park synagogue with covert positive rabbi still holding large indoor prayer services, despite $15,000 fine, by the way, something very similar. Happened in Israel the other day. It's not getting much press here, but we'll look at the parallels and why they matter. And back to Gothamist police arrest has she Tischler as his backers swarm home of the Jewish journalist he targeted and listeners we will talk to that Brooklyn based journalist Jacob Corn blue from the Jewish insider. Coming up in this segment, but first to that league Gothamist headline. New York's positivity rate goes down, but hospitalizations Rise with me Now is Gotham the senior editor Elizabeth Cam, who post regular updates on Corona virus in our area highlights thanks for coming back on the show. Hi, Brian. Good morning. Can you flesh that out a little bit or Fletch out each of those a little bit hospitalizations, air rising even as the percentage of new tests coming back positive. He's going down. So what I can say is that hospitalizations along with the positivity rate, which is the percentage of people testing positive are the two main indicators. That public health officials watch. Um it's a little bit confusing because hospitalizations tends to be thought of as a lagging indicator. So these may have been people who you know, during, you know that the positivity rate has been on the rise last week, so we could be that these were people who were testing positive. And then found themselves getting sick and having to go to the hospital. But I have to say it's still not entirely clear because these numbers also bounce around a fair bit, so it's not like there's been Um, you know, one day after another, a steady increase. On some days, you'll see that it goes up and not on other days, you'll see that it goes down, and that's certainly the case when you look at local data. In New York City. If you go to New York City's Corona virus data page, you'll see that that hospitalization number has been just going bouncing up and down, and it's not really clear. Um, Is this a serious trend? Obviously, the other number we're looking in conjunction with that is the positivity rate and for that we still been staying, like, like the governor stated like statewide. It's still been around 1% here locally, it's still around 1.5%. So Definitely two numbers that we're looking at here is Governor

New York City Mohr Corona New Jersey Laurel Park Synagogue Israel Tischler Rape Jacob Corn Brian Senior Editor Elizabeth Cam Gotham Brooklyn
How the Supreme Court Operates

iHeartRadio Podcast Premiere

06:15 min | 2 months ago

How the Supreme Court Operates

"Professor of law at the University of Texas School of Law and executive director of just security and senior editor of the Law. Fair Blonde. He's here to talk about the U. S. Supreme Court from how the nation's high court operates to the confirmation process for Supreme Court. Justice is a process that will be front and center. Throughout the month of October. Steve thanks so much for the time and let's start At the very beginning, The founders set up this novel system of government involving three different branches, one being the judicial branch. What was the vision that they articulated an article three of the Constitution really, the core purpose of the judiciary. Yeah, I mean, the very fact that it's a separate article actually is the beginning of the story because in England, you know from which we were breakin the judiciary was not independent. The court was called the Katie's sketch on Go. The founder's put the courts in their own article entirely because the founders thought that a critical part of preserving our rights was to have an independent judiciary that could in appropriate circumstances after the checkup on potential charity of the majority, So from the start, the idea was that we would have Independent judges who were not politically accountable, who, in appropriate cases could have the power to do the obligation to strike down democratic laws. But democratic laws that were nevertheless in violation of the Constitution. Supreme Court always seems to be a hot button issue. These days, Some people cast their ballots in presidential races specifically because of the possibility a seat on the bench could open up. Has it always been that way? It really has been followed. I mean, I think you know there are periods in American history, where the court with a huge issue, I mean the dread Scott decision for the Supreme Court really goes out of its way to put its stamp on the institution of slavery in 18 57 became a galvanizing part of 1st 18 58 Senate race in the Lincoln Douglas debates and then the 18 50 presidential election. But I think what's different about today is that The court look so much like the rest of the country that you know the court really is divided and polarized into much of the same two camps as so many of us and that's why I think folks tend to see high profile cases before the court in such partisan terms and, you know debates over confirmation. Such partisan turns because increasingly looks like the court is just another institution divided into two parties based on who's in charge of the time. There've been some discussions. As of late over the amount of justice is that should be on the court or whether or not justice is should serve for life may be implementing term limits. How are those decisions made in the past and what flexibility does Congress have to potentially make changes to the court? Yeah, In the side of the court is perhaps the easier one Because there's just no question that the court is to some degree. It lied to Congress is controlling that that you know, Congress has overtime. Barry the size of the court at the Fountain, There are actually six justices. We had many of 10 for a short period of time in the sixties before settling in the current number of 1918 59. So you know there's nothing unconstitutional. I've got a statute that would say, added 234. C To the court. I think the tricky part is, you know, if you start down that road, then you Republicans the next time they're in charge at their own speed to the court, and what does that do for the court legitimacy in the long term, But at least it's a matter of pure constitutional law is up to Congress. As on there's at least one justice. How many more than one of the question of legislative grace On term limits that met here because we've actually never seen Congress, you know, try to do anything other than allow life tenure for justice is the Constitution doesn't say like tenure, it says, you know, the justices are allowed to hold their offices during quote, good behavior, unquote. But of course, you know that doesn't answer the question of what it means to hold their office. Could Congress give them different responsibilities? Good Congress keep paying them, but tell them to do nothing. These are questions that Supreme Court's never really had to answer because A question Congress hadn't really ever provoked. So you know, at least on that one. I think we're in a bit more of uncharted territory. The purpose behind the lifetime appointment to the Supreme Court. Why did the founders believe that was necessary? Yes, it was a big part of independence that you know when you have a judge, say who don't serve in the five or 10 year term, You know, here. She might be making decisions for reasons other than because they think they're the right decisions They might be, you know, looking over their shoulder at what their next job is gonna be there. They might be trying to sort of curry favour with whoever's in power tow. You perhaps be reappointed reporting to different position. So the founders thought that one of the ways of ensuring independence was job protection was making clear that You know, you don't have to worry about finding other jobs. You don't have to worry about having your paid diminished if you hand down unpopular decision as a way of just saying it, like the judges and justices would not be beholden to political pressures. Especially when Nick an unpopular decision, and one other area where Congress has control over the judiciary, including the Supreme Court is impeachment power. Certainly not something you see exercised very often, but the power's there, right Yeah, I mean, like any other federal officers, judges and justices there. Seven to impeachment. There's only been one impeachment of justice on the Supreme Court in all American history that you know five when the Jeffersonians tried to impeach arch Federalist Samuel Chase of and it failed, mostly because it was preceded. A political future is not a good one. But there are lower court judges who have been impeached fairly often for I think what we would all agree to it is clear misconduct. So you know there are checks on the court. And Peter did one of them. You know, Congress has at least some power over the jurisdiction of the federal courts decide which cases they got to hear. Congress control most of the budget of the federal court, So it's not that the court unaccountable that the accountability comes in different ways and not necessarily the ballot box. And that's part of how we ensure that courts are able to protect the rights of minorities, which is perhaps the most important function. I'm joined by Steve

U. S. Supreme Court Congress Supreme Court Steve University Of Texas School Of Professor Of Law England Senior Editor Executive Director Katie Founder Barry Peter Scott Samuel Chase Senate Nick Jeffersonians
Airbus' Ambitious Hydrogen Plans

Aviation Week's Check 6 Podcast

07:18 min | 2 months ago

Airbus' Ambitious Hydrogen Plans

"I'm happy to welcome with me on the program senior editor, Guy Norris and tier to our France Bureau chief who as you surely know if you read ideation? Gregory is an expert in aerospace technology subjects to. This week, we are going to talk about three aircraft concepts that Abbas presented for the first time. They are very different from each other in many ways, but they do have one thing in common they are supposed to be powered by hydrogen. And Abbas Vision in the transformation of aviation into a greener more sustainable, future exciting ideas but lots of questions too. So let's take a step back I wonder if I can ask you to just walk us through the plans that Abbas. Presented this week. Sure So basically, there are three concept plaints. At the center of the city they called him supplies because none of them will actually be built but three directions that are going to be studied in depth. One of them is looks like turboprop aircraft to wing configuration. I think the maximum. Capacity would be around one hundred passengers. The other one. Sorry. The first one, I mentioned a because it would burn hydrogen in relatively conventional outside rented conventional. Engine turbines. The second concept plane is also conventional Tuban Wing country duration from be powered by two defense number props to defense money hydrogen. Again, capacity is between one, hundred, twenty, two, hundred passengers, and just like the first concept plane the shooting hydrogen attack is located at the rear of the fuselage and the third concept is definitely the most spectacular. It's a blended wing but. Again powered by defense. So often concepts contemplates both hundred ten. Engines but the big difference, the May feature of the sudden is the blend buddy consideration, which means you can much more optimize hide myrow dynamics, and you can also dispute passengers and fuel tanks. I, know much more efficient way in the in. So. Roughly speaking this, all three concepts that are is. Speaking about so we're we're kind of fifteen years right I mean they're talking about enter enter into service in twenty thirty five but already, they're making some very important technology choices you mentioned liquid hydrogen for instance can just walk Ciragan. You know what are the steps that are coming up in between now and twenty, thirty five so between now one, twenty, thirty, five, the and again, twenty thirty five is the plant date for entry to service our first main Maislin if she wishes twenty twenty-five by then they expect to have majored some technology bricks as they. Call them to choose from and they would launch a program in twenty, twenty, seven or twenty, twenty eight. So that would be a food program for the Industrial Program between or twenty degrees and would would be very, very informative for us to follow is the next five years they plan to do several demonstrations. So they will demonstrate that technology bricks such as hydrogen storage, for example, and one of the most demonstration projects is about hydrogen storage and distribution they were stopped on the ground, but they also plan some instructional on the sorry in the era in. which could be quite a spectacular and they plan quite. Surprised by this, they plan to start with gaseous hydrogen storage demonstration before moving to liquid, and as they seem to have made a choice ready for liquid hydrogen meet surprised by the fact, they are going to also test guess. So Guy. Abbas. Seems to be really enthusiastic about this and it's kind of came out of nowhere but it came a bit of as a surprise to me. That's enthusiasm isn't really shared by everyone in an industry particularly in the engine industry they're still seem to be quite some serious reservations about this. So can you tell us what what what you're hearing? Yeah Hi there. It's basically a very is a very interesting time because, of course, the engine manufacturers like the fray manufactures they're all facing this kind of cliff of how do we meet the sustainability targets in really thirty years seems like a long time but but in the aerospace business, it's really not They've got. So they've they've been approaching this idea of whether to adopt the new transformational approach. Mostly based on alternative fuels, which would be dropping into the existing kind of infrastructure, the existing propulsion designs and the existing tube and wing configurations that the framers of loved and developed and perfected for the past fifty years all nor so you can imagine that there is a bit of a shock going on here to how do we suddenly move all of that towards a hydrogen based ecosystem. Of course, the other thing is that they've saying, well, you know we have been that before we've studied this, we started in the nineteen fifties, for example, more based for military type applications again, in the seventy s during the fuel crisis when they the first global fuel crisis and again in the nineties when there was the first glimmers of the emerging environmental issues this time of course, it's different as you both said, you know the there is a driving force has never been there before, and of course, the the French government tying the. Incentive. Package really to sustainability is the big decision making sort of driver on this. So you know the fact that. There's much more urgent need now is is changing the game, but doesn't change the fact that there is seventy years of history of safety and certification and development behind a no operational cycle around kerosene people know how to handle it. They know how to certify it, and this is a whole new ballgame. So why would you know bus get buy in from the other industry participants if that wasn't possible for one reason or another over the past? Several decades well I mean one of the thunder, the reasons that time does move on and technology has improved. They're all ways of coping now as a couple of ways to look at it. One is from a big picture perspective. The big challenge that a lot of them see both in and out of aerospace is the fact that they feed stalking. The actual production of hydrogen has to be done in a sustainable way to make this entire equation balance

Abbas Tuban Wing Senior Editor Guy Norris France Bureau Gregory Ciragan Stalking
Senate committee revisits the need for federal data privacy legislation

All Things Considered

01:07 min | 2 months ago

Senate committee revisits the need for federal data privacy legislation

"The news. I'm terrorist Siler As U. S senators consider federal data privacy legislation again. They took testimony from Attorney general in California, home to the most comprehensive law in the nation. Rachel Myrow, senior editor of these Silicon Valley desk has more aged heavier. But Sarah has become something of an expert in data privacy as his office is the primary enforcer of the California Consumer Privacy Act. Speaking before the Senate Commerce, Science and Transportation Committee Wednesday, he said today as we battle a pandemic that has moved so much of life online companies know more about us our Children our habits than ever before That data is today's gold. And as with gold, there's been a rush to mine use and sell our personal information. Americans need robust tools that allow them to understand who has their data. What was collected if it can be the leader and how they can opt out of downstream selling. There are a couple of bills at play in D. C. The one from Republicans would preempt state laws. Democrats want to give states like California the freedom to innovate. I'm Rachel Myrow kick you in the news.

Rachel Myrow California Siler Science And Transportation Com Senate Commerce Senior Editor Sarah Attorney U. S
College Campuses Opened for Business, Now Scores of Students Have Covid-19

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

03:07 min | 2 months ago

College Campuses Opened for Business, Now Scores of Students Have Covid-19

"This is on point Jane Clayson. We're talking with student newspaper editors about what college life is like in a pandemic and how the choices their schools have made are impacting students. My guest this hour Andy Thomason senior editor at the chronicle for Higher Education Andy. We were talking about the political sort of faultlines at play even in higher ed right now, this sort of red state blue state colleges in. Ryan States by Republicans are more likely to offer in person courses. It appears blue states or more online has that held steady throughout the opening here. It has but it's gotten more complex as states have to wrestle with. You know the consequences of reopening the public health numbers on campus and that sort of thing for instance, one of the first campuses to reopen the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill had faced a mandate from the system to reopen but just I think about a week Yep after they had started classes, they were forced to shut down in effectively evacuate campuses. So the public health realities are definitely altering some of. That decision making and many colleges and universities are are not messing around they're cracking down on these large gatherings large parties at northeastern here in Boston they expelled students that gathered in a room together and there was no refund on the thirty six thousand dollars tuition Ohio state issued two, hundred, twenty, eight suspensions to students attended parties a give us some other examples of the disciplinary measures that colleges are taking now. Well, much of that action has actually been predominantly rhetorical sort of warning students saying this semester if it has to end early, it's on you. It's not on us. That's the message from administrators on many campuses there have been lots of suspensions at lots of campuses It actually helps sort of spur something of a backlash among others in the higher education community saying the students didn't make the decision to reopen it was the administrators and are you going To blame students for being students when they didn't really have a hand in these plans, some observers called it hypocritical well, right and and you know I've heard both sides, is it too much to ask college students to give up so much of their college experience and on the other hand you know be responsible put a mask socially distance. I mean there are two sides to this as there are more broadly speaking in the cultural conversation as a whole. That's absolutely true and yes, you can see both sides to it, and of course, in a pandemic, we all have to behave responsibly behaviors good public health citizens, but you have to realize and recognize this occurring in the larger context of institutions that have their own institutional priorities, financial, political, and cultural, and in some cases at least students have. Found themselves in the center of that and and facing some of the consequences.

Jane Clayson Andy Thomason University Of North Carolina Senior Editor Chapel Hill Ryan Ohio Boston
Apple iPad, Watch and Home bundle: Breaking down all the announcements

The 3:59

07:29 min | 2 months ago

Apple iPad, Watch and Home bundle: Breaking down all the announcements

"Apple held its big September event today, but there was no iphone. So was the IPAD Apple Watch any new bundle enough? I wrote a Chang charged. With me to break everything down is senior editor at large and apple expert. Sure. I high in a it's been a afternoon for there's been a going on. Let's let's break it all down I. Guess by sequence of when they announce their their various products is talking about the apple. I have to remember. Okay. Yeah. It was secrets quartz. Which? In apple years like three years. Let's let's talk about Apple. Watch was the first off the bad. It was the Apple Watch series six and Apple Watch S C you break down these products rest yeah. It's interesting. So the Apple Watch is very clearly increasingly becoming a health device and to people who've been watching this is not a surprise. Apple found a lot of success turning it into a sport device. That started with the second generation Apple Watch when they made swim proof as what they called it not really waterproof pet swim proof and ever since then they've really been adding a lot more features for health and fitness will now they're adding even another feature for health, which is that going to measure your blood oxygen levels and this is going to do it in. Two ways one will be to do it. If you just want to do it now you push a button and it'll measure over fifteen seconds and uses all sorts of infrared lights in some magic by being you get a number and then it'll also do it in intervals just kind of behind the scenes. So just like with the heart center, if suddenly some something seems completely. Off The watch tap heuristic and say, Hey, you might want to look into this, which is what has saved a lot of people's lives. Yeah. Idea civilized was a big deal that that Promo video they ran to for really unveiling these products just was laid it on pretty heavy about the fact that this is this can save your life. Now I must have been Apple Watch. The reality is that this type of technology is very impactful right I mean it's it's kind of stuff like it's it's really sappy to talk about like how disability functions inside of the iphone arena video game console change people's but they do right there. There are entire people who who were stuck indoors not able to do anything or they were blind and they weren't able to live a normal life and they're able to do so much more now because of the technology that's come from why from. Different phones and all sorts of other stuff. So it's not surprising apples laying this on thick because on some level they they've actually saved lives. They deserve to be able to say that, but I think it's going to be interesting to see whether people buy into this idea over. All right. It's still a nerdy thing. It's still an expensive thing and that's that's a hard sell to people who haven't already bought it read just to be clear like the. Blood oxygen like what is it? What does it actually do be able to detect and monitor that like what is that allowing Apple Watch to do so in a lot of ways, this falls under everything else that we've always heard about various health functions and it was actually in the t at the ending card on their announcements. If you go watch the video, you go to the very end it says this is not meant for medical purposes, right? So. This is really just kind to help you quantify your body and your life, and this is one of the problems we've all had with fitbit and everything else. It's cool to get this data and sometimes it's helpful. But reality is once I've gotten him for like six months. One more do I need right and you know my wife doesn't care about any of the data that she She hasn't even tracker steps anymore. She just cares about whether she closes the rings. That's it right. So it's it's actually a lot of this data is is kind of you don't it's helping with all that right in kind of helping you set goals and get there. But a lot of the state is unnecessary. Apple's doing it because they say look it's going to help us with the. Overall kind telling you what your health is and maybe will maybe it won't I don't know. But we'll see we'll say how how much does this they start for? Yes. So that's the other thing is that this device is going to be three ninety nine to start, which is not cheap and you know, and the other thing also is that they have this cheaper phone watch which. is to Sunday nine starts called the Apple Watch S E and I guess for special edition we never know what these letters mean and one of the things about this thing is that basically a repackaged Apple Watch series three, right so it has the fall detection, which is something that the introduced a while back in a lot of people were really you know they were thinking hey. Elderly people you know they have this I fallen and I can't get up little buttons. Now, they can do their watch. So they're adding some of these functions that they do see a lot of. People. Kind of getting interested in into this device two, hundred, seventy, nine dollars in Stephanie Cheaper. We'll see whether people want it, but it says something yeah. That's two hundred ninety nine seems a little too expensive considering the the series three is still around one hundred and fifty dollars a year. It's not a huge difference between the two, seventy nine and the three, ninety nine. Series six that like I don't know there's that struck me as little expensive for those quote unquote affordable model. I mean think about Black Friday, right one of the things that I have always of found interesting about apple having covered it. Now for more than a decade, is that in a long time ago it apples pears didn't move like there was never a sale on their phones there was never a sale on their. Computers it was very rare and it was only a little bit. But now we're starting to see a sales on them when they come out right and we're seeing prices dropped dramatically during holiday sales. So to seventy nine to start yeah, that does feel a little heart but I wouldn't be surprised to see that creep down to two hundred by the end of this year the other the other big lot unveiled was two new. ipads. So let's let's go into the IPAD at the higher end version what what is new about this new air? Yeah. It takes a lot of the feeling of the pack pro. So it actually has a this more square look to it, which if you care Kinda Cool Stephanie Different and it also has a bigger screen that is actually looks a lot like the IPAD pro so you may remember the IPAD pro they got. Rid of the touch ID, right that button that allows you to use your fingerprint. So this one does not have the face unlock like the IPAD pro instead touch ideas now in the button on the side that you do the power button, that's kind of course. So they that's how they were able to lower the prices from the IPAD pro. It still has a very powerful chip they say it's much more powerful than chromebooks. UPS and all that, and we'll see you know everyone has to do their tests, but it's ships in October for five hundred, ninety, nine dollars again, not cheap and way more expensive than the cheapest chromebooks out there. So we'll see whether people are interested. Yeah. I'll say that pay particular attention that touch ID because it's it is abundant on the top of the screen, not screen top of the device itself it's basically the power bun. I would be intrigued to see if they stick that into the iphone twelve, it would be really smart because right now face ideas essentially useless when you're wearing a mask. So having some sort of touch ID center and I don't think they've got the under glass fingerprint sensor thing down pat yet this would be a good a good compromise.

Apple Chang Senior Editor Fitbit
Microsoft releases Surface Duo

Android Central Podcast

08:59 min | 4 months ago

Microsoft releases Surface Duo

"Wasn't a surprise to anybody who was seeing the writing on the wall but I somebody who wasn't aware that Microsoft was preparing to release a phone or a surface duo that isn't quite a phone. The announcement happened. It happened on Tuesday. It was a pretty big deal for people who? have been looking forward to this product. It was announced alongside the surface neo, which was a is a windows ten x product that has been since delayed before we get into the actual product was this launch sped up at all like we were under the impression that it would come out later in twenty twenty perhaps in the fall or or or even the holiday season but now it's launching in September. What what happened to push up that launch if if anything? Yes. So chat out to Zach Boden, our senior editor who's been. Covering a lot of this and he's the one that's been a lot of the sourcing on this information. So important to talk with this device has been in development literally for five years at least conceptually up until now in a lot has changed since then you know the chemo. was interested in this idea of round two, thousand, fifteen apparently, and he started putting together how how they do stuff at that. One reason you don't get leaks for Microsoft, is they build stuff internally in this one building on campus they three d print everything. So it always stays internal, but he started printing up like basically two smaller screens and tach dumb start carrying them in his pocket. Investigating what was the ideal size here. and. Then we start hearing about around two thousand seventeen. She's started hearing around two thousand seventeen and back then it was GONNA be like windows mobile or maybe kind of windows ten device we weren't really sure and then windows quarrel West started coming out with information air, which is basically abstractions of way from the with the fundamental understanding of windows ten is. And then. Stuff basically change right? They made a decision some time I believe in two thousand, nineteen early on that they weren't going put windows ten on this or windows ten acts or windows quarter wes. For the simple fact that they needed mobile APPS. So they made this like pretty last minute change to go to android and because of that. You know. It was announced with the android a last year as you mentioned, and then it was gonna be holiday season for this year but the specs of the device haven't changed much mostly because they've been so focused on core aspects of the design and function -ality which we'll talk about later that you know it's running a snapdragon e fifty five we all know does have she does doesn't have certain features that people expect in their phones and the F. Samsung coming out with the full to, and we only have the flip and LG. So the market is already starting to move towards this. So they did speed up the release and it's not so much a sped it up cutting corners it just it's done. The hardware was already done for a while it was more about getting android onto this device and as you know and you can speak to a little bit. It's didn't just slap android on this they worked with Google what really makes us device interesting is just how good android To work on dual screens but because of that. They sped it up. And they want to get it out as soon as possible because we already know internally do oh to is in developments like you know calm people expect companies now to do yearly updates on phones yearly yearly releases I should say and that's pretty much can be the case here we're expecting and you can't. You don't want to release a phone in December or November and then released next ball you know knowing how like six or seven months eight months ago I mean some people would only buy with four months upgrade right you. You try to avoid that as much as possible. So yeah, they're trying to get if you're one plus which you do twice a year up. Yes. Right, they're crazy. Yeah. So but yeah so that that's concept long. It's been pushed up ahead of time, but it's basically finished. So it's good. Okay. So before we get into the android side of things, I, still want I wanNA linger on hardware a little bit because it is so important to talk about what you're getting. Panos Panay. So you mentioned Panos, this is the chief product officer of. Microsoft he's the person who stands on stage introducing all the surface products and over the last few years that's run the gamut from surface laptop to the surface book. To the surface pro, we have that massive surface screening. What's that thing called the studio studio which is beautiful. So. There's clearly a cohere cohesion in the hardware division right now that I it finds. Microsoft. Sort of at the peak of its game and I've been really impressed with it as somebody who does not really. Spend a lot of time in that world not nearly as much somebody like you. Tell me about the surface. Design as it relates to other surface products and what the intent is given that it is an android phone, ultimately how it plans to fit into that surface narrative if you will share I I just wanted to talk about a little bit about who this is four because this is such A. You know we're we're so used to win a phone comes out funding like some something from Samsung, for instance. It's a mass release consumer device Arabize by everybody wants it. Surfaces typically aren't like that you need to think of surface devices one as harass perations devices. So they're always a little bit more expensive. They're also things that other companies are supposed to look at like that's a good idea we should do that. Encourages companies to. Not necessarily copied design one for one but a to rip off of it basically to get inspired by do their own take And that sort of the role of surface duo it's not meant to compete with Samsung and apple at this level of like grandma's GonNa go by Jimmy down the streets going to go by my neighbor Bob. Want want it's it's not that you may look at it. It'd be like that's a cool idea. Someday I may want something like that. That is exactly It's built for Panos Panay. Send us like publicly it's built for fans of surface people who live in Microsoft ecosystem. That's a very small group of people admittedly, and that's their expectations here for a sales. You know it's and so when people complaining what type of price later on all this kind of stuff, I get it but at the same time. They see this as sort of just a foot in the door for this new category of devices they're hoping in a couple of years as they go through rations, other companies get evolved that prices come down that. Then it becomes that mass consumer device no different than how surface pro did the same thing whichever's pro came out years ago two, thousand twelve. People laughed at it. It got bad battery life had problems. It didn't. You'll people complain about lap ability like there's all this kind of stuff going on with that and he stuck with it now served pros a well established sort of concept in terms of two and once. So. Of. Markets for and terms of design. You know some people will point to courier, which goes back to two thousand nine. This is a Microsoft project that was internal. It's a hassle dating story about development they were supposed to. They basically came to Bill Gates and was like we can do like windows phone and mobile, or we can do this courier thing and they decided against her. Because it was too proprietary. It didn't actually run any version of windows everything in it was custom built firmware. So you couldn't run like out what God was all this custom. Stuff but you couldn't stall things. And there's some DNA there. Right. But you know four Panos is idea comes down to a digital mole skin. He's been obsessed with this idea I don't even know what it most until years ago, which is a fancy journal, right? It's a bound fancy journal that people in artists and creative people like to carry around and he loves his idea of like a small digital version of that March has always done this idea. That's why other displays are three two aspect ratio. They liked to base things off of what we already know magazines, books, things that work right you. You can criticise whether books you know analog books today are relevant, but the fact is there's something about. Books Right. Like we all have kindles we all love kindles but we also all love the idea sometimes if growing up with a nice book, just opening it up and dog eared the the pages that's where to concept of duo comes from his his idea of a dual screen. Digital Journal kind of device could also work on with two displays.

Microsoft Samsung Panos Panay Zach Boden Panos Chemo. Senior Editor Want Digital Journal LG Chief Product Officer Google Bill Gates Arabize
Material Shortages, Paneled Ceilings, and To Vent or Not to Vent

The Fine Homebuilding Podcast

04:58 min | 4 months ago

Material Shortages, Paneled Ceilings, and To Vent or Not to Vent

"This is senior editor patron mccomb. Today I'm joined by Rob Watson digital brand manager. Hey. there. Kylie Jacques Design Editor. Hello. And producer. Jeff. Rose I. Well, it is a pleasure to see you all this morning. Thanks again for joining me. Pleasure. So I want to start off lending briefly Kylie someone commented on Itunes with regard to the podcast, and they said some very nice things many more about us. So you should definitely take a look at that. I want to encourage all of our listeners to please review the podcast it really helps us out both in terms to know that we're doing a good job and to help others find it. So if you do that for me, I would be super appreciative. That com that was dated on July twenty ninth but prior to that the most recent one was like the end of April. So. Get to. Work People. And thank you in advance I. Look At. Rob, what are you doing? What have I been doing? Well, you know. I. Keep talking about that Porch but kind of done with there's nothing new about. Other night other than last night i. just sat out there and enjoyed a glass of wine even though it's not completely done yet just sat there and watch the sunset. So drinking hooch on your new deck is the best thing ever. But actually the next project I'm not actually the next project because it's a big one is It's been so hot and Muggy lately that for years on and off have been like do do we want to pool problem is we're very particular about our garden and I would I would have wanted my daughter was little thrown up crappy pool in the backyard just to cool off but it doesn't fit into the. Landscape design apparently of our property. So So We've been totally disagree I went above ground. Pool absolutely. Fantastic. As. Long as I picked, the right would grain right? Well, I, I was going to get I was GONNA. Actually just plant some. Or Tall. Grass in front of it so that you know you can kind of hide it but the problem is I just don't have the space for that. So we've been talking about we've a narrow lot with a twenty foot setback from both sides and it's sixty feet wide. So that means we could just put something in the middle of our yard and there's not very many places to do that. We found this one garden bed that we're willing to take a chunk out of. And possibly dig in and put build a concrete soaking pool. So it's something that it's something that. Is Basically. Yeah. Basically, it's bigger than a hot TUB, but it's not something you can swim laps in. and. and. Probably. Even. Though seems kind of a bit labour-intensive thing. Probably do it with pouring slab in doing a block wall and plastering the block wall in doing stone coping in behind the why you think that sounds labor intensive. Well, actually I had. I had this great idea My. Daughter about how hard liens working on your property tactic. Even offered her a little bit more money than you're paying per hour. Maybe she could dig. Don't you dare? Rolling. So it would probably stick up about it would be right in the lawn. So probably stick up about sixteen inches out of the lawn with a stone top on it so that it would act like a garden benches well and Maybe That or not your own disaster at well, I've actually been just searching around for ideas on. Pinterest in elsewhere and phones mice examples have found some one example of some women in. The. Netherlands who built one by herself and his. All this cool stuff. All these cool details that she did is basically the same methods of construction and one of the coolest things was that Like well, this too small swim in this thing and those those jet pools you can swim in place or like thousands of dollars. While this woman bought thing, it's a it's a harness that you hook to some d rings in the corner of the pool and it doesn't same thing holds you back. Easy swam against this idea the harness. For A jet. You don't need a jet you swim in place to harness keep you from swimming forward You know I'll help dig thing if I can use it now on that. Okay. Sure to harness. Of wacky and honestly the Dickens give me really easy because. All the sand is going to be wheelbarrow downhill from the site and my my ground is all it's like a thirty. Patients one. GOING DOWNHILL My ground ground is all course sand. So a guy I dug a trench to my barn for conduct wants by hand and it was no big deal. Easy.

Kylie Jacques Rob Watson Jeff Dickens Senior Editor Producer Editor Brand Manager Itunes Netherlands Pinterest
Rep. John Lewis Makes Final Stop in Atlanta

Morning Edition

24:00 min | 4 months ago

Rep. John Lewis Makes Final Stop in Atlanta

"Rights activist and icon who became a moral force in the United States. Congress will be laid to rest. Today. He's been celebrated in a series of memorials this week and this past Sunday, he received a hero's sendoff in his native state of Alabama. And on Monday, Congressman Lewis was honored in Washington, DC It was an emotional Ceremony with lawmakers. His colleagues Speaker of the House, Nancy Pelosi, played a portion of a speech that Lewis gave to graduates at Emory University in 2014. As young people. You must understand that there are forces that would take us back to another period. But you must know that would mark warned by way made too much progress and we're going to make you some step back. Some delays some disappointment, but you must never give up. I give in. You must keep the faith and keep so eyes on the prize. That is so calling. That is your mission That is tomorrow. Obligation that is oh, man. They get out there and do it getting away. Lewis lay in state in the Capitol Rotunda following the ceremony, making him the first black lawmaker to receive that honor. And today, Congressman Lewis comes home to Atlanta, Georgia. The funeral service is being held at the historic Ebeneezer Baptist Church, where the Reverend Martin Luther King Jr was once co pastor and joining us Now is Emma Hurt. She's a reporter with our member station W. A. B in Atlanta, and she joins us live from outside of Ebeneezer Baptist and Emma describe what it's like there where you are right now. Hi, Emma. Can you hear me? Emma will be joining us shortly. She is outside of Ebenezer Baptist Church. Now let's go to Debbie Elliot. We'll check back in with Emma. And just a few moments. Hi, Debbie. How are you? I am good. I know that you spent a lot of time in Alabama over the weekend. There were several memorials and services. It was quite a scene. Right. You know, I think the thing that stands out the most was was when he was in Selma and his casket was on this horse drawn carriage. And it crossed the Edmund Pettus Bridge, of course, that iconic place where he was met with state troopers and sheriff's deputies who beat him up in a peaceful march for voting rights. Back in 1965 and people had come to sort of witness him make that Symbolic final crossing. Yeah, you've been You've known the congressman for for many years. You spoke with him back in 2015 at that. Edmund Pettus Bridge. Tell us about that. Yes. So this was in advance of 50th anniversary celebrations marking You know, 50 years since the Voting Rights Act passed because of that horrible incident on that bridge. The nation in the world really became aware of the brutality against African Americans who were pushing for equality in the American South. And so I met him there. We stood at the foot of the bridge, and we had a conversation about what it was like back then. And let's listen to a little bit, and he describes what happened on that came before. Beating us. Shrimping with horses. Releasing the tick and I was getting here. A state trooper with the night stick. My legs went from under me. I thought I was going to die. I thought I saw death. He thought he saw death, You know, and this was a moment where he had been that the the sheriff's deputy in the state troopers told them you have to turn back. We're not going to let you march to Montgomery. And they asked to kneel in prayer and as they went to kneel in prayer before they were going to turn back and go back to their churches. They were told. The meeting started. Tell me what's so powerful about that moment in history is that it was it was. It was a time where people were able to see for the first time the brutality. Those images were so powerful. It was labeled bloody Sunday and it sped up the passages you said of the 1965 Voting Rights Act. Debbie will will come back to you a little later to talk more about that. That's NPR's Debbie Elliot. We now have with us in the hurt. She is a reporter with our member station W. Abe in Atlanta, and she's outside of Ebeneezer Baptist Church where services will be held today. And Emma describe for us what it's like for you out there right now what you're seeing. Okay. Hi, Emma. This is Tanya. Can you hear me? Hi. Yeah. Can you hear me? I can I know that. It's It's quite a crowd. Okay? Can you tell us a bit about what you're seeing out there? I'm seeing I'd say about 200 people out here and we've kind of got to groups. We've got the people that are starting to gather at the Jumbotron, which has been set up right outside the church. I'm waiting to watch the service live there. And then we've got a crowd of people who are who are welcoming people as they arrive, welcoming the VIPs on presidential watch. Right now, I would say, waiting waiting for the three former presidents who are going to attend today and speak and the mood here is is really. I mean, it's it's serious, but it's also so joyful. It's about singing, and the stories that people have been telling me are just really powerful stories of how much Congressman Lewis meant to them. How much his message means to them in this time. And how much they want their Children and their grandchildren to make sure to remember him and what he stood for. What's really powerful, a swell about his home state of of his home state of Georgia and the city of Atlanta. Is that so many people felt like they knew him because they met him. You're hearing all of those stories from folks, I'm sure their interactions with him. Ebeneezer Baptist has so much history is I mentioned earlier, Martin looking Junior was a co pastor their share with us the significance of that church. Well, this was this was more Luther King Juniors from church. He grew up in it and was pastor as you said. It was also John Lewis's Home Church, where his wife's funeral was held in 2013. And it's really special. I think for these two figures overlap in this In this part of Atlanta to on Auburn Avenue, which is really the centre of Black Atlanta life, and some would argue the center of the Civil Rights movement and the two figures. I mean yesterday what was so powerful about Congressman Lewis lying in state in the Capitol in Georgia was that this was an honor denied to Dr King when he died. So I spoke to people who said I'm here because of all the people like Dr King who were denied that honor. And here we are giving Congressman Lewis most them may be the most honor. That we can right now. Sure, Let's listen to some of those folks that you spoke with you. It was amazing. It was amazing. All people on the young people. A lot of my friends has passed away. But I remember him from there. So that's why you mentioned This church being in the Hart. I just want to tell you that was Patricia Spicer, who's here, and she was talking about seeing Congressman Lewis speak at the 1963 march on Washington and that that's why his words were so powerful then and grabbed her then and she had to come today. The body of John Lewis was brought to Atlanta yesterday, and as you mentioned, it passed a number of important landmarks in the city. Walk us through. Some of those final landmarks that this journey to finally to Ebeneezer Baptist Church. There were there were quite a few stops because, as you said, Congressman Lewis has been such a presence in his district for, you know, 30 plus years. There was a pause at the Rainbow Crosswalk in Midtown, which you know, celebrates LGBT Q. The LGBTQ community here they passed by his downtown congressional office and a major street here that was renamed after him in the John Lewis Freedom Parkway on DH. It was there was also a big stop at a mural that you, Khun see driving down the interstate that runs through Atlanta. It has a picture of John Lewis and the words hero and, you know, it was really powerful. Tio. Watch him land for the last time in Atlanta and to watch him, you know, make his his final journey around the city. That's Emma hurt. She's a reporter with our member station. W. A. B in Atlanta. Thank you so much. Thank you. We're going to bring in another voice to our conversation. Remembering today the life and legacy of Congressman John Lewis Bishop Leah Daughtry is with us. Now. She's a political organizer and strategist. She ran. The Democratic National Convention is in 2008 in 2016 and she is the presiding prelate of the House of the Lord Churches. And there is perhaps no one better to talk about the intersection of faith in politics in this moment, which is what's so much of John Lewis's life really represents Bishop. Doctor. Thank you for being here. Good morning to you. And thank you very much from including this conversation. I guess I would just start by asking where your thoughts are this morning. Oh, you know, in the it's Ah, it's a powerful day. In the African American tradition. We call this the services home going And so they are mix of sorrow and sadness, but also great joy, particularly when it's someone like Mr Lewis, who has lived his life in such an exemplary way and in keeping with the principles of his faith that we know that he And our tradition. He's going home to be with the creator. And so we rejoice in bed and in the deeply held idea that we will see him again. So the mix of emotions on and I'm looking forward to the servants and being able to worship with those who have gathered To celebrate his life. The the word and his faith came before politics, did it. Not that was with what guided him first? Yes, yes, And I think that's so instructive for all of us who are people of faith. He was deeply guided by the principles of the face that he held so deeply and so closely and though that is what informed him and informed his action. Informed his decision to get involved in the civil rights movement on then to pursue a career in electoral politics. It's because of the ideals of of of our faith of our share faith that God intends for all of us. To live a full and abundant life. It holds us equally ah, in God's eyes and ah, divinely created and therefore in endowed with these Possibilities of being hole and equal. And then we have an obligation to pursue of society that sees us as God. And so for John Lewis that meant getting involved in the civil rights movement. That meant going on the bus boycotts being part of the leadership because it was he was pursuing the principal's off his face. And then in his later life, Of course, he came to Congress again, seeking ways to create a just society, a beloved community that treats all of its citizens equally. That has got had intended them to be he. It was almost a joke near the end of his life. How often he was asked to talk about preaching to chickens as a child on how readily he wanted to share that story, right? It was, he just he reveled in it of the idea of Off the joy he had as a very young man. I mean, eight years old, even sharing what he believed to be the most important important message there, Wass and and it helped him. Negotiate through through Washington. It helped him find ways to communicate with people with whom he disagreed. This's a very important part of his legacy is enough. It is it is, you know it and it tells you how deeply held his faith was. You know in these days, particularly when people are chasing followers, and ah likes and so forth on social Media network to think of this young man who who so loved his face. It was so impassioned by that any audience any Opportunity. He had to share his fate. Even with the chickens, Wass and was a chance to home his craft was a chance to get his ideas out was a chance. The tests, cadences and rhythms of words was a chance to share was the chickens and with those around the pick of the air, the grass the field how passionate he was about things that he believed and then bringing those ideals to Congress and understanding again. The people I help The idea of our faith that God has created a so equal And so if this idea that you don't have to be just like me to be just like me, there's something we have in common with each other. And if we can just talk if we can just be in conversation, we can see each other perhaps here because we may not still agree, but at least The tendency to demonize the unknown goes away lesson diminishes in the conversation. And who could refuse the conversation with Mr Lewis, who could refuse to just sit and talk and listen, and he was as good a listener. As he Waas a conversationalist. So you know, I think the Congress was richer for having him there on the Congress was Richard that his colleagues were Richard for just being able to be in conversation with someone who has deeply held ideal of deeply held conviction and experience. We should point out. Three former presidents are expected to get the memorial today. Bill Clinton. Barack Obama and and George W. Bush. I mean, just exemplifying the way that he he was very firm about what he believed and believed in his party, but he would work with Republicans if it meant Getting getting through the legislation he thought was most important. That's right. I mean, red and blue. These sorts of lines. These artificial divisions that we create among ourselves to categorize each other didn't really existed. Mr Lewis's lexicon. It was all about the humanity of people, and so has admit moving communities forward if admits Getting everybody the rights they deserve. Then he was willing to have the conversation. He was willing to be engaged and involved. And we see that in the folks that are going to speak today that are going to be present today at the tone and the tenor of the service, which he himself Designed. He spoke to his his closest staff. A. Stephen knew his time was shortening and said, who he wanted to be there. And what's the one of the elements of the club is to be what we see. Today is of Mr Lewis's own crafted bishop. Doctor, Can I ask one quick question if you were involved in the ceremony today, Realism putting you on the spot. But is there scripture that you think represents this moment, something you can point to that that carries the weight of history with it, but also Is about hope is about the future. You know, The thing that comes to mind for me is the passage and Hebrews. There's a chapter the faith chapter. We call it. Chapter 11 that talks about all the icons of our faith. Abraham and Sarah and getting and so forth on a long litany and in the middle of verse 13 says these all died in the faith, not having received the promises. But having seen them afar off, and for me that speaks of the hope. That was Mr Lewis's life. He stood on the shoulders of those who went before who didn't see freedom who didn't think the achievement of our civil rights. He followed them and he lived his life in such a way that he advanced the faith. He advance the causes, but he didn't see all of the achievement. And now we come behind him on continue his legacy. So he believed he held these convictions didn't scenes didn't see everything he fought for comes repair, But he still believed he still continue fighting. And henceforth Scripture goes on to say there was laid up for me A crown of righteousness was the Lord. That right? Justo shall give me on that day. And not to me only bought to all those who love disappearing. And so we look forward to seeing the two of us again in the future. Bishop Leah Daughtry. Thank you so much for sharing your reflections with us on this day. Thank you. Yes, very powerful. Let's go now to NPR. Congressional correspondent Kelsey Snell and NPR's senior editor and correspondent on the Washington desk. Ron Elving. Hey, guys. Kelsey. Good morning. We've heard so many powerful tributes from people throughout the country and the world. But But Louis is home state of Georgia. His presence and work had an especially profound. Meaning for his home state of Georgia for his district. Tell us a little bit more about his time there. You know, I am reminded of a couple of really, really standout moments of. I think one of the things that I think about a lot right now is the tribute that that they delivered for Johnny Isakson, who was a Republican senator. Of from Georgia, who retired last year, and in 2019 it was in November. So just just so a bit ago, Johnny Isakson was being was being honored and John Lewis Delivered this speech explaining how they could work together and and how there was an opportunity for anybody to find spaces where they agreed. And then, at the end of his speech, he walked across the Isaacson, who was in bad health and who had had trouble with his spine and said I will come to you brother and walked over and gave him a hug. That was really very much representative of the way. That John Lewis approached, you know, working on problems was what he wanted there to be bipartisanship. He wanted to be the person who came across, walked across and shake somebody's hand gave them a hug and said We can get something done here. He was also the kind of person who, whenever you saw him in the capital. There would be some person some tourist or a constituent who wanted to come and talk to him, and there was always had the time he had the time to tell his story had the time to talk to people about their story. He was extremely generous with his time and his constituents were known to come up to the capital and spent time directly with him. There was never a moment when it team like he was bigger than anybody else. Yeah, it's been Ah, so enriching and so fun over the last week to hear how so many people that I personally no have have met John Lewis, whether it's in Washington whether it's in Atlanta. New York Across the country. People have had a chance to meet him, but also have these intimate one on one conversations with him A CZ. We've learned he never turned anyone away. He was always willing to stop and have those conversations. One of the things that jumps out to me was a story about Congressman Lewis. When Hey, was in his district and he would spend a day doing a job in the district so even way back in the seventies, he would do things like drive a ups truck for a day to get a sense of what his constituents were up against. That is something that so many people feel is that he was of the people. Absolutely, and a lot of members of Congress that I speak to say they learned from that approach. They learned from John Lewis not just from the work that he did in civil rights, but the way he had a relationship with his constituents the way that he continued to speak about issues that meant something to him and then became active in them. I am reminded of the sit in on the House floor. On gun violence. He led House Democrats in a sit in and following. I believe the pulse shooting and they said that this was not a time when they could leave, and then he wanted to be the person who, you know who did the good trouble that he always talks about. He did not want to just be a person talking about it. He wanted to be a person involved in it. And you know so many members of Congress on Democrats and Republicans who felt inspired by that personal connection to his beliefs. The service eyes expected to begin shortly, and about 10 5 or 10 minutes. Ron, I'd love to go through with you what we can expect for today's service. But I want to talk first about Lewis's time as a civil rights activist, part of the movement back in the sixties. We expect to hear a lot about that today during the service, right? Yes, indeed, his life traced if you will, the trajectory of the African American experience over the last 70 80 years in American history. He was one of the group sometimes referred to as the Big Six, of course, beginning with Martin Luther King, whose name will be invoked. Many times today, but also Whitney Young of the National Urban League. Roy Wilkins of the CP. James Farmer of the Congress of regular Racial Equality and a Philip Randolph from the Pullman Porters Union. They were in many respects the Giants. Of the civil rights movement, as it took shape after World War two and rose in the fifties and sixties. Of course, John Lewis was there for most, all of it. He was part of the citizens at lunch counters in Nashville. He was one of the original 13 Freedom riders in 1961 integrating bus travel in the south. He was the youngest speaker on that day in 1963 when the march on Washington for jobs and justice featured Martin Luther King's I have a Dream speech. John Lewis spoke that day was the youngest speaker. He's the last person surviving from the speakers Dyas that day. And then, of course, the 1965 moment we have referenced Many times his beating on the Pettus Bridge. And, of course, his career in Congress, As Kelsey has described and then his links to the Black lives matter movement, which he paid tribute to In death as his cortege was coming to the capital earlier this week and paused on black lives matter Plaza in front of the White House to pay tribute to the movement and the people who are carrying forward his ideals today. Yes, And as we

Congressman Lewis Atlanta Congress Emma Hurt Martin Luther King Jr Washington Civil Rights Movement Debbie Elliot Ebeneezer Baptist Church Georgia Reporter Congressman Alabama Kelsey Snell John Lewis Bishop Leah Daughtr W. A. B John Lewis
Are Amazon, Apple, Facebook, Google Too Big?

Morning Edition

03:25 min | 4 months ago

Are Amazon, Apple, Facebook, Google Too Big?

"Four titans of Tech are expected to testify virtually to the House Judiciary subcommittee on antitrust. Amazon's Jeff Bezos, Apple's Tim Cook, Facebook's Mark Zuckerberg and Google soon dark pitch high here to preview this star studded panel is our own star needs. Rachel Myrow, senior editor of Our Silicon Valley News desk. Hello, Rachel. Shocks. Hello, Brian. Just for context. Here is a challenge for the two of us who both worked at market place back in the day. Can you tell us how big these companies are without using a dollar figure Using a dollar figure? Okay. Facebook has roughly three billion with a B users across various social platforms. That's user numbers figure. Amazon controls 38% of US online sales. Wal Mart, For contrast, is Amazon's nearest competitors, not even 6% like not even in the game. Google process is about 90% of Web searches globally Apples APP store. You're there. You're nowhere in the apple universe. They take a 30% cut. 30%. Brian. Wow. You did it all right. Four very different companies. Four key parts of modern life and that raises for different sets of antitrust concerns, right It does indeed, And that face is big questions about what lawmakers hoped to accomplish with this hearing today, right? I mean, even though all of them are reportedly targets of probes by the Justice Department Coalition of State attorneys general, we could take all day talking about any one of these tech titans. All right. So let's pick one. Okay, I'll pick one. Amazon. You're a prime member, right? Yeah, me and just about everybody else in America. If I make and or market a product, I have to be on Amazon to sell it to America, and I have to pop up early in the rankings. When American shoppers search for my thing I have to pay Amazon to make that happen. Amazon, by the way, has been known to copy and prioritize marketing. Of its name brand version of popular third party products otherwise known as stealing or counterfeiting. Amazon also criticized for failing to shut down other counterfeiters. Let's say somebody else who shouldn't be making my product is making it and according to the Wall Street Journal fairly recently Amazon's venture capital fund steals ideas from tech start ups that pitch to it, So that's just a short list of things Amazon critics have to say about that company. Wow. So back to this question of why the House Judiciary subcommittee is holding this meeting today. Officially, it caps a big investigation. More than 1.3 million documents gathered. Yes, indeed. And I had to tell Brian it is anybody's guess. How much time Will actually be spent on that investigation. Despite that number of documents as opposed to the other hot, we hate tech topics like election security, hate speech and political bias. Wow. Well, Rachel, thank you. You bet. Cheese. Rachel Myrow, senior editor of Silicon Valley News Desk.

Amazon Rachel Myrow Brian Facebook House Judiciary Senior Editor Google Apple United States Our Silicon Valley News Jeff Bezos Tim Cook Mark Zuckerberg Justice Department Coalition O America Silicon Valley News Wall Street Journal
"senior editor" Discussed on Thrivetime Show | Business School without the BS

Thrivetime Show | Business School without the BS

02:54 min | 6 months ago

"senior editor" Discussed on Thrivetime Show | Business School without the BS

"The bottom now on the top. To get what we got. Opportunity to books sees brackets, wisdom, and the look at the father of five. I'm a dive, so if you see my kids, please tell them how to see and see what your break. Now three to what he? Yes, yes, yes, and yes, Doctor! My friend, what what? We commonly referred to as our Business Bible. Do we always say we always quote? Forbes Forbes is our Business Bible. Fits in Forbes Book it? Dano, that's Oklahoma man law one point two seven three. Always, I mean every entrepreneur I mean that that's under Buckley's bend. The cover Forbes I mean and I don could be on the cover of four one. This little bitty like answer to the corner. That's all you need like this just in clay clan. Robert Boom Boom tastic their. Sky. orbs cover stories so I'm looking at the website it's. So. Big Dot Com and kindle thinking. Put The camera on Z. O. G. R. E. IN BU are Jeez oh. Greenberg you can see here. This man has done the article with a Katy Perry the cover article cover story Ashton Kutcher. Justin Bieber, just at a sit down interview with with Kanye West Zach Greenberg onto the thrive time show. How are you are? I could be here. I am so glad you came to Tulsa Oklahoma to to to visit us my friend, would you? Have you been overwhelmed underwhelmed? So what's going on as you're processing things? Tulsa Oklahoma I I've been very pleasantly welcomed well. Over overwhelmed feels like a bad thing. Sometimes you don't WanNa. Be overwhelmed. You ought to be underwhelmed. You want to be like pleasantly WELLM. Mega point. He, does it make you? How would you describe what you do for Forbes now I think a lot of people don't know in the hear the phrase senior editor. What what does that mean sure a lot of stuff? And not all of it is editing, you know for me, the kind of bread and butter of it all for me at Forbes. Over the past decade has been doing these big stories on the biggest figures in media, entertainment, particular music and particularly hip hop. My Passion over there, so you know dating back to the very beginning of my time at Forbes. The way I got into. It was an editor walked into my cubicle, and this is two thousand seven I. Just started. She said. Hey, you're under thirty. Do like hip hop. I said I love hip hop. She said Great. We're going to put together the first ever list of the top earning represent the world. And Let's go do it, so I did it. We put it out Jay Z. Diddy! Fifty cent were in the top three. In that order I believe and They were so excited to be recognized by four. They made a song called money. The Forbes Billion Dollar Remix..

Forbes Forbes Oklahoma Robert Boom Boom Tulsa Zach Greenberg Justin Bieber Ashton Kutcher Katy Perry Dano kindle Buckley WanNa Kanye West Jay senior editor editor O. G. R. E.
"senior editor" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

05:50 min | 7 months ago

"senior editor" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"The senior editor for conservative review their heart which is good for the show in your lives here locally listens to the program all the time great conservative he's written piece called your governor can't force you to stay in your state period the rights liberals finally support travel bans no not with the president uses his lawful power over foreign affairs and commerce demand for nationals from dangerous countries such as Iran or China liberal governors and rhinos arnelle illegally implementing travel bans on their own citizens from state to state he says that would be ideal vote free travel goes all the way back to the articles of confederation yeah here in these United States when they wrote the free inhabitants of each of these states shall be entitled to all privileges and immunities of free citizens in the several states and the people of each state shall have free ingress and regress to and from any other state but R. which rights but now governors like lockdown Larry Hogan it's catching on brewers have illegally barred residents from traveling out of state you heard that correctly while these governors and some wayward federal judges impose a travel ban on foreign nationals from terrorist countries or those who would become a public charge when there's no right to foreigners to emigrate or not including travel bans on their own countrymen channel eleven reporting that the Mike Ricci a spokesperson for the governor said that vacation is not allowed under the governor's stay at home order which would ban people from traveling to another state unless they are exempted from that order thus lockdown Leri has now declared an edict that was never affect first single day in the history of the American settlement on this continent under any governing body sadly and ironically Malcolm Merlyn was the first state to recognize personal liberty no I I've had conversations with some in the millennial generation I think girls reflective of of the mindset of a number of people on the political left R. E. M. they they say well yeah but you know what she's in charge so we should do whatever he tells us to do that's just not my that's not my world view my my world view and I think the world feels an awful lot of people who listen to the show we are free men and women in a Republic we are not we are not service we are not peasants who are killing the land for our lords and ladies we are free men and women in the Republic and we have rates that are not granted by the government they're recognized as god given out in the constitution and there's a clear conflict here when you have when you have some missing you don't have the right to go on vacation if you have arbitrarily you know if you have a place on lake Anna down in Virginia no I'm sorry you can't drive down the lake and have for your vacation because we prohibit it by what authority bye bye we're in common law or in the state law of this state or this country do you have the right to make that determination well we understand that the that the he's in charge argument the problem is they have their priorities a little out of whack because the constitution is in charge the constitution is the law of the land and the article forty four Maryland's declaration of rights and frantically declares that the provisions of the constitution of the United States and of the state apply as well in time of war as in time of peace and just because there's a pandemic or a world war or anything else the constitution that is not suspended at any time doctor bill bar to talk about this are you said that the the you know the right to worship for example first amount rights are not somehow band just because you declare a pandemic and here's the problem this gets confused people say well basically they you want people to die that's always the go to line no I I think we're grown ups and I think that you have the right to determine for yourself what is appropriate behavior as a grown up as long as your behavior does not impact me or if you impact Sean we shouldn't have much of a voice in deciding what your behavior should be and I have your bank robber yes by extension your behavior impacts other individuals but if you say I'm going to vacation in Kansas and I've always wanted to see Fort Leavenworth wise people see from the outside resume threatened by putting it on the inside if you decide to vacation well in China they locked their people inside their homes and apartments by the way here we've locked locked people down telling them do not leave your house unless it's absolutely essential so it's not quite as bad as the CCP but it's a it's a step that's the path and and Democrats and rhinos this is an opportunity for them to transform the country and implement social so much what is all about in Russia by the way you have doctors three doctors the last couple weeks have mysteriously fallen from upper story windows various hospitals yeah yeah I I guess it's the thing that's going wrong with the medical community in Russia now unbelievable six hundred on your friends and rescue doctoral supplements continue to want to make sure that you stay healthy and as a result they have applied a five percent automatic site wide savings discount doesn't matter you don't need any coupon codes or anything of that nature only the code that we give you every Sunday morning on the rescue hopeline program that's five percent automatic but there are other opportunities to save money and to build your immune system get that up and running for you so you're able to fend off illness and virus a disease and what one way to do that is with rescue probiotic your gut flora is you you got to be a balance you gotta have the part of the positive bacteria has got to be in either Dallas or or have more than that than the than the negative stuff in your gut.

senior editor
"senior editor" Discussed on Blazing Trails

Blazing Trails

10:06 min | 9 months ago

"senior editor" Discussed on Blazing Trails

"Sixteen Gretchen helped pave the way for the metoo movement with her Historic Sexual Harassment Lawsuit Against Roger. Ailes the former. Ceo and chairman of Fox. News Gretchen is now putting her network. Knowledge and personal experience to battle in the fight to reform institutions that have historically kept women silent. This was one of the most powerful talk set dream force two thousand nineteen for me so I wait to present it to you here but before we handed over to Gretchen and moderator and senior editor at Fortune Ellen mcgirt a quick word about wordpress. Vip WHO's making the show possible wordpress VIP is the digital publishing solution that powers the world's top media companies as well as marketing platforms for some of the best known.

Gretchen Vip Ailes Fortune Ellen Harassment senior editor Ceo Roger chairman
"senior editor" Discussed on Thrivetime Show | Business School without the BS

Thrivetime Show | Business School without the BS

01:37 min | 9 months ago

"senior editor" Discussed on Thrivetime Show | Business School without the BS

"Names ever Zack. O'malley Greenburg stoughton bottom mantle to the scene hall to kissed we have to build is hip hop cash. Kings vistas bread. Familly senior editor in his books been empire state of mind with Jay z's on considering the Michael Jackson Mccain three kings did he hit a talk about the angels Danny Pin added Greenberg. And he's three two point at this air again. The noise known get ready to enter the drive time show burden off now on the top sisters to give what we got books. Hopperton books sees bring some wisdom at the. That's why I'm a dive. So if you see my kids please tell them to see what your now. Three to what he yes yes yes and yes DR Z. It always ecstasy when you're here next to me on today's show. The listeners are gonNA enter into the DOJO OF MO. Jo because we are entering. We're entering.

Greenberg Greenburg stoughton Jay z Danny Pin Michael Jackson Mccain Zack senior editor MO Jo Hopperton
"senior editor" Discussed on KCBS All News

KCBS All News

04:21 min | 1 year ago

"senior editor" Discussed on KCBS All News

"Watch report with senior editor at large insurer who joins us on the KCBS ring central news line as we have been reporting Facebook's package handling facility in Menlo Park was evacuated earlier today after dangerous chemical was detected on a bag of mail Ian what have you heard so everything we've heard so far is that we still don't know what the substance wise but apparently Facebook evacuated for buildings three of them have been cleared for re population and that the not only the hazmat teams from San Matteo county but also the FBI and a number of other agencies are on the scene all right so and that that is what you know from your vantage point so far yeah so we've we've heard from Facebook a statement about all of this where they say it all happened start at eleven AM when a package was delivered to their mail room that they deem suspicious and then we've also heard from Menlo Park fire district about that nobody seems to have been exposed although they are typically about six people in the in the mail sorting facility all right thank you for that in and of course stay with KCBS we're going to continue following the story with several reporters so in other news president trump says he plans to ease restrictions on the telecom giant giant wall way that's out of China has he given any specifics that you're aware of the yeah that one of the interesting things here is that the trump administration's been talking about how unsafe and and insecure parkway as they've been tying it in a live there talk to the Chinese government suggesting that's been using for hacking and spying and they basically made the argument we should be using their technology now there's been this agreement that's been made that allows while way to buy technology from the United States so particularly stuff like internet software from Google that powers a lot of four way phones and a lot of people kind of shrug their shoulders said wait a minute if you say that these people aren't to be trusted where they allowed to buy stuff from the US government from US companies so it's gonna be interesting to see how they square that circle over time but right now it appears at least one way is not being completely shut out the US market and how important is that to the company well to them I mean their phones are powered by this and in fact the one of the conversations around this has been that if the government is going to step in and not allow companies like while way to get a Google software to power their phones then the Chinese companies might come together and create their own competing software which would be a huge change so there's a lot of kind of interesting bits in here that affect all of us all right so a lot of people seem to be using streaming services to listen to music and there've been a lot of complaints about them however one of the things at the store these services will do is sort of curate playlists and will expose a listener two artists and independent artists might be reaping the benefits how is that working yeah it's really interesting I mean most people are listening you know though though go to their Amazon echo or their their Google divisive apple device and say Hey plenty Samaria Grande or post alone or whatever and they'll get that but then these curated sat at play lists that are based on people's behavior and what music they like are often including independent artists and we're starting to see indications based on a story here from seeing that in talking to a number of different music executives that the independent music scene is actually starting to grow as a result of streaming which is really fascinating already and we thank you as always that is seen at editor at large the insurer and you of course can hear our tech watch report weekdays at one fifty on KCBS under the moneywatch now on PCS and for that we turn to Jeff Ballenger who's at the KCBS super micro Intel money desk stocks advance the key indexes posted gains ranging from four tenths percent to just over one percent investors were encouraged by the troops in the trade war with China the Dow Jones industrials closed one hundred seventeen points higher the nasdaq gained eighty five points the S. and P. five hundred added twenty three Southwest Airlines says further delays in the safety certification of Boeing seven thirty seven MAX jets will force it to reassess its schedule for the remainder of the year southwest has the biggest seven thirty seven MAX fleet it already scrubbed the jet from its flights this summer southwest shares rose one and a half percent shares of Boeing fell to percent Morgan Stanley trimmed its forecast for global economic growth economists at the bank say the trade truce between the US and China has not remove the uncertainty about trade policy one of the.

senior editor Facebook one percent
"senior editor" Discussed on WRVA

WRVA

04:24 min | 1 year ago

"senior editor" Discussed on WRVA

"From Kelli grant, senior editor at acorns, plus CNBC Kelly, give guidance you know, we have heard from a lot of folks who expect they refunds could be all over the map this year. You know, some people could expect to see more some people expect to see less kind of how that the interplay between the new tax laws and withholding from your paycheck. How that's going to maybe make a difference for you in the end, you won't know until you file while you're going to get to the refund maybe smaller, but you gotta tax break in your paycheck and all of twenty eighteen could be fair. Right. Exactly. And for some folks, they could see the refunding bigger, you know, it's really going to depend on a lot of different very individual factors. You know, ultimately, the lesson here is to file as soon as you think you're ready and get a sense of how that might look for you. All right. So what are some of the ways we can maximize refund regardless of size. So no matter how much of a wreath. And you're getting in their ways to use that wisely. One of the important things to think about is spending. Because for most of us, we are living paycheck to paycheck. There was some physics out from career careerbuilder earlier this year things about eight and ten Americans are living paycheck to paycheck, which probably means that you've got at least one important purchaser expense that you put off because it just wasn't in your budget thus far. So this is a good reason to look at that and say like well now, I can get new tires on the car. I can get that dental work. I've been putting off whatever that purchaser expenses try to take a look at it no wiggle room for a little on. They're definitely a little little wiggle room for fun there. I'm usually when we're talking about these sort of they consider windfall money and expected money in your in your life. You want to try to stick to maybe ten to fifteen percent of that at most for something small something fun. Apple kind of help you out there. Right back to the serious stuff. You gotta pay off that debt if you do have debt. That's a good reason to take a look here when you've got some extra money. Coming in especially talking about high rate debt like credit card balance this refund could be enough. If you take at these part of that put that toward knocking out we wanted to your smaller balances, or at least making a nice dent in a larger balance that can help you dig out of debt faster, speaking with Kelli grant, senior editor at acorns, plus CNBC, and she's written a piece about how to make the most of your smaller tax refunds in. So far. The IRS says there are about eight point four percent smaller than last year. You said to shore up your financial safety net. Explain that one most people do not have enough money set aside to be able to handle even small emergency Federal Reserve data points to it's about that four hundred dollar Mark still the bulk of us couldn't put our hands on that much money without having to sell something or incur some debt. So if you don't have a decent emergency fund. Now's a pretty good time to think about building one that can really help you make sure that the next time there is some sort of an unexpected financial expense that you're only Rick. Isn't just to pick up a credit card that you have some cash savings that you could tap to either cover that or to partially cover that expense. Boy, eight and ten Americans use you said living paycheck to paycheck. It's seems like a near impossibility to shore up any kind of safety net. It really is a tough call for a lot of folks. That's why you know, when you have this sort of money coming in. I mean last year and the average refund was about three thousand dollars, and we know a lot of folks if they file for certain tax credit to the refund could easily be twice that. So this is for a lot of people to biggest paycheck. They're going to get over the course of ear. It's really important to think about making the most of that money instead of just spending it I mean that targeted spending. We talked about on things that would be important for your life. That's, you know, its own sort of way of shoring up that safety net. Let me it's Kellie, Kellie grant, senior editor at acorns plus CNBC, thirty minutes now after the hour on This Morning, America's first news..

Kellie grant senior editor CNBC CNBC Kelly careerbuilder IRS Apple Rick Mark America three thousand dollars four hundred dollar fifteen percent thirty minutes four percent
"senior editor" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:22 min | 2 years ago

"senior editor" Discussed on KCRW

"Senior editor of manufacturing engineering magazine. Bill is joining us from Ann Arbor. Michigan. Welcome to the show Bill. Great to be here. So GM is calling this a quote unquote, restructuring, you're someone who's covered this industry for a long time. When you hear the word restructuring in the auto industry, are you hearing layoffs and cost cutting or innovation. I usually think job cuts and plant closings because they inevitably accompany restructurings. It's a bit more polite way of saying it. But there is a broader thing going on right now the auto industry is at the cusp of the biggest change in more than a century. What happened a century ago was it was sort of a toss up which one would win out? Would it be the mass produced cars or would be hand built cars, like the chords and the Duesenberg? Well, the mass produced cars one out what we're looking at. Now is there may be a shift to self driving vehicles ride sharing services in the things that would have very fundamental changes. And nobody really knows how it's going to play out. And so what GM is doing and other automakers are looking to do is essentially, you know, trucks are still very popular. That's how they finance their investments in this future technology, and the market has shifted away from cars, so essentially GM is cutting way back in cars Ford has already said it's going to cut way back in cars. So what they're doing is. They're trying to amp up the price. From the trucks to pay for the self driving vehicles in the future stuff. So I was going to say how much of this has to do with American car sales and preferences, changing versus the Trump tariffs, for example. Definitely the shift toward away from cars is definitely a factor. If car sales were stronger than they are you still might have a restructuring bit of wouldn't take this form. And I'm wondering what is this? You know in terms of the what led to this? I mean, we had heard that there were several plants that had issues between management and union workers did any it was any of this exacerbated by labor issues all three of the assembly plants. There's also to engine plants that were affected by yesterday's announcement. But all through those assembly plants have had problematical issues over the years. GM has tried to close Oshawa before and it managed to win a reprieve, but it has tough labor relations Lordstown has had terrible labor relations over decades and Detroit Hamtramck. I'm not sure it was ever worth the investment. It's it's never like boomed the way other plants. Do I'm not saying, it's the primary reason. By any means. But you gotta take it into consideration. It feels like there's the situation we've been trying to quote unquote, save the auto industry for years now. And it just feels like maybe are. I mean in yours are we trying to save something? That's just never going to really be saved at this point. Well, I think you'll still be an auto industry, but it may be greatly changed essentially what GM's trying to stay ahead of the curve. They don't want to be in a position like they were ten years ago. So they're saying we have to do this for the future. We'll see Bill Koenig a senior editor of manufacturing engineering Bill. Thanks so much for being with us. Thank you..

GM Bill Koenig Senior editor Michigan Ann Arbor Ford Oshawa Hamtramck Detroit Lordstown ten years
"senior editor" Discussed on Creators Collective

Creators Collective

04:54 min | 2 years ago

"senior editor" Discussed on Creators Collective

"But I think I always had an issue that was not scratched by the ministries. So while as a pastor I got heavily into woodworking is Lamar accessible than trying to start up, you know, metal shop in my garage. And really just fell in love with it. So I did that for a while and til I couldn't bounce the two anymore. And so I started looking for jobs, and while I was looking for jobs, I discovered that popular woodworking was in Cincinnati where I was living. I saw job on indeed dot com and ignored it for probably a month. I kept seeing it. Well, it's because I was like I was trying to pitch myself as like some kind of communicator, some kind of content person because of my preaching experience and all the leadership stuff ahead. There is that a big church. So I kept seeing this job. And finally has like, you know, maybe I should just like think about it. And I don't know what made me do this. But somehow as I was looking at popular woodworking. I saw that they had a phone number in the masthead is I called it in Fitzpatrick picked up, and we had a really good conversation and the day after we talked the job description had changed on the website like because of our conversation, that's kind of encouraging. And so I applied interviewed and got the job as the online content director. So I did that role which was just managing our website working with all of our paid bloggers and working on free content, and oh in all of our newsletters, huge newsletter scheme. Get the get the newsletter. It's. Pretty would watch live. By david. Aside from that one. So in the spring of this year after Megan left the magazine Andrews zone or came on our editor, Brendan Gaffney left his position as managing editor. And so we were left with Justin editor, and no editors below them. And that went on for we had we were did a nationwide. Search for like almost a month probably a month. Plus and didn't have any applications that we were really wanting to pursue. So I think at like nine thirty one evening texted, Andrew and said what what if I stepped up to senior editor, and we found someone else to run online stuff, and he says cool, and he talked to publisher, and she said cool, and then I became the senior editor. Wow. Does that? And that was spring time. So I. Fictionally changed positions in like may. And then our publisher changed which is like the person at the top of the magazine overseas a lot of the business things. So like my transition into doing all the print stuff that I'm doing now was slow duties were being reassigned, and I had to train other people on our newsletter stuff and web stuff. Oh, and we got a web new website in the middle of this. So like that through another ranch into where I was trying to train somebody on how I did all things on our website. And then we got a new website. So it's like it's been nuts, like six months of change and transition and finding new normals and new procedures, and there's no documentation for all the new things we're doing yet. So so that's a big. So you even way back when you emailed me about way back way back like before that would ring when I was still a pastor when you're. Passer. You emailed me just about YouTube in like L that kind of you know, why stock to you in found out that you two were a wedding photographer, which is what my wife that's another side of the story. But my wife, and I have been doing wedding photography for ten years now. And so I thought it was super interesting that you did wedding photography and the woodworking content production because as I was trying to feel out directions. Mike career might go. Like oh. Well, this kind of doing something that sounds pretty cool. Yeah. And then he said screwed YouTube. I'm just going to be the senior editor of popular woodworking. Instead, it was an accident. I didn't mean to inches happened. So let there's like this dewalt expo thing last year in Nashville, and I think I can't remember the name of the guy that I met brand is Brandon..

editor senior editor YouTube Lamar publisher Cincinnati Mike career managing editor Megan Nashville Fitzpatrick I. Fictionally director david Brendan Gaffney Justin Andrew six months ten years
"senior editor" Discussed on KMOX News Radio 1120

KMOX News Radio 1120

11:19 min | 2 years ago

"senior editor" Discussed on KMOX News Radio 1120

"X stands for news. Joining us now is senior editor of crime at people magazine, and people magazine investigates, they're showing profiles of ordinary. People thrust in the spotlight after notorious crimes, very popular Jonah right now with the true crime. Joining us is a leash Dennis. Thank you so much for coming onto camel ex. I'm so glad to be here. Thanks for having me true crime. You must be living the good life right now with all the true crime podcast that are out there. People are really consuming. This sort of thing you're in your third season. You guys do investigative journalism. You look into some really interesting cases throughout the United States and season three. I wanted to get a preview of some of the cases you guys will be looking at your right? It's really fascinating. How many many people are riveted by these stories, and I think that it has to do with the fact that you're really connected in this human way, I think to seeing an experience that someone else has gone. Through and we spend a lot of time really trying to tell you know, the human stories here people that have had these kind of things happen in their family is and will make sure that we've spoken very to the to the victims families and really kind of tell the stories through there is. But our premiere episode is called somebody's watching. And it's it's the staff meeting case about a woman named the net. Crin tell who died in what everyone thought was a fire just a tragic fire. Her husband, ironically as the fire chief in town, and they discover just a few days later at her memorial service, actually when the coroner put out a report that she had been murdered and she'd been Sean were no set it all in her lungs, and that's actually how she died. So that's that's one of the cases that we look into. But I think what's interesting is in the season three you're going to see. Cases that maybe you've heard about before we we have an episode about Charles Manson, but it's not what you would expect and everything that you've heard about him. But we're doing some investigation where there could be other victims of Charles Manson that you've never heard of. And so I it's interesting I think because with the fifteen different episodes, we have there's going to be stories you've never heard of. And there's going to be stories that maybe you have heard of. But hopefully, we're going to tell you something different about that. It's on investigation discovery. The ide- television network, you can find it on really the dish direct TV any cable network. It's in every home. So just look for investigation discovery. So when you actually start to research these crimes do you find that some of your journalists when they're trying to reach out to family members? Are they a little hesitant to talk to you guys? Yeah. A lot of times they are these people have gone through something horrific. A lot of times when we're reaching out to them. Sometimes it's a case where Justice hasn't been served yet. And so they still seeking that. And it's interesting because you know, our team when they reach out to people were often surprised about how much people do wanna talk about, you know, they don't want their loved one to be forgotten a lot of times once time has gone by the people that they're closest to are trying to save them the pain and hurt by bringing this up and try not to talk about it. And so we find that a lot of times they really want to talk about it. And they want to tell the story, and they want someone to share it with the world. And we're finding that we're getting the opportunity to do that not only, you know, in the magazine, but also on people dot com, and now in this television show we've had our third year of getting. To do that. And tell these stories in this another way a completely different way. And so, yeah, I think I think that's a good point that you bring up that people are are hesitant at first. But a lot of times once they start talking and they begin to trust the journalists who they're working with. And and luckily with people we do have a name that people trust, and they believe, and it's because I think our journalists are really really some of the best in the business. I'm a bit biased. No, I'm glad you're proud of them. That's the way you should be senior editor of crime at people Alicia Dennis joining us and people magazine investigates its on watch the third season starts on investigation discovery. And I got to wonder too when you start diving into some of these cases, dear journalist secretly hoped. They can crack the case wide open and try to solve some of these cases that may have some loose ends in them. We absolutely do. Do you wanna do that? And a lot of times, you know, we wonder if in some of them are shining a light on them might help them be solved by someone who comes forward and gives information to the investigators or the police that maybe hadn't known about the case before or something just dawns on them or they learn or discover something new that may help the case be solved. Now, we look at a lot of different types of cases, a lot of different mysteries. And you know, when somebody's doing their job well and in digging you you'll be surprised sometimes what they can find. And we've had some of our journalists that are just working shoulder to shoulder with the police, and some of these cases because a lot of police departments are really strapped and don't have a lot of resources, and he's got a journalist who spending all their time. I'm digging and looking at things sometimes it can help to have another set of I. Yeah, you're right. Yeah. I always wonder about that too for primarily speaking, are you looking at murder cases, or do you guys dive into other cases as well? When the crime team, we work on all different types of cases, with our show, people magazine investigates, we're primarily looking at murder cases and cases of well. Some of them would not necessarily be murder cases. They're missing persons cases. Where you ask yourself? The question is this person out there still alive and missing or you know, has something terrible happened to them. And so we're looking into mysterious disappearances as well. How do you guys decide the different cases, you'll investigate? It's such a good question. We spend a lot of time talking about these things sometimes debating different stories and pitch them to each other talk to each other about them. And I think pretty much most of the time when there's a story that has a thread to it touches everyone and everyone's either, you know, spellbound are really interested or feeling a little bit heartbroken about it that we know that it's something that we need to look into further. Yeah. You probably have an abundance of stories out there as well with the amount of true crime of the John Reid self continuing to grow people are really interested in those mysteries that are out there. They are. And you know for us. We we want to try to find stories that not everyone has told before. So the more that genre gets popular as you say the harder. It is for us to find the stories that are new different or ones that are exclusive to us, and that's really important to us. We want we want to be able to try to tell stories in the way that only people can where we we really look at them through the eyes of those who are experiencing them at the same time. We're we're working really hard kind of around the clock to look all over the country for those very unique cases that you maybe haven't heard of. I mean, we're covering the bigger cases that you have. But we'd like to also find the ones that maybe are kind of lurking in places that you haven't seen before lurking. That's the right working people magazine investigates its third season. Getting ready to start up. It's really really interesting with investigation discovery. Just one last question you, fifteen episodes. Did you ever have to go back and revise some of your previous previous episodes? As new evidence comes to light on some of the cases you've investigated. We have we've we are constantly making sure that we're keeping track of all of these cases. And some of them are resolved. We call that adjudicated their cases that there's probably won't be anything different happening in them. But we do have some that are open or that things change or the charges change a lot of time. Somebody has been charged with one thing that can completely have charges added to that or a court date change. So yes, the short answer is. Yes in the longer answer is we just have to track and watch these things to make sure that when the news does break that we update the shows, and we're really good about that. Because it's. Important to us to be telling, you know, the the best version of this case that we can't and the most up to minute that we can senior editor of crime at people Alicia Dennis in investigation Discovery's new season of people magazine investigates. How I imagine you right now is in an office with photos and news clippings on the wall with push pins and red yarn and things that's how you would organize. Some of these cases, you're investigating it. It seems like that whenever I see on television. When you look at the the true crimes, or whatever there's always some kind of wall somewhere where they're trying to connect all the pieces, and I mentioned it behind you right now. That's a good way. To imagine us. We are actually surrounded by stacks and stacks and stacks of paper and files, and but I like the other way. No. That sounds too much like a desk job. You guys are doing much bigger work. You know, you're out there. You're you're talking to people. Now, if people want to check it out when can they watch it? They can watch our premiere episode is going to be on Monday, November fifth at ten o'clock eastern time on investigation discovery. And then after that for our other fifteen episodes this season if they tune in on Monday nights around nine or ten they should look and see what time that is. That's when we're going to have every new episode show. Of course, check out the listings, we're in central time. So, you know, did shifts between we'll check that out people magazine investigates in senior editor of crime of people Alicia Dennis. Thank you so much for coming on overnight, America. Oh, it's my pleasure. Thank you so much on the quiver. River electric guests line overnight,.

people magazine Discovery senior editor Alicia Dennis United States Charles Manson Jonah murder Crin Justice Sean John Reid
"senior editor" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

MyTalk 107.1

02:32 min | 3 years ago

"senior editor" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

"I i hate that they're spending poor jim same same i don't like that either do i but the people magazine guy was on last thursday or friday morning when this all happened to write but they've changed their story they went from one story which was just that they simply just didn't live together enough to their jennifer anna since people are working very tightly with people magazine and when she was on with access hollywood today all the talking points from the magazine verbatim were said by the senior editor but that access hollywood odd jio is not available anywhere of her speaking the same words that you did she says verbatim in his people magazine like things like this i sad and disappointed that her marriage to justin didn't work out aid had would say that she didn't next but but again julie this is all done painting a picture okay i don't wanna let's bring this up but even when you in your husband's split up people have an insatiable need to know what happened and for a year yeah and and and and when you're in the public eye you have part of the game when you're a minus a plus which is how she's always refers rag lie you do your public image is part of how you make endorsement eddie lloyd to manage it it is much of a part of hollywood as the roles you take okay incidence she hears she didn't expect to be single again i mean this woman said this offer beta but that i can see that still was she's not looking for a dating again she ultimately beliefs and love as honorary future again she's not a fan of dating she never was he's always found dating awkward an unpleasant and the club yeah she lazaga media attention and it also the thing they couldn't find common ground that made them happy and also there's a looting to um the baby baby you have the baby news the baby news but without any when sane um she worries i think jennifer aniston for some reason her people worries that you'll lose who fan base if she admits the cheese not she doesn't want to become mother i feel like she's already says no here's what she said they warning and i julia here's the listen you can adopt halle berry had a baby at fifty here's the thing this is.

hollywood senior editor julie eddie lloyd halle berry people magazine justin jennifer aniston
"senior editor" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:18 min | 3 years ago

"senior editor" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The american judiciary for generations justice gorsuch was confirmed to the supreme court in 2002 judges have been confirmed including a recordsetting twelve circuit judges there's plenty of room to disagree over whether what the president and republicans in congress have accomplish this year has been good for the country but for conservatives who initially weren't sure what they would get with the president trump is plenty to celebrate ramesh peru is a senior editor at national review the policy changes that trump has helped to bring about our roughly what you would expect from a republican president with a narrowly republican senate and a republican house for neuro says for an unconventional candidate trump has turned out to be a surprisingly reliable conservative as president conventional even aside from the tweeting and the occasional feuding with fellow republicans there are some issues where he disagrees with the conventional conservative view but he has either been unwilling or unable to put them into practice on the other side of the aisle the analysis of trump's first year in office isn't all that different eat it depends on how you define success but he is deadly accomplish some key goals of the conservative movement near at hand in his president of the center for american progress a group which has been fighting trump's agenda at every turn i expected known trump to pursue farright agenda and he is meeting this expectations and he's succeeding i mean if you think a republican was going to come into to be president and have a republican congress and not succeed that would be on but as tendencies at trump's success is coming at a cost the left is energized and his approval rating is south of forty percent he will reshape american you know life and fundamental ways around you particularly in the regulatory cared and what he's done on taxes but i think you where he has failed is to bring the american people with him naturally trump sees it differently tweeting quote the fake news refuses to talk about how big and how strong our bases adding we are doing well nobody.

american judiciary gorsuch president congress trump peru senior editor national review senate forty percent
"senior editor" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:30 min | 3 years ago

"senior editor" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The american judiciary for generations justice gorsuch was confirmed to the supreme court in 2002 judges have been confirmed including a recordsetting twelve circuit judges there's plenty of room to disagree over whether what the president and republicans in congress have accomplish this year has been good for the country but for conservatives who initially weren't sure what they would get with the president trump there is plenty to celebrate ramesh canoe is a senior editor at national review the policy changes that trump has helped to bring about our roughly what you would expect from a republican president with a narrowly republican senate and a republican house for neuro says for an unconventional candidate trump has turned out to be a surprisingly reliable conservative as president conventional even aside from the tweeting and the occasional feuding with fellow republicans there are some issues where he disagrees with the conventional conservative view but he has either been unwilling or unable to put them into practice on the other side of the aisle the analysis of trump's first year in office isn't all that different it depends on how you define success but he is deadly accomplish some key goals of the conservative movement near at hand is president of the center for american progress a group which has been fighting trump's agenda at every turn i expected known trump to pursue farright agenda and he is meeting those expectations and he's succeeding i mean if you think a republican was going to come into to be president and have a republican congress and not succeed that would be awesome but as tendencies it trump's success is coming at a cost the left is energized and his approval rating is south a forty percent he will reshape american you know life and fundamental ways around you particularly in the regulatory code and what he's done on taxes but i think you where he has failed is to bring the american people with him naturally trump sees it differently tweeting quote the fake news refuses to talk about how big and how strong our bases adding we are doing well nobody is going to beat us make america great again exclamation point the american people we'll get to issue their judgment of president trump's accomplishments and the way his party has governed next fall in.

american judiciary gorsuch president congress senior editor national review senate trump america forty percent
"senior editor" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:25 min | 3 years ago

"senior editor" Discussed on KQED Radio

"To the supreme court in 2002 judges have been confirmed including a recordsetting twelve circuit judges there's plenty of room to disagree over whether wet the president and republicans in congress have accomplish this year has been good for the country but for conservatives who initially weren't sure what they would get with the president trump there's plenty to celebrate ramesh canoe is a senior editor at national review the policy changes that trump has helped to bring about our roughly what you would expect from a republican president with a narrowly republican senate and a republican house for numerous says for an unconventional candidate trump has turned out to be a surprisingly reliable conservative as president conventional even aside from the tweeting and the occasional feuding with fellow republicans there are some issues where he disagrees with the conventional conservative view but he has either been unwilling or unable to put them into practice on the other side of the aisle the analysis of trump's first year in office isn't all that different it depends on how you define success but he is definitely accomplish some key goals of the conservative movement near at hand in his president of the center for american progress a group which has been fighting trump's agenda at every turn i expected known trump to pursue farright agenda and he's meeting those expectations and he's succeeding i mean if you think a republican was going to come into to be president and have a republican congress and not succeed that would be i'd but as tendencies at trump's success is coming at a cost the left is energized and his approval rating is south of forty percent he will reshape american you know life and fundamental ways around you particularly in the regulatory cared and what he's done on taxes but i think you where he has failed is to bring the american people with him naturally trump sees it differently tweeting quote the fake news refuses to talk about how big and how strong our bases adding we are doing well nobody is going to beat us make america great again exclamation point the american people will get to issue of their judgment of president trump's accomplishments and the way his party has governed next fall in the.

president congress senior editor national review senate trump america forty percent
"senior editor" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:32 min | 3 years ago

"senior editor" Discussed on KCRW

"Senior editor of insider up first onto night shower or two of our favorite experts the pollsters on the left is democratic pollster murchio mero she's a partner at gpa strategies and on the right is christon sold us anderson she is a columnist for the washington and cofounder of ashland insights welcome to both of you so democrats one really big in virginia on tuesday actually way bigger than the poll said they would win at the end of the governor's race they're the realclearpolitics average of all the polls had democratic candidate ralph north on the head by three point three points and then he went on to win by knob so people don't notice the polling errors as much when the polls are still write about who wins but this is a big mess like five and a half points it's bigger than a lot of the poll mrs that ms let us about what would happen 2016 election is polling still broken why was a so far off well so in fact real clear politics had a story saying the polls in virginia look like they are within the margie margin that's me um because you have a pollsters may approach that's the difference between how different pollsters may purge the same data set so just because you have unweighted data you have your poll you conduct your pulled as i mean the answer is plus point three and that's the only answer there are different approaches what are your assumptions about party what are your assumptions about race what are your assumptions about turnout and bob in advance of election day because people don't know whether or not they're gonna vote especially in estate labor jinya where you have an odd euroelection.

Senior editor partner washington virginia bob election day ashland ralph north data set