12 Burst results for "Senior Director Of Product Management"

"senior director product management" Discussed on Telecom Reseller

Telecom Reseller

04:21 min | 1 year ago

"senior director product management" Discussed on Telecom Reseller

"This is the green and I'm the publisher of Telecom reseller and today, I'm with Andre Reed. Who's the senior director product management at Poly under? Thank you for joining me today. Thanks. Thanks very much for having me. I'm really excited to to chat today. We're always excited and it's always fun to talk to the people Polly. We've been talking lately about the developments of poly and also the poly experience Center. And how Polly is crafting products specifically designed to look at the way people of work and operate in today's market wage and recently Polly passed a milestone shipping. Thirty million IP phone shipment. That's quite a milestone. It is, it's something we thought was worth celebrating. When we we do the count and we do it, sort of regularly, we were blown away and surprised pleasantly Thursday. We we celebrated it internally and then we thought we should celebrate it externally. So uh, it's it's uh almost largely or wholly ugh celebrated by our end and delivered through life Partners. Uh, so so I do need to make sure I think all of our many, many service provider Channel sales and Alliance Partners out there. So huge number really excited and I'm done it without them. So this you know this is a giant achievement and it Harkens back to the fact that you know, both companies that Polly became they came from you know, your company's DNA is right back to the very roots of telecommunications. In this case we're talking about IP phones which I think started shipping about twenty years ago. So this this is a huge number of of users dead. It is, it's something that you wouldn't think normally. I mean, yes, we we built designed invented, the, the conference phone, right? The the very first conference phone. You know, I've had the pleasure of working closely with the polycom co-founder Jeff Rodman and it's amazing to see the way he would engineer things off. So, so it's it's evolved into the way in the culture that he would look at everything as how do I solve this problem better?.

Jeff Rodman Andre Reed Thursday Thirty million Alliance Partners today Polly both companies poly Poly twenty years ago first conference phone poly experience Center about
"senior director product management" Discussed on The Product Experience

The Product Experience

03:43 min | 1 year ago

"senior director product management" Discussed on The Product Experience

"Diverse. Thank you so much for joining us on the podcast for anyone. Who doesn't do you mind giving us. Just a quick introduction tells a little bit about yourself. Yeah i am vars around currently the ceo and co founder of morocco. We are a real time data platform as a service company and prior to that i was Lee product manager for platform at twitter. Senior director product management at hiroko for developers fans And where else are them. I've been a product manager at Henna product supply company on his visco. The app Platform product manager dundas. And a couple of places where i called myself not product officer As kind of an interesting story of anybody who's like. I don't know if you guys have done or you all have done The how i broke into product story but Yeah my my journey is non traditional. In the best way. I felt like an engineer could could become a product manager. So i was going through your lincoln. So you've been a developer and evangelist. A product manager a cto ceo lecturer and an investor. So how did you get into product in the first place that start with. Yeah i was at microsoft and i was engineer microsoft and we were on one of the most one a pretty tech fairly technical product which was at the time it was called red. Dog was turned into. Windows azure as project red dot. And i had absolutely horrible product management..

microsoft twitter Lee Henna Windows first hiroko one ceo morocco red
"senior director product management" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

07:47 min | 1 year ago

"senior director product management" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"Yet it is true because they make it through again and again and again and again. Has now being reported by Fox News. Facebook and Twitter executives donated tens of thousands of dollars to the Biden campaign. Top executives at Facebook and Twitter, the same people. The hunter Biden story. Donated tens of thousands of dollars to Joe Biden's campaign, according to FCC records. And they gave nothing. To President Trump. There were zero Facebook or Twitter executives who donated the President Trump yet we are supposed to believe that these people are engaged in good faith. When dealing with their platforms. What's to believe? How could you believe it? Why would you believe it? There's nothing left. There's nothing left for us to to do glom onto and think that there's hope of There is an elitist class. Of media types who believe that they're in charge. And then There are there's you Who was told that if you don't listen to them well, then you're not getting real news. You're getting fake news. You're being fed conspiracy theories. It's important that journalists and media know how much they have failed America and I love that They get so angry about it so incredibly angry. How dare you talk this way about the media? You deserve it. Now what? Why don't you go about proving me wrong in doing good work? When do we get to that stage off the conversation where you start doing good work. Where you start actually reporting Take a look at the data from interim County. Sorry, and from county. No. Then you're not serious. Twitter prevented the story of Hunter Biden from going forward. Facebook's vice president. Public policy donated 20 and $2800 to Biden's campaign in 2800 Torto the campaign during the primaries. Facebook's chief revenue officer donated $2800 to buy during the primary 750 during the general election. Twitter's vice president, Macha Rela donated 2000 Biden's campaign in September. Dozens of Twitter and Facebook employees with manager or director in their titles donated at least $1000. Twitter senior director. Donated 2800. Biden's campaign in March. Senior director product management donated $2800 during the primary and $2800 in the general election. Those of the maximums people. Those are the maximums. So Why shouldn't we believe that they failed to share the 100 Biden story which was perfectly sourced. Because they were trying to get Joe Biden to win. And why would we ever believe that? They're not silencing conservatives? Of course they are. And then he would be anybody who believes Jack Dorsey is too dumb to be in the room. Now I rarely use the words Dumber, stupid. Those words and conversation. But there's nothing left. Brought the receipts. It's over. I mean, it's been over for a long time, but there's nothing left to talk about. If you detect anger in my voice Because it's there. Because these people still think that face or somehow in charge. Everything that we have been discussing about the need for Platforms. The needs create content the need for streaming services. It's all there. It's still there, and there's an audience. Do me a favor. Producer. Ari, Why don't you tell me how many people Voted for Donald Trump. Take a look and search it up. How? Don't don't use Google. Screw those guys. How many people Voted for Donald Trump. Well, according to all right, That's 2016. Hold on. We're not trying 16. We're talking 2020 numbers now, 74,223,755. We'll call it 74 million, just for the sake of the conversation. Sure, And you know, there are people who didn't vote for Trump, who are still supporters. 74 million people makes a pretty big audience. If you had a competing service, he only charged a buck a month you could be making $74 million a month. I don't want the bike for Kate in society, but here it is right. It's here. They have told you They have told you that they cannot be trusted and they cannot be trusted. Me. Say it again. They absolutely positively cannot be trusted. So don't do it. Don't you do it. You want more proof? Okay, I'll give it to you. There's a fact checker. By the name of Margo. Sister. I don't know. Marco. I have never met the Margaux. She's she's new to me in my world. But according to Sky News Margo Sista. Retweeted the claim that racism is embraced by nearly half of the country's electorate in America and called yourself a member of Hillary Clinton's team in 2019. She's a fact checker for Facebook. She's a professor. Who goes about taking a look at things People post and decides whether or not they're legitimate and construct a She's at American University, and she's not what what kind of professor journalism professor? That's right, and she's a certified for the international fact checking network since 2017 Now I ask you should she be a fact checker. Now we could take a look at it a different way and ask ourselves Well, could I be a fact checker? Good. I Tony Cats be a fact checker. I think I could. I think I know how to how to do that. But I also believe that people should be able to engage in conversation. And be able to share different points of view, and I believe in not silencing or censoring people. On Social media. What can I say? I'm funny like that..

Hunter Biden Facebook Twitter Donald Trump Biden Joe Biden President Trump Margo Sista Fox News America vice president President Jack Dorsey professor Senior director product manage interim County FCC Google senior director
"senior director product management" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

06:02 min | 1 year ago

"senior director product management" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"America. Mark Levin are number 87738138118773813811 Look at this. Joe Biden refuses to take questions from press on his son's legal troubles. New York Times refuses to cover the Swalwell relationship with Fung Fung, the spy. CNN's state of the Union on Sunday that would be fake. Tapper refuses to cover the hunter Biden scandal. Wow. Don't you wish you were a liberal Democrat? Don't you when we have big tech You know, Mr Producer when I actually posted my opening monologue from Sunday. Did you see Facebook put a Notice up there. Facebook. Fox News Top Facebook Twitter execs donated tens of thousands of dollars to the Biden campaign. You know, these corporations in many ways were created by the federal government. These were basically punks bazaar owes like Jack over Twitter and Zuckerberg over there. Facebook in the rest of them. But they needed something desperately in order to grow in 1994. They got it, which was protection. From libel suits. This is why Today's media are out of control. And this is why Tech is out of control. There's no accountability. So the president United States insisted that the Republicans Add language to the Defense Department funding bill. That eliminates that protection. And the Republicans led the way. Against the president. The United States. This is this is why there's such pathetic losers. Especially in the Senate, and especially McConnell. The top executives had Facebook and Twitter donated tens of thousands of dollars to President elect Joe Biden's campaign. This is how it's written. FBC RECORDS Reviewed by Fox News reveal Is the social media platforms come under fire for limiting the circulation of reports surrounding 100 binds business dealings in the weeks leading up to the election. These Big tech companies. And their platforms were used to promote the election of Joe Biden and the defeat of President Trump. That was their purpose. And they were not going to allow the 100 buying story to get out before the election. They and big media were in cahoots. We do not have a free press is I wrote it on freedom of the press. By the way, I have people coming up to me at a nowhere and saying Like I tried to buy your books or a book one of your books at Barnes and Noble and there's not a single one there. I don't know if it's the damn publisher Simon and Schuster. I don't know if it's the bookstore. I don't know what it is. You go in there, You can find all kinds of books that Marx wrote. All kinds of stupid books on Obama. My books are national number one New York slimes bestsellers and they're never there. And they're never there. Maybe they're burning it with Huckleberry Finn and stuff like that. I don't know. Fox News Review of FCC record shows that top executives at the social media companies made large donations large to the Biden campaign, including several gave the legal maximum of $2800. I think you'll find that with almost all these media companies, including the media company that I work for I think you'll find that But I don't know exactly. Fox News identified zero Facebook or Twitter executives who donated to Trump's campaign. Wanted. FBC RECORDS Facebook Vice president of public policy Erin Egan donated 2800. Biden's campaign on October 1. In addition to the 2800 she donated to the campaign during the Democratic primaries. Facebook chief Revenue Officer David Fisher donated 2800 of the Biden campaign during the primary and an additional 750 during the general election. Facebook's chief financial officer, David Winter. Donated the legal maximum 2800 of the Biden campaign or not, April 22. Facebook Vice president's Gene Austin. Michael very do sure, Ari Robert Yes, Khurana. Also donated the legal maximum of 2800 bind campaign during the 2020 cycle. Instagram. You know they own instagram to Chief operating officer Martin Levin. Conference bid also donated the maximum live it $2800 Rich waiter Vice president Matt Durell, a donated 2000. Biden's campaign. The executives were not alone if he see records reveal dozens of Twitter and Facebook employees with manager director in their titles, donating at least $1000 to bite his campaign. Put a senior director Ryan Oliver, for example, Donated 2800 Divides campaign in March. Senior Director Product management James Kelm 2800 of the Biden Campaign primary, another 2800 of the general election. Facebook, the platforms. Public policy director Steve Satterfield, another public policy director. Michael Matthews, product manager. Brett Kintz, Facebook director. Abraham Kill, You see, Don't 80 $2800 to buy his campaign. Facebook program manager David Apart. Ola donated 5600 split between binds primary and general election campaign..

Facebook Joe Biden Biden Biden Campaign primary hunter Biden Twitter President Trump Vice president president Fox News New York United States Senior Director Product manage Fung Fung New York Times CNN director Michael Matthews senior director
"senior director product management" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

02:02 min | 1 year ago

"senior director product management" Discussed on KTRH

"The month and 300,000 but the end of January Sue Guzman. Fox News News on demand at ktrh dot com. Sally Adams on Use radio 7 40 ktrh. Welcome to in the oil patch present by Shale magazine Broadcasting today from a Greco studios. A Greco powering the Permian in the oil patch is where together we explored topics that affect us all in oil, gas business and in your community. Every week, your host Kimble Otto will visit with the movers and shakers in this fast paced industry. You'll hear from industry experts, elected officials and many more right here on in the oil patch. And welcome to in the oil patch radio show. I'm your host, Kimble, Otto. And today we're being joined by Alex Color. Fatah's senior director, product management and Ron Beck, who is the marketing strategic director. Both gentlemen are with Espen Tech, but before I bring them on, I'd like to talk to you about the latest issue of Show magazine. It's a fairly new release. In which the cover is the president of the Texas Alliance of Energy Producers, Jason Module in and we were able to catch up with him. You know, he's new leader for the association. It's over 100 years old, and he had a lot to say It was really great to catch up with him because he's just this fresh face who's been in the political world for a very long time. And I believe by the interview. What we will see from the alliance is a new path and a new Way forward with some really great ideas. And, of course, he's very techie him and his team, so we'll see a lot of great things coming out from the Texas lines of energy producers. It's the story and you wanna learn about the association. Make sure you go to show meg dot com again. That's S H A l E M A G. And speaking about the issue currently on Show magazine. You know, at the end of the year, we wound down with our women's issue of Show magazine, and every year we get a lot of feedback on who's gonna be on the cover since it's a woman's issue. And so I encourage our listeners..

"senior director product management" Discussed on IT Visionaries

IT Visionaries

01:42 min | 2 years ago

"senior director product management" Discussed on IT Visionaries

"Look at monthly active users others user engagement and things like that and other advanced metrics but get to know your users there is humans that are just trying to do their work at the end of the day and and talking to them personally will give you insights that Would be mind blowing to you. What are you most excited about for the future mobile? What are most excited about is that the smartphone is becoming more and more of a hub in your pocket? We know that glasses houses are coming. We know that digital glasses with augmented reality are coming the watch the wearables are already here but they all need your phone phone to actually function. Your phone is essentially what they use for processing memory and to save battery life. When I'm really excited about is the being able to use that so that devices get smaller and smaller and basically? That's it what question did never ask that. You wish you were asked more often. That's it's a tough one. I think when people ask what is your passion outside of work. What is your passion outside of work? What do you do for fun? I love cooking. I love reading one of the things when picking a major for college was picking between English literature and Computer Engineering unerring. I love the human side of things as well so reading books that are not related to tech is probably one of my favorite things to do. I love it victor. Sure thanks so much for coming on. We appreciate it. We'll be following along closely anything with the APP that goes wrong. I'll make sure email you put. It never does right in a perfect. It took me..

Computer Engineering
"senior director product management" Discussed on IT Visionaries

IT Visionaries

06:04 min | 2 years ago

"senior director product management" Discussed on IT Visionaries

"Our capabilities of a smartphone with no code and low code tool so for example One of the surprise hits to me is we're building being a component called the business card scanner and all that really does is that it takes. The phone's camera scans business card and then creates a contact it in salesforce but like you said earlier a lot of sales reps what they have to do is they go through all these sales meetings and on Friday afternoon. They just want to get home but they have have to do. A bunch of data entry part of the data entry is all the business cards. They got that week. They have to create contact records in sales for. How do we do that in a way? So that we take that pain from the users and immediately just create that sales for so the way we're building is we're creating a barcode scanner. We're we're creating a business card scanner. We're getting a document scanner and basically taking all these things that were easier to do with pen and paper and making it an in order magnitude easier to do with the salesforce mobile APP but I think the magic really is for salesforce admins. NCO's is being able to roll. These is futures out using no code and low code tools so what will happen is all these components. They're just lighting components. We'll just be part of the lightning APP builder so an Admin who does not have a degree potentially in or has not spent the last five years of their life. Doing machine learning can go the lightning APP builder and drag and drop these components into the salesforce mobile APP and immediately deployed these to their users does really cool I. It is definitely a request for For feature that I've had in my life since I started selling many years ago. man you'd get a stack of business cards after a conference you'd have like fifteen or like. How am I ever going to ask all these? Yeah absolutely and most of the time. They don't have the time to do so or for those sales reps that love taking notes still on their pen and paper. What we're trying to do is find a way so that you can take a picture of your notes and have that that immediately get entered into salesforce without you having to deal bunch of data entry? What about a how would that potentially intially be able to make user experience even easier the way I look at a I is that one way to look at? It is wouldn't be great if a feature got better the more you used it. And that's what I think. The main purpose of AI is is is to learn from a user's behavior what information is important to them and surface that so that there's less taps and there's less clicks flakes to get to what they need. Yeah it's a great point and one of the great applications of. Ai is search especially on your phone where let's say your Sales Rep. You're on the go you're in between meetings and you just need to find information about this account that you're about to meet with the thing is let's say there's thousands of sales reps in your company and there's many accounts of similar names for example. And so you're in between meetings or searching for something nothing on your phone you can find that account the great thing about the updates were making to search on the salesforce mobile APP is with Ai. It learns which accounts are most is important to you so as you start typing it actually shows these accounts that we predict are really important to us so that lessons amount of taps and user frustration of. Hey No that wasn't that count. I was looking for the other account. Do you think that you know with things like Ai. Okay and building that into an APP that you know every company going forward. Is it easier to be able to build that functionality into an APP rather than you know on your website or via browser that certainly. We're trying to do. We're trying to make it so that is just built into every feature a is just built into lightening components So you can use your local Noko tools to just add. Add them to your APP. I think they are incredibly important to websites Incredibly important to people who use their laptops and desktops but as you you mentioned earlier it's super important when you have a small screen for that small screen for that apt to do the heavy lifting for you and that's what really helps helps with. And that's what makes features an order of magnitude better than what they were before because ultimately you know it's about saving time and if okay is decreasing your search time or things like that it's going to be way advantageous and then the other piece of that is being predictive. You know like like. Hey you're near this company's headquarters and you haven't talked to them in three months. Maybe you should stop by because you should stop by Ren Headquarters quarter spot as the days right. You know things like that to actually be predictive instead of being reactive. Predictive and proactive are to Couple of my favorite words these days menu example is great another example. I uses if you had door to door sales folks and they were just just in this particular town and they visited all the all the accounts all the residences that they had slated to that day but they have extra time. The the APP should be smart enough to say this person's in this geographic location. These accounts are close to them. So I'm going to proactively. Send them a notification saying actually. Here's other accounts that you might be able to visit all right. Let's get into the lightning rounds. These questions are fast easy and the lightning round is brought to you by by the salesforce customer three sixty platform of course which you know very well.

salesforce Ai NCO Ren Headquarters Noko
"senior director product management" Discussed on IT Visionaries

IT Visionaries

10:58 min | 2 years ago

"senior director product management" Discussed on IT Visionaries

"Android phone software. Keyboards are still really hard to use especially for work if you've ever type multi paragraph emails. It's hard but what voice promises to do is taking that effort away from the user so just talk to salesforce just say they give us your record updates and we will do the heavy lifting of updating the database records for you. Yeah and I think you know a lot lot of times with voice we kind of think of this you know with with obviously Syrian Lexa. And all that stuff you think of just like this one kind of person or assistant that you're talking to figure it all out but without without an application without a database without a layer in there it to capture that into put it in the right place you're potentially like who are you talking to sort of thing right and I think that part of the thing that's so exciting to be able to. AH Open your mobile weapon. You know whether it's you click on a customer whatever and say hey you know had a great conversation day You know X Y and Z. These are the follow follow ups you know and then it throws something calendar. Does those things you know. How difficult is that reality in like? How close are I know? There's specific acidic things that were seeing already that either sales forces has demo recently at dream force. Or what have you but like. What are those kind of things looking like? This all goes back to building a voice application for a very specific purpose. Yeah is I would say medium difficulty but building a voice application that can be used for many different purposes is a lot harder to do. And that's what that Einstein voice he's team is working on. which is there's a down the middle sales use case where a sales person meets with the customer and then after the meeting goes launch Mobile APP taps on the Einstein Voice Button goes had a great meeting with this customer. Update the opportunity closed date to thirty days earlier. Update the opportunity amount to this much and here are my follow up. Items that down the middle use case is reality. It's here but then Dan if accustomed if a salesforce customer goes we actually need to use it for internal employee engagement use cases more our sales folks in in North America will use it for a different object than our sales folks in South America. How can you make us make voice configured Using a no code tool so that's when the complication happens. But really I think you you nailed it where the magic with voice isn't so much the speech to text ext because any APP can do that. And that's actually provided for free by your by Iowa android. The magic is taking speech to text to then mapping it to useful business data. And that's really where the magic of Einstein voice is it. Looks at the salesforce records that matter to you personally and maps your recording to those salesforce record yet we had the CIO of autodesk on recently recently and one of the really interesting things that he was talking about was the bots that they were using to like. It's they don't call ticket taking but basically to resolve issues and I kind of feel the same way about about voice where it's not good enough just to be able to say. Hey we're putting this out there. It's a recorded thing was so exciting to me is that it can actually resolve the issue. It can actually do the thing it can send the email it can set the follow up and obviously with an machine learning like those things are are right around the corner. It can find time on your calendar it can do all those sorts of things and then we're we're really live in the future but again it has to go back to like that source of truth in in the mobile APP and it has to be on the go and it's not gonna be you know desktop. How do you kind of see mobile? Being able to to leverage those technologies like fully close the loop and like do the next action rather than just kind of record. It's going on the mobile will phone the smartphone more and more has all these hardware capabilities Like we were talking about the Mike which records which turns speech to text text right the way I see it is first of all it has to be easy to use. Yes and the one thing that is funny it to me and the the the one question that we always ask on the mobile team is is the feature. We're building an order of magnitude better than how people used to do this thing. Yeah so for example taking notes of your sales meeting using and pen and notebook. That's not such a bad way to take notes but users will not stop doing things the old way unless we provide something much better so the first thing with voice is make it as easy easy as opening a notebook and pulling out of your pocket so that means that user pulsar phone out of their pocket and tapping on the salesforce mobile APP immediately. Really it should start recording. What do you need what you want to update and things like that and then second is it has to be right ninety nine point nine percent of the time because as opposed to consumer apps what people record using Einstein voice is critical business data so the accuracy is super important? Yeah and to your point if you're sitting in a board meeting you can't do speech to text notes and you probably you shouldn't be recording. The conversation potentially maybe should. I don't know but you can't just like stop the middle of the meeting and give yourself voice no rate. She's still need to have an application where you can put those things things in and again is probably on your phone or like taking note or whatever it is and then when you leave the meeting in our walking to your next meeting you leave a voice note to you know take action on something thing but I think you're I love the order to piece. How do you measure that like? What does your team look at like? What is an order of magnitude better? Yeah we measure it. In two ways raced. There's the qualitative way to do it which is speak to the actual users and then there's a quantitative way which is let's look at the analytics behind and users using it but the quantitative way of doing it gives you a leading indicator of whether you build something that's an order of magnitude better where you look at the number of users that are using your future the qualitative way of doing it is actually talking to those users and saying is is it an order of magnitude better. What are the things that you wish you could do with voice that you were able to do with your pen and paper before but as going back to? Cio's where my conversations was IOS across a lot of customers is. How do we measure the success of our mobile features and building being data driven from the beginning is critical and building analytics? So when you are sitting down saying here's what we're building and here's how long it's GonNa take take. My advice is build in the work to build analytics from the very beginning. So you have numbers to see whether you're features actually working out or not yet so great point and you know it goes back to the Amazon and doing anything to save. Click right doing anything to like. Save those actions and preserve those actions like even with with you know. We're for salesforce customers. Obviously you know. Updating stages is something that has changed it's so much easier to update a stage now. Now of just boom you just you click on it and the stages updated for an opportunity or something like that and you just see those type of use cases are so obvious that like hey I could say that a stages updated but like just clicking on it with your thumb and takes like a fraction of a second but transcribing what happened in a in a you know long conversation when you're on the go when you're in your car or you know when you're running from place to place. I mean I remember when the salesforce APP APP I launched is years ago and we were trying to implement it the at the last company I worked at and it Kinda got some resistance from some the people that were like. Oh it's all right I'll just do when I get home. And then it was like you know sales reps going home you get home at the end of your day and you forget all the conversations stations and you do all that stuff or you took handwritten notes and then you have to go back then you spend two hours updating salesforce when rowdy. She's like he just fire up the average. Take the notes right there. Like doc you know. Take eight seconds after your meeting and do that but a lot of people. That was the huge sticking. Point was like they didn't have that minute because they are running from meeting to meeting. They didn't have the thirty seconds with voice. I just feel like that's an an mobile together. It's just so much easier. Had you mentioned that saving one tap is so so important Especially since you only have thirty minutes or sixty seconds to go from meeting to meeting and I WANNA add is the technology behind invoice where it takes your speech and converts it to salesforce data or does the data entry work for you can also be done honestly with written notes so if you type up your notes during a meeting or while you're on a plane that's one of the use cases that I've heard which is I love Einstein voice this but if I'm on a plane or public plays I can't suddenly just start talking to my phone especially if it's a confidential I if what I'm saying has confidential official business data like opportunity amounts so one of the things that were exploring is can you just type up your notes and then using the same technology that takes speech and map APPs than to business data. Can we take notes and then map. It's business data as well. So that's kind of the. That's why see Einstein voice and the salesforce mobile APP as essentially one in the same. We just finished dream force. Obviously lots of talk about the mobile roadmap. Can you share some insights on on. What's next for the sales for Sapin up in mobile Here at salesforce one of the most exciting things about dream force is we get to talk to customers dozens if not hundreds of customers at any given time and one of the one of the sessions that I love presenting at the most is the mobile roadmap session re talk about where we're building six months twelve months eighteen months from now and one of the fan favorites one of the features are the fan. Favorites is being able to take advantage of the hardware.

salesforce Einstein CIO North America South America Iowa autodesk Mike Dan Sapin Amazon official
"senior director product management" Discussed on IT Visionaries

IT Visionaries

09:51 min | 2 years ago

"senior director product management" Discussed on IT Visionaries

"Experience in the hacker thon and decided to join the seals US worse mobile team get and so this was a little over four years ago at this point. That's right. Yeah so flash forward to today tell me a little bit about your Karol. My current role is I lead a team of product. Managers the work on the SALESFORCE MOBILE APP and I see our main role as being the voice of the customer as far as mobile goes. Yes we need to understand what our customers. CEO's go through what their stakeholders need from them what their end users need from them and then building that into you are salesforce platform. And what are some of those things that CEO's kind of you know require from this and technology leaders and business leaders like order things that that they require from the APP. Yeah I feel like the demands for. CEO's Today are so complicated. They have so many stakeholders they're asked to build things build build mobile APPs across multiple lines of businesses in their company but at the same time need to tailor those experiences to that line of business across multiple countries and things like that. So that's hard in itself but they're also asked to make these mobile APPs really easy to use so that they spend the minimum amount of time and money any training their users on it. Yeah and obviously when you're talking about a solution that impacts potentially you know large percentage of the company implementation and all that sort of stuff and you're really competing with every other consumer based APP out there like that's one of the tough things that I'd love for you to kind of speak more about here is now you have post mates or you have You you know all these other. You know obviously uber lift and all these sorts of applications. That are so seemless that are you know chill located that can do all these amazing things things and as business people we expect that. Sort of seamless. You know use case and when you get on a BBC APP or an internal APP it might not be the case. Dah absolutely absolutely and the thing with phones is that it's such a personal device. Users actually don't differentiate between this is my work phone and my personal phone is just one device and so you're beat Abi APPs on their home screen. Sit Right next to your Uber. APP Post meets APP. which are seamless you launch? Shit you enter your phone number. Then you're ready to go minimal setup and your users get to go which because of that users have the same expectations -tations of B2B APPS now. which if my UBER APP only ask for a phone number and then I can hail a ride in less than thirty seconds? I should be able to do what I need to do for work in that same amount of time for this APP and the screen. I mean this is obvious but the screen is so much smaller than what you're used to sure. A bunch of our listeners still work with multiple additional screens and all that SORTA stuff but in most cases I mean like for these sectors that we talked to on on the show. Almost all of them work primarily off their phones on the go. You know running around. Because they're not doing the indepth tha-that not champion excel all these days or or programming heavily. But I think it's just a fascinating you know kind of time in history where everything that can be done on a mobile device. We we just prefer to do it that way even if it's slightly more difficult than just going and grabbing your laptop yeah I think it's a misconception that a lot of people have where because it's a smaller screen it's easier to build software applications on it is actually the opposite because you really are forced to think of what are the essential the things that I need to provide to my users in this APP and like we let's go back to the comparison to the consumer experience. What are the most essential essential things and I need to see these things the moment I launched the APP also yet? It's like Dea Mark Twain. If I had more time I would have. wrote you a shorter letter. I think So how do you look at the APP development. So let's say you know for our listeners. Who are maybe see? They have launched maybe one or two of their APP and they're struggling with things like from a principles first approach. How would you if you're talking like an and enterprise application for your company and I know there's a lot of use cases here but just if you could walk through some of kind of how you view APP development men at an enterprise company? Yeah the highest level I feel like at an enterprise company. An APP has to be tailored to how they do their business to their unique business processes. I speak to about a dozen customers a month just to understand what they're going through and one thing that I've learned is that their business process the way they do sales that way employee engagement is so unique. And it's like a unique fingerprint. So the first thing I look at had I if I was building an APP for B. Two B. Purposes is what our unique business processes. And how can we tailor the APP and the user experience to that. Do you think you know with obviously so many great apps out there like when let's say an enterprise uprise B2B company if you wanted to build an application for your customers for example for your employees like do all all these live in the same under the same hood like are you say. Do you want to have something. That's for both of those like do you want to have one source of truth. Do you want to build multiple applications. How would you look at the? There was a time around two thousand eleven when the first APP store version came out for apple and Google that there was an app for literally everything right an APP that one thing and then you had to have one hundred APPs on your phone What I what we've seen especially in enterprise? Prize is a consolidation of apps where customers whether their employees or external customers one place to go to do their work. Yeah yeah no I totally agree and I think that's that's part of the thing there. I think it's exciting that with low code and no code tools that you know a random employees play can vote an APP that helps them do something you know an expense report or whatever it is I think that stuff is is super cool but ultimately like that core use case of you just want to go into one thing. You don't want to sit there and have you know fifty five apps for that. Do all of these different things. Do you see that changing do you. I think that you know standing up a whole separate potentially could be cheaper than changing the Kerr one like. What do you think kind of the future of that looks like yeah? I think lawn building launching. Avi One of an APP is one thing and continuing to update that maintain that with functionality. And you'RE GONNA get feedback from your users is another as well The way the principal I look at it is this a lot of employees out. There are not what software people what they need to do is to be able to do their jobs. And so the APP itself should actually do the heavy lifting so if you can provide your employee's with one place to download one APP. Download one username and password to log in and based on what they do and what they need for their work. The APP adjusts adjust the user experience. It adjusts the features to that. I think that's where the slam dunk. Use Case Yeah and what are some Then you can't share specific you know customers or anything borders some places that you've seen APPS like that work really well. So let's say you're a a big insurance company and you have a lot of a lot of different employees a lot of different sales people's across us the entire United States and what your sales folks in California need from an APP by different what your sales folks need from New York work different laws Different insurance plans Different way of interacting with their own customers. The Way I've seen this executed. You did really well is that they take the salesforce mobile APP and based on the employees user profile. The APP knows okay. This user for is from California in this specific county so the customer information that we're going to pull up for this. Specific employee is localized to that person. So that they don't have to go and search or they don't have to tell the APP. Hey I'm in this county. I'm in the city amended the state. pull up my customer information. It already knows those things and what we've seen. Is that the what we call user adoption for an APP. Like this that Taylor's itself to different sales. GEOGRAPHIES is magnets knits orders of magnitudes better than apps that are built as a one-size-fits-all. Oh that's really cool. So how would you look at arranging your team to work work on that. Would you have different kind of PM's on different regions or use cases. That's a great thing about low code and no code platforms. Where are you don't need? People who have a background engineering to be able to be calm product managers for these different regions. You can actually take the. Let's say your sales ops folks or your business analysts who know the business really well and use them as your product managers for saying this is what my region aijun needs versus that region. And so you'll be as as a CIO. Meyer accommodation is used the business experts..

CEO salesforce US California Dea Mark Twain BBC CIO Meyer Avi One Kerr principal apple Taylor Google New York
"senior director product management" Discussed on IT Visionaries

IT Visionaries

04:58 min | 2 years ago

"senior director product management" Discussed on IT Visionaries

"How they're going together in your role on the salesforce APP but first how did you get into technology in the first place? I grew up in the Philippines. Actually and in the mid nineties young kid The MIT Media Lab Organiz an online conference for about three thousand kids all over the world. My brother and I got invited. And this was the mid nineties so it was essentially a bunch of kids e mailing each other in that conference in the goal was to talk about the problems that our own countries had. And how technology could help solve those problems. And so coming from the Philippines at talked about income inequality thirty access to clean water and things like that But the really cool part about it was all. These kids spoke different languages right from Africa to South South America to North America and so the media lab had a auto email translation technology. So think of it as a really early version of Google translate blade that allowed me to communicate with kids from Africa and learn about their problems then. MIT chose about ninety kids from that three thousand than to go to mit for a week and spend time with their professors to look at emerging technologies and things like that so a week and MIT. Not after I go back to the Philippines I was really hooked to computer engineering and college and became an Ios and android developer and just took off from there. That's incredible what a cool story. Yeah it'd be so cool to go back and look over the transcripts from that totally and the the interesting interesting part was a lot of my exposure to technology was how it can help humans as opposed to building technology for technology's sake and and that's influenced my career from there. Yeah you've done a ton of work in healthcare specifically around designing applications locations You founded in we're CEO come to call healthcare. Love told me a little bit about that. Yeah this was when universal health care is was was a huge topic and the United States and I wanted to find a way to make to use technology. Use My expertise to help people find the right healthcare plans for them and so that was one of the things that I thought. Hey technology could really help with this space. Yeah and so funny enough You end up learning about the salesforce Million Dollar Kathan like tell me. Tell me about this. You know the funny part was we. Ah Couple of friends and I were having a barbecue in San Rafael and one of them said you guys should really join this Hackworth on and personally I I. Don't I don't like hacker cons just because it's It's kind of it's kind of a crapshoot and whether you win or not And what the judging criteria is bots I heard a lot of good things about salesforce and it was a million dollar Hackworth on so I said why not so three of US decided to look. What's what's the biggest problem that Americans have one of it is access to health care? How can we use salesforce to make that easier for them? So we built this beautiful easy to use IPAD APP that essentially used salesforce as an API for people to be able to pick the healthcare plans that are right from them based on their income level all based on their family and so on so spoken like a true developer that you don't like how cons because of the judging criteria. Yeah that's pretty great. So yeah what happened so we. We entered and no expectations at all. And then the Sunday night before dream force in two thousand thirteen we got an email from sales for saying hey show up at dream force at eight. Am Tomorrow Tomorrow. You're going to present your APP to about five hundred thousand people at reinforce and you're just going to do a demo in front of the judges and and so showed up. Had No idea what to expect. I had no idea. There's one hundred thousand people at the conference and that they closed down half of San Francisco for it Demo and forevermark benef- Parker Harris In a lot of the execs ended up actually winning first place and was was grateful for the experience. That's so cool. And so then what and then you kind of went back and and Delta company around this did you already have the company. Yeah I took a a year to see what's what we could do in the healthcare space to start a company around it but it was also one of the most humbling experience of experiences of my life on how hard it is to build and maintain and make a company successful and after.

salesforce Philippines MIT United States developer Africa CEO South America Google San Francisco San Rafael North America Parker Harris Delta
"senior director product management" Discussed on IT Visionaries

IT Visionaries

01:48 min | 2 years ago

"senior director product management" Discussed on IT Visionaries

"The usage of mobile Bulfon's has been skyrocketing since two thousand seven and continues to play a major role in our personal and work. Lives in the future. Will our usage continue to grow. The the answer to that question is still unknown but what we do know is.

"senior director product management" Discussed on This Week in Machine Learning & AI

This Week in Machine Learning & AI

08:26 min | 3 years ago

"senior director product management" Discussed on This Week in Machine Learning & AI

"Hello. And welcome to another episode of twin? We'll talk the podcast y into interesting people doing interesting things in machine learning and artificial intelligence. I'm your host Sam Sherrington. Today. We're joined by Gary Brahmin, senior director product management at Qualcomm technologies. Gary who got his start in through music now leads AI and machine learning strategy and product planning for the company with a focus that includes the Qualcomm Snapdragon mobile platforms in our conversation. We discuss a on a mobile devices and at the edge, including popular use cases and explore some of the various exceleron technologies offered by Qualcomm, and others that enable them we also dig into the state of a on devices from the application, developers perspective, and how various acceleration technologies fit together to help developers. Bring new products to market. Before we get going. I like to send a huge, thanks to Qualcomm for sponsoring today's show as you'll hear in my conversation. With Gary Qualcomm has been in the AI space for well. Over a decade. Now, powering some of the latest and greatest Android devices with their Snapdragon chipset from this strong footing in the mobile space. Qualcomm now has the goal of making AI at the edge. Ubiquitous define out more about what they're up to and how they plan to get their visit to a AI dot com slash Qualcomm. And now onto the show. All right, everyone. I am on the line with Gary brought Mun Gary is the senior director of product management at Qualcomm. Gary welcome to this week in machine learning AM. I thank you and happy new year. Happy new year to you. I am excited for this new year. And as I mentioned to you as we're chatting before we started rolling today is my birthday making this a, well, it's always very cool to kind of have the new year on my birthday, align. But I'm excited to make this my first interview of the year, and I'm happy to share your birthday with you. Sam. Fantastic fantastic one. We get started by having you told us a little bit about your background, you got into artificial intelligence initially, by way of music is that right? Yeah. That's right. I guess my my interest in started way back I guess it would have been at the turn of the century. I was working at a company called music match which had developed juke bucks off where -plication for the P C. But part of that offering was a personal music recommendation engine. That was a proprietary engine that music magic created and it was using collaborative. Filtering algorithms to monitor the listening behavior of the users of our jukebox software. What they what they were listening to what they skipped what they listen to fully. And we were able to really develop some rarely rich correlations between artists and listeners had that transcended any traditional tagging data like John raw or year or era would have you just looking listening to her actually watching what people are observing what listeners actually doing not what they were saying. Saying that what they said they liked or disliked, but what they were actually listening to and then taking the correlations between individualises and myself or another somebody else, and that combined the combined influences came up or resulted. It's very unique recommendations, my my background early on was in music and digital music and IMP three compression. And when I came across or we when I experienced music match had to offer and help promote their recommendation technology, which also powered personalized radio and on demand streaming recommendations that got me hooked. And I carried that with me for a number of years and up until four years ago when I had an opportunity Qualcomm to bring some AI machine learning technology at a corporate r&d into the commercial side of the house and release it across our Snapdragon platform, kind of tying those things together over the past four years has really been a. A great experience in quite rewarding. Why don't we may be spent a little bit of time talking about Qualcomm for those who are not familiar with the company, and what you're up to Eno in our newsletter. We've talked about Qualcomm quite a bit particularly over the last year, everything from the the Snapdragon platform launch in December prior to that the extended reality released that you did in June some new chips in April and think maybe in January or something there was a neuro processing engine hexagon vector processor. All really interesting stuff that I'm excited to talk to you about today. But for folks who've seeing those pieces and don't really know what the the big picture what's Qualcomm up to in this space. Well, I mean if you go back in time. We've been a kind of a mobile innovator for over thirty years. Now, most of it starting with cellular and since the early nineties we've been focused on the connective inside with every g transition we call it from three G to four G and now to five G, but we also got into the chip business in in the nineteen in the nineties because it was others are having some difficulty. Developing two g and three g chips, and then that was a springboard for us to then move the internet from the PC onto a mobile phone. We saw this trend happening very early on and try to hasten that with investment in both collectively and silicon, and then we introduced the Snapdragon mobile platform a little over a decade ago. In fact, we're probably coming up on eleven years now and that and Snapdragon is now a powers the majority of Android phones in the marketplace globally. What we've done on the Snapdragon side specifically when it comes to compute on a handset or in. Any other embedded device IOT automotive etc. We've we've leveraged the compute capabilities that we developed over that past decade to drive what we have seen over the past four years is being very quick movement of artificial intelligence and machine learning based workloads that have been mostly relegated to the cloud. The server side or the data center, but are matriculating to the edge. Mobile phone is really a kind of the primary focus for us. But we do look at other verticals like IT and automotive as I mentioned, but the the the activity from Qualcomm standpoint has been very strong on on five G, but also in a over the past four years, and specifically on device a and ensuring that any device the Snapdragon processors able to efficiently run an accelerated AL them's and a power Fisher way. Okay. So. Make sure I understand that trajectory the company started out, basically building the or not started out. But one of the the companies big moves was really building the chips that allow devices to connect to wireless networks like three g four g five g and then from that and presence in the mobile space moved into as smartphones arrived moved into providing the compute platform or the the the computation compute chips for the smartphones. And now are providing and the AI acceleration extensions to that computer form the right way to think about it. Yeah. I think that's that's the right continuum. There's this the three big pillars will

Qualcomm Gary Qualcomm Qualcomm technologies AI Mun Gary Sam Sherrington Gary Brahmin senior director senior director of product man IOT automotive John Eno