20 Burst results for "Seneca Falls"

Feminist Literature

Miss Information: A Trivia Podcast

05:20 min | 3 months ago

Feminist Literature

"This week from me here getting the problem that has no name. Feminist literature. All right. If we were going to cover just like feminism assure general, we would be here. Forever I'm sure there's already a podcast that that covers that folks I'm sure. So we're not trying to reinvent the wheel here. No. Quick definition. Feminism is a range of social movements, political movements in ideologies that aim to define establish in achieve the political economic, personal and social equality of the sexes. Feminism incorporates the position that society's prioritize the male point of view and that women are treated unjustly within those societies Charles for Ya who is a utopian socialist in French philosopher. He's the one that's credited with having coined the word FEMA KNEES MMA in. Thirty seven. So, modern Western, feminist history is conventionally split into three time periods or waves. So you'll typically hear them referred to as that Each of them has slightly different aims based on the prior progress that was made during the wave before. I wave feminism is the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries that was focused on overturning legal inequalities, particularly addressing issues of women's suffrage. Second wave feminism is the nineteen sixty s and nineteen eighties that broaden the debate to include cultural inequalities gender norms in the role of women in society, and then third wave feminism. The nineteen ninety s to the thousands that refers to the diverse strains of feminist activity. So third wavers are see this as a continuation of the second wave in also as a response to the perceived failures out of the way before it. So I guess we're right outside third wave right now I think we're moving into the fourth wave interesting, which can't be defined until after it's passed exactly exactly a you. Hey I know my history man you know what I'm talking about or woman. Watch out I should say I WANNA point out as part of that definition. feminism is not women are better than men no absolutely not and it's still maintains to this day. It's about Equality Ackley. So exactly that's all I wanted to point. For our listeners great segue. Lauren. So seminaries literature, it can be fiction or nonfiction or drama or poetry that supports the feminine schools of establishing, defining and defending equal civil, political, economic, and social rights for women. So we're GONNA. Cover. Ten important feminist. Pieces of. Very excited that everyone should know. Great and we'll go in chronological order for me So the first we're GONNA talk about is a vindication of the rights of woman with strictures on political and moral subjects by. One, craft from seventeen ninety two. So this is one of the earliest works of feminist philosophy it was published in the United Kingdom Mary wollstonecraft responded to th century educational and political theorist who believe that women should not receive a rational education. It was believed at the time that women were too susceptible to sensibility and too fragile to be able to think clearly. So not able to be. The recipient of a rational education. Sure. Sure. Sure. So craft argued that women's education should match their position in society in that they are essential to the nation because they raise its children and could act as respected companions to their husbands then yeah So Wall Street, maintain that women are human beings deserving of the same fundamental rights as men and that treating them as ornaments or property for men undermines the moral foundations, a society which how about that you think You'd think that people any rational person would be like, yeah. That makes sense treat women as human beings. Sure. But the fact that there was such vitriol against this concept is like my to me but it was seventeen, ninety two that was like, yeah. Put it into writing and people are like. Dr. So her work had significant impact on advocates for women's rights in the nineteenth century particularly, the eighteen forty eight Seneca falls convention that produce the Declaration of sentiments which laid out the aims of the suffragette movement. In the United States Mary Wilson Craft her name might be familiar. She is the mother of Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley. And she actually died eleven days after giving birth to Mary wollstonecraft shelley. So Mary wollstonecraft was like she was this great feminist philosopher great writer, her husband was super. Supportive. And she died in childbirth which. was killed a lot of women. Yeah. Septicemia man because men who were only allowed to be doctors. Refuse to treat women because of all of their naughty bits, nobody washed their hands. Oh Yeah. Nobody we should really point out. Yes. No one wash their hands that probably cost a lot of issues too.

Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley Mary Wollstonecraft United Kingdom Mary Wollstonec Septicemia Charles Fema United States Mary Wilson Seneca Falls Lauren
"seneca falls" Discussed on This Day in History Class

This Day in History Class

05:44 min | 4 months ago

"seneca falls" Discussed on This Day in History Class

"The!.

"seneca falls" Discussed on This Day in History Class

This Day in History Class

05:47 min | 4 months ago

"seneca falls" Discussed on This Day in History Class

"It listen to Alex Iona. Let's get into it on iheartradio, APP, apple, podcasts, or wherever you get your podcast. Hi Guys I'm Katie, lowes, actress, mom and host of the parenting podcast Katie's crib. A show that helps women navigate the colossal changes that come with motherhood. You'll hear from resilient. Mama's knowledgeable experts and me asking a whole lot of questions. It's real talk that offers real perspective on what it's really like to be a parent. New episodes published every other Thursday listen to Katie's crib on the iheartradio, APP or on Apple, podcasts or Get Your podcasts. Hey y'all rerunning two episodes today. You might hear to house. Enjoy the show. Welcome to this day in history class. It's delight nineteenth. The Seneca Falls Convention took place on this day in eighteen, forty eight, and it was the first major women's rights convention in the United States. The two women who get the most credit for organizing this convention where Lucretia Mott Elizabeth Katie Stan. Both of them had a history of activism before this Lucretia Mott had helped organize the Philadelphia Female Anti, slavery society, and then Elizabeth Katie. Stanton had gone to the World Anti Slavery Convention in London on her honeymoon. As a side note, she also famously refused to include a vow of obedience in those wedding vows. The two women actually met at this convention where they were forced to sit in a separate section that was only for women on July, ninth, thirteen, forty, eight. The two of them were at a gathering at the home of Jane and Richard Hunt. With Marian McClintock and Martha Right, they're also. They were talking about their frustrations with the limitations on their lives, and we should take A. A moment to note that these were all white educated well off women, and so the frustrations they were talking about. We're really ones that were affecting white, educated well off women. And when they talked about these issues you can tell they were sort of assuming them to be universal when they really weren't. They were as the particular subset of women that their work really applied to and. That would play out in a lot of ways later on in this movement, so they decided to hold a convention. This is something that Stanton and Maat had been talking about way back in London in eighteen forty, and they scheduled this convention for ten days later, they announced that in the cynic accounting courier on July fourteenth. Convention only for Women on the first day with the general public invited on the second day, the same ad ran and other newspapers as well including in Frederick Douglass. Northstar Douglas was really an important part of this movement, and he was present at the Convention Elizabeth Katie Stanton drafted a declaration of sentiments leading up to this this detailed eighteen injuries and usurpation. Women were subject to this included. The idea that women had an inalienable right to vote, but they weren't actually being given that right. That by being denied the right to vote. Women were also being died representation that they were held to a different moral code from men with women, being cast out from society for behavior that was tolerated in men speaking of mankind as a concept. This declaration said quote. He has made her. If married I have the law civilly dead. Anti has taken from. From her all right in property, even to the wages she earns, they're also eleven. Resolutions in this document that included that women were equal to men and quote that the same amount of virtue, delicacy and refinement of behavior that is required of women in the social state should also be required of man, and the same transgressions should be visited with equal severity. Severity on both man and woman, one of the resolutions was also that women should have the right to vote between two hundred and three hundred people attended this convention. The declaration was read and discussed and read again. Changes were made in an amended and updated version was signed on the second day by sixty eight women and thirty two men. You can learn more about the Seneca Falls Convention on December seventh two thousand fifteen episode of Steffi Missing History Class called the road to the declaration of sentiments, and you can subscribe to this day in history class on apple podcasts, Google podcasts, and wherever else yet your podcasts tomorrow we'll look at an event for young athletes. That was really groundbreaking for its time. Hi Guys. I'm Katie Lowes, actress, mom and host of the parenting podcast. Katie script. A show that helps women navigate the big shifts. Motherhood can bring this season. You'll hear from resilient. Mama's like actress. Gabrielle Union Thought Author The New York Times. Best Seller UNTAINED Glennon Doyle and experts like prenatal and postpartum clinical psychologist. Dr Eliza Berlin. We get candid about our experiences and share resources for everything parented, and Demitrio says surrogacy, divorce and blended families emotionally preparing for Postpartum Katie's grabbed is covering it all for a dose of comfort and community with those who understand the struggles, and the joys of raising tiny humans subscribe now for brand new episodes every other Thursday listen to Katie's crib, iheartradio APP, or on Apple podcasts or wherever you get your podcasts. Welcome to this day in history class we're history waits for no one..

Elizabeth Katie Elizabeth Katie Stanton Katie Lowes apple Lucretia Mott Elizabeth Katie Stan Mama Katie script London Alex Iona United States Frederick Douglass Gabrielle Union Martha Right Glennon Doyle Dr Eliza Berlin Marian McClintock Northstar Douglas Richard Hunt Demitrio
"seneca falls" Discussed on Here's Something Good

Here's Something Good

06:44 min | 5 months ago

"seneca falls" Discussed on Here's Something Good

"One hundred and seventy two years ago during two hot days in July, three hundred women and men gathered in a chapel in upstate New York, and they set off a movement that would rock the nation. America's very first women's rights convention held in Seneca, Falls July nineteenth and twentieth eighteen, forty eight with lead decades later to the passage of the nineteenth amendment that gave women the right to vote. The Seneca Falls Convention was originally organized by Lucretia, Mott and Elizabeth Katie Stanton, and it was groundbreaking for many reasons including the fact that women gave inspiring speeches at a time when quote, Nice, women were not supposed to speak in public, the centerpiece of the conference with the Declaration of sentiments modeled on the Declaration of independence. It declared shockingly that women should have the same rights as men to own property to keep any money earned, and of course to vote. Now we're getting ready to celebrate. Not only Seneca Falls, but next month is the hundredth anniversary of American women's suffrage. We spoke with historian Dr. Sally McMillan Professor Emeritus at Davidson College and the author of the Book Seneca Falls and the origins of the women's rights movement. Here's what she had to say. Dr McMillan. Thanks so much for joining us. It's my pleasure. So what was life like for women in eighteen forty eight when the convention was held, what were they allowed to do and what we're women forbidden to do. Well, of course, it depends on what women you're talking about. Slave women for a new rights. Their bodies were on by a slave owner. Pre Black women have very few rights. They managed to create an existence living in towns in working, but for the most talking about middle and upper class. White women women at that time had virtually no rights if they were married. If you're a married woman, and of course back then most women wanted to marry. You had no right to any possessions that you brought into a marriage. You had no right any earnings. You might make You could not sign contracts. Of course you could not vote. You could not serve on juries, and if in rare cases a divorce, the children became your husband's. So women were known as FEM coherence legally that meant basically you are covered by a man for our listeners. Could you explain the significance of Seneca falls and how it connected to women's suffrage? Seneca falls was really the first organized convention held to demand the rights for women. It was held in was a small, but very thriving town middle of New York state right on a canal, and what happened to create this convention was a tea party very popular form of entertainment among five women and two of the women there are well-known. Elizabeth Katie, Stanton and Lucretia Mott, and it was at this tea party. Where are they began to talk and apparently Elizabeth Katie's? Downton began to just spiel. Spiel forth all of her concerns about the rights that women did not have, and so they decided to hold a convention which they had to do very quickly. Because Lucretia Mott one of the five women was very well known, and her name would attract a crowd, so they sent out notices to newspapers, local newspapers, and invited certain people to come, and in the process of course, drew up the declaration of Rights in sentiments, which was head of the basis for many organizations such as anti-slavery societies. And Elizabeth Katie Stanton likely was one of the authors of this declaration of Rights and sentiments. And so just a few days later on July nineteenth and twentieth, eighteen, Forty Eight, they held this convention in Wesleyan Chapel in Seneca, falls! New York and some three hundred people attended the two day convention, which was quite remarkable, considering most people lived in rural areas in two days were devoted going through all of the demands that had drawn up the fact that. Women lived on separate sphere for men. Their lives are basically and find the home and all of the rights that married women did not have that I just outlined that women were. But they had no rights. They did not have equal pay. They had no access to higher education. What they did was lay out all of their complaints, and then make resolutions for change and one of the most ringing phrases while I think it's the most ringing phrase of all is that they based his declaration of Rights and sentiments on the Declaration of independence, and so what they wrote was all men and women are created equal, and so they presented these resolutions to the convention they were discussed widely for the most part there was unanimous agreement on all of these rights, the most controversial though was giving women the right to vote, and that created a lot of dissension in discussion. But, eventually, it was Frederick Douglass. The abolitionist escape slave. who had been living in Rochester New York and he stood up, and he said I cannot demand the right or lacks gain the right to suffrage, unless also make this, give me up for women, and that saved the day, and so all resolutions passed, and a hundred people signed that declaration. Would that convention did? It was a very local convention? But. It was sort of the first step in women moving forward which they did in eighteen, fifty to create national women's rights conventions, and from eighteen fifty, until civil war broke out, except for one year, women held national conventions, demanding their rights, and sometimes they drew thousand people. They drew famous reformers. They gave speeches and did reports all to show the injustices. Women faced in this country. Thank, you to Dr Sally McMillan for such an incredible conversation. Make sure to check out her book, Seneca Falls and the owner of the women's rights movement. You'll learn more about the convention and also get a historical dive into fifty years of women's activism from eighteen forty to eighteen ninety. So here's something good for today. It's remarkable to think about women's lives in eighteen, forty eight, and realized the courage it took for women without legal rights to gather for this convention to speak out and to demand change, and as we approach the anniversary of the Seneca Falls Convention let celebrate that one hundred and seventy two years ago, women and allied men set in motion the women's rights movement today we salute them for taking those first steps on the long journey to women's suffrage, and to creating a better world for all have a great day..

Seneca Falls Elizabeth Katie Stanton Lucretia Mott Seneca Dr Sally McMillan New York Elizabeth Katie Lucretia Dr. Sally McMillan America Rochester New York Davidson College Frederick Douglass Wesleyan Chapel Downton Professor
Cory Booker airs his first campaign ad as he seeks to make the December debate stage

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:26 sec | 1 year ago

Cory Booker airs his first campaign ad as he seeks to make the December debate stage

"The entries for discussion taking some of the attention away from the democratic democratic presidential presidential primary primary one one of of those those who who suffered suffered is is New New Jersey Jersey senator senator Cory Cory Booker Booker was was trying trying to to light light a a fire fire under under his his campaign campaign with with a a new new video video I'm I'm here here today today because because of of love love of of her her role role with with love that push people to March knowing they could be and board bosses knowing they could be bomb from Seneca falls to Selma to stone wall Booker the only candidate on stage for the first five debates who has yet to qualify for the sixth

Senator Cory Cory Booker Booke Selma New New Jersey Jersey Senator Seneca Falls
"seneca falls" Discussed on We The People

We The People

04:47 min | 1 year ago

"seneca falls" Discussed on We The People

"Would have just been a one legal way to do all of those things things by requiring inquiry of any time the law had a formal difference or formal denial of privilege based on gender so the thing so the the I think the E._R._A.. is important because it goes back to those first underpinnings Seneca falls and it wasn't just about the vote it was always about a complete restructuring of culture and the way you do that is by full constitutional permanent equality for all women that is in as unchanging as we can make it in the Law Alice Paul Understood that Alice Paul understood that once we pass the nineteenth amendment that was only one of eighteen demands that was only a piece of the political system not the entire legal legal social system that needed to change and so that's why she proposed it very early on the first U._S.. Supreme Court case one of the earliest supreme court cases on the Nineteenth Amendment Atkins Versus D._C.. Children's Hospital said this it said the nineteenth amendment was not just about the vote it was about changing the whole system of culture under which women would be treated differently and in doing so it struck down a maximum hours law for women workers. That's quickly changed and that's what happens after the nineteenth amendment which looked to be at least maybe some early interpretation that it would respect it would articulate this whole systemic change then we start to get the battle between Labor advocates ads and Alice Paul's era group and because the E._R._A.. Started to look like it was challenging some of the occupational workplace laws the minimum wage laws the minimum our laws maximum our lies and so the unions versus the professions fashioned were kind of battling and women who were social feminist and promoting laws in the workplace and for working women found themselves at odds with women who were promoting the E._R._A.. But Alice Paul in her group of many lawyers lawyers on both sides but a lot of lawyers some professional women tracked did a study early on of over five hundred state laws that on various things back to Seneca falls again on custody property employment that all needed to be changed all will created formal barriers to women all would be changed within e._R._A.. So the principles of the era have been there from the very beginning politics and different <hes> this labor versus business battle different different presidencies. You know kind of stall that but I think the E._R._A.. Is exactly what Seneca falls was all about Erica last word to you. Do you think that the I._R._A.. Was What Seneca falls was all about or not and and as a Virginia and other states are considering ratifying. You'RE A are they're conservatives who support the array or not. I think that they're they're probably would be if there was not this kind of close. Rhetorical kind of you know argument that is is really <hes> within all you know pro-choice <hes> legal scholarship of of of equality with abortion rights I mean I think this is where you see. The equal rights amendment fail is because it right around the time of Ro <hes> you know feminists lawyers at that time we're beginning to make these equality link link equality and abortion and so you lose a lot of you know the new Dell Catholics you lose a lot of those the those who would end up calling themselves pro-life feminists who were great backers of the I._R._A.. Including Alice Paul herself you know <hes> who who make statements about <hes> about you know being so pleased with all that had come you know four women <hes> <hes> but then seeing seeing real problems with abortion. I think that I would <hes> really worry about the risks of strict and absolute equality. I mean I think what we have now as you know what caller scholars have called the defacto e._R._A.. With <hes> with intermediate scrutiny on the in equal protection clause I think that the risks extract and absolute equality <hes> basically are that we tend to see as normative the unencumbered traditionally male or masculine kind of lifestyle <hes> that are that are free of childcare responsibilities <hes> or we look at the autonomous male body that <hes> you know has sex and can walk away <hes> and that's not the case for women and so we lose some of those asymmetries that.

Alice Paul Seneca falls Seneca Supreme Court Children's Hospital Dell Virginia Erica
"seneca falls" Discussed on We The People

We The People

04:07 min | 1 year ago

"seneca falls" Discussed on We The People

"Court. One of the biggest champion of abortion rights in the court is really <hes> it it. Doesn't you know make room for <hes> you know the asymmetries that's that's still exist with regard to reproduction and caregiving and with regard to caregiving not just <hes> you know that women take on but that father's take on as well <hes> and I think it's it's kind of no surprise that because of this kind of you know focus as abortion rights it says the center of the movement that we've we still see that mothers are the ones you know. Women have made extraordinary gains in the workplace in an education I mean we could you know spend a whole hour and more documenting those those gains. It's it's incredible <hes> but that we what we don't see is is the rights of caregivers and of course this is what you know. American law really needs to be looking at because of how our really awful we treat caregivers both in in getting time off to care <hes> but just in all sorts of measures so I think <hes> you know that's where I think I'd say that that when we when we focus on sort of equality is this kind of autonomy that we end up kind of promoting cultural hostility toward pregnancy and motherhood and so we're derailing these necessary supports that that women pregnant women deserve and that caregivers to deserve and so if there's one place where I think you look back I guess in addition to Volunteer Motherhood and the lessons that that would teach us it would be an in <hes> in the work of <hes> the cause for joint joint <hes> property ownership which of course we don't have time to look at Riva Seagull. We've mentioned her before the great legal scholar scholar at at Yale has a great article home as work and I think you know there was this move for separate property ownership but that the early women's rights advocates really were looking for joint property ownership and by the Nineteen Oh seventies and eighties we finally have that we're women. <hes> you know inherit the same rates as the same way that their husbands should they predeceased them inherit that they own you know half of their of what they've earned together but I think what join property the ownership can now show us is that you know women or men sometimes who remain in the home <hes> still don't have earnings right and so looking at how we can <hes> look together as a as a women's movement <hes> for for how we can start communicating women in some way and men who do that <hes> to give them more of an equal basis <hes> so that caregiving families were doing a great deal of sacrificing especially financially <hes> cannot be you know held held financially. <hes> you know be sacrificing more than than those who are autonomous unencumbered by by care for children well. It's time for closing arguments in this completely fascinating discussion which is revealed so much relevant and unfamiliar history which points and all sorts of surprising directions and I guess this is my final question. <hes> the E._R._A.. Was was first introduced by Alice Paul in Nineteen twenty-three after the nineteenth amendment was ratified ratified on the seventy fifth anniversary of the original Seneca Falls Convention. Paul argued that we shall not be safe until the principle of equal rights is written into the framework of our government and Justice Ginsburg to has argued that she believes the ratification Haitian the E. R. A. is necessary to complete the promise of the nineteenth amendment. Tracy will begin with you would stanton have supported in version of the I._R._A.. What would what did she say about and how does the era fit into the goals of the Seneca Falls Convention as articulated in the Declaration of sentiments well? I think the E._R._A.. Is a shortcut to all of the things that were articulated and Seneca falls because again we saw such a broad based declaration of all of the various areas that needed to have equality that the E._R._A...

Seneca Falls Convention Seneca falls Alice Paul Justice Ginsburg Nineteen Oh Riva Seagull Yale Tracy stanton E. R. A. seventy fifth
"seneca falls" Discussed on We The People

We The People

04:18 min | 1 year ago

"seneca falls" Discussed on We The People

"It could have domestic chastisement by your husband you cannot on your marital property and what was the similarity there it was all that gender and so focusing in on I mean there were certainly other issues of race and class but it was it it was new for society start to understand that gender was a commonality and that gender was an inferiority a disfavored class where penalties and lack of privilege attached to that gender from that collectively then you get an ability to create a social and political movement for the vote where you get temperance women <hes> joining which you also get what becomes the basis much much later of our constitutional doctrine of equal protection in the beginning when we finally had the U._S.? Supreme Court equal protection cases in the nineteen seventies we start to see the court men on the court understand that gender is an immutable trait and unchangeable factor upon upon which lawn society operate for to create inferior and deny rights and so understanding that there is that commonality for the court allows them to then look at laws in say that we are stereotyping. You're typing women we are basing it on gender instead of the realities and that is something the court news to scrutinize and question and states must justify with valid legitimate interest in so really this is what the Seneca falls and death and the declaration of sentiments articulates very specific eighteen tangible holistic approaches but it was part of this notion that women have to understand what is it the heart of all of this it is gender and gender is a category that has been used to deny these rights and the law needs to change so stanton she she had this wonderful ability to flip back and forth between the philosophical the systemic and the very concrete so she's making these collective have challenges to the system she's also saying how do we do this. We get women on juries. We need women lawyers. We need women judges and women doctors. We need women buying their own stoves and their homes. Don't ask your husband by the stove you want so of concrete solutions at the time we're looking at systemic and I think that is one of her <hes> significant contributions and why she's really the leader over time of the of the women's movement because she understood things on every level legal social individualized and that has a much greater legacy than just simply the vote Erica. You have argued that the effort by pro-choice feminists to locate a right to choose an equal protection clauses unpersuaded because the equal protection clause governs only those regulations that discriminate between similarly situated people and men and women are not similarly situated with regard to their ability to get pregnant. Do what do you agree with Tracy that Stanton's legacy supports notion of collective identity for gender that might have legal implications in striking down laws that discriminate discriminate against women as a group. Do you have more individual base notion of equality based on the history. That's interesting. I think what State Tracy said is <hes> is right on. I mean I <hes> you know one of the chapters in my book really hails the work of <hes> Paulie Murray and Ruth Bader Ginsburg in the in the early <hes> in mid nineteen seventies and you know in <hes> you know throwing to the wind <hes> those those laws that really just based I <hes> <hes> you know categorize women on the basis of sort of their reproductive potential and not as <hes> as individuals with their own capabilities that were equal equal to men <hes> I think I think the concern I have today is <hes> is the real focus <hes> when it comes to equality on autonomy because I think when we focus on autonomy which is <hes> some of what you know Ginsberg's work then tends toward especially in her <hes> in her looking looking at a champion of abortion rights on the court..

Supreme Court Stanton Tracy Ginsberg Ruth Bader Ginsburg Seneca falls Paulie Murray Erica
"seneca falls" Discussed on We The People

We The People

03:00 min | 1 year ago

"seneca falls" Discussed on We The People

"<hes> which coach curly entitled indicating the Rights of Women knew where we want to look at what voluntary motherhood is asking us to look at in terms of the the sexual and social imbalances in sex because the sexual act is that's where these women been understood kind of the key questions of equality to be and feminists have always understood that right but but abortion really moves that to something else and and doesn't look at kind of the the preconditions <hes> which I think are really important. Thanks so much without a congrats on the book I very much looking forward to reading it and I know the listeners will as well <hes> tracy in our final rounds. I I want to explore for the degree to which Stanton thought that the suffrage movement was linked to a broader <hes> access to the legal system and much of your work has focused on that question. You've noted that early in the suffrage movement the women's vote was clearly tied live with the issue of temperance and also written <hes> in Elizabeth cady stanton notion of illegal class of gender that Stanton was trying to create a collective consciousness among women and you say that <hes> Stanton's has worked to arouse women to their own subordination tonight women as a group to reform the laws was the first step two women identifying collectively and thus providing the social foundation for legal transformation. Tell us more about how stanton believed that that collective identification legal reform and what kind of legal reforms did she think it would lead to yes and we see that really beginning at Seneca falls all the way through right I mean when we get when we think about women collectively and <hes> the personal is political and raising the collective conscious we often think of the nineteen seventies and Gloria Steinem and betty for Dan but really it was began with Stanton and it was really one of her key sticking points from the very beginning women I would say to her. I have all the rights I want and that became a title for one of her more famous speeches that when she would try to convince women or petition women ask them to sign petitions for marital property rights or voting rights child custody rights they would say I have all all the rights I want and so part of both the social movement as well as the Legal Movement for Stanton was to getting women to understand their commonalities getting women and lawmakers to understand how. How gender was the basis upon which many of these norms and laws operated so she started just in these grassroots movement with sharing stories which is kind of a key feminist methodology of just sharing stories sharing narrative understanding women's experience experience and realized that whether you were a working class tavern owner or an eras with a million dollar farm you both had restrictions based on gender you could not have custody of your child or guardianship you.

Elizabeth cady stanton Rights of Women Legal Movement betty Gloria Steinem Seneca falls Dan million dollar
"seneca falls" Discussed on We The People

We The People

04:16 min | 1 year ago

"seneca falls" Discussed on We The People

"I think that that voice <hes> of of women is is really key is a place where row row took that away from from women and men who would want to have a voice on these things I think the other really important part of this is to really just put the idea of the nineteenth season trade voluntary motherhood side by side with what today we hear from abortion advocates this idea of forced motherhood because they they seem kind of similar right and so or as betty for Dan put it. I mean remember her. <hes> the first volume of the feminine Mystique I eat didn't mention abortion. <hes> you know the first <hes> <hes> you know <hes> <hes> sorry the first statement of the National Organization for women which he founded didn't didn't include abortion. I mean these were real. <hes> statements about women being respected as persons and looking at the discrimination held against them especially in the workplace and wanting to understand that they could think can have professions and be mothers to if they choose <hes> but if you put these things side by side so you look when Free Dan comes <hes> in nineteen sixty seven she talks about the right to control reproductive process and the right of Chosen Motherhood and these are certainly echoing both stand and all of the Voluntary Motherhood <hes> proponents you know that it's the same principle right there but the problem is that voluntary motherhood was achieved formerly through sexual abstinence right and that's manifesting interesting the couple shared respect for the potential of sex and the asymmetrical role of women's in that in that that experience and so no longer did this right of chosen motherhood mean affirmatively choosing to engage the act that might make one one other but now it men are firmly choosing whether to end the life of one's child and so really flips voluntary motherhood on its head <hes> and so this original principles seeking to protect against this what they call anti-natal murder order right they're saying what are the cause of this lustful men. Let's tell men no and I think it's especially interesting. If you look and I really WanNa follow I mean I think Catharine MacKinnon in the nineteen eighties Robin West has sort of re recapitulated some of her her work and just <hes> I'm going to quote West here and I think this is exactly right and it and it brings us back to volunteer motherhood. She West says the row approach shifts the focus away from addressing the social and sexual imbalances that result and unwanted pregnancies ABC's to the unwanted pregnancy itself so strongly suggests that the appropriate social and individual response to unwanted sex is to protect the decision to end the pregnancy now. I'm not saying Robin West is pro-life. She's obviously pro choice but I want to just point out that that that focusing on the social social and sexual imbalance is what the voluntary motherhood advocates were trying to do and so it's really sort of ironic that right at the time when women are coming to hold positions of power into nineteen seventies getting into the workplace getting into <hes> you know better education etc opportunities so then they abandoned the earlier insights about the threats of undisciplined male sex right and then you know I mean I just want to mention sort of me to that. We still have these powerful men who who are asserting themselves onto women and so had we instead been doing what Mckinnon and west call us too but the voluntary motherhood advocates cost to which is looking at those social and sexual imbalances. I think we could really understand better. <hes> you know Ah Women's distinctive needs desires satisfaction. I mean we look at the casual sex movement or schedule sex culture sorry that so many women are starting to Bemoan you know it's a masculinization of sexuality where intercourse is kind of the end all and be all and I think all of these things need to be put into question we need to look at at <hes> you know the increase in sexual risk-taking the comes about with with easier access to abortion obviously which has been curtailed in some states now pending pending in a constitutional review but <hes> in these are the really interesting questions that I think looking back at this history guest her grapple with and should get us to grapple with that. I think you know haven't been and I actually have a book that is almost complete..

Robin West Dan Catharine MacKinnon betty murder National Organization ABC Mckinnon
"seneca falls" Discussed on We The People

We The People

03:28 min | 1 year ago

"seneca falls" Discussed on We The People

"It is true that again put this in historical context abortion had been a practice at common-law up up until these criminals ation laws and up until the time of quickening about more month four or five midwives used various practices to restore menzies so to start periods again which would stop because you were pregnant so it was not a talked about but it was a practice at Kamla in our history. The the criminalization came out of the professionalism of the medical doctors from taking from the midwives to uh-huh columnist who were male and he'll excluded women from that profession <hes> it was also though it was not only that it was also the male profession sort of changing their idea of the moral reality and that and then arguing that women did not have the moral authority an autonomy to make these decision so I think Stanton's writings support that she was all of this voluntary motherhood and her writings on infanticide all go back to a women's right to make the choice to make a choice in the laws and that we need women's voice in creating those rules Erica Tracy has just argued that by insisting assisting women should have the right to vote <hes> they were objecting to the ability of male physicians and gynecologists to <hes> regulate <hes> abortion you have written <hes> a piece in clip gap glow review putative right in search of Constitutional Justifications Understanding Planned Parenthood A._K._C.'s equality rationale and how it undermines women's equality and you also <hes> written about but <hes> embodied equality debunking equality protection arguments for abortion rights <hes> tell us about why you believe that the equality arguments were abortion rights which are based on the claim that the laws regulating abortion in the nineteenth century were based on stereotypical views views of male doctors toward women are not persuasive and why you think that the quality rights perhaps pointing another direction sure so I think <hes> just as a precursor looking at you know what the common law was doing prior to <hes> you know the the greater scientific developments where there was started began to basically be an understanding <hes> pretty radical <hes> new scientific understandings about embryology at the same time yes men were keeping women and out of out of the medical profession but they were you know looking at those scientific developments and and wanting to basically update the common law and so the common law had you know since the thirteenth century they had prohibited that abortion only after his tracy saying the point where pregnancy could be detected and so they referred to this animation coming to life or quickening from Lord Cokes quick with child or blackstone as soon as the infant is able to stir in the ones the mother's womb right so we have all this and I think it mistakenly is interpreted and that was even done in the row case itself as sort of affirmative allowance for abortion before quickening but what it really is looking at is the evidentiary limitations right doing due to the science of the time <hes> I'm due to the rather harsh penalties for homicide and so you WanNa have good evidence and how do you find that evidence..

Erica Tracy menzies Stanton
"seneca falls" Discussed on We The People

We The People

04:09 min | 1 year ago

"seneca falls" Discussed on We The People

"If we've had recent incidents it ends right in the press with two other very prominent authors missing historical fag misinterpreting misunderstanding historical fact I mean and I think this is important for understanding making questions about what did Stanton. Would've said about row I mean the question is what did Stanton engage about during the if anything during the abortion debate during her time and then can we take anything of value with that too for us. Today I mean the short answer is that she said it almost nothing she denied engage directly with the criminalization of abortion efforts Eric alluded to this was really this specific debate was not they didn't weigh in on it what they weighed in on and again as Erica said correctly was the misogyny that these attacks were that women are selfish. Women are trying to be professional. Women are killing children and that women reacted to that what Stanton did say I mean we have and I have spent a decade looking at her paper so I know what she said. Versus <hes> many of the other women who we would need to rely on the scholars of their work for that but there were four different occasions where she said something that that referenced something that looks like abortion. She is the word abortion once so all of these <hes> were were she definitely she acknowledged this. As a problem stemming from women's lack of equality and lack of choice she responded in one writing the one that you quoted earlier to New York magazine New York newspapers articulation of abortion as a crying evil so that quote comes from someone else and she kind of excerpts that and she kind kind of just skips over the moral issue or the criminalization issue and she just goes right to women's equality of women's franchise -ment and what that meant for her as women need a voice in the law. If women have a voice in making the laws we we will see something very different. We will see we will see women understanding why women resort to abortion we will see women advocated for women to be on juries women were excluded from juries because as of the historical English coverage for laws but also they were considered to week inferior not intellectual needed to be protected from what was in the courts so she said we need women in the courtroom to understand justifications and mercy as to why someone might commit infanticide what she talked about Moore was infanticide which is the killing of a child after its birth and certainly the much more <hes> horrific and much more sensational idea but she weighed in on several including one big criminal trial who that Hester von trial who eighteen year old English immigrant who was <hes> sentenced to the death penalty for this oppose it infanticide of her child she was found in tenement German tenement housed not speaking the language of anyone there with a three day old infants dead next to her there was no autopsy obser- inquiry which may have proven that was stillbirth or that whether child's even born alive but <hes> stanton took up her 'cause and road tremendous volumes for the newspapers and speeches about this and so she was taking even the more for a seemingly no justification for why you would kill a child who was born and said but women may understand why and so that was certainly very provocative and she was using that as a point I mean she also defended fended has driven by saying we she had incompetent council. We didn't have proof of any of the things you would need it in a criminal trial but she took it as an occasion to say we need women making the laws and so that is that is an implicit sid reaction to men the male legislatures and the male gynecologist making the laws against abortion..

Stanton Erica New York magazine Eric Moore Hester eighteen year three day
"seneca falls" Discussed on We The People

We The People

03:18 min | 1 year ago

"seneca falls" Discussed on We The People

"It is to destroy it after fully-developed forum is attained for that self-same life that is taken but she's he's also the same person who writes when women rises from sexual slavery to sexual freedom into the ownership in control of her sexual organs and man is obliged to respect this freedom so there's this kind of holding these two things together which we don't see those two things together in terms of the sort of the way the abortion rights movement has really taken over sort of all of feminists understanding but if you think about owning and controlling one sexual organs so or say controlling one's body right we might say today it didn't extend to this idea of owning controlling the fate of one's unborn child because that was another human beings body and this ownership of another was actually exactly the erroneous era that they were trying to see to root out in both culture turn and in slavery so so there was no extension you know as Tracy and Linda Gordon. Both you know you know see you know recognizing their own great work in in the history of of seeing some sort of right to abortion by the very contrary it was seeing that abortion was a wrong that was done to women and so what did they do. They pushed back again not on the restrictive laws but on this vitriolic language and they wanted to show the underlying causes that were forcing women into abortion and so they were laying the the the blame at the well lustful men and so that's what voluntary motherhood was all about was really asking men to control their sexual impulses to practice sexual self mastery for the good of you know the relationship etcetera and of course women's unequal status in society so that they could not be forced into into marriage in order to you know basically take care of themselves or of course prostitution and so that's where those the twofold solution is involuntary motherhood and then obviously in education first and foremost foremost but then as the movement were on into enfranchisement of women as well Tracy. What does the nineteenth century history tell us about what Elizabeth Cady Stanton would have thought about Roe v Wade Rita Seagal has of yellow school has argued that the restrictions for abortion really arose in the mid nineteenth century because of doctors efforts to close ranks to professional competition and it was around eighteen fifty nine that the Eh American Medical Association secured a resolution condemning abortion as an unwarranted destruction of human life than really just before and then as you said after the passage of the fourteenth amendment that <hes> very restrictive abortion laws got on the books did Stanton another attendees at Seneca falls comment on those laws and what was their position? I think first of all when we're looking at history I think we have to be careful about focusing on historical oracle fact versus and historical context and then what arguments we can derive from those points so this is this is an area where that becomes really important in. We're looking at historical fact. Not many people know the historical Colfax about the abortion laws or the women's rights movement. We tend to love all of these women together did if we say Susan B.. Anthony said something we attribute that to Stanton Etcetera..

Elizabeth Cady Stanton Tracy Stanton Etcetera Linda Gordon prostitution Susan B Wade Rita Seagal Eh American Medical Associatio Colfax Seneca Anthony yellow school Roe
"seneca falls" Discussed on We The People

We The People

03:43 min | 1 year ago

"seneca falls" Discussed on We The People

"Of the first woman to run for president as as the nominee equal rights party and that was the political party that back the are at that time with <hes> she had as running mate the great abolitionist Frederick Douglass and you look at all these women who as <hes> the historian of of birth control and Really Abortion Linda Gordon Rights and Echo Tracy said is that this idea voluntary motherhood <hes> kind of the right to say no to husbands was really sort of the underlying sort of that foundation <hes> you know of of every claim for women's rights and they really understood it to not only as the claim for rights but also as something that would bring about an understanding sort of a collaborative understanding of marriage so there's US you know not only illegal `asymmetry at that time with culture laws but also the sexually symmetry and caregiving asymmetries with regard with regard to <hes> both you know who the two men in the woman have sex together and it is women who ended up pregnant and then at that time and still in our time <hes> are often the ones who are you know caring for all these children and again as Tracy pointed out I mean at that time you know the threats to women's life to women's health of pregnancy <hes> <hes> you know the the fact that women couldn't <hes> you know access either education many instances it's certainly not at the same kind of education as men but also occupations if they did you know get into Eddie occupations they were they were paid little as one of the complaints there in the declaration <hes> and so they were forced often into marriage and into <hes> into prostitution in some cases and so here forced into marriage right one of the reasons that the temperance movement became so large because you know women were finding wanting to complain about their drunken husbands and so this temperate move movement went along with voluntary motherhood drunk and husbands who were pushing themselves ourselves on women what we would consider as marital rape today <hes> and so you know when <hes> looking at these this kind of holding these two things together. Is You know at this time the states had had laws prescribing abortion in many cases all the way to <hes> to conception except in cases where the life the mother of the life and sometimes health were in danger especially right around the time of the Fourteenth Amendment we see these these laws across across the country not <hes> you know and so what what women were doing at that point was well a couple of things I I love and Tracy's book where she points out and you see this in a lot of the antiabortion. <hes> you know a kind of the vitriolic anti-woman kind of language that's used at that time about prostitution about women who are being forced into abortion all of that and and what you see the women's rights advocates doing at that time they're not pushing back against the restrictive laws themselves. I mean they too are characterizing abortion and fantasized together as child murder or abortion as anti-nato murder. I mean you again. You see this Victoria. <hes> woodhall this first nominee of equal rights party you know having talking about you know here's a great quote where she talks about the rights of children that is individuals began yet when they remain the fetus she says many women would be shocked at the very thought of killing their children after birth deliberately destroy them previously if there's any difference in the actual crime should be glad to have those a practice the latter pointed out the truth of the matters that just as much murder to destroy life and it's embryonic condition as it.

Echo Tracy prostitution murder US Frederick Douglass child murder Linda Gordon president woodhall Eddie rape
"seneca falls" Discussed on We The People

We The People

03:38 min | 1 year ago

"seneca falls" Discussed on We The People

"Between the two between between men and women and they find it in the capacities the the they say the identity of the. Race capacities or capabilities <hes> and responsibilities and so that's really interesting too. I think they say quality of human rights results necessarily from this identity of capabilities and responsibilities so rights are derived from the shared responsibilities abilities rights aren't sort of these free-floating self-determined initiatives on our part but they actually flow from our responsibilities and I think then they say so you know with men are going to be out there being responsible with their vote in politics and responsible for the for the future of the country than women to who have these equal responsibilities equal moral responsibilities which hey man you recognize in the home you say that all the time I mean that's what Republican Motherhood is <hes> then we should have this <hes> the sense later you know it comes to be understood by more and more women <hes> that that suffrage would then be of course what how women could participate in in these <hes> with these moral responsibilities I mean I think it took time <music>. I'm obviously well decades to get there and bringing on <hes> kind of the more conservative wing with Francis Willard and the Women Christian Temperance Union who understood you know the the suffrage is the home protection ballot you know where and and then Jane Addams to who later later in the early twentieth century she talks about you know this is just an extension of the responsibilities that women have in the home which is to protect you know children families <hes> etc in the industrial Israel conditions that were out there of course women the right to vote to be able to protect all those things and so. I think that that that <hes> part of the resolutions is really is really quite interesting to fascinating you have mentioned <hes> Stanton's endorsement of the idea of voluntary motherhood or Republican motherhood she also different times called it enlighten motherhood and said that it included the woman's right to protect children children her family in the context of the home to the same degree as men <hes> Tracy tell us about Stanton's notion of voluntary motherhood or Republican motherhood and did it or did not mean that stanton an was opposed to abortion well. Actually each of those kinds of motherhood are slightly different so Republican motherhood is what Eric has been describing which was more of the revolutionary were her colonial aftermath period of women's contribution to the public as a citizen was in the home in raising moral children and in the sort of domestic sphere stanton didn't really prescribe to that ideal in fact she thought that was one of the sticking points to women's Equality Voluntary Motherhood was actually an idea that was much broader than Stanton but it certainly wants she subscribed to voluntary motherhood was the critique back of the unlimited marital sexual rights of husbands and men and it was the idea that motherhood was often involuntary for women because men once married you were I said to consent to the marriage and sexual activity at any point in time without the right to withdraw that so for instance we had laws that didn't recognize marital rape <hes> we had domestic. We didn't have domestic violence laws. We didn't have the.

Stanton Jane Addams Women Christian Temperance Uni Francis Willard Israel rape Eric Tracy
"seneca falls" Discussed on We The People

We The People

04:06 min | 1 year ago

"seneca falls" Discussed on We The People

"Declaration of sentiments was the right to equality in the church women had sort of been labeled with this moral superiority but it was actually an inferiority they were not allowed to teach in the churches speak in the churches. The pulpit talked about women's inferiority back to stories of Eve and certainly the quaker religion especially the quakers at Seneca falls very much believed in every individuals in her late in right to equality so the the third part of the declaration declaration of sentiments also talks about women having the right and duty to speak the right to speak in the churches the right to their full happiness autonomy sphere of action so a very broad broad based itemization going against every limitation of women in Society Law. Thank you so much for that and thank you for calling my attention to the third part of the declaration. I'm just reading as you say it's absolutely fascinating in emphasizing <hes> he allows her in churches well estate but a subordinate position claiming Apostolic Authority for exclusion from the ministry. He's usurp the prerogative of Jehovah himself claiming it as his is right to assign for her a sphere of action when that belongs to her conscience into her God Erica. Can you please tell us more about Elizabeth Cady Stanton's conception of <hes> religious equality with men and how it influenced her other views about women's equality more generally. I think I should let the expert on on Stanton really take care of stand but I I would want to call attention to Lucretia Mott the quaker minister who also was involved in <hes> helping to draft <hes> <hes> you know how much he was involved what was written by whom obviously I think we know that <hes> you know Motte was a friend of William Floyd Garrison so certainly was part of that Garre Sonian wing of the abolitionist movement you know that that Tracy spoke of where she was much more interested in moral suasion and so really <hes> took some issue with the idea of putting forward <hes> suffrage right away but I think you know a key part of what I would say is the Mont influence is another part you know really attacking the double standard the moral double standard which ends up being a key part of of their response to many of the ills that that come about in in what hopefully we can talk about in terms of voluntary motherhood but you know Lucretia Mott was was an avid reader of Mary wollstonecraft seventeen ninety to treat US vindicating the rights of women and and she was one really was calling attention to that double standard you know talking about how women had been held to this norm of chastity and no other virtue and men weren't held to the norm chastity and so Lucretia Mott. I I suspect is the one but who knows maybe I suspect it was also stanton as well but there's a straight line about the fault you know created a false public sentiment by giving a world of a different moral code of Sorry Different Code of Morals for men and women <hes> which by which moral all delinquencies which excluded women from society and not only tolerated but deemed a little account to man so when you look into the resolutions you start to see what is their response to that and and I think that that's that's sort of very interesting is that they they want to raise men their answer to the sexual double standard the moral double standard is not to sort of eradicate morals. It's to raise men expect more from men <hes> so the same amount of this is one of the resolutions the same amount of virtue delicacy and refinement of behavior that is required women be required of men in the same transgressions visited with equal severity which of course to our our ear sounds well severe but I think too. I mean getting back to the religious part. One of the beautiful parts of the resolution <hes> the resolutions is the very beginning <hes> where they call about this great precept of nature right and so <hes> in to.

Elizabeth Cady Stanton Lucretia Mott Mary wollstonecraft Seneca falls US Apostolic Authority Society Law Motte Tracy Garre Sonian William Floyd Garrison
"seneca falls" Discussed on We The People

We The People

01:46 min | 1 year ago

"seneca falls" Discussed on We The People

"Declare the sentiments the moral sentiments of the convener so she adopts the declaration of sentiments title but she uses the Declaration of independence as her model for for articulating all of these wrongs two women done through culture and the Declaration of Independence it was obviously in the public's mind it was something a public icon people understood that what kind of revolutionary spirit and so the the that was her more political statement was to try to use that norm but the content of the declaration of sentiments really was quite wide sweeping and it included the elective franchise franchise the vote and that was actually probably it's most controversial not because of women voting was so controversial because women had voted temporarily for period of time in colonial New Jersey but because has the rest of many of the quaker women the abolitionist who were at Seneca falls did not believe in the political system they found the political system corrupt government corrupt and so they were trying moral suasion to change the hearts and minds of the country as far as slavery and so they didn't want to play into that public governance but Stanton did because stanton believed in the power of representation in the power to change a lot so the declaration of sentiments takes on every aspect of coverage there are eighteen specific demands hands in the law for the vote for custody of children for the right to divorce the freight to be freedom from domestic chastisement which <hes> punishment of your spouse or domestic violence we would say guardianship of children marital property but but also the third part that we often forget about the declaration.

New Jersey Stanton Seneca falls
"seneca falls" Discussed on We The People

We The People

04:42 min | 1 year ago

"seneca falls" Discussed on We The People

"Husband under whose wing protection and cover she performs everything so women lost her the property rights that she had his offense soul a single woman and when she entered marriage her husband actually gained the full use of her that real property that she brought in and then had the full rights to her personal property and he then of course was in exchange bound to protect her by law but you know what was allowed in culture richer including sort of disciplines and things like that is <hes> aspirin obviously to us today but I think it's also important to remember you know that he that he was understood in this kind of early understanding of the Republican form of government it to be the political representation representative of the family right and so there's one sort of head patriarch of the family and the woman is understood to be a member of the family without her own individual rights just as the children are members but the backdrop of all all of this is the real agrarianism of of the time and so remember that most Americans are subsisting on the land in these how in household production and women are incredibly important as collaborative collaborative you know <hes> members of the family in the interdependence I mean they didn't really have time at the beginning there because they're all subsisting to really make issues of of you know they're subordination in the family so they had no rights or recognition recognition of legal status but they had this essential contribution which of course Tocqueville recognizes as he talks about democracy in America as women having this the superiority of women of American women are what's going to bring about the success of of the American republic if in fact it will come to be because of this idea that <hes> Republican motherhood which you know they understood as kind of their most important work which was inculcating personal virtue because again and it Republican understanding early Republican understanding the central tenant was that the political freedom that was promised required personal virtue and so this was the high mission that women understood and I love this quote by historian Elizabeth Fox genevieve? She says you know no longer will women viewed as breeders who produce smell airs for families women is mother came to be viewed as guardians of individual character and so you know the the historian Linda Gerber talks about how this this understanding of Republican motherhood among themselves really was kind of seed that fomented did into their work I of course inside the home through the household Barry Productive household economy but then into their work outside the excuse me outside the home and began to give give rise to their political sensibility women's is leadership in in movements for abolition of course first and foremost and then social purity women's rights and ultimately women's suffrage and all of that is key because what happens right along the time of of of Seneca falls is the move industrialization and that you know the the importance of industrialization where you know women's productive work in the home is being taken out of the home and basically being done by men you know as robbing her if some of that work and then also changing you know how her work is viewed in the home fascinating thank you so much for that Tracy. Erica has told us about how women had a deprivation of before Seneca falls both of their civil rights such as rights of property through the couve richer laws where they were considered <hes> the agents of their husbands and their political rights where the husband's representatives of the family tell us more about that context what sort of disabilities did women suffer under these cougar laws before eighteen forty eight and what in particular was the declaration of sentiments of eighteen forty eight designed to reform the declaration of sentiments elements was really designed to attack everything it was a very holistic broad-based systemic attack on all of the social religious in legal aspects of culture so stanton takes on Elizabeth Cady Stanton. The author of the Declaration of sentiments took on all of these social norms but also how they were entrenched in the law she herself had been trained in the law read law her husband Father brothers-in-law were all lawyers so she was very familiar with how the law operated as a vehicle and in the declaration of sentiments in a declaration of sentiments that terminology itself was something that had been used in the abolition movement and and in various conventions to declare.

Elizabeth Cady Stanton Linda Gerber Elizabeth Fox Seneca falls aspirin Seneca Tocqueville representative America Erica Father Barry Tracy
"seneca falls" Discussed on We The People

We The People

03:32 min | 1 year ago

"seneca falls" Discussed on We The People

"Of women's legal history and Gender Law Erika Becky is a fellow at the ethics and Public Policy Center in Washington and a research fellow at the Abigail Adams Institute. She was visiting visiting scholar at Harvard Law School and she is the editor of two books women's sex in the church a case for Catholic teaching and the cost of choice women evaluate the impact of abortion. She's also contributed to the blog mirror of Justice Erica. It's wonderful. We'll have you on the show. Thank you Jeffrey Tracy. Thomas is John F. Sieber Ling Chair of Constitutional Law and Director of the Constitutional Law Center at the University of Akron School of law. She is the author of Elizabeth Cady Stanton and the feminist foundations family law and editor of West annual volume women in the law she was also co editor feminist legal history essays on women in the law and his co editor of the gender and the law profit blog tracy tracy. It's great to have you with us. Thank you glad to be here. This is such an important topic and I think let's just begin with the declaration of sentiments issued at Seneca falls on July nineteenth eighteen forty eight listeners. You can check it out at the constitution centers blog and what's remarkable is that it's based on the Declaration of independence it begins we hold these truths to be self evident that all men and women are created equal and then has a list of of grievances about the repeated injuries and user patients on the part of man toward women including he has never permitted her to exercise her inalienable right to the elected franchise he has withheld from her rights which are given to the most ignorant and degraded you did men he has made her married in the eyes of the law civilly dead. He's taken from alright in property even of the wages Sheeran's and it goes on it's absolutely fascinating document based on the Declaration Erica. Please help us begin by giving awesome historical context. Where did this declaration come from and why is it based so closely on the Declaration of Independence Yeah you know I wanNA start speak to the legal economic and cultural context of this really remarkable documentary but first? Let's go all the way back to Abigail Adams and you know remember her she. She was from a precursor in her letter to John Adams of obviously her husband where she herself was the first to make this analogy between the common law status of married women in culture and to the injustices of King George against the against the colonists and I think it's it's important to remember sort of her legacy as as being the one you know Oh she talks that we we sort of remember her saying remember the ladies but she really talked about sort of you know the tyranny of men and that sort of thing and that you know if you don't remember the ladies they will foment a rebellion which of course they then came to do <hes> but I think it's important. Just you know most most of course love listening to this podcast. Remember the law of Culture. which was you know appropriated by the founders as this kind of unquestioned common-law backdrop to the national structure that they were erecting the constitution and so they look they looked to blackstone because I was really the only the main the main guy they read on the law and so I think it's important just at the beginning of this to quote that that language of blackstone very being or legal existence of the woman is suspended during the marriage or at least is incorporated and consolidated into that of the.

editor tracy tracy Harvard Law School Abigail Adams University of Akron School of Justice Erica Constitutional Law Center Abigail Adams Institute Jeffrey Tracy John Adams Erika Becky Elizabeth Cady Stanton research fellow Seneca falls Public Policy Center visiting scholar Washington blackstone
House weighs bringing articles of impeachment against Trump

Laura Ingraham

10:07 min | 1 year ago

House weighs bringing articles of impeachment against Trump

"Facebook I'm gonna take you through some of the nitty gritty of what happened yesterday what happened yesterday was more than just a floor fight instability screwed up and we are going to see a movement on impeachment in the house I'm going to explain why and why you shouldn't freak out over it she's going to have a press conference here shortly and we are going to take some of that because I and I think that that's going to that we're gonna see where she's gonna go with us there is so what happened yesterday and I will I watched it I was also doing like a million other things I I watched as it happened and I was really fascinated to see it go down the way it did she messed up at eight I mean she really did she really did mess up at at at some point because what ended up happening is that she well she violated those those rules are violated the the rules of decorum there because and here here's a I have so many things up so just give me bear with me it literally says in V. I. the handbook is Jefferson's manual and this gets into the weeds a little bit because even though yes it's a Republican the way things are structured it's hundred center but we write we also incorporate parliamentary rules so that we can maintain order so that things can progress because it can otherwise it could be just even more of a freak show that it is any manual literally says and I'm reading for I'm reading verbatim from it it says quote and I'm an ex give over all the dead the citations at such a reference references to racial or other discrimination on the part of the president are not in order as such remarks may not refer to the president as a racist and it gives different having made racial slurs racial epithets telling a racist lines using direct quote a bigot having made a bigoted or racist statement having taken bigoted action I mean it goes on and on having run a prejudiced campaign and give citations you know I but so that's it's literally a rule violation breed I quoted it verbatim it is literally a rules violation and so that was what that that is what the back and forth was that you saw when there was a dramatic pause because they were going with the it was the Democrats and it was the parliamentarian's office and it was just you know back and forth back and forth so green AL Greene has filed articles of impeachment and they will have a particular amount of time that that they're I mean they're gonna have to they're going to have to at some point I think what is it two legislative days at this point and to go through with that and what I mean again it's Adam and also get into all the latest with the squad in all of this stuff but I need to pull as is expected to hold a press conference here and a little bit and we're going to take that when she comes up because I'm interested in hearing what is set up because if you noticed the interview that the four congresswoman did gave to Gayle king they double down on it they also mention impeachment but did you know that they also refocused the attack back on into below sea there is a lot that's going on here that's more than meets the eye it is this isn't yes it is about trump but don't think for one second that this party is unified in the wake of of his tweet don't think for one second that they are this is the battle of battles for this party this is the life or death right now of the Democrat party it will be determined by twenty twenty and in the civil war going on with Democrats I have to say you if you're AT at this point it's great to watch them consume each other but you need to pause and hope for a reason because you could end up the further leftist party goes the further left other people may be drawn with it so it is a cautionary tale for everyone now as where it concerns Nancy Pelosi al green's move it and this is I'm looking at this piece here there's a couple of pieces so he introduced articles of impeachment because of the privileged nature of the resolution beat it they're gonna have to legislative days he can he can bore he can force a vote on the impeachment articles into legislative days if the house leadership doesn't do anything so Nancy Pelosi's options at this point are limited this was the fight that she was hoping to stave off now she's approaching the podium now I want to hear this because this is going to determine the fight that they're gonna bring to drop in the general election listen this is John the a justice Stevens with a true guardian of the constitution he made history not only as the longest serving justice but it's one of its finest country more influence will be flying in St Monday the service will be Tuesday and again it's a great loss to our country today last night a head of a particular pleasant experience which was to sign the legislation which enabled us to use the Washington Monument as a backdrop for the moon launch exciting I hope everyone will take advantage of observing that as we observe that historic event in our country the world's history at seven it's pretty exciting so here we are because you know we campaigned on for the people agenda slowing health care costs building as either a bigger paychecks clear government and to that end of their paychecks this week we'll have three bills on the floor raising the minimum wage raising the minimum wage increase wages for up to thirty three million workers and if one point three million Americans out of poverty it would help secure fairness and equality for women many of whom are will be the beneficiaries of getting nearly twenty million working women a raise and help narrow the gender gap to me that we should get the disproportionately impact women we're also proud to pass this bill a tomorrow on the anniversary of the Seneca falls convention which America declared that all men and women were created well also continuing a diverse our promises to workers to day will honor our promise to be at to the hard working men and women of the labor of labor as we lift of the Cadillacs taxes seem I'm gonna have you monitor her speech and when she gets the part that we want to hear you take it live for us if you don't mind please Sir but as she gets through all of those few she's gonna get to it she's gonna say all of that stuff first get it all out there while everybody watches everybody's attention but as I said so I'll green in introducing these articles impeachment after they pass this resolution of that and she had she realizes she must option of walking off the floor which also was a rules violation I mean if you're if you're accusing the did the president of violating decorum then why are you violated the Koran to accuse the president of violating the core of that's what I find fascinating with all of this so he can drink and force a vote on the impeachment articles into legislative days so she doesn't really have a lot of good options before her and this has been the moment that she has wanted to push off for quite some time because she realizes that if there is a move on impeachment in the house you are delivering the election to drop that is it you might as a and not only are you delivering the election to trump but you're delivering a lot of vulnerable Democrat seats to trump that will light a fire under Republicans and you will see a turn out on like you have you haven't seen and I'll I'll goodness the generation it's gonna be pretty insane so she knows this because she's been in Congress for for ever and this is where she is right she's right because that absolutely will happen you'll even see individuals disillusioned who are Democrats but are disillusioned with the way Democrats are legislating that out of spite they will show up and they will they'll vote the vote or for Republicans or maybe they won't go out at all she may even suppressed her own basis turn out and she can't ignore it this is something she can't ignore because it's a privilege motion green knows this child this could she has tried to fight this off and this ended it so anything that she does at this point is going take is going to trigger an additional fight within her within her caucus anything else that she does at this point there's gonna be a fight because it is going to I I mean if she moves on it she's going to make the moderates mad if she doesn't move on it she's going to make the socialists mad so this is she doesn't have a she doesn't have a lot of options before her and she's taking questions at this point and Stever she being asked about any of this stuff because if I have to hear some about a quality and all this other stuff I'm just going to I've lost my okay well let us know when she gets to the meat potatoes so we are that's what that is she I mean her caucus is gonna be further divided so that is that and and yet these are I mean you're looking at districts that trump one in twenty sixteen where there are in battle Democrats who will lose their seats seventy Murphy is a representative out of Florida and she is the head of the conservative blue dog Democrat group and she says yeah this is she's I mean she's worried about this all the other more moderate Democrats are worried about this candidates like Joe Biden or worried about this because see this kind of stuff is going to affect how he his support within the party need to pull it the it's not just it's not just a fight for Nancy policies ability to control her her caucus and her ability to control Democrats in the house it's also a fight for the direction of the Democrat party and I don't think this was intentional but at least with this with with the president's tweets were listening to policies press on the she's being asked questions about all this now as

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