35 Burst results for "Seneca"

"seneca" Discussed on Seneca Women Conversations on Power and Purpose

Seneca Women Conversations on Power and Purpose

08:09 min | 5 d ago

"seneca" Discussed on Seneca Women Conversations on Power and Purpose

"Dot com. Now it gives me great pleasure to introduce our guest. Host for the keep going series amina brown. A minute is a spoken. Word poet author and host of the podcast her with amina brown. On the seneca women. Podcast network amina. Thanks so much for joining us. Thank you kim. What an honor to be guest hosting this special series in collaboration with makers we've been having such great conversations here and today's conversation is going to be very special. We're going to start with an excerpt from a talk. Given at makers by kimberly crenshaw professor of law at ucla and columbia law school and executive director of the african american policy forum. She is the person who coined the term intersection -ality and she's going to give us a guide on exactly what it is or as. She calls it intersection. -ality one on one and then i'll be joined by dr alabel smith professor of management sciences at the tuck school of business at dartmouth. Dr smith and i will go deeper into the definition of intersection. And she's going to suggest some practical ways leaders can be sure. They are taking intersection. -ality into consideration in the workplace. Now let's listen to kimberly crenshaw and i'll be back right after with dr alabel smith so i'm just going to dive right in with how intersection analogy can help us understand why we're not done now. There's a lot of nonsense circulating around about what intersection analogy is particularly from. Its critics. they say it's a religion is an identity politics on steroids. My new favorite. It's an assault on straight white men. You know what i think about that now. All of these ideas about what intersection now. The is completely off. The mark when intersection alley is is a prism. It's a framework. It's a template for seeing and telling different kinds of stories about what happens in our workplaces what happens in society and to whom it happens now. Some part of why. We're not done is predicated on what we haven't been able to see what what's not remembered. The stories that are not told so intersection training wheels to get us to where we need to go. It's glasses high index glasses to help a see the things we need to see now in all honesty when i fashioned the term some thirty years ago i thought of it as remedial education for judges who didn't get to see didn't seem to understand what was happening to black women. They didn't seem to understand that. Black women can experienced race discrimination in a different way than black men do or they didn't understand black women can experience gender discrimination in a different way than white women did image. A graph reach story was a person who understood that problem claiming that she experienced discrimination as a black woman but earlier and the court seem to agree the since the employer hired black people and they hired women even though the black people that they hired were all men and the women they hired. We're all white. That couldn't prove discrimination. So i was trying to figure out what kind of framework they needed to see in order to keep black women from falling through the cracks of. They're very narrow conception of what discrimination was so intersection audi was just like a flashing neon sign. I know you're used to thinking about intersection. Alley discrimination in this way. But i want to draw your attention to where they overlap where race and gender discrimination inter set so. The point of intersection was to say that what happens to black. Women isn't the sum total of what happens to black men and white women. It's different and sometimes it requires a different approach. Now that's intersection one. I think a lot of people get that so good to hear about intersection. Kimberly shaw herself. And i'm excited to welcome dr ella bell smith professor of management sciences at the tuck school of business at dartmouth to unpack some of this with me l. a. Talk to me how. How does intersection. -ality help us understand. The particular challenges that women of color are facing in the workplace will first of all. Hello hello hello. I'm just delighted to be here Okay in the early research on women and management on breaking the glass ceiling. everybody was talking about. That was a book. All about white women. Black women were invisible The were that Price cobbs did and others. And they were more organizational consultants. The work they did around. Black executives was primarily based on black men so black women literally fell in between the cracks. We still fall in between the cracks. ina sexuality became really important because of the loudest to understand the intersection of race and gender and for a black women for black women for ground. Women we have to deal with an asian women indian women native american women we have to deal with the struggles that hit us because of our race and because of our agenda now there was a scholar before kimberly i love. He said she used the term. We use the book in term in our separate ways. Because we wrote the book for kimberly came out with a brilliant framework of racial laws sexism. So we have a long history. If you will over thirty years of trying to understand the particular 'isms that black women experience it's critical dairy. I could go on. Give you another A recent example on working with a client and Wage analysis which is really really important and i was talking to the the guy who did the in them. Great guy brilliant. You know good technique all that kind of good stuff. And i noticed that he had people of color blacks separated from gender and i said to him in the house and he was telling me what you know. The numbers are too small. And i know you're gonna be talking about intersection -ality but the number is a too small and you have to do a whole different cut and if you do statistics you have to make sure you're filling all the cells in to get a really good analysis and they're not enough black women and so we really can't do that analysis and yada yada yada yada yada yada yada We are still doing analysis Around wage around promotion around other types of advancement that still lump black men and black women together so we cannot differentiate what their experiences are particularly around soured particularly around advancement on. And we've been preaching this song that you've got to understand again believes term on the intersection between race engender so it silences.

kimberly crenshaw Kimberly amina brown dr ella bell smith smith amina kim dr alabel smith ucla today thirty years ago Price cobbs asian over thirty years indian dartmouth Dr school columbia law school american
Kimberly Crinshaw on Intersectionality

Seneca Women Conversations on Power and Purpose

02:04 min | 5 d ago

Kimberly Crinshaw on Intersectionality

"I'm just going to dive right in with how intersection analogy can help us understand why we're not done now. There's a lot of nonsense circulating around about what intersection analogy is particularly from. Its critics. they say it's a religion is an identity politics on steroids. My new favorite. It's an assault on straight white men. You know what i think about that now. All of these ideas about what intersection now. The is completely off. The mark when intersection alley is is a prism. It's a framework. It's a template for seeing and telling different kinds of stories about what happens in our workplaces what happens in society and to whom it happens now. Some part of why. We're not done is predicated on what we haven't been able to see what what's not remembered. The stories that are not told so intersection training wheels to get us to where we need to go. It's glasses high index glasses to help a see the things we need to see now in all honesty when i fashioned the term some thirty years ago i thought of it as remedial education for judges who didn't get to see didn't seem to understand what was happening to black women. They didn't seem to understand that. Black women can experienced race discrimination in a different way than black men do or they didn't understand black women can experience gender discrimination in a different way than white women did image. A graph reach story was a person who understood that problem claiming that she experienced discrimination as a black woman but earlier and the court seem to agree the since the employer hired black people and they hired women even though the black people that they hired were all men and the women they hired. We're all white. That couldn't prove discrimination.

"seneca" Discussed on Seneca Women Conversations on Power and Purpose

Seneca Women Conversations on Power and Purpose

05:05 min | 6 d ago

"seneca" Discussed on Seneca Women Conversations on Power and Purpose

"They're at.

"seneca" Discussed on Seneca Women Conversations on Power and Purpose

Seneca Women Conversations on Power and Purpose

07:22 min | Last week

"seneca" Discussed on Seneca Women Conversations on Power and Purpose

"Journalist and founder of katie couric media talking with actress director and activist olivia wilde. They'll be discussing why it's so important that women get the opportunities that lead to a successful career. After that i'll be joined by the incredible. Tiffany are warren executive vice president chief diversity and inclusion officer sony music group. Tiffany and i will talk about what we've heard and she's going to give us some fresh creative suggestions we can bring back to the workplace. Okay let's listen to katie couric. An olivia wilde. And i'll be right back after with. Tiffany are warren. We'll talk about the industry sort of the opportunities for women and according to the center for the study of women in tv and fell Women comprise only twenty percent of all the top roles including directors writers and producers who worked on the top one hundred grossing films in two thousand nineteen but what is taking so long olivia to get those numbers at a higher level. I think that in order to change those numbers we have to change the way people are hired. I think when hiring when anyone in a position of power is basing their decisions on resume what they will of course end up doing is perpetuating this system because when women haven't been given as many opportunities to take on those leadership roles resumes are not as long even i know in the position of hiring. Let's say production designers. I can look at the resume of a man has done fifty movies one tons of awards and he seems like the more valuable option than the woman who might be really have a great take on the on the on the concept but her resume looks so thin next to this guy so i guess i'll just go with this. Yeah and if we continue to do that. Then we will perpetuate this system. So i think it's embracing america talk. I did an hour For national geographic is part of the series called american side out on gender inequality in hollywood and silicon valley. And i went to the set of the handmaid's tale and the director said. She said it's so hard to get your first your first break and and men just hire these guys because they have more faith and trust or confidence in them and as you said they can build up this list of credits which helps them achieve more and more and more. Yes but if you don't get those first few things under their belt yet are kind of hosed. That's why i think. It's about empowering women to make their first films by having more grant programs. I really benefited from a short film. Grant program that glamour magazine used to do. They should keep. They should do it again. It was called glamour real moments and they gave up pretty great budget for a short film to a bunch of women every year and it was the first time i have been kind of given the steering wheel and i so enjoyed the process that i thought that at this is all i want to do. And then i started directing music videos so that my real continued to grow. And i learned until i earned the the opportunity to direct a feature but even at that point it was a female student executive. Megan ellison at purna. Who recognized that. I was ready and she took a huge risk in hiring me and did to this day. It feels that the riskier choice as the unproven woman right because we are used to this narrative of the scrappy young film. School guy. who's who knows could be the next steven spielberg so given this chance. There aren't as many examples for those people in positions of power to draw from of women who out of the gate had something that worked and therefore it's harder to take a risk on them so we need to empower more women to have their first film made right. And i know you believe deeply in sort of this idea of once you are in that spot. You have to start mentoring other women and do what the men have done for years which is give the job to their buddies or someone who looks just like them. That's right exactly caitlyn. Denver who stars in our movie directed her first music video and i am very proud of her because she is wanted to direct for a long time and she said live. I don't know how to get going. I don't know how to start this. Nice she has a band. And i said you have an easy way to start this director video. Start building your real. I think it's about mentoring and encouraging and it's also helping them get the job making the calls helping people get in the room for a long time. I feel like for one woman to feel. She was succeeding in breaking through all the barriers and the glass ceiling. There is a sense of. I must go at it alone. Because if i bring others with me. It'll be harder to get through this small crack in the ceiling. Lots to discuss from this conversation. I am delighted to welcome. Tiffany are warren executive vice president chief diversity and inclusion officer sony. Music group tiffany. Thank you for joining us. Thank you so much. I'm honored to be here. Okay tiffany i wanted. I want to jump right in here. Because katie brought up in this conversation between kadian olivia. They brought up an interesting phrase which is a first break and in your experience in the entertainment industry. You have experienced both being the one in need of that first break and being the one to provide others with their first break into the industry their first entrance into the room so to speak. What are your thoughts about how we can improve that hiring process so that women aren't excluded in even more so for women of color. It's such a great point on and you know this idea of i break. I often say. I built a career doing things i it's not that i wanted to. It's just the path that i chose You know i'm in my third first job or my third. I break meaning. I'm the first to do this particular job. And then i feel like i'm the director of first breaks because that's kind of a little unknown secret at you know. I don't think it secretive. But that when you're a chief diversity officer you have a responsibility whether it's in your job description or not on to clear the pathway for people to have i breaks to clear the barriers to take down the wall so that people can walk into rooms and sit at tables without any impediments. I saw recently that privileges not privilege is not having an advantage. It's actually having a lack of impediments in show. How do i understand creates environment. Where privilege is not something that becomes an impediment for those that. Have the talent i think about. Why often in she said this phrase of. It's still a risk to give an opportunity to unproven. Woman will take that even deeper. What does that mean for women of color. What does that mean for someone of color. Someone of difference. If it's risk to give. I break to a woman you think about the other underrepresented groups and so when you think about the hiring process. I feel like one of my. My main jobs in the jobs of those that are involved in hiring process is to really look there specifically at the impediments.

steven spielberg Megan ellison olivia wilde Tiffany olivia kadian olivia warren katie fifty movies third purna caitlyn first time first film first films sony first music video first breaks first break both
EU Asks Belgian Court to Fine AstraZeneca

Monocle 24: The Briefing

01:59 min | 2 weeks ago

EU Asks Belgian Court to Fine AstraZeneca

"The european union and vaccine producer. Astrazeneca are attempting to settle their differences in brussels court today. The e contends that astrazeneca has been slow to deliver the doses of covid nineteen vaccines was contractually obliged to and that at least fifty million doses the e. You should have had were sent elsewhere. Astrazeneca unsurprisingly disputes. This cynical souls have suggested that. The eu is seeking to deflect blame for a generally slow rollout of covid nineteen vaccines especially when measured against the progress of recent. You abscond e the united kingdom. Well joining me now. From brussels fronts twentyfold europe editor. Catherine nicholson She's joined also by independent legal expert. Get vancouver who is joining us from leuven catherine first of all to the basics of the case itself. What is the use case here in what of i hoping to gain from this i say the european commission signed a contract with seneca supply Vaccine doses at the end of august last year and it paid two hundred twenty four million euros astrazeneca a full ingredients for these vaccines in september of twenty twenty so the commission is saying that contracts to astra zeneca to deliver three hundred million indexes affects seem by the end of june this year But it's now expecting to receive just fifty million even the listens per we remember that astrazeneca said earlier in the yet they have some production problems therefore saving issues as we know with experts being restricted from various places around the world the european commission. Oversees saying this is not what they contracts it. That's their arguments And they are demanding. That's more doses be delivered And it's essentially arguing that astrazeneca's failed to honor contractual commitments. To deliver vaccine doses. On the other hand astra zeneca says that this case is without

Astrazeneca Brussels EU Catherine Nicholson Seneca Supply Vaccine Leuven European Commission United Kingdom Vancouver Europe
Microaggressions Between Women

Seneca Women Conversations on Power and Purpose

01:59 min | 3 weeks ago

Microaggressions Between Women

"Microaggressions. They stand in the way they stand in the way every day all the time and we have some urgent business to attend to. I remember years ago. Many years ago. When i was first beginning to practice law i joined a very prestigious public interest law firm. They didn't really hire people out of law school. But i had gotten a temporary job there right out of law school to help you get ready for trial. People were so excited about what. I was bringing. They quickly developed a program. That would me to be able to join the firm. But as a fellow i joined the fellowship program. It was their way to bring me in but within six months they said oh. Just let that go. Just come one of our partners. And i did but there was a woman there who had been what they called. Legal secretary then. I suspect they use that language anymore. I haven't practiced law in twenty years but she was smart as a whip. She understood the law but she wasn't a lawyer. One day i had gone to work not expecting to have to go into court dress very very casually and something happened in. My case was up. And i had to go to court. Went into the women's room with a couple of other. Who were there barham. Sturt from somebody gotta blouse from somebody else. Somebody else had. A jacket looked at myself. I looked pretty good. Looked in the mirror and said. Does anybody have lipstick. I think i need to add a little color. And this woman who had smart as a whip knew everything about the law but not a lawyer might woman said. I thought that's why we brought you in. I was so taken aback. I'd been friendly with her. She had helped me out on a couple of cases. And i thought not. She didn't hurt me. what she did. Is she exposed herself. I've thought i didn't know you were in that kind of pain. I can see it. I didn't know it.

Barham
Environmental Concerns Arise Over Energy Needed To Mine Bitcoin

Environment: NPR

01:53 min | Last month

Environmental Concerns Arise Over Energy Needed To Mine Bitcoin

"Making or mining. Bitcoin requires a lot of energy which can mean burning more fossil fuels now at the same time states are making a push for clean energy. So does something here have to give. Here's von golden from member station w. skg in new york's finger lakes about one hundred. People are walking down the shoulder of a highway overlooking seneca lake. They're heading down to the greenwich generation. Power plant the natural gas-fired facility generates some electricity. Oh what's gotten. The attention of. The activists is their generation of bitcoin. They're protesting today. Because greenwich is looking to expand. Its bitcoin mining. That would probably mean burning. More natural gas emitting more greenhouse gases. Yvonne taylor is vice. President of seneca lake guardian and is leading the opposition to greenwich. We simply cannot allow this ludicrous scheme of burning fossil fuels to make fake money in the midst of climate generating or mining. Cryptocurrency is complicated. there's no actual mining the gist. Is that a whole lot of computers. Do a whole lot of calculations to create digital currency that requires a ton of energy which can mean burning more fossil fuels. And that's the case with greenwich. The plant isn't always producing electricity for the grid so a few years ago. They figured out they could make a profit by using excess power to mind bitcoin. Dale irwin manages. The plant came up to that. It was a very good business solution for irwin. Won't say exactly how much more the plant will emit with its expansion. Only that it'll be in compliance with its

SKG Yvonne Taylor Seneca Lake Guardian Seneca Lake Greenwich New York Dale Irwin Irwin
"seneca" Discussed on Seneca Women Conversations on Power and Purpose

Seneca Women Conversations on Power and Purpose

07:39 min | Last month

"seneca" Discussed on Seneca Women Conversations on Power and Purpose

"At this point in your career you know well. Let's be clear for years we've been asking people to bring their benthic selves to the workplace. But we don't talk about the risks and the dangers of doing that for so many of us and the early part of my career. It wasn't lost on me that people that looked like me often sidelined marginalized and drawn out to visibility. You you quickly learn that you have to spend your energy as as boese said trying to fit in into white professional norms and that can be suffocating for me that meant ensuring that there was not a trace of an accent to be heard or anything that could be called out in my appearance that seemed to ethnic or overly sexual artist and it took me time to stop doubting my abilities and not feel like an imposter in organizations that are not designed for people like me and you know as as i heard bozo speak. I remember that along the way. There were many times that i gave up small parts of myself. I let my courage shrink. I let my voice diminish. Even i was fighting to bring more seats to the table. I had to desperately fight to earn in. Keep my own while watching others face far less hurdles and so that that authenticity courage that i showed today that's been slowly revealing to me over the years and it's been about no longer leading toxic. Managers set up roadblocks for my success or having pierce question value it's about building deep and lasting friendships and communities in our workplaces of support. And of course. I of encouragement. And it's also been about recognizing that my vulnerability doesn't diminish capacity to lead it enhances it and that's what i bring to the workplace. Come on daisy. Oh i just i i appreciate you bringing nuance into that. This is a process Because sometimes we enter the workplace in. We feel like. I have to have all of this together now in my in my first moment in my first meeting. I'm starting this new job. I gotta have it all together and it's a process. It's a process for everybody. I think sometimes we see other people in our workplaces and think man look at that person how confident they seem when they walk in a room and you're not knowing behind the scenes that's been a process in their professional experience. I i really appreciate you adding that today. Also can you give us some takeaways here because when we are talking about things like what it really looks like to do. The work of inclusion to do the work of diversity to do the work of equity right In some of our places were starting to enter ethereal conversation. We're starting to have sort of a pie in the sky kind of thoughts about this but we actually need practical steps of what do we do. Based on what we're hearing levian and boza bring into this conversation. Tell me what are your takeaways. You would get people for people who are leading in their workplaces. What's the the stuff to do now. There is so much stuff. But i'd like to frame it in threes and i think every manager every leader needs to do three things to nurture workplaces that work for everyone. I reflect and listen. Everyone wants to immediately jump to solutions. But you can't solve a complex structural problem that you don't understand so take responsibility for your learning by asking questions and really listening what are the biases that hold back. Women non binary people by pock. Lgbtq and other co workers from marginalized communities at my workplace one of my overlooking or tolerating that goes on said for for years and years. What are the assumptions habits or practices. That hold me back from creating an inclusive and equitable work environment. Ask yourself that question and take time to really reflect and listen now. The second is show that you care. There's a lot of pressure for leaders to have all the answers and the truth is you do you do not have to know all the answers with you. Have to show evidence of care that you really care in that. You're willing to put the effort. Sometimes people just want to acknowledgement that. You see them the difficulty. They're facing in that you care about them that means engaging and navigating difficult conversations not shrinking away from them. Not just simply calling yourself an ally but doing the work of an ally and that takes suit number three is to own this work. Create and support. Fresh organizational practices programs and policies. Fresh not the old school way of it but the new world of work this this means looking at processes that not disadvantage any race or gender group before they even get a chance to succeed. Take a close. Look at everything once there. What meets updating. What are you missing and address the weaknesses and strip by and discriminatory practices. That are either formal or informal out of your hiring. You compensation your performance in your advancement practices amina. I engage in this work. Because i believe changes possible and i'm trying to make work safe equitable and inclusive of all people because it is possible worthy and important and in order to do that. I'm counting on you and everyone who's watching this to help realize this vision because it's up to all of us drive this change forward. Yeah ooh daisy. Thank you for sharing with us. First of all for showing with us some challenges that we all can do in our workplaces that we have. We all have some places we can step up to this work and thank you for bringing your expertise to this table today. Daisy aw thank you so much so great my pleasure thank you daisy. Yes every time. I hear daisy. I'm not only one. Listen to what she says. But i also were to take action and do something about the things that she says speaking of do something. Let's ask ourselves three questions when you think about this. What are the habits or practices that are currently holding you back in creating a more inclusive work environment. What are the ways that you can bring care and thoughtfulness to your leadership to your ally ship to how you do the work. The diversity equity inclusion requires in your own workplace. And how can you create fresh fresh programs. Fresh cracked is's that would better support your team and support the work of diversity equity and inclusion on your team and think this is just a little of west to come. What an incredible conversation. I hope you found. It is valuable. As i did so tune in next wednesday for another amazing makers conversation about how we can all contribute to making progress in the workplace. You're listening to seneca women conversations on power and purpose brought to you by the seneca women podcast network and iheartradio with support from founding partner p. and g. listen to senator women conversations on power and purpose on the iheartradio app apple podcasts. Or wherever you get your podcast for more information on seneca women follow us on social media. Visit our website. Seneca women dot com and check out the seneca women app free in the app store.

iheartradio levian Daisy boza next wednesday second first meeting today three questions first moment First Seneca seneca women app seneca women three things one threes daisy Lgbtq bozo
Officials rush to defend AstraZeneca Covid vaccine after UK, EU blood clot guidance

Today in Focus

02:05 min | 2 months ago

Officials rush to defend AstraZeneca Covid vaccine after UK, EU blood clot guidance

"The oxford astrazeneca vaccine under uncomfortable scrutiny medicines regulators in the uk and the eu have judge that its benefits outweigh any possible risks. But they haven't ruled out a causal link between the vaccine and rare blood clot conditions in a tiny number of recipients resulting. This week in britain's regulator the are recommending alternative vaccines be given two hundred thirty s. All of which is worrying when it comes to competence in this back saying because as the observers science editor robin the key points out the stakes are incredibly high. It is the vaccine which the world depends. Because it's so easy to store and distribute a little cost so it's an incredibly important vaccine for the planet we might in the west. Get away with visors. Madonna's leaves astrazeneca. There's no doubt about it from the guardian. I'm a niche kristalina. Today in focus understanding the risks and rewards of the astra zeneca vaccine robin. When did this start. When did they first notice. But there might be a link between the vaccine and blood clubs. I miss in scandinavia at the leg. Ego muffled memento through dot com the live it will be weakening at astrazeneca seneca walks in norway and denmark. A proper schooners vaccine and they've begun to spot. These links of these tastes on gemini finds. Stop stop stuff. The in china from ministers bondi influence middle astrazeneca forces tiber asthma also advising defiant britain finds cases the british medicines regulator the hra says. It's like done defied. Thirty cases of red blood clots and people who've had the astra zeneca corona virus vaccine.

Oxford EU Britain Astrazeneca Astrazeneca Seneca Robin UK Astra Madonna Scandinavia Norway Denmark Asthma China HRA Red Blood Clots
U.S. study finds AstraZeneca COVID vaccine 79% effective

The Afternoon News with Kitty O'Neal

00:48 sec | 2 months ago

U.S. study finds AstraZeneca COVID vaccine 79% effective

"AstraZeneca says A new U. S study shows its vaccine is 79% effective at preventing covitz symptoms and 100% effective in stopping severe disease in hospitalization, opening the way for FDA consideration and possible use here. At today's White House briefing on covert 19, Dr Anthony Fauci talked about the benefits of the AstraZeneca vaccine. This vaccine could be stored, transported and handled. Had fridge aerated temperatures for at least six months. Also, importantly, conditional marketing authorization or emergency use is already in play in more than 70 countries across six continents. Dr Fauci says the astral Seneca vaccine has also received emergency use listing from the World Health

Astrazeneca Dr Anthony Fauci FDA White House Dr Fauci World Health
AstraZeneca's COVID-19 vaccine 79% effective in U.S. trial

WBZ Afternoon News

00:54 sec | 2 months ago

AstraZeneca's COVID-19 vaccine 79% effective in U.S. trial

"On WBZ after Seneca says data from a long anticipated US study shows its covert 19 vaccine provides strong protection among adults. Public confidence in the shot took a hit over concerns about previous study results and a scare over rare blood clots in Europe. AstraZeneca says the U. S study shows the vaccine was 79% effective overall and none of its study volunteers were either hospitalized or developed severe disease. It also says there were no safety concerns and no increased risk of the blood clots. Good results. Dr Anthony Fauci says the next step is for AstraZeneca toe apply for emergency use approval in the U. S. Which the company's Ruda Bear says will happen next month. We hope this soul it's an impressive set of data today will pave the way for millions of Americans and many others have access to the safe and highly effective vaccine

WBZ Astrazeneca Severe Disease Seneca U. Dr Anthony Fauci Ruda Bear Europe United States
European Medicines Agency on AstraZeneca: ‘This is a safe and effective vaccine’

Democracy Now! Audio

00:27 sec | 3 months ago

European Medicines Agency on AstraZeneca: ‘This is a safe and effective vaccine’

"About a dozen nations including germany france italy and spain of resumed. Use of oxford's ostra seneca vaccine. After europe's top regulator declared the shot safe and effective the european medicines agency investigated twenty five cases. Where blood clots. Among some twenty million people who've received officers on the inaugurations. It's not known whether the vaccine caused the blood clots. Health officials say it's benefits far outweigh the

European Medicines Agency Oxford Italy Spain Germany France Europe
Women-Owned Businesses We Love: Hint Water

Here's Something Good

06:34 min | 3 months ago

Women-Owned Businesses We Love: Hint Water

"During this women's history month we've been celebrating. Women owned businesses and talking to their founders. Because we know that buying from women owned businesses is a great way to empower women. We learned a lot from these women. And why women entrepreneurs will help us restart this economy. They've told us how they pivoted during challenging times bounce back there examples of resilience optimism and innovative thinking. Today we get a lesson in another topic doubt and we hear from woman who you might not expect would have a lot of doubts. Cara golden the founder of hint water. The unsweetened flavored water that she built into a hugely successful brand. In fact carry even wrote a book about it. Undaunted overcoming doubts and doubters. I had an opportunity to speak with her on are made by women podcast. Here's what cara had to say. You call yourself. An accident entrepreneur. I guess by that. You mean you really weren't intending to start a company but you as you say realize that water just needed to be cooler for lack of a better word. Yeah no absolutely yeah. I call myself. An accidental entrepreneur primarily because unlike many other entrepreneurs out there i. I didn't intend to actually go start a company but what i realized is that just by kind of living my life as a consumer. I started seeing these problems that really needed fixing. And and so that's why i decided to go tackle it. I think there are entrepreneurs that i've met over the years to where they know when they're a kid or they know when they're in college that they should you know go develop something and but that just wasn't me at all and and You know so. I think there's entrepreneurs come in all shapes and sizes. I guessed i sort of didn't know the aspect of actually starting a business raising money. You know figuring out how to not only start a company but started brand new category in a very competitive marketplace. So that is what. I embarked on so a lot of people have great ideas and i think maybe even a lot of people see holes in markets but still to crossover and actually do. It is a different thing. Your book is called. Undaunted overcoming doubts and doubters. How did you cross over to decide to start the company and and did you have doubts early on absolutely Yeah i. It's one of the things that i felt in and really the reason why i wrote. The book was that i think there's this Misconception that that entrepreneurs are are you know very confident and they don't have fears and they never have doubts or don't have doubters donut failures and you know. Especially when i was out speaking about building my company over the last few years i would run into these people who would articulate that and almost you know site that i was so different than they were because they had all these insecurities and walls around them and one day. I just. It really dawned on me that i was no different and and successful people that or business people are athletes. Were really no different than anyone else. Other than the fact that they actually tried and that they knew that there was a chance that they were gonna fail but they felt like they would go and try and so that is really the essence of my book. Is that just by sharing my story of not only building The company but also a little bit autobiography to on growing up as a kid and and kind of the things that you know. I thought about an somebody who read my book early on As a preview of it said that you know just you don't actually say in this book you don't talk necessarily about parenting but you definitely describe this environment that you grew up in which was go and try right like it doesn't matter if you fail you need to just go try and i think it's a lot of what i do. You know as a parent to i for Teenagers and you know. That's that is what i'm constantly saying. What do you tell yourself when you're taking on that next big challenge. I mean obviously not everything you do everything. Anybody does going to be successful. So what did you tell your younger south. And what do you tell your kids say about that. I try whenever anything's a little bit scary for me. I try and figure out how to break it down a bit. And so i don't allow myself to sort of get into a head space of making it so big that it's it you know it's gonna freak me out right and so that i can't move forward and so i think that that is such an important piece for for people to recognize. Is that when things do. Start getting really scary and again like i still fear things i still. You no doubt myself on things that i'm doing but just know that if you could actually just break it down a little bit and start to make steps forward things start to seem easier and even when you do fail right this. This isn't another thing that i've really learned to appreciate that. The next hard thing that you encounter you'll probably have greater strategies and ways to kind of move forward learnings just from that last failure In making this next scary things successful or you know really less daunting what great advice. So here's something could for today. Carol golden reveals the essential quality of all entrepreneurs perseverance. They may have doubts and they may fail sometimes but they try again and when they try and fail and then try again. Chances are they have success the next time that willingness to try is the hallmark of so many women business owners we speak with you can learn about more of them are new seneca women marketplace. We're showcasing dozens of women don't businesses. We love for women's history month you can shop. They're amazing products and learn their stories. Go to shop. Seneca women dot com and there you can also learn about a new credit card from seneca which is the first credit card that rewards you for shopping from women. don't businesses again go to shop. Seneca women dot com to learn more.

Cara Golden Cara Carol Golden Seneca
How Stonewall Unified the LGBTQ+ Community With Activist Mark Segal

LGBTQ&A

03:30 min | 4 months ago

How Stonewall Unified the LGBTQ+ Community With Activist Mark Segal

"In the mythology ising stonewall we talk about how it lasted three days as if it lasts three days just on its own and something i had heard before until your book was about how it lasted three days because you were writing chalk on the street come to stone tomorrow night. How intentionally kept it going. I mean you writing chalk on the street meet stonewall night like that spread information that that's like tweeting. Today we had no cell phones. We had no internet most couldn't afford a phone quite honestly. During some fifty sort of amazing. I would go out to various speaking engagements. Some of them were museums. Some of them were in schools. Everyone had it seems a different day. Oh went on for three days. Oh it went on for four days. Oh it went on for six days. How many days did go on is a good question for me. You went on three hundred sixty five days because right from the beginning we started organizing that includes from the street running on street tomorrow night to the third or fourth or fifth night. I don't remember which where we had leaflets on the street saying you know we're not going to allow the The police to oppress us anymore. This is our neighborhood. That's what is so that was in itself illegal. When we gathered at the steps of stone wall that was illegal homosexuals could not congregate to that was when we said. We're gonna fight the police. That was illegal. Everything we did in that first year was basically illegal and we wouldn't be stopped. We were going to be out loud proud and don't even try to stop us. I don't think i knew that. Part of history that it was illegal to congregate if you're gay. Yup that's why stonewall was so popular because if you were walking up and down christopher street all night long which is what i did with my friends. The chances argue would be stopped by the police sometime. The police that they saw drag queen will try to find out if they had three pieces of mail clothing on because that was the law. Others would be harassed. It wasn't a safe as you might think it would be so when you went into the stonewall it was a safe place it was a place you to be yourself. You could hold hand. You put your arm around somebody and more importantly to eighteen year old. You can dance sure. Now you mentioned. Marty robinson he with one of the co founders of the liberation front which was a group that really helped to forge. The foundation of our community was the gay liberation front. Was that group something that came out of stonewall or was it already in existence beforehand. There were many organizations before stonewall. The leading one in new york was mattachine and all my first or second week i tried to go in about a sheen. They said i was too young as i was leaving. That's where i met. Marty robinson who is coming out and he said you know these guys. They don't get it they don't understand what's going on in nineteen sixty nine. We just can't be doing once a year march. We need to do some more. He created the action group which i was a member off. There were many little groups or pockets of groups like that around new york somehow. After stonewall we all unite for the first time action roof aries lesbians. We got together. That's what created gay liberation front. He was the first united movement in our country from the grass. Roots up before that drag queens weren't allowed to be part of it before that streaking like me weren't allowed to be part of any movement so that change gay liberation front. That's what we were

Marty Robinson Foundation Of Our Community Stonewall New York United
Tips for Making It Through the Covid Winter with Your Relationship Intact

Here's Something Good

05:49 min | 6 months ago

Tips for Making It Through the Covid Winter with Your Relationship Intact

"Look into this episode. Here's something good. A production of the seneca women podcast network and iheartradio each day. Aspire to bring you the good news. The silver lining the glass half full because there is good happening in the world everywhere every day. We just need to look for and share it. Here's something good for today. Purchases of fire pits are soaring and so are the sales of home exercise equipment. Americans are hunkering down for what we've been told will be a very long very cold cold winter and one of the big concerns at this time is how we cope when we're stuck inside this winter. How we keep our anger and check and our relationships intact turns out there. Simple things you can do to stay upbeat this winter in fact you might even find that your relationships improve. That's we're gonna learn today. From one of our favorite guests psychiatrist doctor gail saltz. Dr salts is a clinical professor of psychiatry at the new york presbyterian hospital and bestselling author. She's also the host of the upcoming podcast. How can i help with dr gail saltz. That will appear right here on the seneca women. Podcast now work in partnership with iheartradio. Here's what dr salt had to say. Dr salt thanks so much for joining us. It's a pleasure to be here. So how do we mentally prepare ourselves for this very long ahead. This is going to be hard winter. there is no two ways about it And it was hard summer for many people in now. Everybody is together between schooling and work in one small space and with fewer options to just hang out outside which has various benefits. Not not just the being part benefit but the of being out sunlight being out in nature having physical activity which all are helpful in terms of decreasing stress and improving mental health. So it i think you know People should be thinking about what they can do heading into this winter. That can both mitigate the over togetherness let's say and the over togetherness during a time stress which tends to increase irritability and what they also do in terms of improving or preventing mental health issues as the winter wears on. And so i think those range from having a ecorse some time together that you do something fun and creative and Not maybe what you would typically do basically constitutes play Whether that's even though its cold going out. You know in the snow and sledding together or Were playing board game together or something that feels like off the usual schedule and his son together. But i think that it's also important. Everybody plans some time apart being together. Twenty four seven generally is is extremely difficult. It's pretty rare the relationship that is totally enjoyable. All the time at people don't need some space and that's even space from your children and they from you at various times so Within your home trying to create separate spaces where it's okay for people to go and be on their own so that you know whether that literally is hanging a sheet in the middle of a room to create the sense of separate space with headphones so that you have you know not the sound etc If you can't have separate rooms but using rooms that you don't typically use if you have that room so by separate area is this living room dining room or whatever it may be but if you don't have it creating it within the home having part of that separate space in time be time you can talk people who are not in your pod so headphones again big asset. I think and adding in things to your day and to your families day for themselves that are going to help decrease stress and decrease irritability such as thirty minutes of aerobic exercise each day Using some deep breathing techniques or muscle relaxation techniques to calm your body because i exile eighty does tend to propagate irritability in a short us so incorporating whether it's surprised dissed of mindfulness or some yoga. Some something during your day that helps your anxiety and stress level. Decrease will help everybody getting along better and even though we'll be cold wherever you are potentially do some getting outside bundle up and get outside because being in the sunlight particularly in the first half the day being out in nature any sort of way and being physically active even if it's cold is actually how cold so when we're in these tight environments and perhaps conflicts arise. What is the best way to defuse them. Don't wait until you've been thinking you are ongoingly furious with your family member and then because what happens is basically people tend to sort of suppress it. We don't have an argument as they go along and they go along until they're just had wailing level and then one little thing that little thing that frankly doesn't make any sense to the other person you've got so enraged about happens and there is explosion

Gail Saltz Dr Salts New York Presbyterian Hospital Dr Gail Saltz Iheartradio Dr Salt
"seneca" Discussed on Seneca Women Conversations on Power and Purpose

Seneca Women Conversations on Power and Purpose

03:04 min | 8 months ago

"seneca" Discussed on Seneca Women Conversations on Power and Purpose

"Next <Speech_Music_Female> Is <Speech_Music_Female> that. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> I don't know I <Silence> think it's. <Silence> <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> It's such a <Speech_Female> hard time <Silence> <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> That <Speech_Female> really what's <Speech_Female> next in <Speech_Female> when I've been really lucky <Speech_Female> to work on <Speech_Female> is <Speech_Female> brand <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> relevancy <Speech_Female> and brand reputation <Speech_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <hes> i. think that <Speech_Female> is you <Speech_Female> know. <Speech_Female> <hes> what <Speech_Female> truly want <Speech_Female> and <Speech_Female> <hes> is what <Silence> really does <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> Make It <Speech_Male> really does make a huge <Silence> difference. <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Female> Within <Speech_Male> whatever <Speech_Music_Male> industry <SpeakerChange> that you're working <Speech_Female> in <Speech_Female> I think that's exactly <Speech_Female> right and <Speech_Female> <hes> Madonna. <Speech_Female> I just WanNa say thank you <Speech_Female> for using your <Speech_Female> superpower <Speech_Female> to change the <Speech_Female> world through your <Speech_Female> platform whether <Speech_Female> it's advertising <Speech_Female> creative <Speech_Female> your <Speech_Female> ideas <Speech_Female> and and frankly <Speech_Female> you're mentoring you <Speech_Female> know helping to bring <Speech_Female> other people. <Speech_Female> Into this <Speech_Female> field and let <Speech_Music_Female> their voices be heard as <Speech_Music_Female> well. So <Speech_Female> it's been a pleasure. <Speech_Music_Female> Thanks for spending time <Speech_Music_Female> with us. <Speech_Music_Female> Thanks for having <Speech_Music_Female> me. <Silence> <Speech_Music_Female> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> What a <Speech_Female> great and powerful <Speech_Female> conversation <Speech_Female> we all owe <Speech_Female> a huge thanks <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> to Madonna Badger <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> for working to change <Silence> <Advertisement> an entire industry. <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> And <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> for ensuring that commercials <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> and ads <Speech_Female> portray women truthfully <Silence> and authentically. <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> Here are some of the key <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> point that I got out of the <Silence> <Advertisement> conversation. <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> I <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> media <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> as we know, it is one of <Speech_Female> the most powerful influences <Speech_Male> in our lives. <Speech_Male> Which is why <Speech_Female> we need to hold advertisers <Speech_Male> and producers <Speech_Female> accountable for what <Speech_Female> they show. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> If we want to get <Speech_Music_Female> to equal, we need <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> to make sure that advertising <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> picks as they <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> truly are <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> as leaders <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> as contributors <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> powerful <Speech_Male> three dimensional. <Speech_Music_Male> And Madonna <Speech_Music_Female> reminds us. <Speech_Female> We all have the ability <Speech_Female> to advance progress <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> each of <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> us in our own way. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> For Madonna <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> that meant using her experience <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> in advertising <Speech_Music_Male> to change the way <Speech_Music_Male> women are portrayed. <Speech_Music_Male> No longer <Speech_Music_Male> is objects, but <Speech_Music_Female> as actual human <Speech_Music_Female> beings. <Speech_Music_Female> You can see Madonna's <Speech_Male> groundbreaking <Speech_Male> video at women <Speech_Music_Female> not objects <Speech_Music_Female> dot com, and <Speech_Female> you can check out we <Speech_Female> see equal on Youtube. <Speech_Male> Now. <Speech_Music_Male> This is the final episode <Speech_Music_Male> in our special six <Speech_Male> part series getting <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> equal <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> and I wanNA. Thank Angie <Speech_Music_Female> is caroline task <Speech_Music_Male> debt. Indiana bath <Speech_Music_Male> for guest hosting. <Speech_Music_Female> And <Speech_Music_Female> for showing how we can <Speech_Music_Female> all help to make <Speech_Music_Female> progress towards equality. <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> You can listen to all <Speech_Music_Female> six episodes of <Speech_Music_Female> getting to equal on <Speech_Male> Seneca's conversations <Speech_Male> on power and <Speech_Music_Male> purpose. <Speech_Music_Male> Have a great <Music> day. <Music> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> You're listening to Seneca <Speech_Music_Female> women. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Conversations on <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> power and purpose. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Brought <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> to you by the Seneca <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Women podcast network <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> and IHEARTRADIO <Speech_Music_Female> WITH <Speech_Music_Female> SUPPORT FROM FOUNDING <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> PARTNER BEING <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> Listened <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> to Seneca women <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> conversations on power <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> and purpose <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> on the iheartradio <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> APP apple <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> podcasts <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> over you get your <Speech_Music_Female> podcast. <Speech_Female> And please support <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> this podcast by telling <Speech_Music_Male> your friends <Speech_Music_Male> subscribing rating <Speech_Music_Male> us. <Speech_Music_Male> For more information on <Speech_Music_Male> Seneca women <Speech_Music_Male> follow us on social <Speech_Female> media visit <Speech_Music_Female> our website. Seneca. <Speech_Music_Male> Women. Dot Com. <Speech_Music_Male> Check out the Seneca <Speech_Music_Male> women <SpeakerChange> APP <Silence> free

"seneca" Discussed on Seneca Women Conversations on Power and Purpose

Seneca Women Conversations on Power and Purpose

07:32 min | 8 months ago

"seneca" Discussed on Seneca Women Conversations on Power and Purpose

"Welcome to this special edition. This new six part series called getting equal will change the way you think about women and leadership, and it comes at a time when women's leadership has never been more crucial. We have to amazing leaders who are guest hosting these six episodes. Caroline said group President North America, and Deanna Bass Vice President, global diversity equality, and inclusion, both from P. G., one of the largest consumer goods companies in the world. Together Caroline Indiana have created an impressive gender equality strategy for PNG and it's a strategy that's really breaking new ground on these issues in the private sector. In today's episode of getting equal Caroline Indiana discuss how each of us can use her own unique voice, really our own superpower to make progress towards quality. Their guests today is the incredible Madonna Badger the legendary advertising executive. Caroline Dan thanks so much for joining us again today I, am really looking forward to the conversation with Madonna. Thank you, Kim. So today we're GonNa talk about finding your superpower and we're going to talk to someone who has certainly found hers. So what do we mean by finding your superpower while it's finding that place where each of us as individuals as companies, organizations of any kind can have the greatest impact and then take action to accelerate progress for all people in the workplace and frankly in the world. That's so right. Diana. We all have sin powers large and small, and we know that we make the most progress for equality when we all decide to get in the game. We started thinking about this really in the very beginning when we were defining our overall strategy for gender equality at and Jeep. We knew he had to be very choice f-full in defining the work that we would do. We knew we had to be intentional to have the greatest impact. And we chose three areas to focus on one was using our voice in advertising to tackle bias and speak up. To was using our influence to ensure access to education and economic opportunities for girls and women. And finally ensuring that at p., and G., we built a workplace that would enable women to thrive to bring to life our aspiration for fifty fifty representation at all levels with forty percent multicultural representation in the US. and. We know that when we access our superpowers, we can raise the bar and we can build a better world for all women and all men. Equality for all individuals in however they define themselves joining us for this conversation is a woman dubbed the lioness who roared thirty year advertising veteran and founder of Hashtag Women Not Objects Madonna Badger is founder and chief creative officer of Badger and winters. After a pivotal announcement that the agency would no longer create work that objectified women, Badger and winters took home advertising age's coveted. Small. Agency of the Year award in two thousand sixteen. Recently ad week name Madonna a disruptor for spearheading a revolution in the advertising industry and the four as recognized her as one of the one hundred people who make advertising. Great. I am so thrilled and happy to introduce you to our friend, a creative partner of ours Madonna Badger. It's so great to be here. Thank you the such a nice introduction. It is so great to have. You hear Madonna I can think of no one better to talk about using their own superpower to eradicate bias and advance equality. Enduring these podcast, we've been speaking with extraordinary individuals who have amazing platforms, all using their voices and their influence to accelerate progress for women, and you know we love Badger and winters but for those who are listening and who don't know your agency, tell us a little bit about it. Well, at Badger winters, and Jim Winters is my business. and has been for the last sixteen years. Our idea is to build a brave agency culture that helps others create brave brands. And that this focus on, we've and purposeful work as really attracted a group of talented passionate and very diverse people that makes us incredibly proud. These individuals are inspired by the way are open, supportive and collaborative culture helps them to thrive. This also helps us to attract the kind of clients that we WANNA have clients like away who is with Brock Gamble. Of course, clients like rices where we did. Hashtag. No kids in cages and also doing our own work like Hashtag women, Ex and love that you brought up women not object. So I WANNA start there that was. In Two thousand sixteen I believe that you launch that campaign. Importantly, it put a spotlight on widespread objectification of women in advertising. And frankly helped open a multiyear dialogue in the advertising industry about its responsibility to ethically represent women in all forms of Advertising Hashtag with not objects has had over thirty, one million views on youtube and facebook in over one hundred and seventy five countries. That's just amazing. So tell us a little bit about women not objects well, women not objects was created to really help people see the way that women were objectified in ads all around them in outdoor on television. In print in fashion in alcohol in liquor in. In every industry in every way in every medium, women were being objectified and what do I mean by that? I mean that they were treated as a prop a body part though super sensual used to sell you know a bottle of Bacardi or Even. Seen it for. A grocery. Store. With Cantaloupe, and then the other is plastic. So really retouched beyond human recognition. I've got a great example of women not objects it was a Christmas. And Fifth Avenue and on this billboard where three young women. They were completely naked They all had the exact same shoes on they were like retouched so that their bodies all look the same their skin look the same basically, and it was such an incredible way to objectify the three very powerful supermodels. And I just couldn't believe how many people were walking by with their children and sort of not even thinking about it. That has a huge impact on young girls when they see stuff like that, you've also done films about that as well. Yeah. A dozen are in our second film. We did it was all about the Har-. And there were teenage girls taking cellophane and wrapping around their thighs as many times as they could so that you know they had, they would get a five gap. and I.

Madonna Badger Badger winters Caroline Indiana Caroline Caroline Dan executive Jim Winters Vice President President North America Deanna Bass Bacardi Kim Diana US. founder P. G. Brock Gamble
7 Rules to Life-Long Happiness

The Daily Boost

04:40 min | 9 months ago

7 Rules to Life-Long Happiness

"Rules. To lifelong happiness. Really Scott just seven well, this probably some more. There's no doubt about that. Lifelong happiness. Really. Scott. Is such a thing as lifelong happiness well, sure there is. You've been happy most your life. Well, maybe you haven't I mean some people I'm sure haven't but for the most part, you pretty much have. And you will be Var- a couple of bad days in between here or there. So we want to focus on that making those days better but are there seven things you can do seven mindset shifts that you can do to make things a little bit better even during covid nineteen. Well. Yeah I'm a fan of STOIC philosophy has been for a long time. Sometimes you look at stoic philosophy and you go really. Those are the rules. Those are kind of hard. But yeah works a lot of it's still does it's Oh well over two thousand years old now but it's still very much fits in today's world and I think given some of the things that are going on in social media and some things that are happening in politics these days Rau- craziness if you will. Looking at something that's real practical has for two thousand years cannot be a bad thing. So there's some rules we live by for happier life. Let's go number one if you want to learn to succeed. And you want to be that way you gotta be humble. Is always somebody's smarter and more successful in Weiser around you. Always. Use a little more humble in this world. What do you think Number to. Find the right seen that WANNA. I saw that years and years ago so far is seen what is this a movie Kinda Sorta? Choose your friends and your situations very carefully. You gotta be careful now by the way social media I, know it's not real friends but boy, it is a scene isn't it? If you're not careful, you know they are looking for ways to draw your attention away from your life to there's got to be careful there. If you want to rise in life. You can't allow yourself to be held down by others STOIC philosophy. So choose your seen, choose your friends, choose your situations very carefully you will rise but pay attention to where you put yourself in who you surround yourself with. Respect your time Seneca said this. We're tight, fisted, property and money. Think too little wasting time the one thing about which we should all be. The toughest misers Leiper short I love the way. Stocks talked. Time is ticking fast quickly even in Cova Times. There's no doubt about it. It seems like it's dragging along. We'll this thing ever come to it in can I get out of my house I go do something please whereas normal. The Duck. Duck. Take your breath. How about the fourth rule for lifelong happiness if you can apply everything pretty much commonsense so far right and you probably doing a lot of this just reminding you that's all. Never do anything out of habit like Scott. You've said in the past have some good habits. Good habits that we should do that bud. They're not mindless habits. Not. You should choose those habits and by the way I think you should always be choosing better things and always question yourself. Get. In the habit of working out and eating right and all that stuff that good stuff right at the same time. You should be questioning whether it's still the right thing for you to be able to do. Should you head down that road sometimes doing that we've been doing for twenty years and at one time it was probably a good idea. And twenty years later maybe it's not. If you don't question it. You're never gonNA know. Number five, keep it simple. Do Your, job. Approach. Every task as if it were your last because. Could be. That simple fact isn't it? That's truth. A lot of people don't WanNa. Hear that don't totaled at that the dumpling negative I'm gonNA live forever. No you. It could be the last thing you you ever do get it. It's kind of hard to think that way really is. I don't want to run around every single day thinking. It's my last asshole don't. What I do the best can do my job the best I can every single day and get an extent tried again. Don't always get it right but I'll try again. Number six adapted learn from failure using your success to justify complacency. That's. Pretty Common. It's also easy which is why most people do it? You can do more you can be better. Adapt. It's okay to fail. It's okay for it to be difficult for a while to get easy eventually we stick to it. You get exactly what you one. I like this this is one that this. This is one of those going around more and more these days I think because life has gotten tougher. A lot of folks the economy is kind of what is it it's hard to say which ways ago it it's it's just a big mess. But we're still here.

Scott Wanna Weiser Cova Times Seneca RAU
What Everyone Forgets About Money

Optimal Finance Daily

04:44 min | 9 months ago

What Everyone Forgets About Money

"What everyone forgets about money by Crowning Chris. RINING DOT COM. Washing dishes was how I earned my first paycheck when you're fifteen years old and don't get money from your parents to buy things then you have to work. So there. I was scrubbing dishes in the filthy kitchen of a small family owned Italian restaurant, and it's where I learned a little life lesson work is nothing more than trading time for money a medium of exchange. You provide one hour of time to an employer and they provide an hour's wage. I quickly discovered teenagers time isn't worth all that much a measly four, twenty, five per hour. Not long after starting that job I wanted this blind melon album. You might remember their catchy song no rain. One Saturday afternoon wandering the aisles in K. Marts, electronics, department I saw it for sale. Cool. I'm getting it. The price was sixteen, Ninety, eight for whatever reason I did the mental math to figure out the album didn't really cost me seventeen dollars. No, it costs four hours on your feet washing never ending streams of bus tubs overflowing with half finished plates of meat balls is this CD worth four hours of my time. In this case it was but more importantly, you realize the money tucked in your wallet isn't money at all. It's time disguised as money. In fact, it was Benjamin Franklin who said time is money but in our hectic day to day lives, it's easy to forget this. When you spend your money, what you're really doing is spending your time, which means if you waste your money, you waste your time. anyways throw my teens I worked a series of jobs, bagging groceries, stocking merchandise theater concessions, and mostly saved my earnings my time to precious and then I went off to college started a career and forgot what I learned. have. You heard that saying from Texas big hat no cattle meaning you can look rich but be poor. It's hard to believe people who make lots of money are poor. But then your tax preparer tells you they see plenty of families making three hundred thousand dollars and living paycheck to paycheck Thomas Stanley profiles. These folks in the millionaire next door, the doctor lawyer types who drive fancy cars living exclusive neighborhoods and take exotic vacations they look rich, but it's an illusion. It's the families who make one hundred, thousand dollars spent forty thousand and have a million dollars in the bank who are rich. Isn't the worst irony that the simplest way to get rich and have lots of money to spend his by not spending lots of money. But just because it's simple to get rich doesn't mean it's easy spend less than you earn and invest the difference that simple would makes getting rich so difficult is that spending less than you earn takes discipline the median retirement account is worth twenty, five, thousand dollars, and so the problem isn't paying people more money they'll save more give people more money to spend and they'll spend more money. I know this because back in my twenties, I spent just like the next person you think acquiring loss of material possessions satisfying all your superficial desires is the key to happiness. It took me years to relearn what I knew as a teenager. The things you buy with money that you surround yourself with aren't things at all it's your time. And research shows it's having control over your time that makes you happiest not money and things. So, most people have a choice. You can trade time for money and money for things, or you can trade time for money and then use that money as a tool to buy back time. That's why you save and invest, which reminds me of what stoic philosopher Seneca said quote. It's not that we have a short time to live but that we waste much of it life is long enough and it's been given to us in generous measure for accomplishing the greatest things if the whole of it is well invested. But when life is squandered through soft and careless living, and when it spent on no worthwhile pursuit death finally presses and we realized that the life which we didn't notice passing has passed away and quote. What he's saying is when you're about to die, you realize life is time and doesn't that make time your most precious resource. Here think about it like this see, you've worked forty hours per week for the past ten years. You've traded twenty thousand hours of your time. That's forty hours times, fifty weeks, times, ten years, and on the other side of the trade is everything you've consumed sure necessities like food clothing, shelter and healthcare but probably a bunch of other stuff you've totally forgotten about buried in the back of some closet. Was it a fair trade? Maybe it was maybe it wasn't but people are always telling me they've earned million dollars over the past ten years and have nothing to show for it and it makes them sick. They're not complaining about wasting their money. What they're complaining about is wasting their time. Trade wisely.

K. Marts Benjamin Franklin Thomas Stanley Texas Seneca
Feminist Literature

Miss Information: A Trivia Podcast

05:20 min | 9 months ago

Feminist Literature

"This week from me here getting the problem that has no name. Feminist literature. All right. If we were going to cover just like feminism assure general, we would be here. Forever I'm sure there's already a podcast that that covers that folks I'm sure. So we're not trying to reinvent the wheel here. No. Quick definition. Feminism is a range of social movements, political movements in ideologies that aim to define establish in achieve the political economic, personal and social equality of the sexes. Feminism incorporates the position that society's prioritize the male point of view and that women are treated unjustly within those societies Charles for Ya who is a utopian socialist in French philosopher. He's the one that's credited with having coined the word FEMA KNEES MMA in. Thirty seven. So, modern Western, feminist history is conventionally split into three time periods or waves. So you'll typically hear them referred to as that Each of them has slightly different aims based on the prior progress that was made during the wave before. I wave feminism is the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries that was focused on overturning legal inequalities, particularly addressing issues of women's suffrage. Second wave feminism is the nineteen sixty s and nineteen eighties that broaden the debate to include cultural inequalities gender norms in the role of women in society, and then third wave feminism. The nineteen ninety s to the thousands that refers to the diverse strains of feminist activity. So third wavers are see this as a continuation of the second wave in also as a response to the perceived failures out of the way before it. So I guess we're right outside third wave right now I think we're moving into the fourth wave interesting, which can't be defined until after it's passed exactly exactly a you. Hey I know my history man you know what I'm talking about or woman. Watch out I should say I WANNA point out as part of that definition. feminism is not women are better than men no absolutely not and it's still maintains to this day. It's about Equality Ackley. So exactly that's all I wanted to point. For our listeners great segue. Lauren. So seminaries literature, it can be fiction or nonfiction or drama or poetry that supports the feminine schools of establishing, defining and defending equal civil, political, economic, and social rights for women. So we're GONNA. Cover. Ten important feminist. Pieces of. Very excited that everyone should know. Great and we'll go in chronological order for me So the first we're GONNA talk about is a vindication of the rights of woman with strictures on political and moral subjects by. One, craft from seventeen ninety two. So this is one of the earliest works of feminist philosophy it was published in the United Kingdom Mary wollstonecraft responded to th century educational and political theorist who believe that women should not receive a rational education. It was believed at the time that women were too susceptible to sensibility and too fragile to be able to think clearly. So not able to be. The recipient of a rational education. Sure. Sure. Sure. So craft argued that women's education should match their position in society in that they are essential to the nation because they raise its children and could act as respected companions to their husbands then yeah So Wall Street, maintain that women are human beings deserving of the same fundamental rights as men and that treating them as ornaments or property for men undermines the moral foundations, a society which how about that you think You'd think that people any rational person would be like, yeah. That makes sense treat women as human beings. Sure. But the fact that there was such vitriol against this concept is like my to me but it was seventeen, ninety two that was like, yeah. Put it into writing and people are like. Dr. So her work had significant impact on advocates for women's rights in the nineteenth century particularly, the eighteen forty eight Seneca falls convention that produce the Declaration of sentiments which laid out the aims of the suffragette movement. In the United States Mary Wilson Craft her name might be familiar. She is the mother of Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley. And she actually died eleven days after giving birth to Mary wollstonecraft shelley. So Mary wollstonecraft was like she was this great feminist philosopher great writer, her husband was super. Supportive. And she died in childbirth which. was killed a lot of women. Yeah. Septicemia man because men who were only allowed to be doctors. Refuse to treat women because of all of their naughty bits, nobody washed their hands. Oh Yeah. Nobody we should really point out. Yes. No one wash their hands that probably cost a lot of issues too.

Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley Mary Wollstonecraft United Kingdom Mary Wollstonec Septicemia Charles Fema United States Mary Wilson Seneca Falls Lauren
Severe Thunderstorm Watch Issued For NoVA, Washington DC

WTOP 24 Hour News

02:14 min | 10 months ago

Severe Thunderstorm Watch Issued For NoVA, Washington DC

"Is is the the warnings warnings have have either either expired expired or or they've they've been been cancelled cancelled a a few few minutes minutes early early that that storm storm that in particular we were watching in Montgomery County in Howard County. As we can quite a bit in the past 15 minutes, no longer above severe levels. It's still a thunderstorm is still putting down some pretty heavy rainfall. But the potential for any large hail or really strong, gusty winds is now pretty much over with. So the warning Is cancelled early, but still some fairly heavy rain from the Seneca area through Rockville in Rossmore, White oak up to sandy spring in Brookville and over the line into a highland in scaggsville and love on savage areas. Uh, just to the north of the Montgomery County side of the Beltway. Just to the north of Beltway is the heavy rain. Aah! And again. It stretches into parts of Howard County and up towards the Baltimore area to sew. The warning has not been extended to the East and unlikely is It's an an unlikely unlikely unlikely that that that will will will be be be extended extended extended any any any farther farther farther to to to the the the east east east through through through Northern Northern Northern Prince Prince Prince George's George's George's in in in and and and around, around, around, Oh Oh Oh counties, counties, counties, But But But it it it is is is the the the remnants remnants remnants are are are still still still moving moving moving to to to the the the east. east. east. So So So those those those areas areas areas are are are still going to get some heavy rain in the next few minutes or so. We're not seeing any thunderstorm development now in Virginia anymore, except that northern tip of Fairfax County, and we're not seeing any thunderstorm development in southern Maryland. So even though there is a still a severe thunderstorm watch until midnight. For those areas, stuff will likely be cancelled early, so the thunderstorms that exist in northern Maryland will continue to wind down for the next two hours and 90 minutes or so. Everything will be out of here completely by midnight. Regardless, Temperatures will continue to fall through the eighties through the low to mid seventies for overnight lows. It'll be a warm and muggy night. And tomorrow after dude. We'll do it all over again. And with a stronger cold front on the way from the north, With even hotter temperatures. We will likely see Maur storms than today of affecting more locations. And some of them could be stronger, too. So so more severe weather likely tomorrow afternoon into the evening. Amaro size of being the upper eighties, too low nineties But behind the cold front that I mentioned on Friday just a few straight leftover showers in the morning, then lowering humidity, breezy conditions the rest of the day highs in the low to mid eighties. Saturday, mostly study and warm but much less humid and much more comfortable Hae to be in the upper seventies, too. Low eighties Sunday, also 80 degrees right now in Fairfax, down to 73 behind the storms, and hi it's down in its 84 at at Washington. Washington. Reagan Reagan National, National,

Montgomery County Prince Prince George Howard County Maryland Fairfax County Reagan Reagan Fairfax Washington Rockville Scaggsville Baltimore Rossmore Virginia Maur Brookville Amaro
What Governs History?

5 Minutes in Church History

04:20 min | 10 months ago

What Governs History?

"What governs? History. Well, there have been various answers to this throughout history I. Suppose someone they will nothing governs history. Everything is just opened a chance who even how today is going to and others have said will fate determines all things and we go back to Greek mythology and Roman mythology to understand fate we find this in the writings of homer and has said. The fates were the three daughters of the Goddess Knicks. She was the goddess of the night. And these three daughters, her three daughters were the fates. One of them would simply spin thread from spindle. That's all she would do just spin thread from spindle. The second sister the second fate would measure out a given piece of thread and that given piece of thread signified the length of life. And a third sister well, she would cut a thread and that signify death. And Greek her name literally means the in evitable an ancient mythology even mighty Zeus had to bow to the fates they were independent they were arbitrary. Capricious. And they governed all events of human history and all events of a single life. This idea of the fates carried on into the early Roman philosophers and they would talk about causality as he determining factor of all that happened in history and in a given life. Well, what is the Christian response to these two answers of nothing governs history or the fates govern? Well we find it very fascinating answer in Archibald Alexander. He was one of those old Prince Tony. Ian Scholars and he lectured on theology there at Princeton and one of his students was Charles Hodge and Charles. Hodge was very diligent student and he took very careful in cursive handwriting notes of Archibald. Alexander's lectures, and so we have this preserved for us today in book form and Archibald Alexander's talking about the doctrine of Providence. He sets it up by talking about fate and he explores how various Roman thinkers talked about fate talked about how cicero spoke of the order or series of causes that governed all things. He talks about Seneca. Seneca makes 'cause and fate an irrevocable necessity controlling the course of both human and divine affairs. So the supreme ruler. is even governed by fate and continually obeys the fates and the causes. Well, none of this is something that Archibald Alexander wants us to believe in or think about in fact, he says ought Christians to retain and use the word fate any answers categorically? No because this is very inconsistent with the truth. So. What does govern history? Archibald Alexander says Providence does and here's what he has to say does providence extend to all things small as well as great. That is to say does providence govern human history and does it govern the events of my life? He answers yes. Because God created all things and therefore he cares for all. Archibald Alexander goes onto reference Nehemiah chapter nine verses six, and that tax reads you even you are Lord alone you've made Heaven and the Heavens of Heavens and all their host. You've made the earth and all things that are in it in the sea and all that is in it you preserve them all and then he goes on to draw attention to. Such passages as Luke twelve seven or Matthew Ten twenty, nine Matthew Six, twenty, eight or Psalm. One, forty, seven, verse nine we put all of that Biblical material together and what do we find? Well, even the hairs of our heads are said to be numbered the fouls of the air, the lilies of the field even the insects are under the care of God. So what governs history will I we could ask who governs his tree and the answer is God us, and then we can ask what can we say his providence God's providence governs all things and moves all things to the fruition and the fulfillment of his perfect good and wise will. That's providence

Archibald Alexander Providence Charles Hodge Goddess Knicks Heavens Of Heavens Seneca Evitable Matthew Six Cicero Ian Scholars Luke Matthew Ten Princeton Nehemiah
Leaf botany: Silicon

On The Ledge

06:53 min | 10 months ago

Leaf botany: Silicon

"Me ask you a question what is in the night off. Probably, most of us would say, when asked this question? Might be we'd say Kaban maybe we'd say water. Nutrients. Silos. But I think very few of, US would mention silicon and yet silicon can make up. To, ten percent over leafs dry mass. The what exactly is silicon on? What role does it play in the life of leaves? In this third part of my occasional leaf botany series, I'm joined by applauds ecologists that spent a lot of her career finding out what silicon is all about my name's Julia Cook. Planned to colleges of myself as a plant functional color just because I'm interested in the role that different spacey's play in Ecosystems I work at the university as a lecturer. So my next year of teaching and research and public outreach. The really super obvious question to stop war exactly is. Silicon is, is sort of coming into its moment beat in terms of plants. So I'm not surprised that you haven't had too much about it, but I hope I hope you willing feature even more. So silicon is one of the elements sits on the periodic table below carbon and it doesn't easily exist just as plain silicon on earth. It's often silica glasses is silica or insulation. So it's as sadistic acid in in water. So it's it's often associated with oxygen, and then when it dissolves, it's it's sort of as component of water, but it's very, very abundant on earth in the in the cross it's the second most abundant element of oxygen silicon oxygen together a silica. Everywhere really do plants contains the uneasy something that's concentrated in particular plant tissues or residual spread around the hope loan. Yes. It is in old plants, but the mountain plants varies enormously. So some plants have have just miniscule amounts whereas others can have. Up Ten percent or even more in their in their plot tissue. So ten percent of their dry mass is a lot this. This is enormous amounts. If you think about how much not uniform Susana plant, the amount of silicon also can really exceed that some of the plants at a really big accumulators things like horse tails you can always feel how grain Ian they are when you run your hands up some some of the and some people actually use them as Sandpiper because they've got so much silica in them. Another family that has leads of silicon as the the grasses, some more than others but most crosses have quite a bit of silicon and sometimes you run your finger class blade and you get a little paper cut. and. That is because the edge of the Cross has a whole lot of little silica deposits on there, and that's designed to as a head of defense to damage the mouth parts of animals and stop animals eating it. But we see that as a paper cut on fingertips. That is amazing. Ten percent that's quite as you say, that's. A lot silicon. So what what, what's the role? Obviously, as you say, some more than others, what was the purpose of the silicon that's in our plants? That's great question because we're still learning about that I guess the simplest way to describe it seems to help plants manage a whole range of stresses. of its its main role seems to be stress alleviation so they is stresses can. Biotic or caused by things that are alive or can the Arctic so coast by by sort of environmental factors. So looking at the the biotech stresses so plants get eaten a lot by animals. And look for ways to or revolved a number of ways to defend themselves in silicon can be very important they for some animals so. Things, like stinging nettles when you get stung busting initial, the sting is essentially a little silica needle that that injects toxin into your skin. So without the Seneca, you probably wouldn't get stung busting missile they can be very abrasive. Surfaces can can be very bryce than damage the mouth parts of insects and possibly mammals. It can be layers of silicon within Leith that prevent animals from cheering all eating them as much as they might if they was nice elegant. So plants he silicon quite a lot as a head of defense and and Somerset is found that once the plant is attacked by Voles, some plants were able to then take up more silicon to protect themselves when they're under attack so it can be judged any juiced defense. On the other side looking at the environmental factors silicon has is shined to help a lot of different stresses I want to stress stress. It can help manage nutrient imbalances. help manage wind stress. Also two things if a plant stressed adding silicon generally helps some is a house plant grow this obviously immediately makes me think of my own selfish world. A think about. Whether I need to worry about the silicon in my plants. In the amount I have seen some fertilize houseplants recently advertising include silicon, making this making big play of this, but he's not something that's worth considering I how plows usually get this in the first place. So that's really interesting that you've change and I don't know if that because people making the fertilizers have appreciated the importance of silicon now owned adding more silicon over there reporting silicon that was always there I'm not sure. Suddenly silicon is applied losses of fertilizer in agricultural systems, particularly in Ross sugarcane where as as crops, harvested and things people removing silicon from the system in deflatingly available silicon. So it's it's becoming increasingly popular as infantilized in terms of. Indoor, plants. There's been a lot of work looking at indoor plant. Specifically I know there's a lot of work looking hydroponics and and sort of indoor plants way. Is Routinely added and very important as I. Think he will also ask how plants a obtained silicon. Plants take up silicon through the roots as dissolved in in the sole solution of the water solutions obviously gathered. And then that goes through the transpiration stream in than is deposited. Ole Throughout the plant often there's more in leaves. Oh, the sheets lays the plants, but they can be high silicon deposits in route sandbar can and woods end all sorts of places in Pont. One

Susana Plant Leafs United States Julia Cook Spacey Lecturer Arctic Pont Somerset IAN
The Iroquois Nationals Team | The History of Lacrosse

Iroquois History and Legends

05:09 min | 11 months ago

The Iroquois Nationals Team | The History of Lacrosse

"Hello welcome to Iroquois history and legends. Today we're GONNA be talking about the history of Lacrosse and current status of the Iroquois national team. Today. We don't have just one guest we have multiple group. I'm just going to let them introduce themselves one by one if you gentlemen could just give me a brief background on who you are just a little synopsis on how you're associated with the Iroquois national team. REX LINES MONOLOGUE NATION I've been a Lacrosse player has this as long as I can remember as I could walk at sticking my hand going up on Doug a nation it's been. A big part of my my life, my lifestyle the and I was on the First Leroy national team in eighty three and. Been in three tournaments and. The program at percents. I'm Leon Nolan multiple on Gatien. My mother's Aquasonichowie Mohawks enroll visit. Mohawk will clan. Lamb. I've been involved with your co-nationals across in about early two thousands and then k back. But you're a half ago and serve as the executive, director and board member. and. Tissue late at SMU and while the across like wreck, all my life and Real honor to be a part of the organization again to help with the many challenges facing us. So, we're very pleased to have this opportunity to give him a good historical perspective in a future perspective on warmer. Had IT. For us. And David Brian from the Seneca nation and the wolf clan I grew up playing cross started off with a new toll across went off to college played at Cornell University on a couple of national championship teams. I was also on the I Iroquois national team. And I've been a lifelong participant with your coin nationals as either as a player. Executive, director or board member and I'm still in like brexit it's kind of A. Lifelong journey to have our people be represented in Lacrosse whether it's at the college level professional level or international level. I'm Randy Scott some from six nations on -Tario A maternal clan. Mohawk like these guys are saying, I've started across when. You know I gotta stick when I was born. I've been playing ever since it's a big part of my life I played professional across for. The Georgia. Swarm. the Boston cannons and at the world stage with Uruguay nationals I've been playing with Uruguay national since. Two Thousand Eight Also. Went to Syracuse University got my degree there and. You know. Like these guys are saying, Lacrosse, has been a big part of my life in it's It's awesome. Thank you very much gentlemen. That's a lot of talent and a lot of experience for me growing up in Western. New York every. Year, has a Lacrosse program. Every College in university has lacrosse program, but there might be some people in the country that really might not know what it is or what the history of it is. So which one of you mind giving me a a synopsis of Old, this game is where it came from what the basic just of the rules are by I'll take that question. Well, it's part of our creation story so. know your guess is good as ours. You know it came from the spire creation story came from the Sky World. So in in our cosmology re talk about. Across in all being played in creators land. And before it came down to Turtle Island here. So it's as old as we are as Randy said, you know your mail you're one of three things you're born. You're you're a a speaker which measure speaker of ceremonies language or a singer, the singer of the ceremony or your across Blair. That's how significant across is to our culture. And you always have the exception to the rule where somebody's all And we have real lot of examples of that but let's how important it is to are. inherently. It's part of four yards culture. It's site in part of that responsibility to share the scheme. With others which we've been very successful at. Now, I believe sixty six countries have. Lacrosse organizations within her order states. Within our borders and it's been really I. Think we've done a great job of showing the green game with the many many around the world and or looking forward to continuing that and. One of the. Mainstays who are Bruh given this responsibility directly by the. Sedition confederacy in one, thousand, nine, hundred, three. And we were given that responsibility to golden compete internationally represent the initially in that regard play fair play hard and spread this game around the world.

Lacrosse Syracuse University Sky World Randy Scott Executive Director Uruguay Aquasonichowie Mohawks Leon Nolan Doug David Brian SMU Cornell University Seneca New York Boston Turtle Island Gatien Georgia Blair
"seneca" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

Stuff You Missed in History Class

03:01 min | 11 months ago

"seneca" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

"In gradual way of eliminating slavery, and they weren't to the end of that yet. Two of these buyers Epiphany Davis Andrew Williams were also members of the African Methodist Episcopal. Zion Church Epiphany was actually a church trustee, and that church was the city's first black church, and at the time it was described as possibly being the largest and wealthiest black church in the country. It's unclear exactly how Williams and Davis had heard about the white whitehead's land for sale, but word clearly spread through the church a week after the first lots were sold the church itself purchased several connected lots from the Whitehead's Ame Zion lost their access to. To the city's Potter's field in eighteen, twenty, seven, when that land was reallocated to become Washington Square Park and at that point, several of the Church's lots in Seneca village or set aside to develop them into a cemetery, purchases of the white headland, made by prominent leaders within the church, continued for several years by the time all fifty lots were sold by the white heads in eighteen, thirty to twenty, four of them had been purchased by black residents of the city Seneca. Village had formed although where that name came from is still unknown today. I think as people like obviously the Seneca lived in new. York, that's true, but like we don't. Know, we don't know how the village came to be called that we'll talk in a minute, but there are often when you see. The village referred to in contemporary papers of the day. It is referred to with a racial slur. So in just a moment we will talk about black communities of historical significance to contextualized cynic village a little bit. But, first we will pause for a red front of sponsor. Did you know GEICO's now offering an extra fifteen percent credit on car and motorcycle policies. That's fifteen percent on top of what Geico could already save you. So, what are you waiting for your baby to let you sleep in? Sleeping another half hour. Thanks Sweetheart. You'll change yourself to. There's never been a better time to switch to GEICO. Save an extra fifteen percent when you switch by over seven limitations apply visit. GEICO DOT COM for details. Hi I'm Devin leary and I'm Carolina Barlow and we're here to tell you to dump him. Break up with your boyfriend, and we want you to listen to our podcast true romance every week where we talk about our love lives and the lives of others. Please join our XS who we know. We'll also be listening like Kyle. Kyle. Are you there? Hey, babe, how's life? No, you look good though me. Oh my God sob, please. I haven't even gotten a haircut like three months. Okay, please help us pay for Carolina psychiatrist bills by listening on the iheartradio, APP, apple podcasts or wherever you listen to podcasts..

GEICO Seneca village Andrew Williams Zion Church Epiphany whitehead Kyle African Methodist Episcopal Devin leary trustee Carolina Washington Square Park Davis York apple Carolina Barlow
"seneca" Discussed on Seneca Women Conversations on Power and Purpose

Seneca Women Conversations on Power and Purpose

05:15 min | 1 year ago

"seneca" Discussed on Seneca Women Conversations on Power and Purpose

"During these difficult times, we're talking to experts who can help us gain perspective on the impact of coronavirus as well as your tips and resources and so much needed inspiration. Today joined by Ruth Glenn Ruth is the president and CEO of the National Coalition against domestic violence. Ru thanks so much for joining us. Here. So. Obviously. This is a very difficult time on so many levels. and. We're starting to see some of the faultlines in our society being exposed. And you obviously have a very important role to play in this moment. For our listeners, how common is domestic violence in the US? And how common was it prior to corona virus. Very common. In fact in are killed four and in our relationship with our ally in those that want to end domestic violence, their draft Mesic virus. We consider an appropriate health crisis, and hidden for the most part public health crankier. Crisis there's the aftermath of one in three women and. and we speak mostly about of course but one in three women. Are experiencing or have experienced. Mesic violence. If you're Alcatel with your friends, you know wanting view of the three interview. has experienced. Violence aren't experiencing. So, this is all prior to corona virus. Yeah, seeing now in the midst of you know one of the greatest health crisis, our country, certainly in the world has faced in recent yard world we were active as some of our allies and partners in ensuring that re providing support and restoring for. Survivors and advocate as we got with their. What we're seeing and I I. Certainly we're GonNa. See more is more interns. domestic lower being reported. That grantee be kind of a long term thing world seeing a lot more I want the end of this. The other concern that we have been Sarah City by which my domestic violence is happening in the home. And We've been hearing of incidences where an abusive person has been using code to get their big. We had one that was actually pretty wire who went. He was banking then that she was trying to harm US covert. And? began to remembering and physically fault her. as a result of that from smack that it had really nothing to do recur curves become another tool. Can Abuse. But those in sort of in domestic violence situations, it seems as. What we're hearing is that that is really going up. And and why is that going? What I. Like say recur treating you. NOW HAVE PROXIMITY 'CAUSE! whereas the victim writers had. Some ability to have raft there for relief from being because he'd been are now. The abuser have a lot more at. And using Colbert as a tactic to continue their abuse. Would not that. Uncommon abusers make a choice to view? And when they discovered that they have yet another wing at their disposal to abuse. They're certainly going to use that. I think Kobe. You're not necessarily a trigger I. DO like you say that. When an abuser and seeking tool and tactics to abuse, they make choices about that. But it can certainly be risk factors such as substance use. Mental Health Tobin Nine Pool. all of those things can certainly be at risk factor, but. Wardrobe part abusers will will use those as a tactic to exercise their power control, and at the same time. We know that many women have less choices now in terms of. Being in proximity in this lockdown moment when we're sort of stuck at home here, what what can women do in that moment? Reminding everyone that be this is certainly not a guy can't even imagine being rabble. And Emotional dog that maybe occurring in a home in with an abuser president and being their partner, and what I would pay his survivor You've gotten far by. You're creating thinking not planning whatever it might have been that. Can you say? Don't forget what. He's done to this equation can make that happen. And keep employing that he's thinking about that, and then secondly.

Sarah City president and CEO US Ruth Glenn Ruth Alcatel National Coalition president Colbert Kobe partner
"seneca" Discussed on Seneca Women Conversations on Power and Purpose

Seneca Women Conversations on Power and Purpose

03:32 min | 1 year ago

"seneca" Discussed on Seneca Women Conversations on Power and Purpose

"And you have to <Silence> move quickly. <Speech_Telephony_Female> And you have <Speech_Music_Female> to make the <Music> assistance pretty <Speech_Telephony_Female> direct <Speech_Music_Female> and easy to navigate. <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Telephony_Female> Complex programs <Speech_Music_Male> as work against <Speech_Music_Male> you in terms of making <Music> it difficult <SpeakerChange> for people <Speech_Telephony_Female> to navigate. <Music> So, <Speech_Telephony_Female> what I'm hoping <Speech_Music_Female> to see <Speech_Music_Male> locally here <Speech_Music_Male> in Baltimore is <Speech_Telephony_Female> stronger local response <Speech_Telephony_Female> to try to <Speech_Music_Female> help bridge <Speech_Music_Male> as I say this very <Speech_Telephony_Male> difficult <SpeakerChange> period <Speech_Music_Female> for. <Speech_Female> Well obviously, <Speech_Female> the news right <Speech_Female> now is very somber <Speech_Female> and experts <Speech_Female> are predicting some <Speech_Female> <hes> unprecedented <Speech_Female> ships <Speech_Female> in our economy, <Speech_Female> but in this moment. <Speech_Female> Is there anything that <Speech_Female> makes you <SpeakerChange> optimistic <Silence> or hopeful, <Speech_Music_Female> but I think <Speech_Music_Female> you have to begin <Speech_Telephony_Female> by saying. This <Speech_Music_Female> crisis is <Speech_Telephony_Female> not my fault <Speech_Telephony_Female> and I should ask <Speech_Music_Female> for help, <Speech_Female> and there's a lot thing <Speech_Music_Female> offers here. <Speech_Music_Female> I think <Speech_Telephony_Male> individuals and particularly <Speech_Telephony_Male> women's <Speech_Telephony_Female> pay a lot of attention <Music> to some of the forbearance. <Speech_Telephony_Female> That's out there <Speech_Music_Male> on your student <Speech_Telephony_Male> loans. For example <Speech_Telephony_Female> you can defer <Speech_Music_Female> payment. You <Speech_Telephony_Female> can ask your bank <Speech_Music_Female> for help. <Speech_Music_Female> You can file <Speech_Telephony_Male> for unemployment <Speech_Male> insurance benefits. <Speech_Telephony_Male> If you're eligible, <Speech_Female> you can defer <Speech_Telephony_Female> buying <Speech_Music_Female> your tax returns <Speech_Music_Female> this year. So <Speech_Telephony_Female> I think you need to <Silence> keep your <Speech_Music_Female> wits about <Speech_Telephony_Female> you and <Speech_Telephony_Female> recognize that <Speech_Telephony_Female> there is a lot of <Speech_Music_Female> assistance being offered, <Speech_Music_Female> and <Speech_Telephony_Female> you should take advantage <Music>

"seneca" Discussed on Seneca Women Conversations on Power and Purpose

Seneca Women Conversations on Power and Purpose

01:30 min | 1 year ago

"seneca" Discussed on Seneca Women Conversations on Power and Purpose

"Hi. This is Malayan verve here and this is Kim as a rally, we are co authors of the book fast forward how.

"seneca" Discussed on Seneca Women Conversations on Power and Purpose

Seneca Women Conversations on Power and Purpose

01:32 min | 1 year ago

"seneca" Discussed on Seneca Women Conversations on Power and Purpose

"Hi, this is Malayan verve here and this is as a rally. We are co authors of the book fast forward how women can achieve power and purpose, and you're listening to Seneca women conversations on power and purpose brought to you by the Seneca Women, podcast, network and iheartradio. Welcome to this special edition. During these difficult times, we're talking to experts who can help us gain perspective on the impact coronavirus as well as share tips, resources, and some much needed inspiration today I'm joined by a least Nelson Elise the CO founder, vital voices and the current president and CEO of the vital voices global partnership at least welcome to the show. Thank you so much for having me our pleasure, so for our listeners who don't know which I hope is non what is vital voices, and who does the organization work with? Me were founded on a very simple idea that no country, no community, no corporation can move ahead of hackl. Population girls are left behind. And what we do today has really evolved win. Women meter as we ever bought over the last three years that we've been in existence, but we do now is search the world for whether you have a daring change, and we invest in her dream, training, mentoring.

"seneca" Discussed on Seneca Women Conversations on Power and Purpose

Seneca Women Conversations on Power and Purpose

08:20 min | 1 year ago

"seneca" Discussed on Seneca Women Conversations on Power and Purpose

"Of Corona virus as well as show tips, resources, and some much needed inspiration today I'm joined by President and CEO of green. America Andrea Jong Andrew thanks so much for joining us. Thank you. Hope everybody. Stay and Staying healthy and the player to be here. Thank you, Andrea. so for our listeners who don't know about grooming America tell us a little bit about the organization and who you serve. Sure. I mean America is the fastest growing and largest microfinance organization in the United. States. we give entrepreneurship known. To women and their families who are living. At or under the poverty line we serve out members in twenty four locations, and we are in fifteen cities. we have dispersed. Over one and a half billion dollars of loan capital since the organization started in two thousand eight. And what's pretty remarkable? These are non-recourse loan. and. Over ninety nine percent of that money has been repaid so it's been amazing. We served over one hundred thirty thousand women and their families. Across the country amazing amazing just for the listeners. What do you mean by non-recourse? meaning. That if you were I. Have a loan traditional loan. We have to have some kind of collateral. It has to be back and that is not the case with a grooming low We obviously want to encourage. Encourage them to build a credit score and repay, but they cannot repay. For lack of. Organization amazing so so you're really addressing women entrepreneurs in sort of low income circumstances. How are they being affected right now? Well Narrowly hard in and if I go back before the pandemic by just look back. Over the last ten years, women in general core business owners Having a harder time accessing capital. A one dollars out of twenty three dollars in two thousand, eighteen were given to a woman entrepreneur. That's four percent, and certainly at our level. If you're in a woman in poverty, a low income. Family, that's even tougher. So women are been disproportionately affected in the ability to access capital. One of the things that we've been doing. Obviously since we started in La is making sure that we level the playing field. Right right pandemic and the is hitting. All businesses I mean Sir Green. Is the number one priority is the health and safety of all Americans and every single city and we understand that, but equal to that is is that we come out of this? Crisis. The economic impact particularly like on businesses is huge. the restaurant earner. Who you know spent ten years building up a tiny bit with two employees. It's great little restaurants She would have been a member in America. Every single week. You know building credit. Serving more and more people in the community. She like every other restaurant is shut. She's not a large. She doesn't have the same kind of balance sheet. You know she only has weeks before. Potentially you know she has to shut down so the impact on micro and small businesses is huge all over the country to grameen certainly, but to to other organizations that lend. To small businesses. And could small business owners. Are South so. certainly for themselves and their families trying to be safe. and protect. Protect their loved ones and yet worrying, equally having an extraordinary amount of anxiety about. The economic impact that he's going to have and paying next month's rent. We know that you're community in particular has a lot of service businesses right, so it seems like that would be Your communities disproportionately affected is that. Is that right? Well are happened. Our businesses are services and have of them fell products, and certainly the services are media hit. If you're running a nail salon a hair salon. If you are cleaning services, people don't want you in their homes. You're running a small food. Establishments. Yes, of course just like the big establishment in that space, but certainly the small ones are being. Super Super Heart and the other thing that's amazing about grameen, and the model is as you said earlier, the repayment rate being so incredibly high and I think that's due to the unique way that you lend money. Could you talk a little bit about the social capital model? Yes, I mean it has been an extraordinary. Two weeks of pivot and a transition because. Grameen America like many Microfinance Organizations all over the world. A really has been centered around social capital and community. So equally important to the money that we land, our members are the fact that we have anywhere from on a given day twenty five to thirty people. At a central meeting. And we have over two thousand four hundred centers. Going on every week where women are coming. Sharing their best practices. Really forming a peer network of other women entrepreneurs in addition to. Our staff, who are. Financial coaches are send our managers as we call them. really teach them the disciplines and financial education. So that the alchemy and the glue of the Grameen Model for nearly twelve years here in the United States and the. City that started social distancing. And then that moved to shelter at home, and you cannot go out. Obviously put this concept of coming together as community which has been so critical. Great odds with the proper and mandated things to do so. I'm really proud that we have converted completely to virtual community. So you can imagine in terms of current members who have loans we're talking about. You know close to sixty thousand and literally dialing in to zoom calls. thirty at a time. Entering, their pass codes and continuing their community. But Over Zoom. Technology not in person that has now been converted in every single city across the country, so we have tens of thousands of women now participating in their grooming America censure meeting. Virtually we. have. Acknowledging that can enable the process so every single in America member. Has A card, Card. expressman car that we can load their loan onto and it comes directly. Technology wise from our central bank. So therefore, they don't have to come to us and get a check. For alone they can just have noted in instead on their house at home. Not leave their home and get their own murder on to it. They can repay us. With and reload payments. Capabilities and all of this wouldn't have been possible several years ago, but we are. Ahead of many microfinance institutions in terms of adopting the technology. As tool for these women. We've been working on it over the last few years. We never dreamed that this crisis would be the kind that conversion and adoption of this would have been in city, not just an enhancement. Thank goodness because we have. Thousands of women who can participate in the loan program who can continue the come together as community and support each other in a very very fearful time. And that infrastructure is in place in rolling right now. You know obviously we have. Centers that are happening in.

America grameen President and CEO Grameen America Andrea Jong Andrew Andrea. La Sir Green United States murder
"seneca" Discussed on Seneca Women Conversations on Power and Purpose

Seneca Women Conversations on Power and Purpose

03:37 min | 1 year ago

"seneca" Discussed on Seneca Women Conversations on Power and Purpose

"It's time for <Music> great stuff that we. <Speech_Music_Male> Kind of <Speech_Telephony_Male> who we are, <Speech_Telephony_Male> and what we're <Music> meaner than, <Speech_Music_Male> and what the <Speech_Music_Male> if we can <Speech_Music_Male> grow <Speech_Telephony_Male> from the challenges <Speech_Telephony_Male> burn. Hopefully <SpeakerChange> we're <Speech_Male> all. <Speech_Male> So true I heard <Speech_Male> someone early on say, <Speech_Male> which I thought was kind <Speech_Male> of funny, but it. <Speech_Male> It actually resonated with <Speech_Male> me. They said, listen this either going <Speech_Male> to be corona divorce <Speech_Female> or Corona Romance. <Speech_Male> We're going to have to decide <Speech_Male> whether it's going to be. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> Maybe being attentional <Speech_Female> help, have you found people <Speech_Female> kind of trying to <Speech_Male> work at their relationships <Speech_Male> every day and make that <Speech_Male> a priority <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> Are you recommending <Speech_Female> that as well? <Speech_Telephony_Female> Yeah, you know I <Speech_Telephony_Male> definitely. Am <Speech_Telephony_Male> I mean that I'm. <Silence> Her <Speech_Telephony_Male> whole without <Speech_Telephony_Male> the distractions <Speech_Telephony_Male> of. <Music> Work <Speech_Telephony_Male> and <Speech_Telephony_Male> leaning <Speech_Telephony_Male> I should say there's there's still <Speech_Telephony_Male> working but home weaving <Speech_Telephony_Male> and <Speech_Telephony_Male> traveling <Speech_Telephony_Male> and all those things it's <Music> like getting together. <Speech_Telephony_Male> It is <Speech_Telephony_Male> an opportunity <Silence> to <Music> you know work <Music> on <SpeakerChange> both <Speech_Telephony_Female> relationships, yourselves <Speech_Telephony_Female> and <Speech_Telephony_Female> our partners I think <Music> it's a huge opportunity <Silence> <Speech_Female> Yeah. <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> So <Speech_Telephony_Female> I. AM couples <Speech_Telephony_Male> I? Mean I think <Speech_Music_Male> I think we're also hearing <Speech_Telephony_Male> your little bit of the. <Music> People <Speech_Telephony_Male> are also feeling <Speech_Music_Male> pressure <Silence> to kind of. <Speech_Music_Male> Personal <Speech_Telephony_Male> growth and optimize <Speech_Telephony_Male> personal growth <Speech_Telephony_Male> while we've got <Speech_Telephony_Male> all this time <Speech_Female> earns so <Speech_Telephony_Male> I'm definitely not encouraging <Speech_Music_Male> people to sort of push <Speech_Telephony_Male> themselves too <Speech_Music_Female> much, you know. <Speech_Music_Male> What <Speech_Telephony_Female> what's the deal will? <Speech_Telephony_Male> What's possible? <Speech_Telephony_Female> It's an opportunity. <Speech_Telephony_Female> <Speech_Telephony_Female> Heal right. Taking <Speech_Telephony_Male> doesn't <Speech_Music_Male> don't don't work <Speech_Telephony_Male> too hard. We're under <Speech_Telephony_Male> a lot of stress <Speech_Female> right now, trying to <Music> hear. <Speech_Telephony_Male> During what work <Speech_Telephony_Male> and not let <Speech_Male> not <SpeakerChange> with much <Speech_Male> in such good <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> advice, well, it's wonderful <Speech_Female> to talk to so what <Speech_Female> what makes you <Speech_Female> optimistic <SpeakerChange> in this moment? <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Telephony_Female> <Speech_Telephony_Female> Talking about <Speech_Telephony_Female> you know I think that <Speech_Telephony_Male> lean <Speech_Telephony_Male> rare in a culture <Speech_Telephony_Male> that encourages <Speech_Telephony_Male> us to outside <Speech_Telephony_Male> or Seltzer validations <Speech_Music_Male> helmet <Speech_Telephony_Male> out the next promotion, <Speech_Telephony_Male> the next instagram <Speech_Music_Male> posts <Speech_Music_Male> which leads a lot <Speech_Telephony_Male> of people in my office <Speech_Music_Male> door you know, <Speech_Music_Male> and while <Speech_Telephony_Male> there's so much fear <Speech_Telephony_Male> and worry invulnerability <Speech_Telephony_Female> that we're all <Speech_Telephony_Female> right now. I'm <Speech_Telephony_Female> optimistic. Because <Speech_Telephony_Male> slowing <Speech_Telephony_Male> down because <Speech_Telephony_Male> of <Speech_Telephony_Female> world, war distractions <Speech_Telephony_Female> <SpeakerChange> we, <Music> it's giving us the gift <Speech_Telephony_Male> of time and <Speech_Male> then full face. <Speech_Telephony_Male> To work <Speech_Music_Female> on these relationships, <Speech_Music_Male> and and from <Speech_Telephony_Male> my perspective, <Speech_Music_Male> this needs to improve <Speech_Telephony_Male> the one <Speech_Telephony_Male> relationship that's actually <Speech_Music_Male> even mental <Speech_Music_Male> health, which <SpeakerChange> is the one <Speech_Music_Male> with ourselves <hes> <Speech_Male> <hes> <Speech_Male> kind of reevaluate <Speech_Male> what you value <Speech_Male> what you're doing <Speech_Male> and how you're <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> living your life now. <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Female> Being <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> well, thank you so much. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> It is so <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> great to have you on the show. We <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> appreciate everything <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> doing to help. Couples <Speech_Female> get through this difficult <Speech_Female> period <Speech_Female> Is there a way? <SpeakerChange> Listeners can <Speech_Female> learn more about your work <Speech_Music_Male> after. Yeah, <Speech_Telephony_Male> you can find me roaring <Speech_Telephony_Female> at <Music> www <Speech_Telephony_Female> dot. <Speech_Telephony_Female> Dr Laura after <Speech_Telephony_Male> therapy <SpeakerChange> SF <Speech_Telephony_Female> DOT COM <Speech_Female> fantastic. We <Speech_Female> hope to have you on the show again, <Speech_Female> and we hope you are <Speech_Music_Female> or stain well and staying safe. <Speech_Music_Male> Thank you very much. <Speech_Music_Male> <SpeakerChange> For <Music> Mexico.

"seneca" Discussed on Seneca Women Conversations on Power and Purpose

Seneca Women Conversations on Power and Purpose

01:32 min | 1 year ago

"seneca" Discussed on Seneca Women Conversations on Power and Purpose

"That we come up with solutions. Rowing Nature. Well. It's a wonderful to talk to you about this I. Think we'll be checking back in with you. we will try to maintain the good in sort of calming attitude that you have about staying. Calm panicking and it's good to hear that you think that we as a society, and then our financial markets are resilient, so thanks so much for joining us. Thank thank you for having me Cam and also your thank you to. The health care providers and those route there on the front lines supporting every day. We really have to be grateful for these healthcare providers. What they're doing is just so incredible. Thanks so much for joining us. Right. You're listening to Seneca women conversations on power and purpose. Brought to you by the Seneca Women podcast network and iheartradio. With support from founding partner PNG. Listen to Seneca women conversations on power and purpose on the iheartradio APP. Apple podcasts or wherever you get your podcasts. And please support this podcast by telling your friends subscribing and rating us. For more information on Seneca women follow us on social media. visit our website Seneca women. Dot Com and check out the Seneca women. APP, free in the APP store. Have a great.

"seneca" Discussed on Seneca Women Conversations on Power and Purpose

Seneca Women Conversations on Power and Purpose

01:32 min | 1 year ago

"seneca" Discussed on Seneca Women Conversations on Power and Purpose

"I hope you enjoyed that conversation with Louise's Do Bay and it is always so incredible to hear the Voice of Justice. Sandra Day O'connor for more information about civics visit ice evicts dot org my top takeaways. I as Justice O'Connor reminds US civic. Participation is more important than ever and it starts with young people teaching children about civic discourse and how to have positive conversations sets up the next generation with the tools they need to succeed Second Justice. O'conner's life reminds us of the power of being I as the first woman on the. Us Supreme Court Justice O'Conner broke barriers for women in the law for women in the judiciary and frankly for women around the world. Lastly Justice O'Conner is incredible of using your power for purpose. Her impact extends well beyond the law across boundaries and generations as is evidenced by I civic for US Seneca. Women Justice O'Conner is a beautiful powerful example of living a life of service and purpose. You're listening to Seneca women conversations on power and purpose a podcast brought to you by the Seneca Women podcast network. If you like this podcast please subscribe. Tell your friends and rate US ON APPLE PODCASTS? For more information on Seneca women follow us on social media. Visit our website and check out the Seneca women APP free in the APP store. Have a great week..

Justice O'Conner US Seneca Women Seneca Justice O'Connor Sandra Day O'connor Do Bay Supreme Court Louise
"seneca" Discussed on Seneca Women Conversations on Power and Purpose

Seneca Women Conversations on Power and Purpose

04:52 min | 1 year ago

"seneca" Discussed on Seneca Women Conversations on Power and Purpose

"Lillo. She went back to a home. Her mother fed her six months later. Fiance came to Belgium. They got married. The doctor says you absolutely cannot have a child for at least five years because you want survive and the child will not be normal and sure enough. Nine months later I was born and I was not normal. My mother is the for example of strangth. She taught me. Fear is not an option no matter what never be a victim and she every year I used to ride and she used me. God saved me so that I can give you live by giving you life. You gave me my life back. You are Dr Mike Torch of freedom so what she put in my hand as a baby is the torch of freedom and I didn't realize any of that until I was much much later and I realized that's what I fight for freedom. Freedom is everything freedom. Health Freedom is financial freedom freedom is being able to speak the more important freedom is being able to be who you are so my word to you is trust who you are. You are so much better than you think you are. Don't be afraid of your own strength and once you know you're strong you don't and have to show it doesn't matter you know the life code. I think I think you need your ally should good thing about getting old so let's go quickly Getting old I mean we. Don't we only have what we want to talk about getting old. Yes yes because it's an achievement and I am I am owned. Being older is in that she'd -ment I turned seventy this you and I and I I tell everybody because first of all I like the sound of it I liked them to say. Oh really they don't mean it but also because it means that I made did and truly having live the life I live. I should be hundred and I'm forty so don't be afraid of the years when I see a young girl was thirty five. But she's afraid to say her age. I mean that is insanity eighty when the child is there. Oh you're ten years old. Who Your twelve will your fifteen and then all of a sudden what we don't say agent and that's insane insane? Well you know they say it's a state of mind and there's no doubt in my mind it's not what you will forever be no no matter how you feel physically and I doubt that you feel bad physically so anyway I don't know enjoy. I think you need your own show China in your life and enjoy who you are. That's my message. And what a great message. It's always incredible to hear from Diane. Von Furstenberg go to deviate DOT COM to learn more about her new incharge in charge manifesto and movement and contribute your own thoughts by finding the incharge Hashtag on social media. My takeaways I as dion reminds us the most important relationship in life is the one you have with yourself. She recommends that we each find that little house inside ourselves increase our own support system as she says in life we will all face loss and hardship but the one thing that is lasting. Is Your own character second. We each have more strength than we know as the F. says all women are strong but she cautions us when you doubt your power power you give power to your doubts finally the open to everyone and everything around you. You never know what doors will open. And it may be the least glamorous or unexpected or we'll be the very one that helps you get closer to your goal. You're listening to Seneca women conversations on power and purpose. Please support this podcast telling your friends subscribing and rating us on Apple podcasts. For more information follow Seneca Women on social media visit in our website. SENECA WOMEN DOT COM and check out the Seneca connect APP in the APP. Store have a great week.

Dr Mike Torch Seneca Women SENECA Belgium Von Furstenberg Apple dion Diane China F.
"seneca" Discussed on Seneca Women Conversations on Power and Purpose

Seneca Women Conversations on Power and Purpose

15:37 min | 1 year ago

"seneca" Discussed on Seneca Women Conversations on Power and Purpose

"Seneca Women Attorney and businesswoman Valerie Jarrett rose to political heights as the longest serving senior advisor to President Barack Obama. She joined Seneca Women at the Metropolitan Museum of art to discuss her journey to the White House lessons. She learned as a leader and effective ways to fight for progress. Enjoyed for this conversation with Valerie. Milan and stick around. After the discussion for our top takeaways.

President Barack Obama Valerie Jarrett Seneca Women Metropolitan Museum of art White House Milan