5 Burst results for "Senator Jefferson Davis"

"senator jefferson davis" Discussed on Recode Decode

Recode Decode

08:19 min | 6 months ago

"senator jefferson davis" Discussed on Recode Decode

"One of my favorite people Katie couric was bent on this show before she's the host of the podcast next question and back to Biz and I've been on. On both of those shows, she's also working with Time magazine on new video series about the human side of the covid nineteen crisis, and of course she's the former anchor of the CBS evening news and Co Anchor of the today show. But you knew that already Katie welcome back to Rico Care how you doing happy to be with. No, we like to. We like to mix it up Katie and the Nice thing. is we really like each other? Yes, we. accept. We don't. Know we actually very simple, very supportive. That's one of the best things about you Katie, your sister. So, so let's get into it. I mean right now. Is such a you know you're working on something about coq eighteen, but covid nineteen was like a week ago. Things have happened I just. New Site the new stones. Isn't it it is, it's it's interesting I love to. You'd think about how to cover that. And how the coverage is gone, but talk to me a little bit about your. We're in this Kobe thing. You're working on something about sort of life afterwards and you have this back to is about that idea of. How do we get back to her thing, so you get back to visit about back to his after Cova now it's after this, too, so talk a little bit about how you're looking at it as a as a journalist. Well, it's amazing cameras. You mentioned you know the new cycle. It just seemed to undergo appropriately this massive shift where so much focus appropriately was focused on this. Horrific murder, of George, Floyd and it seemed to just shift everyone's attention just immediately towards racial injustice, and you know it's. It's to me very inspiring time because I think. That that the eyes, the nation are on this issue, really in in such a profound way that I've never really seen in my lifetime. I guess I've seen it periodically with Riley King when I first came to the chase show, you know I think about Rodney King and obviously everybody was focused on that, but. This feels different I think most people we talked to, and I don't care about your conversations, but most people I talked to black and white say it feels different this time it feels like. That something is going to change. Something is going to happen that everyone. Almost obviously, there are some exceptions in his probably of what I'm What's incoming in my news feed? And what I do, you know as part of my my news consumption habits, but you know so we we actually have shifted and I interviewed Reverend William Barberie yesterday for for this time. Time series I had met him when I did a story. When I was at Yahoo and North Carolina about this young man named Lennon Lacy who was found hanging from swing set, but his shoes were not his shoes the belt. His parents didn't recognize the belt that was used and I read a piece in the Guardian about it and I said. Said to my editors at Yahoo I, really liked to North Carolina, and to this story so I had interviewed. Reverend Barbara for that so yesterday I interviewed him because he's such an important voice, not only for Black Americans, but for poor people everywhere. You know he's doing a whole March. That's now going to be virtual on June, twentieth and I'm using my. My platform to to try to continue the conversation to try to help, not only educate myself, but educate my followers because I think people are really really receptive and open to learning I was thinking about this hour I did on confederate statues three years ago Cara and you know I was disappointed because I didn't feel like enough. People watched it, but right religious. Narrative and yeah, and why confederate statues were so offensive because growing up in northern Virginia? You know I live near leaving highway. You know we had so many schools named after confederate officers, and and I really wanted to dig into the loss, 'cause narrative, and find out why these were so deeply and profoundly offensive I went to Charlottesville. I was in at the so-called. Unite the right rally so I feel like people are very receptive. So I'm I'm taking segments. Segments of that in posting it, so people can hear the very eloquent. Bryan Stevenson talking about how we have never come to terms with our with our history with the history of lynching with the history of slavery, unlikes places like South, Africa and unlike places like Germany, where they have consciously rewritten their nations narrative, and this country has never really done that, and hopefully now is the time where a good faith effort really will be made to help people understand. Our history because I think that's part of the problem. Care of people don't really understand well, I've probably. Memory whole thing I think I think Americans have the deepest memory hole of any country, which is a good thing sometimes, but is often a forgetfulness about. That they they don't remember what happened last week now and by because of social media and other issues. It's now accelerated, I mean like you look at someone like Donald, trump, with all the things he'd done. You're like Oh, shit whole countries Oh. You know Charlottesville like I of course I remember it, but you don't remember, and that's just recently. I think a lot of our history around. The way we've taught it or that I think that I think you never really hit the nail on the head. I think the way that history has been taught in this country needs a serious reevaluation. You know Howard Zinn teaches history from the point of view of the press, not the oppressors, and you know I think that growing up in Virginia, the way I was taught history was very very different than the way it should be in you know. There are certain textbooks in Texas where they won't allow a different point of view for history, so we've gotten such twisted and warped view of history, and and when I. Tell my friends about the. The loss caused narrative about when these statues were erected during the Jim Crow era, not immediately after the civil war, but as a real f you to the. Federal Government when all these schools were named after confederate officers. It was after Brown V. Board of Education, so I think when you understand the arc of history, and the motivations of why, and when and how these things happen. You have a much better understanding that you can make an informed. You can have an informed opinion. Right, so talk a little bit about that. You've done a let the did that. You're wearing for National Geographic and I remember you put a lot into that you were. Also worked hard on that Syria. And of course now, the governor of Virginia is going to be taking down some of the statues right in Richmond. which which is a big deal because they have this whole avenue of statues, and they have Arthur ash on there, but it doesn't really mitigate some of the more offensive statues and I to Mitch Landrieu. I went to New Orleans. I went to Alabama. The governor of Alabama wouldn't speak to me, but they passed a law that said any statue that had been put up I. Believe Before Nineteen seventy. Seventy five. It would be against the law to take it down, so you know I? Talked to a state Senator Jefferson Davis is on the you know. On the grounds of the state capital I read him back some of his racist quotes and said, does this person deserve? Does he represent all people and you know what's so interesting is how public squares really telegraphed the values of a community you? You know they send a message. And if that message is, you know venerating Robert e Lee, that is not a mess and inclusive message for a a diverse community. Right? Absolutely so let's let's talk about what you're doing. You're working for National Geographic and you've had such a fascinating. We've about this for your your sort of Arc as a as an anchor of one of the big this morning. Morning the biggest right morning, show and then you went to run to anchor news programs and evening and everything change anyone to Yahoo in the new national groping. Talk a little bit about what you're doing now and why you're I, find and then you have a you have a newsletter now and everything else and I read the very lovely..

Katie couric Virginia Yahoo National Geographic Charlottesville Time magazine Co Anchor North Carolina Alabama CBS Riley King Reverend William Barberie Robert e Lee Rodney King Howard Zinn Cova Reverend Barbara Bryan Stevenson Senator Jefferson Davis New Orleans
"senator jefferson davis" Discussed on American Elections: Wicked Game

American Elections: Wicked Game

06:30 min | 10 months ago

"senator jefferson davis" Discussed on American Elections: Wicked Game

"It's Monday April thirtieth eighteen sixty and Charleston South Carolina's institute hall the Democratic National Convention Delegates have just heard North Carolina's William William Avery present to platforms the majority platform asserts that the federal government should protect slavery in the territories despite the wishes of territorial residence. The minority orgy disagrees. Favoring Stephen Douglas's Freeport doctrine of popular sovereignty after both platforms are presented. The convention floor erupts into a heated debate. Ohio delegate Henry Pain stands at the podium to defend the minority platform. Gentlemen of the South. Do Not Saddle US your northern brothers with with more weight we cannot then to your demands for slavery protections again asked popular sovereignty in the territories. We will never receive from that doctor. Never never never so help us. God Alabama Delegate William Yancey stands rebutted this argument. We southerners have had enough of Stephen Douglas and his Freeport doctrine. It's time that northern Democrats take a stand to protect southern brothers constitutional rights to property. This is indeed the price we demand. Ah or else we will last through much sir before Yancey can get a chance to finish his threat Ohio. Delegate George Pugh cuts him off and forcefully takes the podium. You are asking northern Democrats to eat dust. Gentlemen of the South you mistake us you mistake us. We will not do it. You say the only way southerners will remain at this convention is that northerners adopt majority platform. We were fused so leave if you must in good riddance to you. Northern Democrats will no longer ban to the back and bidding of the South prickly the convention falls into pandemonium hundreds hundreds of delegates from both sides of the argument vie for the floor. It's nearly a riot with finally the halls brought to order the delegates officially vote to adopt the minority pro Freeport doctrine platform one sixty five to one thirty eight after the result is announced aging Alabama delegate Pope Walker quietly shuffles to the podium. He addresses the crowd. The Alabama delegation is retiring. Justice has not been done by the south never never again will any representation from the State of Alabama grace this convention stunned delegates from the North and south on silently As the entire Alabama delegation walks out of the hall and protests Mississippi and delegate DC. Glenn stands and breaks the silence. It is time that the Yankees Moscow their ways the south must go her ways our enemies may hallucinate the Mississippi and Alabama Department. They're lonely self like Hagar in the wilderness the less S. than sixty days. You will find a united south standing shoulder to shoulder with Glenn Statement. The mississippians followed the Alabama delegation out of the hall delegates from Louisiana left shortly after along with representatives from South Carolina. Florida Texas Texas and Arkansas. At their national convention. Democrats fractured along sectional lines. They failed to nominate a presidential candidate and after the slew who of southern delegates walked out. They no longer had the numbers to do so party leaders closed. The convention made a plan to reconvene in Baltimore. Two months later they hoped cooler heads would prevail that the southern states would return to the fold in the end though it would be just wishful thinking In early eighteen sixty stephen. Douglas still had enough clout within his party and on the National Stage Garner support as the democratic. Party's presidential. Oh candidate despite his break with President Buchanan over the Kansas Lecomte constitution and his support of the Freeport doctrine many delegates went into the Democratic National Convention invention expecting to nominate Stephen Douglas. The powerful Senator from Illinois for their party's ticket but after the southern delegates walked out of the April convention northern in southern Democrats realized just how the divide between them was many. Northern Democrats fell coerce by southerners who asked them to bow to slaveholders interests again. I and again one delegate ranted after all the battles we have fought for the south they only wished to rule us or ruin us. Many southern Democrats felt that their state and property property rights were being stomped on by northern friendly policies like the Freeport Doctrine Mississippi Senator Albert Gallatin Brown forcefully argued for slavery protections and US West Territories. Would I demand protection that protection which you admit we are entitled to by the Common Constitution. Give it to us now do it at once. Mississippi's other senator. Jefferson Davis took a more moderate position. He explained that all property requires protection however slave owners right protection does not necessarily involve the enactment of additional laws instead Davis thought the court should intervene if necessary on slave owners behalf thus creating legal precedents events that favoured slavery but even this moderate position wasn't enough to bridge the gap between northern and Southern Democrats. The party didn't officially break apart but they splintered into two factions and each nominated their own candidate in June northern Democrats backed Stephen Douglas and adopted his Freeport doctrine popular sovereignty as a platform plank. Douglas accepted the nomination and avowed. He would fight against two sectional hostile parties. Each struggling to use federal the power and authority for the aggrandizement of its own section at the expense of the equal rights of the other. Southern Democrats nominated President Buchanan's vice president. John John Breckenridge. Breckenridge was a staunch proponent of slavery protection and promised to crush out what little life there is still left in popular sovereignty and its twin brother. Unfriendly legislation this schism in the Democratic Party worried a few southern voters in running to candidates the Democrats split. Their voting pool opened a door for the mostly northern Republican Party a full anti-slavery man could end up in the White House pro. Douglas newspaper editor wrote if the Democratic Party breaks to pieces we can discover noble work to the encroachment of Republican fanaticism. Therefore no safety to.

Stephen Douglas Alabama Mississippi Delegate William Yancey South Carolina Democratic Party President Buchanan Ohio Republican Party John John Breckenridge Douglas William William Avery North Carolina Charleston stephen federal government George Pugh Glenn Statement Jefferson Davis
"senator jefferson davis" Discussed on Aaron Mahnke's Cabinet of Curiosities

Aaron Mahnke's Cabinet of Curiosities

06:05 min | 11 months ago

"senator jefferson davis" Discussed on Aaron Mahnke's Cabinet of Curiosities

"Animals have been used in bore since the beginning of time. Hannibal the Carthaginians general famously used war elephants elephants as he crossed the Alps conquering much of Europe in the process. Though you wouldn't see them in use today elephants were a common sight on the battlefield. They functioned much like today's tanks tanks plowing through scores of soldiers and intimidating horses. The US army has also utilized unusual animals in its military campaigns during in World War Two for example napalm charges were strapped to thousands of bats bound for Japan unfortunately a few got loose and ended up bombing an air force hangar and that was at the end of the bat bomb idea. Dolphins have been trained by the Navy to find underwater mines and interfere with enemy divers by perhaps the most unusual and ingenious genius use of animals in the military came. During the eighteen thirties as Americans migrated west they quickly discovered how to ferry us. The terrain was compared to the develop cities. Back in the east. There were deserts and mountains to cross. The environment was often too harsh for horses to navigate safely. But one man Lieutenant George Crossman in the United States Army wrote back to Washington. DC with an idea. Camels camels could carry hundreds of pounds on their backs and gopher tens of miles deals with very little food or water and unlike horses. They didn't need metal shoes to protect their hooves. Either but crossman idea didn't pan out at first his superiors in in Washington didn't see the benefits however years later after crossman had achieved the rank of major. He spoke to Major Henry Wayne. The army's quartermaster departments major wayne new how how useful camels could be as well on crossman suggestion Wayne wrote to the war department. His letter found its way to the desk of senator. Jefferson Davis Future President confederate states and a major player during the civil war. It took several years but in eighteen fifty. Three Davis was able to convince Congress to approve funding. For Wayne's camels. You thirty thousand dollars were appropriated for the project Wayne was sent to the navy ship. USS Supply to acquire them. He first travelled to London then. Paris heiress to speak with camel. Experts zookeepers you needed to learn how to handle the animals once they were on board the ship from there. He travelled to Tunisia for five months on. Swain and the supplies commander. Lieutenant David Porter sail to Greece Turkey and Egypt purchasing camels along the way with thirty three camels in tow Oh. They traveled back to America. In roughly three months. The ship had to deal with choppy seas and heavy storms much of the way but on May fourteenth the USS Supply docked docked in Texas. Finally home from there. The animals were marched for almost two hundred miles to a camp much like the ones Wayne had encountered in the Middle East here. He could train his camels to perform specific military duties. He said the caravan of three wagons pulled by six mules each to San Antonio along for the trip or six of his this camels to measure against the mules their mission bring a supply of oats back to the camp the wagons were only able to carry about eighteen hundred pounds of oats. It's back to the camp and five days the camels however could carry more than double that amount in half the time. The test was a success. Wayne continued to put the animals through their paces and was impressed over and over again with their ability to handle the south western terrain meanwhile porter returned to Egypt for forty one more camels which which he brought back at the end of January eighteen fifty seven however a few months later newly elected president James Buchanan had wayne moved back to DC without him there air to move the camel experiments along the animals remain dormant at the camp then the westward expansion hit a major milestone. A railroad was commissioned ashamed by Congress to build a more direct route between New Mexico and California horses alone wouldn't be able to make it that far but luckily for California militiamen. Edward Beal was a whole corral full of camels just waiting for their time to shine. twenty-five camels joined forty four soldiers a dozen wagons and almost a hundred hundred dogs and mules as they work their way west. Each camel could tote around seven hundred pounds without slowing down often going over rocks and sand that would bring the horses to to a halt the AIDS very little and performed reliably earning them potential position among the United States military's other animal forces when a new road. Oh needed to be built. The camels were there to carry materials and surveyors from site to site by the civil war. However the camel experiment had hit a major roadblock some were captured by confederate troops and abused or even killed technology had also come a long way in that time and the camels were becoming less necessary? Eventually no one knew what to do with the the remaining stock anymore so they were sold at auction. Often to circuses or private ranches kids attending the circus had never seen a camel up close in the animals drew large crowds for a while but when the crowd stop coming the owners didn't sell them or donate them to local Zeus instead they let them loose into the wild for decades these camels roam the desert's of California and New Mexico last one reportedly passing away in April of Nineteen thirty four in Los Angeles. It was eighty years old the US army camel corps was a short-lived idea with a lot of potential and think all it really needed were supporters. Who could see the bigger picture and helping get over the final hump into mainstream use? I hope you've enjoyed today's guided tour of the cabinet of curiosities. Subscribe for free on Apple podcasts or learn more about the show by visiting curiosities PODCAST DOT COM. The show was created by me. Aaron McKie in partnership with how stuff works I make another award. Winning show called Lor which is a podcast book series stories and Television Show. And you can learn all about it over at the world of Lor Dot Com and until next time stay curious..

Major Henry Wayne Lieutenant George Crossman United States Army Navy Jefferson Davis US army camel corps Congress Washington California David Porter Egypt Lor Dot Com president New Mexico army Europe Hannibal DC
"senator jefferson davis" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

10:47 min | 11 months ago

"senator jefferson davis" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"Nothing like this occurs in our day in the states not in North Carolina and and Douglas once the popular vote to Lincoln Lincoln won the popular vote but Lincoln Lincoln also won the debates in the long run because he damaged Douglas a going forward as he sought the democratic presidential nomination eighteen sixty these are seven debates that take place in the beginning like it's not doing well he's on the defensive and Douglas is smearing him up one side and down the other he's at Lincoln is a traitor in the Mexican war Lincoln is a drunk Lincoln of course is a teetotaler and learn about spotty he it out he calls him rancheros body which is an aide named for a Mexican terrorist and because Lincoln had long story when you've been a congressman and yeah propose something called the spot resolution demanding to know where the Mexican war it started and claim that it had been falsely started by the democratic president and that the origins of the war were phony not that anything like that ever happens not in our time is so so here's what happens in the debate when the key moment comes in the town of Freeport and Douglas is also attacking Lincoln is being in favor of quote Negro equality but he doesn't use the word Negro and Lincoln throws Douglas on the defensive Lincoln's team says you're into the link in your getting beat up badly you got to do some you gotta throw some questions and Douglas he throws this question which is a complicated question involving a Douglas is well known position called popular sovereignty that he anyone in a territory could be either pros could vote for either pro slavery or or for making a Free State and it could be either and he didn't care and that was democracy and Lincoln proposes the question because this could you do this before the state constitution is created are you in favor this and Douglas says yes it's a well known thing but Lincoln is elevating it and what he's doing is he's getting Doug was in the navy the southerners because they don't like the idea could be one thing or the other they want one thing and then they think that that I was and they they thought the Supreme Court had articulated that principle in Dred Scott correct take slaves into territories then you've got a right to it they think you have a right everywhere owned slaves justice Connie had ruled that Congress could not make a law prohibiting slaves from being brought into territories and Lincoln was saying there's going to be a second it's got case in which they make slavery national and based you know as a corollary to the dread Scott case any corner Douglas on this and it really damaged Douglas down the road going into the into the contest for the democratic presidential nomination of eighteen sixty yeah so so that was politically damaging but what about the public philosophy that Lincoln himself articulated over the course of the debate did that become a platform for his candidacy in eighteen sixty Douglas put on Lincoln on the defensive and Lincoln has one low point and he has and then he source and reaches his high points and the low point involves Douglas accusing him not only of Negro quality but it being in favor of what's called amalgamation which is the sexual mixing of the races and says that's Lincoln's true hidden agenda and Lincoln says I'm not for the social the quality of the races this body says I'm for the declaration of independence and guaranteeing rights to everybody that's as low point from there he stores he says that and he embraces the declaration of independence even more and says that Douglas is blowing out the more lights among us by proposing in speaking the way he is about the inferiority of one race over another and Douglas is a is a belligerent and brazen proponent of white supremacy in the in these debates and Lincoln takes it on yeah and he invokes the revolution and the founders and the decorations right yes he does and this is all before the Cooper Union speech when he's done this very systematically and in a detailed way but Lincoln is he's he Lincoln makes an argument and then never forgets at any bills on is a very he's he's he's he's very loyal ally yeah and then the seeds of the Gettysburg address are planted really with his beginning to articulate what the declaration of independence was all about and that is kind of quite everybody Douglas says almost the words of the Gettysburg address in the debates he says this country is based in a way he said he says you know of the white man for the white man by the and he says it's just and yeah you know so link at Lincoln is is refuting I wanted to ask you to set the stage for what happened in eighteen sixty presidential election by talking about the the unlikely nous of this candidacy reminding me of another unlikely candidate Barack Obama from a from Illinois but Lincoln was an extremely unlikely candidate he'd only serve one term in the U. S. house of representatives and got beat up for his strong antiwar views they are over the Mexican American war in otherwise he'd been in the state legislature but even out of office for a long time and he was it is certainly not as famous as the luminaries from the east to overall and going to run tell the story how without much active campaigning at least in public view he ended up becoming the nominee of this new part so the front runner is William Henry Seward the senator and former governor of New York and he is he's the most prominent Republican in the nation and Lincoln is not very well known and no one really in the east is familiar with him except for having seen the Cooper Union in February of nineteen sixty and they have read his debates with Douglas in the newspapers made a national figure and they were the Cooper Union address and the Illinois team comes to the convention which takes place in Chicago which is a a story in itself of all the different candidates one of the Republican convention to be in their cities New York Cincinnati for salmon chase of Ohio St Louis for Edward Bates of Saint Louis and the Illinois representative says in the meeting of the Republican National Committee taking place in New York says well we don't have a candidate so why not a neutral sitting like talking so the conventions in Chicago any political please and very the greatest railway depot in the country is the greatest booming economic city in the country and Lincoln's political team is there they thought to be a bunch of Hicks the candy is savviest and most clever political operatives you could put in a room and led by a judge David Davis Lincoln appoints of later the Supreme Court gets a room in the tram on hotel downtown puts a sign above it Illinois headquarters and starts operating day and night all night Seward's men come in and they start throwing cash around trying to buy delegations there was not much campaign finance laws and unlike today where it works great Sidney Blumenthal discussing the years leading up to the election of Abraham Lincoln his book all the powers of the earth interview by democratic congressman Jamie Raskin right no one ever wrote me checks to any SO they're making deals with and people feel that Stewart is a is not a candidate there sure about they think you can lose he's been around a long time and he has a lot of enemies people think he's corrupt even though he is is the most notable man of his party and is a great order and as well not better known they think is operation from New York is corrupt the Albany lobby is corrupt his teeth campaign manager thermo weed is corrupt and they they want somebody else who can also appeal to others in other states I'm in Pennsylvania in Indiana they think Seward can't win he's also been stained by the John Brown raid John Brown is a status rated Harpers ferry and been executed and Stewart is painted as a radical there's a kind of witch hunt that takes place in Washington after the John Brown raid and there's a a committee of the Senate then investigates among those on the committee investigating is senator Jefferson Davis of Mississippi and the call Stewart is a witness to know to find out what he knew about this is it was I will I will say it was conducted I even know was a witch hunt it was conducted more fairly than the Benghazi committee and.

North Carolina Douglas Lincoln Lincoln
"senator jefferson davis" Discussed on GONE

GONE

12:18 min | 1 year ago

"senator jefferson davis" Discussed on GONE

"Where the treasure ended up as is the case with most missing treasure, their dozens of reported locations with the gold is suspected to have been hidden for this episode. We're looking at the possibilities that are most supported by historical facts. The first theory is that the bulk of the treasure was stolen by outlaws most likely deserters from the confederate army who buried the gold somewhere in the southern United States. The second theory is that the gold was actually stolen by union troops who are tasked with transporting it back to Washington DC. Instead the soldiers smuggled the gold north all the way to Lake Michigan where it sunk and still remains to this day. Our third theory is that there is no hidden treasure. The legend grew out of rumors and hearsay surrounding the end of the confederacy. And that story has persisted to this day. Thanks to conspiracy theories and sensationalism given the hindsight of history. It can be easy to forget. How complicated the civil war. Actually was it's not a stretch to say that the confederate states of America were doomed from the start. It's probably a good thing that seceding from the United States to form a separate nation is pretty hard to do even after the southern states ceded, the remaining United States where military and economic force to be reckoned with there were a number of issues that led to the civil war, including economics states rights against the federal government and the enmity between the northern and southern states just to name a few. But the single main cause of the war was slavery. There were only thirty three ratified states in eighteen sixty as the United States spread across the western frontier. The US congress ran into a problem abolitionist them the movement to abolish slavery had been present in America since the country was founded in seventeen seventy six. For the entirety of the country's history. The southern states had affectively banded together. In congress to vote down any movement to end slavery on a national level. But the southern leaders couldn't stop individual states from ending slavery within their own borders. Every new state that entered the union got to choose whether it would be a Free State or a slave state by the eighteen forties. There was a chance that the anti-slavery. Congressman might outnumber the pro slavery ones if that happened the south might not have been able to stop a national abolition of slavery. The south responded by forcing protection measures, including legislation which stated that for every Free State admitted to the union, a corresponding slave state must also be admitted. So that the balance was maintained, but by eighteen sixty compromise between the two sides seemed like an impossible dream with the eighteen six. The election. It was becoming painfully clear that the issue of slavery. It was not going to go away peacefully, although ABRAHAM LINCOLN did not seek to abolish slavery in the south as part of his political platform. He did want to restrict it spread to new states, and the southern leadership made it clear that they would vote to secede. If Lincoln was elected the question of succession was complicated at face value. A single state breaking free of the United States was illegal and unconstitutional. However, considering that the original thirteen colonies broke free from Britain to rebel against an oppressive regime. The southern states felt that they were just honoring history Lincoln was elected and the southern states led by South Carolina voted to succeed beginning in December of eighteen sixty by March of eighteen sixty one South Carolina, Mississippi, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, Texas. And Alabama officially formed the confederate states of America. The war officially began with the battle of fort Sumter on April twelfth eighteen sixty one the first of many vital tasks for the nation was to establish leadership shortly after the formation of the confederacy former Mississippi Senator Jefferson Davis was elected as the country's first president. He would also be the nation's only president Davis was a popular choice in eighteen sixty one because of this pro slavery politics and his stance on states rights. However, his appointment would ultimately do more harm than good. His blunders, particularly in the matters of military and economic decisions would contribute to the confederacies downfall. That isn't to say that the rogue nations quick demise was entirely Davis's fault. The reality is that there was no realistic chance. The confederacy would win the war in. Head on military battle war is expensive and complicated. Especially when you're also trying to establish a new country, the confederacies simply lack the necessary manpower leadership and finances to combat the more organized union forces. Before the confederacy was even one year old Davis was forced to declare martial law and enforce a draft of all able bodied men to fight in the war, though, the confederacy boasted some of the more accomplished military officers in the United States at the time. It was lacking for infantrymen the confederate government was no more organized given that the rogue nation was formed in large part because state leaders didn't want to submit to a federal government. Davis had trouble commanding his own cabinet. This is significant mostly because it meant that the confederacy never got its finances into decent shape. Previously. The southern states had largely relied on farming and the production of raw resources like cotton as a benchmark of their economy. These resources had to be sent north where the factories were in order to be turned into useful materials since the south was now at war with the north. They no longer had access to the industrial facilities that. Were required to produce weapons and war supplies from the outset. The confederacy was outgunned. Additionally, they had few options for trading. Most nations didn't recognize the legitimacy of the confederacy. And thus the newly established confederate currency was useless almost everywhere as such the confederacy did everything it could to consolidate more universal currency such as gold and silver in the later years of the war, the confederate government even confiscated jewelry and other valuables in order to combat it's growing financial crisis. This was all held in the confederate capital city of Richmond. Virginia all of these efforts to bolster the confederate states of America were futile as we said, the southern states had little chance against the more organized. Well supplied union army. This is where the confederacy was in eighteen sixty five outmanned poorly supplied and in possess. Session of a rapidly dwindling supply of money as union forces scored victory after victory Jefferson. Davis was attending church on April second eighteen sixty five when he received word from general, Robert E Lee, the message was simple Richmond must be evacuated and the confederate government must flee. If the nation was to survive the night Davis ordered confederate troops to set. Richmond ablaze said that the advancing union army would not the able to make use of any supplies. They found within the city, then he ordered the full contents of the treasury loaded onto train cars in preparation for departure. We should state here that the exact amount and value of this treasure has long been disputed naturally. It's impossible to confirm since the treasure has yet to be found, but the general account states that the bulk of the treasure consisted of gold, silver and bullion valued at around. Around five hundred thousand dollars. Additionally, there were millions of dollars in confederate currency, though, as we've said, it was generally useless. Finally, the troops loaded up the seized assets from a number of Richmond's private banks, which added another four hundred and fifty thousand dollars value. The treasure was split up a number of times during the journey, and we can't account for every individual crater barrel that might have been misplaced by confederate soldiers, but we can track the journey of the bulk of the goal to appoint Jefferson's initial plan had been to flee south and use the funds from the treasure to establish a new base to continue the war effort. However, the plan quickly unravelled the convoy reached the end of the train line in danville Virginia, and the party was forced to carry what they could on horseback before the treasure had been consolidated to a single train car. But now it was being spread out among. The numerous men, horses and mules. Additionally, the soldiers with Jefferson were growing restless, they hadn't been paid. And as a union victory seemed more and more inevitable. They started to grumble about whether what they were doing was really worth it. The confederate leaders were forced to use part of the treasure to pay for their own military detail, Jefferson, eventually split the treasure up the money taken from the Richmond banks was placed in a vault in the city. The rest of the treasury money was assigned to confederate secretary of war. John breckenridge. Most of the confederate cabinet was captured in the city of Washington Georgia in may of eighteen sixty five Davis was captured just days later union. Soldiers recovered, the Richmond Bank money, but the rest of the treasure was missing. There are two main reasons that it's so difficult to track. What happened all of this treasure? The first is that the treasure was large but easily split up into small. Containers. The treasure dwindled and fractured as it moves south, and thus it became harder and harder to track where every single cent ended up the second. More concrete reason is that there's not a lot of hard documentation from this particular period in early may of eighteen sixty five the confederate cabinet burned. Most of their government documents which included treasury slips the goal in doing. This was to prevent union troops from finding out about the treasure that Jefferson Davis had sent away. Unfortunately, it also makes it hard for modern historians to find out what really happened to the mounds of gold that for all we know could still be out there somewhere waiting to be discovered. 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