20 Episode results for "Senator Ed Markey"

US Senator Ed Markey

The Young Jurks

41:30 min | 3 weeks ago

US Senator Ed Markey

"Hi It's Mike Crawford welcome to the jerks podcast wanted to tell you why we chose anchor. For Our podcast hosting, it's the easiest way to make it podcast. Let me explain it's completely free this creation tools that allow you to record in editor podcast right from your phone or computer so easy I can even do it. Anchor will distribute podcast for you. So it can be heard on spotify apple podcast and many more. and. If you're paying for hosting services right now for your podcast, why this is completely free anchor is completely free and you can make money from your podcast with no minimum listenership. It's everything you need to make a podcast in one place anchor DOT FM. Jerks sponsored by UFC w fourteen, forty, five, a labor union representing cannabis employees Massachusetts currently. CW is holding a union election at net New England treatment access in Brookline, as well as mayflower if you're a cannabis employees worried about your health and safety and are not being heard work, call the union UFC W. local fourteen forty, five dot O. R. G. or call them at one, eight, hundred, four, three, nine, one, four, four, five. Mike Crawford here young jerks. Special episode. We've been running for six years not too often well, actually lately, it has happened. We've had some I another I today. Because of our guests that we have here, we're really excited. Ed Markey Senator Ed Markey has been in office for over thirty years since the early nineteen. I of the Massachusetts State House and then in Congress now as the US junior senator from the state of Massachusetts. he's pals with Ao. See they have a green new deal that they've been working on. He's mall the native. And he's fighting for workers in small businesses. He's running for re election. It has a strong challenger Congressman. Joe Kennedy I'm really happy. To have a first US senator on the show. That's a first for us today at Congressman District Attorney's Mayors State Rep State Senators first US senator in office. I'm really happy about this to have a hem. The are I. Welcome. US Senator Ed Markey. What's up? Well The I what's up are the people of country they're up out on the streets. They're. Protesting they're standing in solidarity. With all of those who believed that black lives matter it's people up you know Donald Trump busy you are not a divider he is uniting uniting people all across our country in a way they have not been united in a generation. So people are up and that is a good news for our country because. We have an election that's right over the horizon and you can see this incredible. Incredible Uprising of people I was over in some -able two weeks ago at an incredible vigil. That was organized in the aftermath of the murder of Josh. Floyd. And there were hundreds and hundreds of people over there. And I was I I was I was glad I could be there listening to all all. Those wanted to speak about the need for us to have racial justice built into every single part of our society. So people are up in data and I'm so glad that you know the that. We're doing it. In the immediate of prelude to fumigating Donald Trump. In. His. Racist. Policies Racist Attitudes say he's a racist himself of. The in ensuring that we don't agonize, but we can is, and so that's what. People good that people are up and ready to go. It seems like it on all fronts even. Before even the black lives matter in the COVID. Just like watching AFC elected a get elected, there's been so many movements lately locally nationally. where it seems like younger people, people of Color Black people are getting more active in start really grabbed power. So it now obviously lives matter in George Floyd, and everything else that's going on Kobe seems like anything's possible. Now this is that feeling on in. In Congress as well or is. Sticking that well, no, it's. Something's happening you know There's an old buffalo springfield onto something happening here. It ain't exactly clear. I think it is clear on this. I think that we've got this incredible changed as taking place I think you know the polling that we saw in the. ABC. Opole out yesterday that suburban white women are just Getting more and more and more concerned about what Donald trump is doing to the country every time he. Doesn't even dog whistle the racial. Message anymore he just says it it absolutely not hiding anything, and so I think that we are. Potentially. Going to run the table win the presidency win the Senate. I think maybe big. Win The house with many more seats and then we'll have more people to align. With Progressive Agenda I was over at matter pan. You know ion is Congressional district runs from panel to solvable in I was over Amanda Pan was two days ago as we introduced legislation for Free Public Transit so that people can get on and off the train the buses for free we know it will increase ridership for sure but we also know that That That it's it's an impediment. To getting to the doctor or getting to their place of work for someone that only makes thirty thousand dollars a year. A transportation cost a thirty percent of their income so We held up press conference two days ago, introducing legislation and as you know, Alexandra Cossio quotas and I introduced the green new deal in February of last year and it it's great in a revolution. People are up in activated on climate change in. It's nominee of sunrise young people the partnering with Older Climate Activists A. Meeting this issue now to the top of the of the a list of issues that people are concerned with we never really had this before the green new deal was the catalyst upright proud ship with Ao see in getting that done and I'm very proud of her support. Funny. This race or the United States Senate as well. She's just an vendors and again even there. We built into the green new deal. It's only fourteen pages long but starting on page five, we just to talk about the need to put the frontline communities at the front of the line intersection -ality of we talked about how a communities of color have. Always you know had more exposure to pollutants as a result more asthmas and as a result. Very clearly over Chelsea, for example, the Aspen then make them available to the growth Iris because it's a respiratory illness. So we built all of that in to the green new deal trump in Fox and a lot of people called it socialistic when we introduced it, but it actually looks like it's A prediction. A prediction where we are today same thing by the way through the Medicare for all. Seems to. I. Am not anti-business like I'm I'm totally progressive left on issues, but like some people are anti business completely but I like small business I, think that the green new deal and Medicare for all actually helped small business in ways that aren't even talked about like especially, the green new deal that to me is like NASA like when we went to the moon, they invested in a project created all kinds of other businesses opportunities in technology it seems like the green new deal would be. A great way a powerful way to get people employed to create new businesses. I don't get why people are against creating business I mean that's another angle beyond just the public good and like you said, it makes sense 'cause that's our future here. This is this is like a a a win win. It's almost like you know I don't I don't understand the pushback against it do. Do what is the common pushback you get against the green new? Money money money from oil gas and coal companies that pours into the Republican Party pours in. Probably, the largest single. So some funding. And so you know there's a, there's an old saying tied to understand something when you're paid not to understand it. and. That's what the oil and gas industry do coal industry. They just pour all this money in all of a sudden. All of these Republicans who went divine universities can't understand science anymore just so hard to understand. What is going on in science and of course, you know their kids understand it junior. High School. But when the when the Congressman Senator Leaves for work all of a sudden, they lose any ability to be detached and analyze the threat. So that's why the army of activist coming over the hill this year and and defending. Republican Party, always events the biggest business in any fight it. So they're they're like congenitally incapable of actually backing small businesses. You are. Right. In, the effort to collapse the oil gas coal industry, we're going to have to create tens of thousands of small businesses, insulating homes installing solar win. Bending new technologies. That will be deployable to solve this problem up just to do let's just say just insulate is to. Make, more efficient every public building, every private building in and out of states that's going to be millions of people. It's going to be small businesses all across the country hiring. People to give them the skillset they need to win and have the energy consumption by fifty, seventy, five percent in all of these buildings. So so we it's a little bit like the Internet where. You can just have a cable company telephone company. Or you can just was through net neutrality which the lead sponsor of in the Senate just make sure that tens of thousands of small entrepreneurial chaotic. Economic interests can get online without having to beg for permission from the cable other telephone company so that they create the new ideas well, the same thing is going to be true in the clean energy sector in the energy efficiency sector of we'll have smaller business people who will be elevated doing all of the things we h dramatically in telescope timeframe, reduce the greenhouse gases that are endangering. Thank you senator. Covy nineteen I know you've been asking for more relief. Right now dispensing reports coming out that people in July. Thirty percent of people that had a mortgage in pay their July bill pop, or at least part of it in at thirty, six percent of renters didn't pay their July bill either. What's going to happen here is they're going to be any more relief. It seems like I I know it's not seems we know people falling between the cracks at that. Now there's at least a third of people who are struggling out there. What's going to happen? Well I. WE HAVE THE WE have to extend the unemployment benefit that six hundred bucks a week from the federal government that has to get extended. That's July thirty first such coming up in three weeks. So have to make sure that we got that part for sure. And again, Mitch McConnell is going to be resisting this absolutely, but people need money in there. But. What Bernie Sanders and Kamla Harrison I did was about six weeks ago, we introduced new legislation. And we wanted to bait it. We're saying that every individual should get two thousand dollars a month. In a couple four thousand. Also, if they have a kid, six, thousand dollars two, thousand, two, thousand, two, thousand. So have the money in their pocket to pay the rent. Money the pocket, the bay, the mortgage. We'll get date. It's not their fault or in this crisis is not their fault is getting worse. Not Better Donald trump a sci he's been criminally negligent says January and putting the protections in place and who's going to solve a will marry families are going to suffer. Regular people are going to suffer. So what Kamla in burning is saying where the three Co sponsor of this legislation is that we've got to provide cash into the pockets of everyone in the country until we get through the whole. Otherwise this going to be a catastrophic. Impact on families in a begins right with where you live don't have enough money to pay your rent your mortgage are your bill and and that's the essential. That's what it's all going to come down to in. My feeling is very strongly that is the job of the federal government. To provide the income families. it's it's like the new deal took a while Herbert we fumigate. Of Herbert Hoover because he didn't understand that. The are to help us get through the depression Now, we need to do the same thing. It just ignore Donald. Trump. So here's my hope. Michael my hope is that. These red state senators and Congress are GONNA. Come back in a panic. The the ones that six weeks or saying, Oh, it's a blue state problem. Why should we be helping right now? I think I just saw in the paper it's now up to sixty six, thousand new gazes yesterday. Predominantly in red states will be back in ten days and I'm going to be crossing over asking these Republicans. Do something need help we need help. We need people that stay home too. I mean when you're when you're like. When you're under that, it's happening in your state. We need to encourage people to stay home I mean really unless you're essential service like that's a way to do it. That's all other countries have done it. That's why they got it under control like. This totally make sense. You can't leave people behind. we have a lot of other questions to we all have a limited time. Also, I have A. Grant is our producer today. I actually want to mention it's your birthday today Senator Mark? I. Found out. He. Happy. Birthday. Thank you Michael. Appreciate it doing our show today. That's like awesome. You're working on your birthday. Yeah. I agree with you and in at seven eleven, July eleven. So I always felt good about the Piper seven eleven now in. In in in. Thank you so much. Thanks to everybody out there who has been sending best wishes today. Thank very much right. Now we got notified of that from. Canvas. Control. Commissioner. She titled She is a question that she wants us to ask we may get to that in a minute, but I also know that Grant Smith producer, we have for bree xio Dasilva. Who is with UFC w fourteen, forty, five, they're actually our sponsor. Them around cannabis workers in unionizing, but they also represent. The stop and shop workers So I was hoping to bring him in to talk to you because I know that you've been supporting the stop and shop workers. On. Hazardous raises it young. Ratio there. Be On here. We have senator Markey here as well. Do you want to sit I know you probably want to talk to Senator Mark Your thank him Yeah I I've been watching. The broadcast and the lives each year. Want to say, thank you to Santa Market for all the support he zing giving local fourteen, forty five. Over the hazard, Bay showing up at our a press conference there in south. From Nando Limaj and we appreciate him a getting in front lines of this problem is supporting our caused for our stuffing shop work in Russia workers in general he Massachusetts. A. Zeal in end up. Yeah. Michael Coupla days ago I was over there at the. At the stop and shop and we had a big press conference as. SAYING WITH With Fernando who? Is. In charge of the Union right now, which is great rally over there. All the Boston TV cameras came and would stop and shop has decided to do is to talk take away. The hazard pay. While you walk inside the market. Everyone's wearing a mask. Nine. The Meat Counter Deli. Cash Register, they're all wearing masks in coming all these people. Walk. In exposing these workers who have to be there to provide the food forest, there are essential workers we we can see now who the essential workers. In in and they deserve hazard pain. People, GonNa. Grab their bags and go home. Probably knock allow for the rest of the day. Whereas these, we're going to be there all day long being exposed to absolutely everyone who's coming in. So from my perspective I look over what mit is saying what the CDC saying which is the could be ten times as many cases out there. As. Being reported because we don't do that. We're not doing testing for everyone. And people could be walking into the diplomat gets a symptomatic. Very. Easily walking asymmetric. So the numbers you see on TV how many new cases that's the cases we tested a what about all the people we haven't tested which is. A vast majority of the seven million people in Massachusetts. So so fourteen forty five is over there protesting and I'm with them. the the the the goal that we have to have is to make sure that we're wanting and protecting those essential workers and it's unconscionable that that Stop and shop would take away. That extra bonus pay these people are risking their lives for us. They're taking the rest for themselves in their families for us, and we have a obligation to take care of them. That's why out there standing with fourteen point five in. We will be there for resale. As. I. Why Senator? So. Want talk a little bit about that scene over there at the supermarket. so When we were getting ready for the our press conference slash rally you know a lot of management came out and their wondering what are you guys? GonNa do it's big rally. We're GONNA have space, and we say we're not. We're going to do this. Just we're here to make sure that a message gets out loud and clear and make sure that the customers understand why you and your team. have decided in this case management and you know CEO's and wherever. There that while you're requiring people to come in where in a mask you at your workers are going to be losing hazard. Berry un-american. So do on July fourth by the way right you could have done this at any time. This? Week. Down the week before might have they choose the holiday on July fourth. Okay We know that regardless of offend. A lot of people come to the store to shop right and yet decide to do that on a day on they were supposed to be celebrating they decide to make a move that is so this appoint and not just because these are union members usually just workers. Are the local fourteen, forty, five members by These workers in the grocery stores who many times I've seen as less than the workers are now have this. Situation where we call them heroes all the time. But yet we don't treat them like heroes Ns Joe's unacceptable for us whether you in the union or not. But obviously stopping short workers union the very. Strong Union members, and we know that what we do here, stop and shop. We'll get replicated on an award as well, and that's what we're fighting for all workers in. Massachusetts. Not just stopping shop a grocery workers but every grocery stores in the states should be should continue to receive hazard pay and will say one last thing that when stopping shop responded on their statements, they said that this was a a bonus to say thank you to those workers due. To the high volume of customers coming into the stores this wasn't because there was a high volume of because they're working hotter these work every day they work hard every day serving communities they need to understand. This was a dangerous situation. Okay. Continues to be dangerous. This isn't just a good bonus as a matter of fact. Stephen enough for the mine at work and these work is an amount of risk that they're taking for us for my family and our communities around. Boston and the whole state. So stopping trump really we're disappointed but we're GONNA continue to to put the message out there and again thinking Senator Markey for being honest fight with us and anybody that wants to join in Make sure that these workers I actually treated like heroes and we don't call them heroes. And let me just add. That, it's the same company. that a year and a half ago was trying to break the Union. and. and and you know the most gratifying part of that was because I was there with you know with. Stop and shop in South Bay in a mall in Quincy no matter where I went. Great it was great seeing. On. Mary. People say I'M NOT GONNA shop there if you're going to hurt these workers I'm not going to shop there and so there was like this. Incredible. Coalition of custody were present workers, broke stop and shop at Brokaw and like you're saying. That then serves as an incredible model for the rest of the country. It says that if you do stand up if do fight. You can be successful. So that's why. Not, so proud to stand with. With the you'll see w fourteen, forty, five. Because you are, you really do represent the workers who are most vulnerable and the ones that need the help most, and my father was the local union leader of when I was. A kid and so it's just kind of A. A. Very inspiring. Moment, to be out there with you on those protests but also all the attention we were able to drive to it which I make. Earth, we wanted we have to explain to people. WHO. The who the essential workers who the heroes are and That is for sure all of the workers in your in your unit. So thank you for. Thank you. Thank you. Thank you. I with the on that was for breach show Selva. He's with UFC w fourteen, forty five, we love them We've been standing with stop and shop workers to is a petition right now I, think it's over like forty thousand signatures they gathered. So you can check out there we share their links all the time in our facebook group, but you can also find them on facebook UFC w fourteen, forty five you haven't signed the petition signed the petition get their hazard pay restored. It got taken away on July Fourth Mall Days. also related to the UFC W. fight. This the cannabis issue. UFC W has been represented some canvas workers at. New. England treatment access. And we've myself I write for DIG Boston as well and through the show. We've been covering some worker safety issues at net for the last couple years. And specifically, the Cannabis Control Commission doesn't seem to have the money to really investigate if started actually this week to find some of the bigger players in cannabis for a variety of reasons. But New England treatment access we've uncovered we've interviewed more than twenty of their current or past employees about mold and other health and safety issues. Serious health and safety issues has been. An investigation investigation a complaint filed. With Osha is been complaints filed with the candidates control commission nothing seems to get done and we've talked to Osha ourselves as have some of the employees in ocean seems to have the stance that they're not going to get involved. In cannabis in protecting cannabis workers because it's still federally illegal and as a US senator I'm wondering if there's anything that you can do to kind of make sure that workers are protected with some federal agencies whether it's Osha or culture I don't know which agency, but it seems like workers in the candidate space don't have as much protections and it is Kinda dangerous to grow indoors with with possible chemicals with mall. Pace up employees coming to reports COPD from Oregon, at the you know at these locations. Is there anything that you think Osha can do or that you can even speak Osha to look at specifically but even all cannabis in general Well you know. My father of worked in a factory in and and he had his up, he had his finger chopped off. You know and then he'd say at the kitchen. Table You. Know? Osha? When I when he was working in these factors, that's why you need unions. That's why you need to. Have these safety agencies that replace. But as we know. The trump administration as usual is completely wrong. You know they're they're of. They're just Refusing. To deal with the reality that marijuana should be legal. though should have standards. We have banking institutions that are in place. So it's not a cash business and people can regularize the the the business itself in a in a course. A. Department of Labor they have a Antony Scalia son is the secretary of Labor. You know it's just absolutely the most aggressive. Set of individuals ever put in place in order to deal with workers, health workers, safety By the way, my father using US another finger to talk about. The company's boss's. Anthony describe how he felt about them. So from my perspective. This is another issue that just right there on the ballot in November it's on the ballot. It it's another reason we'll move very quickly. We're very quickly in January to change these laws to make sure that there are national our productions which place but unfortunately, trump controls distraction every use of these personnel and they're of committed. To. To keeping this crazy non scientifically based analysis of marijuana of front and center in as a result of while I fight. Along with Elizabeth Warren. In order to. Protect the workers to make sure that we follow the science where we're we're constantly confronted with this obstinate obdurate opposition. From the trump administration is just again, we're coming up to only four months before the fumigate election i. hope you I hope we can vote him out I really do. Some people though I know I'm not I'm not even reading the comments Yep. I'm sure people already commenting about Joe Biden. Cannabis legalisation because you know I, I know that. Everyone. That's elected federal official in Congress. In Massachusetts, supports cannabis. We've seen it. They got you mentioned Elizabeth. Warren. Yourself. You guys vote the right way. But Joe Biden is basically saying he's not gonna be for cannabis legalization. Do you think that he he will change that or do you think that that's something he'll look at especially since so many Democrats need now seem to be supporting. Opinion Michael will have the majority of the votes. In the United States. Senate. And I know Chuck Schumer has moved in that direction. You'll be majority leader in January so I think that we have. That I think we'll have to just move it and the science has moved there with without the with say even without. I think what's going to happen on so many issues is that Congress Stimulus Response Institution, and there's nothing more stimulating to what? What's happening out there and climate change on cameras, and after this election, it's going to be pretty clear what the basis of the of the fumigation was, and that we need that we need to move on these policies in have our own have our nineteen, thirty, three, our own new deal. January wondering climate change would be a big part of that change in our country I hope people listening. Because I feel like that. But went to hear you say at the way you said it. Because I know a lot of from canvas community been medical cannabis advocate for longtime before it was legal. And I know a lot of ours cannabis community. Don't like trump but they they kinda like, Joe Biden either and they're in, they're holding back because he won't support it but I think you're so right if if if Democrats win across the board. The congress going to do it and Joe Biden is going to have to go along with it. So believe. Like a win when we when when we introduced a the green new deal Of It got pooh-poohed in so many different circles but guess what's happened since then now everyone has a green new deal. Everyone has a version of it. Every one of them is twice as much as they thought, they were going to be supporting back when AFC and introduce the a bill and because all issues go through three phases, political education, political activation, political implementation. So we're now through the political education. On climate marijuana into the activation stage and in November implementation. Win The election and then we begin to just decide the floor on on. Medicare for all green new deal marijuana of just move the country legislatively to where it already is operationally in their lives what they want to see happening I hope. So Medicare for all to is another big one but I I want to go back to the cannabis issue because. This is a commissioner title had a question for us but for you actually. And she wanted to know. If you would support if you support right now even though you're in Congress, but this could come before Congress you a Senate could come before you. But in Massachusetts right now, there is a proposal to create loan fund our tax revenue for loans for economic empowerment applicants. Would you do support that idea take money to support the disproportionately as applicants in the industry. We. In order to have their license yes. Yeah. Absolutely. You know again that's just the further. That's just another. Variation awful with the green new deal is saying about putting the frontline communities exactly which is the same exact principle and we have to be intentional. To say, yeah, we're going to create the policies to make that happen. Apparently Mauldin has done this year from all. That's actually leans from all the to you guys have something you entitled Commissioner Title. You on the actually. I don't know she's not on here right now on the call we should gotten allow I'm sure she's listening I was lifted. I wanted to speech on today I'm going to go out and take my little I, try to get five miles a day. Where am I massive XSL? I'd love to know what to meet up with her later. Yeah. So you can organize that we can definitely Organiz. I'm sure she's in the comments we'll. We'll figure that out. Thank you. Appreciate it. That's awesome. Michael Thank you. Thank you Michael. Thank you. Thank you all becky brand for organizing this thing technologically today. In My much much appreciate. Your. Your your activism progressivism. Your Voice in this is exactly what democracy should look like end up. Thank you so much. Awesome. one speed round question I. Know I gotTa. Let you go overtime I also want to ask you another question. Will you come back on the show number one and number two federal expunge -ment for just you know crimes especially canvas crimes okay. Number One. Yes. I'll come back on number two. Yeah, we did. We we criminalize. Off. Is Low. Level drug issues for too long we just cory. Booker Dr. Cory. Booker in. Cory's going to be up here in endorsing me this week in he has something called the next step. act. Which I'M HIS CO-SPONSOR ON IT which goes to this experiment issue. You know we just can't have people walking around for the rest of their lives with with something that. Should not have been a crime and so yes, the answer is absolutely Essen Cory Booker going to be talking about that this week actually I want to thank you so much. You got to everything I had on my left I had a huge list and you've got to quickly any a lot of time. It gave us extra time. I'm really happy to have you on the show. Thank you so much Senator Ed Markey I hope you enjoy the rest of your birthday. Happy Burn. Appreciate my goal and thank serving money stay safe stay distant where mass we gotta be the leaders GonNa protect the essential workers. Thank you all so much. Thank you, senator. Mike you're still on I'll remove the senator. We're still alive Mike Crawford here young jerks which spoke to center at Marquis, a first for me having the senator on the show. A quick half hour gave us a few more minutes that was good. Of Questions. I'm just looking at your comments author. Any comments anyone has anything to say about it. But I was impressed I liked Yeah I definitely liked it. I don't know. If I should even wrap it up. I mean he basically got to the health and safety he was interested in that. You could tell about the workers rights definitely is pro workers rights pro cannabis. I really liked his feedback on what will happen if the Democrats win. That they will get all of this done. This no matter what Joe Biden. Insane about cannabis legalisation I. Think I think that was a really good insight. Again. We had the jerks. My name is Mike Crawford you could find our podcast apple itunes anyway you find your podcast. If you like us a lot rate in especially review on those platforms, we're also at midnight mass dot. COM YOU COMMUN- ships to us there. But Yeah. We're on twitter now as well at the young jerks. And obviously our facebook page, you can watch us live when we are shows on facebook and twitter. And Yeah that was a really good interview I'm really happy to interview at Markey tomorrow. There is a special mask cad meeting general members meeting I will be there grant Smith will also be there a lot of our community will be there it's at Salem willows it's outside please wear mask. If you want to help the codger, you could bring some isis some refreshments in water assets. The latest news broke that Bill Bill Flynn has. Done something to the can bank account. Things are not looking good over there for Bill Flynn. A lot of going to be over there to Asheville Flint to resign from. Nascar normal for a number of reasons that we filed laid out in our recent podcasts. With the. Will See on Sunday. Hope I. Hope People Show up tomorrow Sunday at noon sale Massachusetts. I also want to thank for bree xio Dasilva for calling in from you w fourteen, forty five. He had a good call and I wanna ask our listeners our viewers to sign a petition support restoring hazard pay for stop and shop workers. I also WanNa Thank Grant Smith running the board for US tonight or today since it's new. And I especially want to thank Senator Ed Markey taking the time with us. You can find out much more information on his campaign online on twitter facebook. Also so good a website. And I WANNA thank Liz. Bach for booking it from the ED markey campaign today and I also want to thank our friend Meyer Dolan. For making the connection, she's awesome. With young jerks we will be back soon I don't know when we pop up when a whenever we feel like it. But again, if you're if you're looking to catch up and you miss anything, you know always catch us on the replay on facebook or twitter. Or on I tunes where I'd like to listen to everything. PODCAST are big. If you're walking dogs don't want to watch the video you want to catch up on everything that we do hit up. I tunes or Stitcher or wherever you find your podcast. All right. Mike Crawford I'm out of here. We will see you soon. Young. Jerks. You F C Fourteen forty five a labor union representing cannabis employees in Massachusetts currently you have. CW. Is Holding a union election at net New England treatment access in Brookline as well as mayflower if you're a cannabis employees worried about your health and safety and are not being heard at work, call the Union at UFC W. local fourteen, forty, five dot org or call them at one, eight, hundred, four, three, nine, one, four, four, five.

cannabis Ed Markey Senator Ed Markey senator Massachusetts Donald Trump Senator Ed Markey US Congress UFC Union Michael Coupla Mike Crawford Joe Biden United States Senate Boston New England Commissioner Congressman facebook
AP One Minute Headlines Feb 07 2019 15:00 (EST)

AP Radio News

02:51 min | 1 year ago

AP One Minute Headlines Feb 07 2019 15:00 (EST)

"It's always been controversial. But now pot in derivatives of it are so common. All this week news for showing you the high stakes of wheat and what's next for the drug tonight at five driving under the influence of marijuana. The news for team hits the streets with cops. We have marijuana seizures feel like almost on a daily basis on covering a startling number of drivers on drugs. Does it all impact how you before behind the wheel? I don't think those in what's being done to keep everyone safe tonight on news four at five. The of Brexit may not be certain. But one thing is clear. Your business could face serious challenges. Enterprise. Orlands wide range of supports will help you plan innovate compete on diversify speak to your enterprise Arslan development adviser or visit prepare for breakfast Dodi. An initiative of the government of Ireland thinking green, I'm Ed Donahue with an AP news minute. Democrats are calling it the green new deal. Massachusetts Senator Ed Markey says the intention to transform the economy too. Combat climate change and create thousands of jobs market pointed out climate change was not mentioned by President Trump in the state of the union addre- every reason. Trump and the deniers and the critics offer to give up is proof positive that we should push forward even harder. The aim is to eliminate carbon footprint by twenty thirty baseball hall of Famer Frank Robinson has died besides career as a player in Cincinnati in Baltimore. He was the first black manager in major league baseball. Frank Robinson said this after his final game in two thousand six managing the Washington nationals. Fifty one years. And you know, they all say it is when you take a man's his job. Stay loud enough to be fired. Frank Robinson was eighty three. I'm Ed Donahue. I'm Jay Farner, CEO of Quicken Loans, America's premier home purchase lender. We've created a new way to protect you from unpredictable interest rates are exclusive rate shield approval. I we lock your interest rate for up to ninety days. Then if rates go up your rate stays locked. But if rates go down your rate drops either way you win. Call us today at eight hundred quicken or go to rocketmortgage dot com, racial approval. Only ballot on certain thirty year fixed rate loans, all for cost information and conditions. Equal housing lender. Licensed in all fifty states last number thirty thirty additional conditions are exclusions may apply. The all new Toyota RAV four asks. What if what is your ride was refined? Rugged at the saints. Introducing a car that's got style and substance to spare the all new wrath four limited featuring a sophisticated. Muscular new exterior and available options like premium JV allowed ecosystem and panoramic roof. The y'all new raff Ford LTd, Toyota, let's go places. Jaylen clarifier registered trademarks of Harman international industries, Inc.

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Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez Releases Green New Deal Outline

NPR's Story of the Day

04:37 min | 1 year ago

Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez Releases Green New Deal Outline

"Support for this NPR podcast and the following message. Come from the UPS store, offering services from shredding to printing to mailbox ING and instead of closing this holiday. The UPS store is doing another ING altogether. Opening the UPS store every ING for small business. And of course shipping to progressive. Democrats have unveiled what they are calling the green new deal, New York congresswoman Alexandria, Cossio Cortez and Massachusetts Senator Ed Markey are advocating for an overhaul of the nation's energy sources and Connie I to closer look at the details while the chances for this plan and congress or slate the green new deal could reshape the climate change debate. Here's NPR's Daniel, Kurtz, LeBron the first thing to know about the green new deal. It's ambitious really really ambitious Ocasa Cortez told NPR that's because it needs to be even the solutions that we have considered big and bold are nowhere near. You're the scale of the actual problem that climate change presents to us to our country into the world. And so while carbon taxes are nice while things like cap, and trade are nice. It's not what's going to save the planet. The new legislation calls for a variety of measures to drastically cut carbon emissions in the process. The goal is to not just massively create jobs, but transform the economy Okasha Cortez says the aim is to get to net zero carbon emissions in ten years to do that the legislation lays out some lofty goals, for example, upgrade all buildings in the US for greater energy efficiency. Not only that. But it includes a wishlist of progressive economic policies, for example, guaranteed jobs, all of them with family and medical leave and paid vacation importantly, it's a nonbinding resolution, it wouldn't create any programs rather it's a plan for future bills that will fall under the green new deal heading any legislation that. Wants to call itself. Part of it. Green new deal agreed new deal project or greedy legislation has to meet this scope now with the resolution out there. The critiques of the plan have begun, for example, the goal of net zero emissions in ten years may not be reachable. Here's Jesse Jenkins. A post doctoral fellow at Harvard's Kennedy School where we need to be targeting really is a net zero carbon economy by about twenty fifty which itself is an enormous challenge. Twenty thirty might be a little bit early. There's virtually zero chance it will pass this congress House Democratic leadership. Seems lukewarm on the plan. Speaker Nancy Pelosi said this today, quite frankly, I hadn't seen it. But I do know that it's enthusiastic, and we welcome all the enthusiasm that are out there. In addition, the potential for massive spending is a non starter with Republicans who control the Senate Francis. Rooney Republican congressman from Florida and co chair of the bipartisan climate solutions caucus believes the Bill could be a good place to start. A conversation on climate change. Even if he doesn't like many of the particulars could go out more mouse would need to be used to figure out how to go from these concepts to something that can practically be accomplished and not destroy the economy and the job growth and all that beyond congress. The green new deal is already part of the debate in the twenty twenty presidential campaign. Here's an Iowa voter pressing democratic candidate Kamla Harris at a CNN townhall will you fully endorse? The green new deal tonight. I support a green new deal, and I will tell you why climate change is an existential threat. In addition, some proponents are hopeful that green new deal style policies could take root at the state and local level New York governor Andrew Cuomo, for example, recently put out his own version for Marquis Indo, Cossio Cortez. The Bill does one other important thing. Help them dictate the terms of the climate change conversation. We started seeing a lot of other folks saying oh well. Have a green new deal. I call lots of things agreed new deal. And so the first step that we need to do is define what the let what what green new deal legislation is as Cossio Cortez's office said the document provided to NPR they'll be working on legislation soon, which is quote important to say so someone else can't claim this mantle then you'll Kurtz, LeBron NPR news. This message comes from NPR sponsor. Comcast business. Business has always been driven by innovators. That's why Comcast business is helping you with technology that provides better experiences. Comcast business beyond fast.

Cossio Cortez NPR congress New York NPR Comcast Kurtz Senator Ed Markey New York Nancy Pelosi Senate US Jesse Jenkins doctoral fellow Massachusetts Andrew Cuomo
Are Democrats Too Scared to Impeach? (LIVE from Boston)

The Argument

41:24 min | 1 year ago

Are Democrats Too Scared to Impeach? (LIVE from Boston)

"This week, we're bringing you our live show from Boston, which we taped it. WBU ours city space. We had a great time meeting. So many of you. And now we're excited to let everyone else here this conversation. I'm Michelle Goldberg. I'm Rostow third. I'm David Leonhardt. And this is the argument this week. We're talking climate change with a special surprise guest. Your Senator Ed Markey, he helped write the two highest profile climate proposals of the last decade. Then do election results from around the world mean that liberalism is dying and finally a recommendation. I segment and we have a special guest at Marquis, he has been in congress since the bicentennial in nineteen seventy six which means he's been serving in congress for this nation's entire third century so far. And he has been a Senator since two thousand and thirteen. We have a lot to ask him about President Trump impeachment climate change, as I mentioned, and the upcoming twenty twenty campaign. Please welcome Senator Markey. Thank you for joining us. Senator. Thank you die. So haven't me obviously one thing that's on many people's minds is President Trump and the question of what congress is going to do about it. And so we want to start there with Michelle, it's so far if I'm not mistaken. You've kind of taken the Nancy Pelosi line. And I guess what I want to ask is, how Democrats can justify at this point, you know, now that Muller has stood up and basically implored congress to do its job and kind of made clear that wasn't an ex culpa Tori report that there was evidence of obstruction of Justice that he couldn't indict, but that there is a process in the constitution to hold a president to account how do Democrats justify not beginning an impeachment inquiry. So Muller said, if we had confidence that the president clearly did not commit a crime. We would have said, so what he's saying is that after compiling that four hundred page report in, I watering detail. The they were unable to say that the president did not commit a crime and he said, at the same time that according to department of Justice policy, which I may not agree with, but their policy is that they don't indict sitting presidents, so that sends it over to the congress, and I think that it is absolutely imperative for the congress to have these hearings and the more that Donald Trump says to Donald Mcgann or the hope Hicks that he doesn't want them to testify is the more he's engaging in the kind of a cover up that would make Richard Nixon blush. And so from my perspective, we must begin immediately the hearings, and if we find that he did commit crimes, then that, in fact, does beg the question of impeachment. But isn't what you're saying. Then that what we know. So. So far. What's in the report, and what's in the SDN wise filings about individual one, the manifest evidence of emoluments violations. Are you saying that, that in itself, isn't enough because to me when I hear people say that, you know, we need to find more evidence what it suggests is that what we all know Trump has done does not sell fries levels impeachment. We'll again I think the, the evidence is piling up. And I think that we need to have the public hearing. So I think the public hearings themselves will build the case citizens is that an impeachment inquiry or now, I think that it is a set of hearings that could lead to impeachment. But we have to go through that process to ensure that the public understands what the crimes were. And why in fact, they should lead to impeachment. Can I ask if you think Robert Muller has done his part of this job adequately? And since I suspect your answer will be yes. Let me elaborate a little bit. I mean, I think one of the reasons that Democrats are in this odd position of confronting an incredibly detailed report that he clearly sees it as possibly building a case for impeachment. But you're talking about having another set of hearings as a kind of intermediate step. I mean, isn't one of the reasons for that, that Muller has ended up with this kind of bizarre double negative approach to the thing that he was supposed to investigate right? Where he's out there saying, well we didn't find him not guilty. I think what he's saying is my hands are tied. I can't do anything and I point over to another institution, the United States Congress, and I say, y'all hands are not tied. But he didn't just say that he didn't say, we think there are reasons to charge the president with obstruction but we can't do it, therefore, it's Congress's hands. He said we didn't reach a conclusion, we did not reach a conclusion. In that he did not commit a crime. Right. But it's an even. It sounds like, but he's saying that because of Justice department policy, and so he strongly suggesting that the United States Congress can look at this evidence, and that they should look at this evidence in order to make a determination as to whether or not a crime was committed. And so I think that his statement is one more nudge, push towards the congress conducting the hearings that could lead to the impeachment compete. Sements now on the table. I think all three of us are a little disappointed in this aspect of Muller's work are you satisfied with more? I can't question his deference to Justice department policy because he is a career Justice department employees. In probably a part of that dick constraints him from acting in a way, that is probably more consistent with his beliefs about what Trump did it's troubling, but still understandable. But what he's saying is this still another recourse, and that's the United States Congress and he's right about that. And we should have the hearings, and they should be the kind of hearings that tipple every rock, bringing every witness not allow Trump to engage in the kind of roadblocks that he has been trying to throw up and as long as it takes we have to go there, so that the American public knows what happened in two thousand sixteen m beyond in their name. Can you imagine a scenario where an actual impeachment process, and vote would make sense? If you were certain throughout that process that it would just die in fail in the Senate. I don't know the answer to. That anymore than I know the answer to the question of what would have happened. If Alexander Butterfield did not testify that there were actual tapes. I don't know what the reaction is going to be to any information, which is put out in the public domain, by any Republican, you want me to get inside the internal workings of the cerebral mechanisms of Republican right wing. Congressman that's hard for me to do. I'm a liberal from as Jozic's so I cannot prognosticate that far ahead. I'm whenever I speak to democratic members of congress who are against starting impeachment inquiry. They make it clear that this is kind of a purely political calculation right either. They'll say the public isn't with us yet or they fear kind of the impeachment backlash that Republicans faced after they impeach Bill Clinton or else. They'll say that, you know, we ran on lowering prescription drug prices. We didn't run an impeachment, but I feel like, although it's probably true or it is true that the polls show kind of slightly more people against impeach. Than four. It doesn't this sort of, like naked political calculation make Democrats look, sort of weaken spineless. I mean, isn't there a value in leading and showing strength, and that has electoral repercussions down the line? Again, I think we need to have two hearings and out of that set of hearings all that information being made public perhaps, even taking it twenty five pages at a time in the mullahs report, so that there's a pull understanding by the American public of what is actually in there, then I think, we're in a position to make a determination in another month or two or three from now, after we've done it in an exhaustive and thorough way. But in a way that has fantas attached to it as well in terms of how these hearings were conducted. I think that's a big part of what happened with Watergate, and I think that's a big part of what didn't happen with the Clinton impeachment, and so it has to be done correctly. Ultimately, if it's going to have the credibility to then make a recommendation to in fact, impeach a sitting president of the United States of America two-thirds of the American people did not want Bill Clinton to be impeached. Right from the get-go, and it never change. They never thought that that quote unquote, high crime a misdemeanor that he was charged with actually was a high crime a misdemeanor. And so the public was saying that the whole way and they lost seats here. This is a potential high crime, that was committed and is no one who's doubting that even on the Republican side. This interference by the Russians is something that's quite a serious, and anyone who engaged in obstruction of that investigation they would be engaging in a crime. So to the extent to which the American public actually does believe that and they do right now. It's imperative for us to lay it all out. Have that case v made in a very definitive way then reach that conclusion as to whether or not it was impeachable. And whether or not we should take that step. So turn to climate at the New York Times, they're all these warnings against using the word. Unique people often use the word unique, when they mean unusual, but I think I'm on safe ground here. The copy editing. God's will not smart me down for saying you are in a unique position here. Your your journey on this has been fascinating. You have had your name on each of the two big climate policies of the last decade. So you are obviously the Marquis, and Waxman, Markey the cap and trade Bill in the Obama administration. That was very ambitious, but was also seen as somewhat moderate and technocratic. And now, you are the partner of Alexandria Oko Cortez on the green new deal, which many people see is radical. Can you talk to us about your own journey, and how you see these two pieces consistent, but also what ways in which you've changed your mind or how you think a different approach is better today than in two thousand nine I had authored from the health side. The fuel economy standard lower in two thousand and seven which President Obama used to increase fuel economy standards to fifty four point five miles per gallon, along with the California waiver, I was the author of the appliance efficiency laws that increased dramatically the, the efficiency of air conditioning and refrigeration in America. So I had worked in these areas before him. But when Obama won he said, did climate was one of his top three or four issues, Henry Waxman, and I had sat next to each other for years. We were the two most powerful Democrats on environment in the congress. So we decided to move and to move quickly in January of two thousand nine and we produce the Waxman, Markey Bill on June twenty six two thousand and nine which was in eighty three percent reduction in greenhouse gases by the year, twenty fifty it was considered a radical by the Republicans, but we were endorsed by the Edison electric institute by labor unions by every environmental group. In America, and we passed it to nine thousand nine to twelve Obama said he would sign it and it fell shot in the Senate. So it's ten years later, we're heading up to June. Twenty six twenty nine thousand nine tenth year anniversary of Waxman Markey. And I've come to the conclusion that we didn't have a huge public movement behind us. Ten years ago, but we had the inside political power now, Trump is president to denier and chief actually sits in the Oval Office. He's named a coal lobbyist run the EPA. He's named an oil love. Yes to run the department of interior. He's pulled out of the Paris agreement. He's pulled back from the fuel economy standards. He's pullback from the clean power plan for utilities and what he's done is he's created an emergency, which the United Nations says is an existential threat to our country in all of his scientists all thirteen agencies said could lead to a nine degree. Fahrenheit warming of the planet by the year twenty one hundred and so the green new deal is not just a resolution. It's a revolution. And young people millennials, this is the issue. That's their top issue, and so- congresswoman Alexandria. Oh, Cossio Cortez. And I introduced the green new deal in the first week of February. Now what's happened in fourteen weeks? It's no catapulted itself up to the very top of the issues that Democrats across the country want to have dealt with along with healthcare, and the economy. We never had that before, climate was never a top tier issue, something people cared about what it was much lower. And they are insisting that be a plan that is put together to deal with it. Every candidate now has a plan. There are calls now to have a separate climate debate amongst all Democrats. So we can lay out the plants and while Republicans might think that they're going to do a reverse take down on this issue. All I can tell you is be careful because the, the millennials who are Republicans, actually believe in climate science. So there's a split that's breaking open even within their own party. And I think it's something that is going to have very sharp political edges in twenty twenty and I believe we need the movement to get back to a point where we can legislate, as we did in two thousand nine I see a question on your face. It's less a question than as light redistribution. Maybe. But it seems like I think David was getting it this a little bit that the theory of Waxman Markey, as you said, there was lots of Republican opposition in there, obviously was that was what doomed it? But it came at a moment when prior to the financial crisis prior to two thousand and eight there had been a certain amount of elite, Republican support for. A cap and trade carbon tax kind of approach, you had John. Mccain, supporting it at least notionally you had Newt Gingrich famously sharing a couch with Nancy Pelosi advertisements series about climate change. And I think there was a sense at that moment that it was possible to have a kind of center, left meet center, right response to climate change, and that failed. And now it seems like the political theory is grassroots mobilization from the left that eventually pulls the center along. So it's a different approach. And I guess, to bring that redistribution to a question part of that different approach has been an attempt to essentially wrap the entire progressive agenda in to climate policy. Right. I mean, the green new deal insists that basically everything on the democratic wishlist from minimum wage laws to Medicare for all. And so on is all part of the. Response to climate change. How do you see that playing as a political matter? Well, there was a coke brother study of degree new deal that came out and said, oh, it's Medicare for all. Oh, it's free college education. Oh, it's going to cost ninety three trillion dollars, of course. Medicare for all is not in the green new deal. And neither is free college education in degree, nude not in there not mentioned. But the Republicans have done a very good job in trying to characterize it that way, but it's not actually in the green new deal. So we call for a mobilization heading towards one hundred percent clean renewable energy. We call for massive job creation. We call for ensuring that marginalized communities communities of color included in this new deal in a way that they weren't in the first new deal. And what we did was we took Franklin Delano Roosevelt's nine thousand nine hundred eighty four state of the union address where he laid. Out a second Bill of rights in this is the language that he used in this is the language. We use that everyone is entitled to health care, everyone's entitled to a good education. Everyone's entitled to good job, everyone's entitled to a living wage that they can take care of their families, and even take them on vacation. Right. Right. That's bigger than Medicare for all. Yes. Everyone does have a right to healthcare in a job and a good education, but we don't call for prescriptively what the policies are going to be to accomplish those goals other than that, that has to be the goal for our country and it should be the goal for our country. Can you see something in response to you really quick? Absolutely. Wait. So we're going to talk in a minute about the rumored death of liberalism around the world, right? And one of the examples of that, that you Rosner colleague Brad Stevens. Sometimes give for this is how embattled Emmanuel Macron is in France. You have these yellow vest protests in part, because people are very angry about these new carbon taxes, but part of the reason that people are so angry about these new carbon taxes, because they haven't been offset by other new social spending. Right. So if you were going to kind of demand that people, make the sorts of sacrifices that, I think most people who studied this issue believe are necessary to kind of decarbonised economy, then it is politically impossible, as you yourself, acknowledge when you talk about how Macron is failing, if you don't backstop it with new social programs. So two points. I mean, the first is that, that larger question is another example of how the political climate has changed since Waxman Markey. Right. That. In two thousand and eight it was possible to say that the US was this outlier in global politics in terms of having like actual political opposition to climate change legislation, and as we see in Europe and Australia, that's no longer the case. So that's another big shift. You know, one of the things that I've said favorably about the green new deal. Right. Is that there is a side of it? That is more plausible more politically plausible than just doing a carbon tax and figuring out some complicated rebate scheme. So it doesn't necessarily fall, too heavily on the working class. I think the side of the green new deal that is sort of plausible is the accent, which suggests a kind of populist center for climate change action where you basically say, we're not going to tax you. We're just going to spend hell of a lot of money on research, mitigation, clean energy transformation, and so on. And we're going to figure out a way to spend it in red states and make it sort of jobs. Graham for the heartland, and all of that kind of stuff and I'd be like that, at least points to a different center. But I don't think you can get there. And again, I'm curious what the Senator thinks if it's just seen as full. Oh. Cossio courtesan socialism, on the March, right socialism, on the March social democracy island. By the way, it's been a caricature. It's just terrorists. Your hand along hundred year March from the first day that the oil companies one hundred years ago, got their tax breaks from the congress. Okay. And for one hundred years, but on the long March all companies gas companies coal companies nuclear companies huge subsidies from the federal government, then we show up and we say how about permanent tax breaks for wind. For solar for battery storage technologies all electric. Vehicles, roll electric buildings and they say socialism, and so what we say is, hey. Socialism. We'll show you how to make capitalism work. We see an existential threat to the planet from climate change the words of the UN they see an existential threat to the business model of the oil gas and coal industry gate. That's all it is. Give us the same breaks k keep the fuel economy standards on the books and increase them increase the building officiency standards for our country the way I did with appliances. Okay. Watch what happens I will move in within five to ten years and cut the cost of actually having to construct a new building that has forty fifty sixty percent less energy that is being consumed. Let's create a capitalistic marketplace through the policies, which just say to the private sector, we're getting out of the way now and I am the author of most of the telecom lost the nineteen Ninety-six communications act. I unleash that I'm the democratic author of that a trillion and a half dollars a private. Sector cash went into that, that created a dotcom bubble but it created a broadband revolution. The same thing is true over here. If we create the correct tax and regulatory policies it's going to be, ultimately a bonanza for private sector companies to say, look at that wind solar automotive building agricultural sector, that we can now move into and completely overhauled. It's been stopped for generation. But don't you think that honestly, if we get that kind of strong AI and you tell it to solve climate change? It'll just exterminate us all Terminator style, aren't you concerned about that, there can I say this, there is a sinister side too? You know, there's a Dickensian quality to all of these technologies that can enable an noble or degrade in the base. And if we're not careful you know, we're not going to actually put in place to protections against sinister side of. Join thank you. Thanks. Hi, I'm Sam sifting founding editor of NY cooking. And we're in my kitchen right now where I'm making dinner, one of the great things about testing recipes our selves, is that we do a lot in home kitchens. Cooking a home kitchen means cooking in the same kind of kitchen. Our users cooking using restaurant. Stoves we're using rental apartments, stoves and family stoves. And that's really important when you're doing the kind of work that I do which involves talking to a lot of chefs about the food that they prepare and then trying to figure out how to make that food, tastes the way it does in the restaurant. But at home using methods of the home cook and recipes for the home cooked to be written differently. Come. See us at cooking dot com. Sign up for newsletter. Start saving recipes and above all cook with us. I think you'll find it worth you want. That's a great sound at the end. The smells good too. In India, the populist, nationalist, prime minister Rendra Mody has just won reelection in a route in Australia. The conservative prime minister defied the polls and one reelection in Europe far right? Parties made gains winning the most votes in both Britain, and Italy. And here in the United States, Donald Trump is enjoying a decent few months. The mullahs report wasn't as bad for him as expected, and the economy is chugging along our times, colleague Brad Stevens. One of Ross's, fellow conservatives recently summed up all of these developments in a column headlined, how Trump wins next year so Ross, what is going on here. I'm not going to channel Brett exactly. Because brat wrote a column arguing that these global development portended Trump reelection and I'm a little more skeptical of that. But I think that they're suggestive. Of something that goes to something we've debated a lot on the show, which is the question of how unfair is it that liberalism is basically out of power in America right now. Obviously, the electoral college, help Republicans in the last election. And we've debated at length, the possibly anti-democratic character of the supreme court, and there's this larger narrative in especially elite liberalism, but not only liberalism right now that the Republican majority is not really majority, that there is this sort of, you know, this tacit democratic majorities majority. Right. Well, it's a majority of the Senate and house, but it's not a majority of the people. That's right. That's the point right? Yes. That's, that's the argument. And what I was suggesting was that? It's obviously true that the Republican party in the US has benefited from these sort of counter majoritarian setups in the last couple years. But the fact that populace and nationalists, are doing well comprehensively in Europe and Australia. And also in the very different, but related landscapes of India, and Brazil, and elsewhere suggests the possibility that in effect. Donald Trump is kind of propping American liberalism up in this weird way. That, yes, he's benefited from the electoral college, and all these things, but liberalism has benefited from the fact that populism in the US is embodied by a figure like Trump, who's a cartoonish character who can't seem to do outreach can't seem to build beyond his base, and that we have examples all over the world now of populist, nationalist political figures, who see more successful than Trump, who seem capable of winning without the electoral college without Fox News and all these things, and that suggests that there's this very potent what I think of as a kind of right wing blocking coalition against liberalism, that doesn't have a clear governing agenda of its own, but it's very clear that it's against liberalism. And that liberals in the US are lucky that, that coalition. In this country is led by Trump instead of an American Netanyahu. So that was my attempt at a provocation that you guys can now be provoked by, so it's too bad that the Brett isn't here because his column was the one that made me like truly up aplastic, because the argument is basically that kind of right wing populism is on the March and liberals haven't been able to stop it, because they are too radical because they haven't embraced centrists, like Bill Clinton or Tony, Blair. And I think the evidence from around the world shows that that is not the case. Right. If you look India's a country where I've spent a lot of time, not recently, but in the past, I mean, it's just it's crazy to think that the reaction against the Gandhi family, which is the descendants of our whole never the kind of founding political family of that country. Right. The Pitta me of that establishment to imagine. That their sin was land of left-wing overreach as opposed to establish -ment sclerosis. And so I do think that there is this crisis of liberalism, all over the world. Personally terrifying to me, you know, I look around sometimes I don't know if if you watch man in the high castle, but it sometimes feels like that. Right. We're like the I roll play it the. The. But Nevertheless, I also think that the places where there has been successful pushback to this. One of the reasons why I've become a lot more grateful for people to my left is because there's a reason why people using the phrase, socialism or barbarism, right? That the people who've been successful in pushing back against this wave are insurgent socialists with emission, right? So Spain has so far held off this wave. It's patchy, but the evidence so far suggests not that the way to stem the tide of this roiling disaffection with mcgarity, which is clearly very real. And this like roiling rage about inequality, the way to do that is not to sort of, like triangulate around the party of votes, but is to meet it with some sort of, and I don't think we quite know what. What this looks like. And as I say this, I'm going to say that Britain is a counter example of left-wing populism, that's failed. But some sort of modern left wing populism. Roiling discontent with modernity, by the way, was that of my that was my stop and high school. I realized that I've spent a lot of time talking about what I think are the tactical mistakes that progressivism has made in his making, but I don't know what you think the Tacoma sticks, so you just got close to it. But I'm curious what do you think in this country coming back to this country? What do you think the Democratic Party should do differently over the next few years than it's done over the last few years to do better politically, I don't know about tactics, but I'd say, like, in terms of broad orientated, and I think that the kind of generation of Democrats before this one were traumatized by series of elections, in which they felt like they ran candidates like McGovern and then were eviscerated in the lesson. They took from that was that you have to pivot to the center, and the way that they interpreted pivoting to the center in this also it's something to do with the decline of union power into sort of needing new sources of campaign cash, but they defined pivoting to the center as kind of pivoting to the. Center on economics. Right is becoming more economically conservative, as becoming more hostile to the welfare state more indulgent of finance, capitalism, more indulgent of a sturdy and to me that was the mistake because I think that there is a type of person who exists in New York and Washington, maybe in Boston almost nowhere else who's like socially liberal, and economically conservative. And they have an outsized impact on political discussion. But if you look at polling they're almost non-existent in the populace at large. And so I think that if the Democratic Party had been listening to your other Senator Elizabeth Warren back when she was talking about the horrors of the bankruptcy, Bill back when she was warning about the imminent financial crisis. The party would be in much better shape. So I think that's actually an issue where the three of us tend to be on the same page whatever. Our view. Use of where either party should go. We have a shared sense that the sort of Blairite neoliberal model, whatever it's possible virtues in the past doesn't work at the current moment. There's, there's a sense in which clearly, there has to be some different coalition forces in liberalism in order to respond to this kind of backlash against liberal governance. Right. And that could mean moving left on certain issues. Right. It could mean moving well to the left. But if it means moving to the left on everything it's not likely to work, and I think my, my frustration and of course, I'm a conservative. So I don't really wish liberalism. Well, so maybe it's not a frustration. But Mike, pseudo frustration with liberalism at this moment, is that it was encapsulated by the questions that I asked David to ask, when we had him as a guest on the argument, which was basically Buddha's edge has pitched his. Campaign as hi. I'm a guy from the heartland who went to the coasts and became a coastal person. But then went back to the mid west and became a mid westerner again. And I'm going to build these bridges between Trump voters and the boss wash. Elite and David says, well are there any cultural issues ranging from, you know, bakers baking cakes for same sex? Weddings to guns to immigration. Is there anything where you can see room for compromise with cultural conservatives and his answer was, basically? No, because either the principle at stake is too big or the country agrees with us already and that can't be Liberalism's answer on everything. Right. Like, if climate change is the existentialist threat of our time. Why are you spending your time trying to close down Catholic adoption agencies because they don't wanna place kids when same sex, couples alternatively, if crushing social, conservatism and destroying Gilead. And whatever case you wanna make their if that's the central purpose of liberalism. Then you may be. Can't also do the green new deal. But no, liberal conceives their purpose as crushing social conservatism. Right. I mean, that's the sort of Leno liberal. I mean except me, but. Completely false choice. Right. Just as I could never say to you. You know, if you actually think that abortion is murder. Why are you spending your time on any other kind of economic or foreign policy issue? You're spending, all of your time outside of abortion clinics. Obviously, people are going to address a host of different problems. But I would I will say, I would happily sell out my fellow conservatives on sixteen other issues. If doing so would persuade you Michelle Goldberg to support even third trimester abortion restrictions. But do you actually think that saying that, like, okay we're going to let you government funded adoption agencies refused to place children with gay couples and Jews and Muslims for that matter because that's also part of the package? Do you actually think that kind of allowing that, even if it were good tactically DEA is going to make conservatives more likely to join a coalition on global warming? And because from where I sit it seems like when you. Give the right an inch. They take a mile speaking, only for cultural conservatives, I don't think the sense among cultural conservatives is that we've been taking any miles lately, although obviously that sort of changed with the sense of the supreme court, having shifted and you've gotten these efforts on abortion in the south, but in general the dominant mood among cultural conservatives in the last ten years has been sort of a panic sense that cultural liberalism now gets to do whatever it wants. And I don't think I don't say the activists are going to suddenly start voting democratic I think the way that political coalitions move inspires mobilization in response. And right now liberalism inspires, mobilization among a lot of different groups that add up at present across the developed world and the developing world to a pretty strong anti liberal coalition. And you at least have to figure out how to d mobilize some portion of this conservative coalition for lib. Eliza to be able to govern. But just looking internationally I think, just shows the extent to which it's not about, you know, sort of parochial, American culture wars shoes. Right. I've come more and more around the way of thinking of Corey, Robin, who's a professor. Who basically talks about conservatism is simply anti-liberalism, right. It's not it's own coherent philosophy. It's just a movement against the gains of the left. And I think that when you look around the world that has a lot of credence, right? Because they're not fighting about abortion in India, all of these different issues. They're fighting about kind of Hindu identity, and this myth that there's some kind of what they call the love t hod that Muslims are trying to marry Hindu women and take them away from their culture. I don't see any sense if you look around the world that if whoever you take to be liberals and each of these different societies said, I'm willing to compromise with you, that it would be demobilizing. To these nationalist coalitions that are on the March. And in part, I think it's because this sense of aggrieved victimhood, which is common to all of them is not rooted in anything real. I mean it's except for the back Catholic adoption agency, or Jewish family wants to adopt a baby and the only one in your town doesn't want to give it to you, because you have the religion. But this sense of kind of singular agreement right, that you just said that liberals have everything, and they're just going to kind of run roughshod over us because all we've got is the presidency, the Senate. This court is. It's a license for them, I think, to kind of do anything because when you're cornered any measure justified, but a I don't think it's legitimate, and I don't think it just seems silly to kind of ask liberals to treat it as if it's legitimate, and therefore to sign kind of indulge it in the hopes that they will then become a little less panicked. And defensive and a little more willing to work on some sort of common purpose. I think we're all set earlier is right. I do think even though we we're in very different places in the world. We wanna see. I think all of us, share this sense that the notion of where the American Center is has been wrong in a lot of elite discussion, and I would encourage all of you, if you disagree with that to kind of take a look at polls, because it really is true that this notion that Michelle was talking about of the economic of the social liberal, economic conservative is a phenomenon of Brookline. Or scarsdale or or San Mateo. And it really the social conservatives and economic progressives are much more common in the United States than the flip. So each week we give you a recommendation to end the show, something to take your mind off of politics and something to get the three of us to stop fighting with each other. And this week is my turn. My recommendation is to retain your regional loyalty from childhood, no matter how thin a string of loyalty it is, I lived in Boston from, when I was two to when I was eight otherwise I'm New Yorker. I was born there in the third generation New Yorker but those are the formative years for sports. And so I adopted the Boston sports teams all of them. And then went back to New York and spent the nineteen eighties completely miserable. With the one exception of the Boston Celtics, I had to go to high school in New York City, the day after game six of the nineteen Eighty-six World Series. I endured all kinds of misery and it was all worth it in the end because no city in modern times has enjoyed a run like Boston is now enjoying the Bruins are now in the Stanley Cup finals. And so, even if you're not a sports fan, even if it's just keeping a little bit of the foods of a place where you lived for a few years, or it's remembering a hiking trail, in a place where you were I strongly recommend this, because being a kid is really fun. And having any reason to be reminded of that you once for six, and you are not always forty six is a wonderful thing. So that is my recommendation. Sort of shameless of peel sympathies. Don't don't you think? That's our show for this week. Thank you. Senator Markey for joining us. And thank you to all of you, tonight's show is produced by Alex, Laughlin and edited by lacy Roberts for transmitter media. We had help from Phoebe, let, Ian Persad, Philbrick, Winton Wong and Tyson Evans. Our executive producer is Gretta Cohn. Our music, which you're listening to now is, by Allison Leyton Brown. Thank you, WB are for hosting us and to all of you for joining. Obviously, the dream of all social conservatives is a return to a climate of perfect chastity.

United States Congress Donald Trump Senator Ed Markey United States president Senate David Leonhardt Boston Bill Clinton Robert Muller Senator Michelle Goldberg Nancy Pelosi Michelle India Medicare New York City
Sen. Markey And Rep. Kennedy Struggle To Differentiate Themselves In Senate Debate

Radio Boston

10:09 min | Last week

Sen. Markey And Rep. Kennedy Struggle To Differentiate Themselves In Senate Debate

"Voters have little more than a month before the September first primaries and Senator Ed Markey and representative Joe Kennedy continued a struggle to differentiate themselves in a race for the US Senate seat. That market currently holds the two squared off last night in the latest democratic debate, and though sparks did fly. It's not clear whether that's GONNA be enough to start any fires for either candidate with Democratic primary voters who may still be undecided, so join us to talk about the state of the races wbz our senior political reporter Anthony Brooks Anthony Welcome. It's Yana. So if you've covered lots of campaigns, how would you describe the mood and tone of this primary right now? Well. I guess you know a couple of ways to answer that. If you talk about the sort of energy in the debate, it's getting pretty angry. But you know I've been saying from the beginning that this is a tough race Massachusetts Democrats to process because you know despite all the heat in these debates and there was surely some heat last night marking. Kennedy agree on just about every major issue so. Do you give credit to market for being one of Washington's most consistent progressives if you do. Why do you throw him out of office? Or do you buy Kennedy's argument that Markey's part of this old system that got us to where we are today, and it's time for new leadership and Kennedy's a guy who kind of looks like new leadership, and and he's a Kennedy, but come back with this idea at the end of the day. There aren't like some huge defining political issue around policy that separates them not at all, so it's a it's a confusing race I think. Is Interesting. Let's talk a little bit about where they trying to land blows. The Boston Globe is out with a new report today. Analyzing Markey's travel records, which was something he had promised to put out in the last debate. It find. He spends less time in Massachusetts than the rest of the delegation. It really struck out to me that in two thousand seventeen. He spent just seventy seven nights in his home state. How is he responding to these accusations into this data? Yeah I mean this analysis from the globe of these travel records is interesting. You mentioned the fact there. That's important. You know. I would put it this way, so from January two thousand seventeen through this past spring. That's a two and a half year period marquis spent less than a third of his time. It is mauled and home the rest the time he was living in Chevy Chase Maryland so at a campaign event in Med for just today. I asked Marquis about this. And he defended all that time out of state, and said he sought to balance the time between Washington and Massachusetts. Here's a bit of what he said I've. Managed this balance between Washington and a Massachusetts throughout the years and Obviously? I do so in a partnership with all of these local officials and I think ultimately the question is going to be. Did I deliver? Then I stand up and fight for in deliver for these communities, and I have done that over. and. DC we should mention that that Marquis was speaking there. In Medford where a bunch of local officials including the mayor of Medford the state senator there gave him credit for among other things, securing hundreds of millions of dollars in federal spending for the Green. Line extension. So this is the kind of thing that marquee talks about. That, he's not only leading. He's delivering and that that was part of his defense today. But this is a place where Kennedy is going after him trying to distinguish himself. Is that right? Now. It's absolutely a place where he's where he's doing that. You heard it in the debate last night. You know Kennedy is accusing Marquis of absentee leadership, and and he's saying that it's important to be here in the state and. I, think by releasing these travel records. It's just going to give Kennedy more fuel to pound away on this issue here. He is speaking at the debate last night. I want around the country trying to. Campaign for other Democrats that we could re regain control and passive. Aggressive Agenda said Marquis by his own campaign to mission nowhere. But he wasn't at home. either. You Talk to folks around Western. Massachusetts you talk to folks across communities like Roxbury Dorchester and Madison and Springfield and Worcester and he wasn't there. There is so much more that needed at this moment than just somebody that files the right bill and says that that's enough so Kennedy. Later in that debate said we need to have elected officials who are in fact hearing the concerns across our Commonwealth and advocating for those voices and his claim. Is that by spending so much time out of state marquis isn't doing that. So. We said we were going to try to sort of Ella Street. The blows they're both trying to land, so what blows US market trying to land? How Painting Righty? Yeah well, Markey's main pitch that he has a long record of successful progressive leadership, and this goes way back way back to the nuclear freeze movement in the one thousand nine hundred eighty s more recently, he sponsored Medicare for all in the green new deal with Alexandria causing a cortes, he's pushed for net neutrality and Lgbtq rights, and his main case against Kennedy is that the congressman doesn't have. Have a credible record as a progressive that he's shifted positions over time. For example he points out that after Kennedy graduated from law school. He went to work for Cape and Islands District Attorney Michael O'Keefe a tough law and order conservative and there have been other policies that Kennedy has shifted his stance on and market asked the question last night in the debate you know was this political convenience you know, or was it conviction, and obviously his suggestion is that it's political convenience so that he can you know the so that he can get into the Senate. I don't think that the stakes are low here, but as you talk about them, trying to distinguish themselves from each other I think about when I was in academia, there was a saying that the battles are so fierce because the stakes are so low and I. do find you talking about this battle over. Who's more progressive when they hold similar. Policies is one of them more progressive than the other. Well, it depends who you talk to, so it's interesting I mean if you say they're both progressives and I've said this in my. I got absolutely hammered on twitter by Marquis. Supporters. Who you know basically say it's just absolutely absurd to call Kennedy a progressive because of of his past some of his past positions, and because Marquis. Does deserve this reputation as a solid consistent progressive advocate in Washington for decades. Now that said there are places that actually measure. There's a website I'm blanking on the name, but actually scores progressive votes in Congress and Markey got like a ninety eight percent score, and Kennedy got a ninety seven percent score, so in of how they vote and the issues they support. They're very very similar, but I think it is fair to say that you know. Mark He's been in office since before. Kennedy was even born. He's been in Washington since before Kennedy was even born. He has a much longer record as a progressive I think you can say that without without getting much debate so that that's but again on the issues. There's there's not a dime. WITH BETWEEN THEM! So then we've got gotta turn to the differentiation that we can see I'm asking thinking. Polling numbers fundraising numbers according to that stuff? Where does the race stand right now? Well? When Kennedy jumped into this race, he jumped out according to the polls with a with a pretty sizable lead in a lot of that had to do with just because how well Kennedy's name polls in this in this state. You know if you're young. If you're handsome and your name, Kennedy, you're GonNa pull better than just about anyone in the state, but as the race went on that. Difference tightened in the last poll, which is still months ago before the pandemic showed that it had tightened quite a bit. So we don't have recent polling numbers, my guess is it's close. In terms of the fundraising numbers marquee might even have a slight edge the market people are very happy with the latest. Quarter that not only showed them raising a lot of money, but lots of donations and small amounts of donations, but they're basically tied in terms of their fundraising marquee had a slight edge. Now Marquis is out with his first ad in the race, and it's a clear response to Kennedy's attacks because he really plays up his Mauldin routes and service to the community. We can listen to a little bit of that if you want. This is where I'm. My father was a Milkman. I drove an ice cream truck to pay for college lessons I learned here. Still drive me today. Don't be scared of the tough fights. That's why I was an original sponsor of Medicare from all. The why? I wrote the green new deal to fight climate change. Remember where you come from. Stand up the People County in always be a leader in the fight for justice. Now TC on. Of course you can't see the ad, but among other things you see. Market walking through the gritty streets of Maldon his sleeves are rolled up. He's wearing his Air Jordans which is a very mauldin kind of thing. And the AD makes the point that not only this is where he's from, but how different his blue collar backgrounds from Kennedy's world of privilege, but but in a campaign between two people agree on most major issues you know Kennedy is hoping to convince voters that by spending so much time away from Massachusetts Marquis. Yes, he's the son of a Milkman, but he's also become a creature of Washington, so we'll see if that sticks, but that's clearly. What Kennedy is hoping to do here. Well. We'll keep watching it with you. That's WBU, our senior political reporter Anthony Brooks thanks a lot anthony. My pleasure, t shown.

Joe Kennedy Marquis Massachusetts Washington Senator Ed Markey Mark He Anthony Brooks US Senate reporter sparks Medicare Boston Medford Chevy Chase Maryland representative mauldin Cape and Islands Maldon
Yes, tech is changing everything. A new book might encourage you to embrace that change.

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

09:16 min | 6 months ago

Yes, tech is changing everything. A new book might encourage you to embrace that change.

"The tech is changing everything but a new book says. Don't fear it embrace it from American public media. This is marketplace tech can demystifying the digital economy. I'm Ali would now I get that. We're in a moment right now. Where we're sort of mad at technology our phones are sucking up all our time in data our social media platforms arms are spreading misinformation and divisive arguments? There are privacy and ethical dilemmas around every corner but there are those who still believe that tech innovation will will ultimately changed our lives for the better. Peter de Amandus is founder of the X Prize and co-founder of Singularity University. He's also CO author of a new book called. The future is faster than you think. How converging technologies are transforming business industries and our lives? He told me yes. We are worried but but there are good things on the horizon. People are fearful about the future because they don't understand what's coming and the rate of change is accelerating waiting so if you're a mom or dad thinking about what career your kids should have where they should go to school. Should they go to college. Is that. It's still gonNA be a thing if you don't have a clear understanding of the road ahead It causes fear so a lot of what the future is faster than you think is about giving people view of what's coming the next ten years and without understanding the realization that the world is getting better on so many levels. It's a book about hope. It's a book about you know what you might consider doing next and the tools we have to change the world. Do you think this skepticism is inevitable and just kind of part of the process of innovation or do you ever think this fear could become a real blocker. Some of this fear is warranted warranted right. We had soon dr the CEO off of Alphabet. Just come out and saying we should start regulating a I and you know the challenges overregulation leads to people just leaving the country and going someplace else. There needs to be some level of voluntary coordination between the researchers and leaders who set their goals and the government plays a very critical role in that. But when you look at the data Lotta people. Their gut tells them the world is getting worse. Because as as we evolved looking for danger saved our lives and so we evolved part of our brain quality Magdala that scans everything you see everything you hear for negative news and we pay ten times more attention to negative news and positive news but the world. The positive news is extraordinary out there. It's just hard to get to it. What are the things thank you know? Let's talk about convergence where you talk about some key technologies coming together to really create the conditions for this great leap forward. What are the the drivers of those but more importantly what are the hindrances? It used to be that if you were a entrepreneurial leader Tech Geek whatever it might be having access to one. Technology was good enough. But S- longer the case. It's really were two three four five. Exponential technologies are coming together and changing business models. So so when there's plenty of money flowing economy which there is right now at record levels people's crazy ideas get funded. And that's where breakthroughs right the day before something is truly a breakthrough it's a crazy idea and then regulation has to balance it. I want to ask you about climate which is addressed in the book and I wonder even since the time that you wrote it it. Do you think that there is. There's an x prize for water conservation. Do you think there's also a place for technology to really really start looking for solutions. Adaptation like beyond mitigation beyond planting. Three billion trees is their technology. The well but survive inevitable climate change. Climate change is coming. We've done a doozy on the climate and we have to understand that every technology brings it challenges. The X. Prize is gearing up for a series of of climate related expert Besides a trillion trees x prize. We're looking at our largest largest prize. Ever north one hundred million dollar purse being on technology that it can extract co two from the atmosphere at scale. We also have technologies that are pulling. Co Two smokestacks of natural gas power plants. Coal power plants entering them into products. That are more valuable than the cost of extracting them and But how do we reverse the process. How do we change it? I mean there's a interesting equivalent story aury from one hundred years ago back in the late. Eighteen ninety s and early nineteen hundreds when people are moving from the rural areas to urban downtown town Chicago and New York and Detroit and so forth. They brought within their motive force. The horse to get around and the populations of horses in these cities were skyrocketing and so was the amount of horse manure articles written talking about you know the devastation from disease and horse manure and the technology analogy that saved us from. That was the automobile which came in and saw this precipitous drop in horses. But it's also the technology that gave Davis anew problem and I for one see the ability of solar primarily solar and wind other renewables truly transform from our our energy economy were different parks world. Right now we're below two cents per kilowatt hour the potential to be below a penny per kilowatt hour this decade. Okay one hundred percent there. I think there's no question we'll get there and it's beautiful. Is that the. The poorest countries in the world are the sunniest countries in the world. Is there this is like a good place to ask. If there are things you think we shouldn't do technologically. I know that is not your bailiwick but do you ever think this is where we should stop. Yeah so I do think about that. I have two eight year old boys that are growing up in this extraordinary world. And they're growing up with the ability you to ask any question on the cloud and imagine VR worlds and play in those viewer worlds. And it'll when asked the question. What should we you do that? It's valid question the challenges. I don't think there's any rate limiter on this game. I don't think there's any circuit breakers. I think you know if we tell someone do this. Don't go into this realm of work. It's illegal here in the US. There's nothing to keep those individuals from taking their technology their knowledge and going someplace else a used to be that only a few countries could support the processing capabilities in the manufacturing capabilities to move us towards this technological explosion. But that's totally de materialized demonetized democratized around the world so it's far more important than society. We understand what's coming again the purpose of this book and learn how to think about it it and deal with it. And how do we really become agile in. How do we learn how to mitigate downside aside and maximize the upside Peter Demand is is the CO author of the future is faster than you think? It's the third book in what is called the exponential toll mindset trilogy and now for some related links thanks related to the other side of the argument. There was a big New York Times story and lots of follow ups last week about a company called clearview a I. It's a facial recognition startup that scraped millions of images of well lots of us from facebook instagram Youtube. Basically anywhere on the web. Where photos were publicly available available and then clear view? Ai Put our pictures and a giant database and it sells access to law enforcement across the country since that story and the ones is that followed. Senator Ed Markey of Massachusetts has sent a letter to clear by asking you to clarify its security policies. Explain how it handles images of children in and whether the company lets people delete their images from its databases among many other questions and there is plenty of other blowback to a Class Action Action Lawsuit in Illinois that also includes. Ibm a cease and desist from twitter. New Jersey Band it's police department from using it and Mit Tech Review reported yesterday. That forty organizations have now signed onto a public letter calling for a moratorium on the use of facial recognition technology in the US. Altogether I'm Ali would and that's marketplace tech. This is A._p._N..

X Prize Ali US Singularity University Senator Ed Markey Peter de Amandus Mit Tech Review New York Times Illinois Ibm co-founder facebook CEO founder twitter Massachusetts
Several coaches fired over college admissions scandal

The Daily 202's Big Idea

08:04 min | 1 year ago

Several coaches fired over college admissions scandal

"The daily to itunes big ideas. Sponsored by Cleveland Clinic ranked number one in the nation in heart care twenty four years in a row, according to US news and World Report for information on the complex cases treated at Cleveland Clinic, or to get a second opinion. Visit Cleveland Clinic dot org slash heart care. Good morning. I'm James Holman from the Washington Post, and this is the daily to two for Wednesday March thirteen in today's news, the FAA refuses to ground the type of Boeing aircraft that went down in Ethiopia. The White House has a secret plan to stop the Senate from passing its resolution of disapproval in Barack Obama's administration really dropped the ball on the federal crisis. But first the big idea the system was rigged fifty people including actress, Felicity Huffman and Laurie Laughlin were charged yesterday with allegedly participating in a multi-million dollar scheme to get their children admitted to precipitous colleges. The allegations include cheating on entrance exams, and bribing college officials to say certain students where athletic recruits when those students were not in fact athletes at all numerous schools were targeted including Georgetown, Yale Stanford. The university of Texas and the university of southern California in Boston US attorney Andrew Ellen called it the largest ever college admission scam prosecuted by the Justice department of the fifty people charged in what the FBI called operation varsity, blues thirty-three were parents. The feds warned that the investigation is ongoing and others could still be charged the scheme's main architect, William singer pleaded guilty and. Has been cooperating with investigators since September officials described singer as a well-connected college admissions adviser, and so he disguised the bribery scheme. As a charity, enabling parents to deduct the bribes from their taxes singer was charged with taking about twenty five million bucks from twenty eleven to two thousand eighteen you some of the money to pay college coaches and standardized testing officials for their help he pocketed the rest. The complaint lays out how singer guaranteed admission to his wealthy clients for set prices and the transcript of one recorded conversation singer tells the father that he can get his daughter a score on the in the thirties and on the SAT's in the fourteen hundreds if he pays seventy five thousand dollars and another tape conversation, he assures apparent that. His daughter can apply to university as a water polo player. Even though she doesn't know how to play water polo the price for that was fifty thousand singer pleaded guilty Tuesday to conspiracy charges for racketeering, money laundering, and obstruction of Justice. Prosecutors say that a month. After he came to the government side singer tipped off several people who are under investigation about the inquiry, which is what earned him that obstruction charge. After the charges were unveiled several of the implicated, college coaches were fired or put on leave Stanford fired its head sailing coach after he agreed to plead guilty as part of the case. Prosecutors also charged Georgetown's former head tennis coach he had moved onto Rhode Island. Authorities say he made nine hundred fifty thousand dollars promoting several students as potential tennis recruits when they didn't even know how to play tennis. Some of the money was allegedly directed to a US department official in the water polo coach there USC said last night. Both have been fired beat. It's a sad reminder that America, despite the myths we so often tell ourselves is not quite the meritocracy that you, and I want it to be the maybe just maybe yesterday's indictments will help our society. Take one small step toward a more level playing field for the hardworking kids who don't come for money and who don't cut corners. And that's the big idea. Here are three other headlines that should be on your radar number one. The Federal Aviation Administration is standing by its decision not to ground the type of Boeing aircraft that went down and heath yoga with the European Union and others following China's move to bar flights by some of the American aviation giants most important planes. Former Transportation Safety officials say the FAA risks losing its status as the world's aviation safety leader Boeing CEO convinced President Trump in a phone call on Tuesday to let his plane stay in the sky senior administration officials say the president's decision wasn't final. And then he's scheduled to have more meetings today with advisors. Meanwhile, a growing chorus of lawmakers from both parties on Capitol Hill is demanding that Trump ban the planes from US airspace for now including Mitt Romney and Elizabeth Warren Ted Cruz, the chairman of Senate subcommittee on aviation promised to quickly hold a hearing to investigate the crashes and. We're learning that commercial pilots had repeatedly complained about the anti-stalin feature of the new seven thirty seven max eight to federal authorities for months in the lead up to Sunday's crash. The pilots complained they weren't being adequately trained on how to use it. But nothing was done. Number two. The White House and several Republican senators are privately negotiating a deal that could lead to the surprising defeat of a democratic resolution later this week rejecting Trump's emergency declaration at the border key to quelling. GOP revolt is legislation drafted by Mike Lee, the Republican from Utah. He wants to generally claw back. Emergency powers that congress has given to the White House over the past few decades that would give Republicans were uneasy about the constitutionality of the February declaration to build the wall. It who are nervous about publicly rebuking Trump some political cover so that they could side with the president despite their personal objections, although four Republican senators have already announced the vote to nullify the president's declaration one. Of them Thom Tillis from earth. Carolina indicated last night after a private meeting with vice president Pence that he could change his position. If there's a deal to revise the nineteen seventy six national emergencies act Tillis defecting could kill the resolution in the Senate. Number three, Barack Obama's administration failed to act on four years of dire. Warnings about fennel as tens of thousands of Americans died from overdoses of the powerful opioid. My colleagues Scott Higgins sari Horwitz in katie's asthma. Have been investigating for months how the government dropped the ball here. Their story came out this morning, and it shows how the CDC I learned about the crisis in the spring of twenty thirteen overdose deaths had spiked at the state war in Providence, Rhode Island and health department was stunned. Learn when toxicology reports should the twelve people who overdosed had died from sentinel, the CDC was alerted immediately. Then the next year former attorney general Eric Holder received a briefing on Fenton, all but didn't take action. Former DEA agents said they provided holder with a personal briefing. That included a thirty slide PowerPoint presentation holders. Former spokesman says it was up to the DA to mix specific asks for action. Not for the. Army general they come up with something ten months after that briefing holder left the administration by then Fennell was spreading across the country. But administration officials rejected a plea in early two thousand sixteen from a group of eleven leading national experts to declare phenomenal public health emergency. That would have made key resources available. Senator Ed Markey democrat from Massachusetts personally, urged Obama to take action on Fenton all during a flight on Air Force One in March two thousand sixteen the two were flying to Atlanta to speak at the national prescription drug abuse summit. The Senator used that face time to tell the president that he had to do something. It took ten more months in the final week of his administration. Obama finally called sentinel national crisis. And that's the daily to of two for Wednesday March thirteenth. Thanks for listening. I'm James Hillman. I'll talk to you tomorrow.

Barack Obama President Trump president Federal Aviation Administratio US Senate Cleveland Clinic Boeing Georgetown White House Thom Tillis tennis Felicity Huffman James Holman CDC William singer White House Washington Post Ethiopia Senator Ed Markey
NPR News: 01-26-2020 9PM ET

NPR News Now

04:39 min | 6 months ago

NPR News: 01-26-2020 9PM ET

"Live from NPR news in Washington. I'm Jeanine herbst basketball. Legend Kobe Bryant. Along with one of his children died today in a helicopter crash in calabasas California seven others in the helicopter also died and Newport beach. The city where Bryant lived is grieving his death very personally as NPR's to a Holy Holy Psycho reports Koby Bryant spent much of his adult life living in homes near the beaches here. When he joined the Lakers he would travel to the staple center in downtown? La Often by helicopter. Bryant left John Wayne Airport Sunday morning with his thirteen year old daughter six other passengers and pilot just after nine. AM local time time authorities at the crash site in Calabasas. Say there are no survivors and that they won't release the names of the other victims until a final coroner's report. The city of Newport beach released a statement saying it is with heavy hearts that we say good bye to Newport resident and international sports legend. Kobe Bryant do a cycle tell. NPR News Newport beach. Meanwhile tributes are pouring in for Brian via social media. Shaquille O'Neal says he lost his friend brother and partner in winning championships and Patriots quarterback. Tom Brady said we miss you already there now. A total of five people infected with the deadly league corona virus in the US and two of them are in southern California one in La County and one in Orange County Robert Grove of member station K.. P. C. C. has us more on the Orange County case the county healthcare agency says the individual is a fifty year old man who arrived from China at LAX. He sought medical care once he arrived in Orange County. The man is being treated in isolation in an Orange County hospital and is in good condition doctrine. Nicole quake is the county's health officer. There's no evidence of person to person transmission mission in Orange County and we believe the risk to the general population at this time is low quick. Says her agency is falling with people who had close contact with the man. The Corona Viruses Larysa killed dozens and sickened nearly two thousand in China for NPR news. I'm Robert DOROTA democratic. Senator Ed Markey is calling on his Republican colleagues to allow witnesses and new evidence in the ongoing impeachment trial of president trump from member station W. G. B. H. Tori Bedford reports. The Senate is expected to vote this week on whether to call witnesses and new evidence as part of the trial for that to happen. The Senate needs four Republicans to vote in favour Marquez. A fair trial requires allowing new evidence and and witnesses I seriously doubted there for Republicans who are willing to in any way run the risk that they would have the ir the anger anger of Donald Trump directed marquee emphasized the importance of witnesses. Who defied how subpoenas especially acting White House Chief of Staff Mick Mulvaney and former national security courtesy adviser John Bolton for NPR news? I'm Tori Bedford in Boston. And you're listening to. NPR news from Washington Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and his political rival. Benny ants are heading to Washington to meet separately with President trump at the White House this week on trump's Middle East plan a plan he hasn't released yet although he says he will this week. But the Palestinians have not been consulted on the deal and at preemptively rejected the US proposal. Ottawa is any more help to fight bushfires in Australia as Dan Carpenter reports this time it's coming from the Canadian and military the Canadian forces sending C. Seventeen military transport plane and fifteen personnel. They will leave on Monday. The aircraft and crew will be transporting fire retardant from the US that would free up Australian planes. The Canadians would also take images from the air of the fires to measure their progress and help predict how the fires might spread. It's it's all part of a standing mission that sends military aid to other countries that are struggling with natural disasters at least two contingents Canadian firefighters and fire management experts totally more than one hundred personnel have already been sent to Australia for NPR news. I'm Dan Carpenter Can Toronto the fire. Many of which continue to burn in the eastern part of Austrailia have left more than two dozen people and around one billion animals dead and millions of acres of land scorched Asian markets are trading and mixed territory at this hour. The Nikkei the main market in Japan is down one point seven percent. The Asia Dow down about one third of a percent the hang sang and Hong Kong is trading just slightly higher on the Shanghai is also trading lower. I'm Jeanine herbst and you're listening to N._P._R.. News from Washington.

NPR Kobe Bryant Orange County Donald Trump Washington Newport beach US Jeanine herbst calabasas NPR Dan Carpenter Austrailia Orange County hospital California China Senate basketball Newport Shaquille O'Neal Senator Ed Markey
NPR News: 07-03-2020 1AM ET

NPR News Now

04:39 min | Last month

NPR News: 07-03-2020 1AM ET

"Live from NPR news I'm Shay Stevens the number of Covid, nineteen infections in the US has doubled to more than fifty thousand cases a day. Corona virus cases are arising in three dozen states and public health officials warned that the death toll could reach one hundred and sixty thousand within three weeks. In Texas Governor Greg Abbott says that all residents must face mask in public K. E. R.. A. Still a child is has more. The order applies to people in public spaces in Texas counties that have twenty or more positive corona virus cases, children undertand in anyone with a medical condition that keeps them from wearing a mask are exempt Abbott said the rapid rise in hospitalizations in new infections show. The virus isn't going away. These spikes are not limited to just the big cities. More than ninety one counties have hit record high numbers in just the past three days some Texas hospitals have. Have reported their icy units are nearing capacity in addition to the mass requirement. Abbott said mayors and county judges can impose restrictions on gatherings of more than ten people for NPR news I'm Stella Chavez Model Nursing. Homes are getting a lot of attention. During the pandemic, a new report from three Democratic lawmakers indicates a crisis at many less regulated assisted living facilities details from WBRC Walser. The study looked at the country's top assisted living operators and found that residents tested positive for nineteen at a rate over five times, the national average, and that almost a third of those who tested positive died. Senator Ed Markey from Massachusetts says. The government is not doing enough to protect older adults. Federal government needs to ensure that these facilities are actively monitored for potential outbreaks and are getting the test supplies and personal protective equipment. They need to prevent outbreaks, says he and other lawmakers will file legislation addressing these issues and establishing mandatory reporting requirements for NPR news I'm Miriam Wasser a federal judge has told the trump administration to stop jailing unaccompanied immigrant children who turned eighteen in government custody as NPR's John Burnett reports. The ruling came in a lawsuit filed over two years ago. The plaintiffs were too young immigrants. Who when they? They turned. Eighteen were arrested by agents from immigration and Customs Enforcement and sent to adult detention centers this when there was a family friend and a group shelter willing to take them demand, critics contended it was cruel to handcuff and transfer an immigrant to jail on the day of their eighteenth birthday. Thursday's decision by a judge in Washington. C. Says is must consider a less restrictive setting for young people including alternatives to detention. We're ecstatic. The court is holding is accountable for failing. These children said an attorney with the American Immigration Council. There was no immediate response from Ice John Burnett. NPR News. This is NPR. AIRBNB will and younger people from booking local homes in the United States people under twenty five with fewer than three positive reviews will not be able to book properties close to where they live the San Francisco based company says it's part of an ongoing effort to crack down on authorized parties. The move comes after five people were shot and killed during a party at an airbnb rental in Arinda California last fall. A friend of Jeffrey Epstein is charged with recruiting victims for the late sex fender. Get Lynn. Maxwell was arrested in new. Hampshire Thursday on federal charges that are pending in New York. Audrey Strauss's an acting US attorney for the Southern District of New York. She says that Maxwell. A is accused of luring and grooming three teenagers for Abuse Maxwell, would discuss sexual topics with the victim. And undress in front of the victim. Or be present for sex acts involving the minor victims and Epstein. Maxwell calls the charges absolute rubbish Epstein committed suicide in a New York locked up last year while awaiting sex trafficking charges. He had been convicted over a decade ago of sex abuse in Florida. In Canada police say an armed man crashed a truck through a gate on the grounds where Prime Minister, Justin, Trudeau and his family lived in auto. The suspect identified as a member of Canada's Armed Forces was arrested two hours later, and is being questioned. The Real Canadian Mounted Police said in a statement Thursday. That Trudeau was away during the attack. I'm Shay Stevens. This is NPR news.

NPR News Governor Greg Abbott NPR Jeffrey Epstein Maxwell Texas Shay Stevens Senator Ed Markey New York US John Burnett US attorney Federal government WBRC Walser Canada Trudeau Audrey Strauss Real Canadian Mounted Police AIRBNB
They werent listening: How Congress failed to act on a deadly drugs harrowing rise

Post Reports

33:04 min | 11 months ago

They werent listening: How Congress failed to act on a deadly drugs harrowing rise

"This post reports podcast is sponsored by fidelity financial planning that moves with your life learn more at fidelity dot com slash your goals fidelity brokerage services number. NYSE SIPC IPC from the newsroom of the Washington Post this is tracey Johnke calling from the pets in Washington. This is post reports Martine powers. It's Friday September twentieth today. Why it's so hard for federal money to reach communities fighting the OPIOID crisis and the story of what happened to Michael Vick's dogs a prescription drug heroin win and Sentinel epidemic is a human tragedy unfolding every day in homes in alleyways in bathrooms the back seats of cars in nearly every city and town of our country that Senator Ed Markey of Massachusetts and last year in mid-september in September he delivered this speech on the floor of the Senate preliminary estimates indicate that opioid overdoses claimed an estimated forty nine thousand thousand lives just last year including nearly two thousand people in Massachusetts. That's more than gun violence. That's more than car. Accidents uh-huh and about three quarters of this deaths in Massachusetts were the result of a power fourth pedic opioid called Phantom so when we talk about the OPIOID crisis races today. We're really talking about the crisis. Fenton all the driver of drug overdose deaths. That's Katie's asthma. She's an investigative reporter who writes about Sentinel Senator Markey. I learned about fencing all in two thousand fourteen making him one of the first members of Congress to learn about what was it he spent years after that trying to sound the alarm in especially among his colleagues colleagues in Congress. It was really hard to get people to care. They just didn't pay attention to it. The opioid epidemic is the deadliest drug overdose crisis in American history so senator mark is essentially been giving the same speech for years. Ted Muldoon producer for post reports and he's been following Katie for the story like here he is in February Twenty fifteen. The state of Massachusetts is being ravaged by then again in February twenty sixteen and it's time for us to come together March Twenty Sixteen Congress Must Step Up May Twentieth Sixteen Illicit Sentinel Event Until July two thousand sixteen being overwhelmed August two thousand sixteen. We need the money for treatment. January March Fenton December twenty seventeen sentinel is a senator markey wasn't alone in trying to ring meal arm unfit and all there's a small group of members of Congress who were also trying to raise awareness of the threat that they were seeing in their districts. They included Senators Rob Portman from Ohio feting and all is synthetic growing problem in my state of Ohio Pat Toomey of Pennsylvania cutting all that is on the streets in Pennsylvania and across America now former Senator Kelly and the New Hampshire right now in New Hampshire heroin sometimes combined with a very important the small group of people in Congress both Democrats and Republicans they were giving these speeches over and over and over and yet every time they go back to their districts. This is what they would hear recorded nine emergency right matched wage quick please. My daughter's either over don't things I had let's see I was facing you could so many Kosovan. What do you think the overdosed I need. All of these calls are just from one city in South East Massachusetts. It's called totten. It's the place where Senator Markey I learned about fencing all they're also all just from one random month in early. Two thousand eighteen pick any other month and you'll find more of the same nine wouldn't say how old are yeah you know how to do CPR. I'm GonNa tell you exactly what to do. I need to take wealthier hand. Hand Okay put one on top of the other okay and I need you to push down hard and fast okay. I'm GONNA help you through it. Okay you start doing it Tom. Tom Tom Tom Okay but yes you keep calling and keep calling Tom. Tom Pom Pom Pom Pom. Talk me as calls like these came and month after month year after year and towns all over Massachusetts. It's there's ED markey on the floor of the Senate trying to make his colleagues understand just how bad things have gotten on the ground and they weren't listening. Senator Senator Markey spent years talking about setting all so the big question is why did it take so long for Congress to actually do something in what we found was that Congress was extremely slow by twenty eighteen congress after years of inaction had finally passed three opioid packages to deal with the OPIOID crisis. They freed up billions of dollars to go to communities that have been affected more money to treatment programs to prevention programs in two states to use as they see fit but the wheels bureaucracy bureaucracy turned really really slowly and it takes a long time for this money to actually get on the ground in places are really just starting to see the influx of the money now so do we wanted to go in and see what it's doing if it's actually helping or not thank you sir. I'm good at somebody checking in your mind that you can you tell me where we are. We're going to talk Massachusetts. Ton is a city that's about forty five minutes from Boston and it's about half an hour from providence so it's it's pretty centrally located from these major places but it it just feels very far away from them air kind of on this road into town. There's a river on my left lots of trees. You know you kind of go get off the highway. Okay and you go down this kind of two lane road and to stand talking green welcome to Taunton all of a sudden. You're in the center of town. It's very much like a classic. New England town has Gorgeous Gorgeous Architecture beautiful homes yeah definitely they're really pretty houses beautiful courthouse building until they used to be on here yeah but then you start to look a little bit more and you see that vacant storefronts here. This is a town that has seen better days ton is an old industrial city nineteen hundred six the place Taunton Massachusetts usage. It's actually known for being the silver capital of America assignment to create a magnificent new silver reed and Barton which is a big big silver company. I remember it 'cause my grandmother used to get these like silver bells for the Christmas tree every year and put them on it and they were reading Barton. They are headquartered in Taunton. Reed and Barton closed and alive these industries closed curtain makers and that sort of thing and it was just kind of hollowed out in would that came loss of jobs loss of opportunity eighty so we're we're going down locked and looted. We are going to the Church of all nations to the Baptist Church in Taunton and we're going to meet with a woman who runs recovery meeting here. My name is Masha Richardson and I'm a social worker so Mercer Richardson runs a Recovery Ministry at at the Baptist Church of all nations just trying to help this epidemic. which is the church where Ed Markey? I heard the word Al- so you're from time so tell me a little bit about out the city diversity. We're glass people. Really you know it's a smaller community in some way so people know one another and tangled about how it's changed or not changed. It's different not as safe as it was. So Tottenham is really seeing the progression that everywhere across this country is seen there were people using heroin but it wasn't like it is now where it's my opinion prescription drugs really came on board and you were seeing different segments of the population being impacted by athletes kids had a prescription for pain in next thing you know short amount of time on the street looking for drugs and next thing you know in the US heroin for a few years and then the cartel's realized it was much more lucrative to start cutting the heroin with elicit fat and all and that's where we got today. You didn't hear about somebody overdosing every every single day on numerous people every single day and if they did they weren't dying once comes onto the scene overdosing and Taunton looks like death. It is no longer reviving people bowl. It is finding people who are dead. You don't really have that opportunity. It's it's immediate. You know. It's very very small amount and people just dying so it's just just the loss and the impact on people's families you know the lies. Just that's the major thing people are dying every chance of recovery in the past with pills and even with heroin people who are addicted could have the chance to try to recover it. You know you often don't go into recovery. The first time it takes a couple of tries. It's a disease of the brain and if people were using drugs while they were figuring that out they had a little bit of time now with Fenton all every time you use. There's a chance that it could kill you with the arrival of in all places like Tottenham places all around the country. The need for treatment is so much more urgent because people are are dying. They're they're not surviving anymore. They're dying when they use these drugs obituary letter Dr in this one so these are all families that have lost their kids. We've condensed it one draw here but we have boxes full of them because we move them year-by-year. We're learned to cope which is an organization based in Taunton. See on the map how many after we're ahead to Kenny bunk main. Oh Wow wow founded by a woman named Joann Peterson and what it really does is help people whose family members in loved ones are suffering through addiction every single day she gets calls from parents who have children who overdosed or someone that they love love in that they care about and they don't know what to do that a couple of people here so we walked into the back room which is actually Jones office it and we met Lori. Poissy gonsalves engine. Gilmore on my name is Laurie Plsy gonsalves and my son. Corey was of acidy. The athletes in national honor society student who worry son was a pitcher in he hurt himself he had shoulder surgery on his pitching arm hurts pitching arm and he was a junior in high school. Michael and he had surgery and he was prescribed percocet in got addicted and he spiraled into a heroin problem he had overdosed in July of twenty thirteen eighteen and he suffered an inox brain injury. He went about two and a half to three minutes without breathing and he survived but he has severe brain damage. Now what we do we go out to schools and other groups when we talked to kids and share historian just in the hopes of helping the people so we do a lot of advocacy work. My name is Chu Gill and Massachusetts. My first son was battling for like ten years in and out in in and out in and out waiting for beds and Rehab Detox in towards family a pack Judy Gilmore. She's a social worker. She had four sons in two of them are dead from opioid overdoses. You're at your social worker. Yeah Yeah I see people so the women just had the worst time trying to find treatment for their son's they couldn't do it. They tried and they tried in. They spent hours and hours and hours each day in week on the phones trying to help their children in they couldn't there's nothing worse than having tiled has an addiction problem and they're sitting with you and they say yes. I want to go get help and you are on the phone one crying. Please don't have a bad. We don't have that callback. Check back in the morning. Experts say that for many people who are in the throes of addiction. They need to stay stay in a long term treatment facility in order to get better. Most of those facilities have twenty eight day stays but they're incredibly hard to get into the treatment. Infrastructure picture is so fractured and there are just so few beds compared to the people who need them so here in places like Taunton people have to go to Fall River which is about twenty twenty minutes away just to even start that process in you know experts say that's just not conducive to the disease with addiction and when they tell you they're ready you strike while I taught because tomorrow morning they might go no. I'm not going to want to go. They were at the mercy of the system. That does doesn't have the capacity. You know they were told they needed. They needed to wait or their insurance wouldn't take it in you know especially for Judy one of her sons he was on a waiting list. He was waiting and waiting and waiting and you know he was just almost there. He is beautiful days and he hadn't been just loved to be outside and pens headphones on. I am right before he went in. He met up with a friend in Jaywalk. I'm you went into the bathroom in his phone bringing in Maine and ringing ringing exit what is wrong why don't you answer his phone ringing and I heard a bang in an I went into the bathroom and he was on the floor and takes his purple so I was doing. CPI How they came in and Western hospital you weren't there too long and they came in and told us that he died and it was fencing all I think the government is doing nearly enough because they're not here down in the trenches hearing from the families. They're not looking king at that. Somebody's kid people losing their kids like aunts uncles cousins siblings a losing their loved ones parents burying their kids every a day in this country like why is that not important I feel like does one of these. Congressmen have to lose one of their kids. Do they have to lose one of the grandkids you know in the Congress peace they will stay in Congress. Will we passed opioids bills right in two thousand sixteen with us to We passed again in eighteen last year. Have you guys seen any Steve Tangible benefits from that in theory Taunton could be seeing money from one of these packages passed by Congress over the past couple of years in two thousand sixteen they pass the twenty th century cures act which covered a lot of public health issues including opioids in doled out a billion dollars for two years and grant money. Congress also passed the Comprehensive Addiction Recovery Act in two thousand sixteen in twenty honey eighteen. There is a huge opioid package that pass that allocated billions of dollars to try to fight the epidemic. Money's supposed to find treatment in recovery. The idea is to try to build out the treatment infrastructure in the United States so if they passed all this money. Why aren't there any treatment centers in Taunton. Still there just hasn't having built there. The instructor is not there was not in existing treatment center oftentimes they build out ones that already do exist in the region egion but you know didn't have this huge drug problem before and it infrastructures didn't exist. Is there somebody we can call to find out yeah yeah. We should call Nancy Paul from star in Fall River Massachusetts. She's a head of one of the nearest treatment facilities to Tottenham well. I think generally most resources go to big cities cities and in south eastern math. The cities are declining historically. A lot of this funding has gone to places large populations so big cities would get more money because they have more people but as we see epidemic unfold. We've seen it really unfolding in places that are little more suburban a little more rural so is being changed now to allocate on a proportional basis in it seems as you all are looked at more as a region. Bristol county south southeastern mass rather than Fall River in Taunton in new Bedford. It's kind of like we'll push this to this area and you know that will help alleviate the problem even if Dr Twenty five minutes or whatever it is is right and I think that shows a lack of understanding of the city's upon and fall river and new Bedford. Someone was just telling me it takes like two hours hours to go twenty miles on a bus from fall river to new Bedford now if you're sick and withdrawing. Are you going to sit it for two hours on a bus that has like fifty stops before you get to my facility and change buses and always crazy. We need facilities all of these in each city. How much money do you think it would cost to build out new treatment centers in these cities well. I'm trying. I'm trying to build one in the north end of the city and I can tell you that the cost for a forty three thousand square foot is around fourteen to fifteen million dollars and I have raised five over five million from local people to build this but I am getting pushback from state legislator slater and Fall River's office of Economic Development That's now spun off. They have been totally against having a facility the install river. Why is that what's what's the reasoning we don't want to import people from Taunton new Bedford into fall river to come into this facility despite the fact that felt gnaws killing so many people correct even though everyone knows that the federal crisis and the OPIOID crisis is is raging one thing that places or running into is that they don't WanNa bill anymore treatment facilities in their neighborhoods Nimby issue. Have you guys seen any of the money from the packages that have passed in two thousand sixteen hundred two thousand eighteen yet are beginning to see more money you no. I would say that the state of Massachusetts stepped up faster overall than the federal government but we still have a huge problem problem and there's not enough money and there's not enough staff and there are not enough to civilities. My detox is in a an old TV hospital that was shut down in the fifties. I cannot get the resources to build a new one from federal grants or state grants. Nobody will touch facilities really why not because I think I think nobody thinks outside the box. I think I think it's it won't sit a two year election cycle once you build it. You have to continue to pay the resources to fund it. answers right about that the way that Congress gives out money is in two year increments so most places who were getting don't know if they're going to continue to get it after it's done so they don't really have the ability to build long term facilities or long-term programs because they don't know how long the money's. GonNa keep coming for. It's clear going to Taunton that people there feel as though they don't have the money that they need to fight this problem and what they have gotten hasn't been adequate in Ansi said it would take fifteen million dollars to build out one treatment facility in one city in southeastern Massachusetts so imagine what it would take to replicate that across this country for people like Senator Markey who've spent years fighting this problem. It's clear to them that more. Money is needed more. The resources are needed and just more heff needs to be put behind an effort to fight this epidemic right now. Senator Elizabeth Warren in Representative Elijah Cummings they propose a package that would allocate one hundred billion dollars over ten years ears to fight the OPIOID crisis SORTA warned and I introduced care act in April it would provide funding as well as flexibility ability to enable heart. It is not gone anywhere yet. They have not been able to get Republican Co Sponsors. They've been able to get a ton of Democratic Buyin' either in the concern. Is that now that these three opioid packages have passed that this is going to be at that. Congress will say you know what we did our job. We allocated money toward this problem. Let's move onto the next issue. I have been around for many many years. I've worked in this field for forty two years and my concern is you know we've been talking about about this opioid epidemic for the last. I don't know four years now. This is a long cycle for people to be talking about it and I keep worrying that they're going to move onto the next thing and that our people once again will be left behind without it being dealt with and I fully expect it to happen again. Katie's asthma is reporter for the post host. Ted Muldoon is a producer reports. This story was also reported by Kobe quits. You can find a link to their full story at post reports dot Com and what's on your list of financial goals buying a new house strengthening your retirement plan all of the above whatever you're saving for fidelity personalized allies planning and advice can help you reach those goals with digital planning plus one on one personal coaching all with low transparent pricing to learn more visit fidelity ready dot com slash your goals or call one eight hundred three four three three five four eight advisory services offered for a fee by fidelity personal and workplace advisors. LLC and brokerage services provided by Fidelity Burkard Services LLC so I remember when it happened I would have been in middle school and it was something and that interested me and and I kind of followed the dogs very loosely for the last twelve years or so. That's Liam Volvo. She is a sports reporter for the Post. Yeah when I'm not writing about dogs. I I usually cover college sports. Today's latest from the Michael Vick dogfighting case vic is on his own to cut a deal of face trial on federal charges so in two thousand seven Michael Vick was a star in a quarterback for the Atlanta Falcons Elkins and it was discovered that he was also running an illegal dogfighting rain down in southeastern Virginia. These are serious crimes. They are so important went to the American people and Vic and his cohorts were apparently testing animals for fighting purposes and one of those animals didn't pass the test they were put in water and then electrocuted. They were picked up other legs and slammed against the ground. They were hung. I mean this is just horrific stuff he plead guilty injustice into running this illegal dogfighting ring and he was suspended from the phone he he went to jail accept the responsibility boss ability for my accident and what I do and pay the cost of sport so Michael Vick spent about a year and a half in prison and then he ultimately returned to the NFL but what happened to the docks about fifty dogs were not eased and at the time the norm was that there would be the legal proceedings and the dogs will be killed. Their role was to provide evidence in a case the freeze that I kept hearing was they're bred to be dogged. They can't rebound because this is who they are and then this time. Some of these major organizations spoke out in thought. You know what like why don't we see like let's just try and see if these dogs could be pets so they knew if we change this and we do it in this case in a public look way than we could really change how dogs from fight buster handled in the future. They thought okay. We've got about what fifty dogs man if we could save ten we could say five if that'd be awesome. I I don't know if anyone was quite expecting that. At the end of these evaluations they would say okay forty seven of the forty eight like time to go home so so almost all these dogs were ultimately deemed fit to live out their days either in sanctuaries or in people's homes but you didn't know was was where exactly they were yet because even talking to these adopters these rescuers Asians. They don't know none of them know how many are still alive. They don't know what happened because they spread across the country. Some of them had facebook pages with half a million followers but some of them just went off into the world and their what ended up becoming a regular regular dog so the reason I wanted to track them down. Was I felt like to have a story about legacy in twelve years out and they're starting to die. We need to know how many are live. You've and so you figure that yes because I'm like how is the Washington Post. GonNa let me publish a story if we only have an estimate so and then just I a couple of quick biographical information about Zippy win. What did you get her and then. When did you bring Leo Home. Do you happen to remember the month and year the Monday year that you brought iggy home. it was January News November of two thousand seven. I believe nine so this is this is this is an incredibly comprehensive spreadsheet so it starts with their name H. A. R. I just okay and do you prefer to be her tubs or do you have any what would you prefer to in the date that the ended up in a home. I guess she arrived here. Valentine's Day the the date that they died. If they're no longer live there adopted name that's where the name came from Jimmy because they're adopted town Rochester Minnesota. How many hours do you think went into this belie- you really are number. Forty seven forty eighty seven in johnny still alive correct. Okay okay MIC and every different. I didn't get boring to me where I saw a tunnel like Oh. He looks perfect. Tunnels is really interesting. So titles is in a two thousand four photo shoot picture with Michael AVEC. He was brought home. July doesn't eight or when he came here's afraid of everything us rate of his shadow and it took him a long. I'm trying to overcome it. I always say that he didn't always show you know who he was and eventually he did. He was a big Marshall and then we have Maya Maya. I met Maya so a lot of people were actually really scared of her and I'm like she's just scared era. You know this is back in the Virginia. She lived with curly. WHO's like her best friend and he's another dog. Take Sweet Georgia was one who who stuck with me. I used to sing to her on our walks and she would just look at me. It was her adoring soulful eyes and they seem to then at the at her happiest when she was out. Walking in all Georgia was adopted by Amy Egger who lives in Arlington and she was just one of the champion fighters so Georgia. Most people say you know probably endured a law. I just loved her so much and I bite all she can turn her broken tail and broken jaw and all that you know her spirit couldn't be broken and I always feel that that spirit in Europe beautiful unbreakable spirit how many of these dogs are still alive now. Eleven eleven are still alive. Eleven of the forty seven that ended up yes in actually I met six of the dogs in the process of reporting the story and two of those who died there. They're getting up there and there's this like acute awareness among the doctors and the wrestlers ations that they are very soon approaching approaching day where these dogs aren't going to be alive anymore. What do you think that means. I think it means that instead said they're going to have to let them survive through the change. They sparked because these dogs really did change inch things. You know now. If if there's a fight bus the dogs are evaluated before the case that never happened so I think it gives them some comfort in knowing all these stars hundreds and hundreds of dogs are alive because of what these stocks did. Imbaba is sports reporter for the post for photos and more information about all forty seven dogs go to post reports DOT COM That's it for today. Show thanks for listening. Our Executive Producer is madly Jessica. Our senior producer is Matt Kellett. Our Producers Producers Are Alexis De O. Rena Flora's Lena Muhammad Maggie Penman Rennie's for Noffke Jordan Marie Smith and Ted Muldoon who also wrote our theme music. The Post Director of audio is just stall I- Martine powers. We'll be back on Monday with more stories from the Washington Post. What's on your list of financial goals buying a new house strengthening your retirement plan all of the above whatever you're saving for fidelity Elodie personalized planning and advice can help you reach those goals with digital planning plus one on one personal coaching all with low transparent pricing to learn more or visit fidelity dot com slash your goals or call one eight hundred three four three three five four eight advisory services offered for a fee by fidelity personal and workplace advisors l._l._c. and brokerage services provided by fidelity brokerage services L._L._c.

Taunton Congress Senator Senator Markey Massachusetts heroin Washington Post Fall River Ted Muldoon Michael Vick producer Senator Ed Markey reporter Katie Fenton United States Judy Gilmore drug overdose Senator Markey Senate
2020's Race to Watch

The Point with Chris Cillizza

04:07 min | 11 months ago

2020's Race to Watch

"Welcome to the point for September nineteen. I'm Lauren Design Ski Co author of the Point. I'm here to cut through the political a little spin to bring you the news. You need to know a major twenty twenty battle is brewing in an unlikely place Massachusetts Congressman Joe Kennedy. The third word is about to run for Senate. He's the grandson of Robert F Kennedy in the grandnephew of President John F Kennedy so yes he is that kind of Kennedy and the Kennedy has had his eye on the Senate for quite some time back in two thousand sixteen Kennedy made public. He was interested in the seat. If Senator Elizabeth Warren were named Hillary Clinton's running mate even now as warrants presidential campaign continues to climb in the polls and the odds of her not serving out her full full Senate term increase Kennedy is setting his sights on the state's other Senate seat that seat is held by Senator Ed Markey who has served in the Senate since twenty thirteen eighteen but has been in Washington serving in Congress since nineteen seventy six he is Massachusetts establishment and he's seventy three years old compare that to Kennedy who only thirty eight as a note. I want to speak to an important thing to know about. Massachusetts politics learned from my years covering the state. There people often talk about an ambition bottleneck where there are so many talented people and upwardly mobile folks who want to run for office put only only so many seats are available in those that do win hold onto their seats open. Senate seat specifically usually vacated when the Holter died like Ted Kennedy or when the holder was tapped to serve in a presidential administration like John Kerry would kick off once in a lifetime races their departures started in open season in part because no candidates have to do the dirty work of challenging an incumbent in what will always be a messy primary after all it's mostly blue state and for the most part all of its federal elected officials have been Democrats other than that Scott Brown's victory. Everyone is is ostensibly on the same team. This all perpetuates a wait. Your turn mentality were time spent in politics and seniority are the most important rather than ambition but last year that changed I on Presley's primary challenge and victory over Longtime Congressman Michael Capuano blew open open the bay state's conventional political wisdom and has apparently heralded a new era in Massachusetts politics now. It's not verboten to challenge a longtime incumbent in fact it could be an advantage. Marquis has known that Kennedy's challenge could be on the horizon. He's rolled out endorsements from powerful figures like Elizabeth Warren Orange and Alexandria. Oko Cortes Marquee has worked hard to shore up his progressive bone a few days doing things like cosponsoring the green new deal but early voting in the state shows Kennedy is already the front runner in the brewing primary fight shows just where the Democratic Party is right now with a younger insurgent looking to unseat a longtime member arguing that a new voice deserves to be at the table of course. There's much more nuance to this race then just old versus new after all. Joe Kennedy is a Kennedy. Eh One can't argue a Blueblood privately schooled. Kennedy is from the political hinterlands which brings us to the point. If you want some Prime Democrat on Democrat action in twenty twenty tune in to Massachusetts Senate race in that is the point for September nineteen twenty nineteen. Thank you for listening back for more updates throughout the week including our Sunday night campaign edition subscribe to the point newsletter at CNN dot com slash point. If you like this audio briefing you can get on Google Google home or Amazon Echo or subscribe on Stitcher or apple podcasts or your favorite podcast app so you never miss an episode do

President John F Kennedy Senate Congressman Joe Kennedy Massachusetts Joe Kennedy Senator Elizabeth Warren Senator Ed Markey Lauren Design Ski Co CNN Hillary Clinton Congressman John Kerry Elizabeth Warren Orange Google Oko Cortes Marquee Congress Michael Capuano Scott Brown
AP Headline News Feb 07 2019 13:00 (EST)

AP Radio News

04:45 min | 1 year ago

AP Headline News Feb 07 2019 13:00 (EST)

"I'm Jay Farner, CEO of Quicken Loans, America's premier home purchase lender. We've created a new way to protect you from unpredictable interest rates are exclusive rate shield approval. I we lock your interest rate for up to ninety days. Then if rates go up your rate stays locked. But if rates go down your rate drops either way you win. Call us today at eight hundred quicken or go to rocketmortgage dot com, racial approval. Only valid on certain thirty year fixed rate loans. Call for cost information and conditions. Equal housing lender. Licensed in all fifty states NMLS number thirty additional conditions are exclusions may apply. Okay. Guys. Welcome to our keyword AGM. Planning quarterly review central meeting. Business can be complicated put traveled as enough to be with my taxi business. You can download receipts and manage multiple bookings. Online makes us smarter choice at might Tuksy dot com. AP radio news. I'm Ed Donahue. Democrats are calling it the green new deal. You're talking about the greatest blue collar job creation program in a generation Massachusetts Senator Ed Markey says the intention is to transform the economy to combat climate change and create thousands of jobs in renewable energy market pointed out climate change was not mentioned by President Trump in his state of the union address. Trump and the deniers and the critics offer to give up is proof positive that we should push forward. Even heartbe aim is to eliminate the US carbon footprint by twenty thirty. Now, the Democrats are in control of the house. There are proposals to force presidents and presidential candidates to make public years of their tax returns. Speaker Nancy Pelosi says the focus is on President Trump. I think of women leaders public wants to see the present tax returns. And so they want to know that truth they want to know the facts, and he has nothing to hide at the national prayer breakfast today. President Trump says he has the backs of people have faith as president I will always cherish honor and protect the believers who uplift Eric communities and sustain our nation to ensure that people of faith can always contribute Aaron. Society. The president told the audience he will not let them down a judge in New York has agreed to unusual part of the search of the unsee to unseal. Part of the search warrant that authorized last year's F B I raids at the home and office of President Trump's former personal lawyer Michael Cohen Bill Cosby has been moved to a general population unit. He serving three to ten years in prison for sexual assault, and Pennsylvania, the FDA says, Dr should be on the lookout for a rare cancer linked to breast implants. This is AP radio news. A nurse is charged in a fatal drugs. Swap by overriding a safeguard redone to leeann vodka was a nurse at the Vanderbilt University Medical Center in Nashville, Tennessee when she tried to find a prescribed drug for a patient by overriding safeguards in a medicine cabinet. According to an investigation, she selected what she thought was the correct medicine, but it turned out to be a drug used in executions. According to the centers for Medicare and Medicaid services which investigated she is now accused of mistakenly killing a patient reckless homicide is the charge. She's doing court on February twentieth. I'm Rita Foley woman in Denmark has been sentenced to four years in jail for draining more than a pint of blood from her young son as often as once a week over a five year period. The woman is a trained nurse. She told doctors or sons low blood count was due to a rare bone marrow disease. She the report says she had a mental condition at Donahue AP. Radio news. I'm Jay Farner, CEO of Quicken Loans, America's premier home purchase lender. We've created a new way to protect you from unpredictable interest rates are exclusive rate shield approval. I we lock your interest rate for up to ninety days. Then if rates go up your rate stays locked. But if rates go down your rate drops either way you win. Call us today at eight hundred quicken or go to rocketmortgage dot com, racial approval. Only ballot on certain thirty year fixed rate loans. Call for cost information and conditions. Equal housing lender. Licensed in all fifty states and MLS number thirty thirty additional conditions are exclusions may apply. Hi fashion outline. Hi this president's day. My family wants to exercise our right to cute new styles. I vote for old navy old navy yet the new styles you want now or up to fifty percent off store-wide get new tops new dresses in new genes for the whole family on sale now, including women's rockstar jeans up to fifty percent off store-wide and buy online. Pick up in store for free dean start at just fifteen bucks for adults. Ten bucks for kids and old navy and all navy dot com. Now, that's democracy and action rush in up to fifty percent off store-wide. Hurry ends tomorrow. Valid to eleven. Eighteen select styles. Only.

President Trump president Quicken Loans America Jay Farner Ed Donahue AP CEO Aaron Tuksy dot navy Senator Ed Markey quarterly review Nancy Pelosi Vanderbilt University Medical Michael Cohen Bill Cosby Massachusetts
AP One Minute Headlines Feb 07 2019 13:00 (EST)

AP Radio News

02:51 min | 1 year ago

AP One Minute Headlines Feb 07 2019 13:00 (EST)

"Edited high fashion hotline high president's day, my family wants to exercise our right to cute new styles. Ivo for old navy old navy yet the new styles you want now or up to fifty percent off store-wide get new tops new dresses, a new genes for the whole family on sale now including women's rockstar jeans up to fifty percent off store-wide and buy online. Pick up in store for free gene started just fifteen bucks for adults. Ten bucks for kids old navy and old navy dot com. Now, that's democracy and action rush in up to fifty percent off store-wide. Hurry ends tomorrow to eleven to eighteen select styles. Only. What's the best thing about podcasts? It's that you can still listen to them during Creamer hunting season, come down the rare white cream egg and being with a chance to win a sweep prize of up to ten thousand euro, join us Philo greenback, hunters and find out more by visiting Cadbury. Ireland on Facebook Twitter. One step closer. I'm Ed Donahue with an AP news minute. The Senate Judiciary committee has approved President Trump's pick for attorney general William bar. It now heads to the Senate floor where bar is expected to be confirmed. Acting attorney general Matthew Whitaker says he won't appear before the House Judiciary committee tomorrow unless the threat of a subpoena against him is dropped Whittaker as criticize special counsel Robert Muller's Russia investigation. New York Republican Peter King is backing a Bill in the house for gun background checks. I want this to be bipartisan Bill, but again to me, it's not Republican democrat. There should be an American Bill. This is just basic common sense. Massachusetts democratic Senator Ed Markey is leading push in both both house and the Senate to transform the economy to combat climate change and create thousands of jobs in renewable energy talking about the greatest blue collar job creation program in a generation. It's being called the green new deal. I may Donahue. I'm Jay Farner, CEO of Quicken Loans, America's premier home purchase lender. We've created a new way to protect you from unpredictable interest rates are exclusive rate shield approval. I we lock your interest rate for up to ninety days. Then if rates go up your rate stays locked. But if rates go down your rate drops either way you win. Call us today at eight hundred quicken or go to rocketmortgage dot com, racial approval. Only ballot on certain thirty year fixed rate loans. Call for cost information and conditions. Equal housing lender. Licensed in all fifty states, and I'm less number thirty thirty additional conditions are exclusions may apply. Hi fashion outline. Hi this president's day. My family wants to exercise our right to cute new styles. I vote for old navy old navy yet the new styles you want. Now, we're up to fifty percent off store-wide get new tops new tresses in new genes for the whole family on sale now, including women's rockstar jeans up to fifty percent off store-wide and buy online pick up in store for free jeans start at just fifteen bucks for adults. Ten bucks for kids at old navy and only dot com now that's democracy and action rush in for up to fifty percent off store-wide her. He ends tomorrow to eleven to eighteen thousand.

Ed Donahue Senate president New York Senate Judiciary committee William bar Ivo Senator Ed Markey House Judiciary committee Quicken Loans Peter King Cadbury President Trump Facebook Ireland Creamer Massachusetts
Ep. 713 - Bezos Like A Boss

The Ben Shapiro Show

56:31 min | 1 year ago

Ep. 713 - Bezos Like A Boss

"Jeff Bezos of Amazon expose the National Enquirer as a blackmail racket. The democratic green new deal gets off to a bit of a rough start. And we check the mail bag. I'm Ben Shapiro. This is the Ben Shapiro show. Remember like a thousand years ago to remember a thousand years ago, when President Trump gave the state of the union address, you remember that that was awesome. Right. But that was like a thousand years ago because so much has happened since then in the lot happened yesterday as well. We'll get to all of it in just one second first. Let's talk about an uncomfortable. Fact, you're going to die. We're all gonna die. We're all gonna plots. And when we do want to make sure that our families have money left to take care of them the best way to do that is to get some life insurance. But what do you know about buying life insurance? Do you understand life insurance? Well enough to buy it. Well, if you don't you need to check out policy genius. They've created website that makes it easy for you to compare quotes. Get advice and get covered policy genius. Is the easy way to get life insurance in minutes. You can compare quotes from top insurers and find the coverage you need at a price. You can afford from there. You just apply online and the advisers are policy genius will handle all the red tape. They'll even negotiate your rate with the insurance company, no extra fees, no commission sales agents, just helpful advice, and personalized service and policy genius. Doesn't just make life insurance easy. Whether you're shopping for disability insurance to protect your income or homeowners insurance or auto insurance, they can help you get covered fast. So. No matter how much or how little you know, about life insurance. You can find the right policy in minutes at policy genius dot com. Policy genius is indeed the easy way to compare and buy life insurance. Go check them out right now over at policy genius again. Just apply. Online, the advisers policy genius handle all the red tape for you know, extra fees, no commission sales agents. Go check them out policy genius dot com. Don't be buried in a poppers grave. Check them out policy genius is the easy way to compare and buy life insurance already. So the big news of yesterday is that Jeff Bezos went to war went to war with the National Enquirer now to be perfectly accurate the National Enquirer. I one to war with Jeff visas. Now, you'll recall the Jeff Bezos is the owner of both Amazon and the Washington Post, and he has been running gun battle with President Trump for legitimately three four years now over President Trump's politics, President Trump's belief that the Washington Post is a smear machine against him. And so president from his revelled in all of the allegations about Jeff Bezos. And all of the new information that be was cheating on his wife with his next door neighbor. And now they're gonna get a divorce in his wife is going to walk away with one hundred and seventy billion dollars or something. Well, now it turns out that the National Enquirer was trying to blackmail Bezos. They had obtained photos and text messages of bees owes his crotch, basically. And then they went to those. And they said we'd like for you to stop using the Washington Post to investigate us or these photos might unfortunately leak well bees owes than just basically said, all right? Well, if you wanna play this game here, we go, and he just unzipped and put everything on the table. So yesterday in a very long post for medium dot com. He wrote. No, thank you, Mr. Packer it. There is something unbelievable about the fact that the owner of the national is named Packer which led to the headline in the New York Post as well as the Huffington Post today. B's those exposes pecker, which is a fantastic fantastic. Headline here is what Jeff Bezos to be said. So first of all just word to the wise don't blackmail a guy with one hundred and seventy billion. Dollars who also has the capacity to create today delivery for anything right and has drones like squads of drones the work for him. It's just going to go very poorly, by the way, it turns out the main distributor for the national inquirer owned by Amazon dot com. Okay. So here's what here's what he says Bezos something unusual happened to me yesterday. Actually for me. It wasn't just unusual. It was I I was made an offer I couldn't refuse or at least. That's what the top people at the National Enquirer thought, I'm glad they thought that because it embolden them to put it all in writing rather than capitulate to extortion and blackmail. I've decided to publish exactly what they sent me despite the personal cost and embarrassment they threaten AM, I the owner of the National Enquirer led by David pecker recently entered into an immunity deal with department of Justice related to their role in the so-called catch and kill process on behalf of President Trump and his election campaign, Mr. pecker and his company have also been investigated for various actions, they've taken on behalf of the Saudi government and sometimes mister pecker mixes it altogether after Mr. Trump became president. He rewarded Mr. Packers. Loyalty with the White House Jenner switch the media executive. Brought a guest with important ties to the royals in Saudi Arabia at the time, Mr. pecker was pursuing business. There will also hunting for financing for acquisitions that is from an article from a believed the Washington Post federal investigators in legitimate media. Have of course, expected and proved that Mr. pecker has used the Enquirer and am I for political reasons, and yet AM I keeps claiming otherwise American media emphatically rejects any assertion that it's reporting was instigated dictated or influenced in any manner by external forces political or otherwise, of course, legitimate media have been challenging this assertion for a long time. And then he has a list of sources he says, I didn't know much about most of that a few weeks ago when intimate text messages from me were published in the National Enquirer, I engaged. Investigators to learn how those texts were obtain and to determine the motives for the many unusual actions taken by the inquirer, as it turns out there are now several independent investigations looking into this matter to lead my investigation entertained Gavin de Becker, I've known Mr. tobacco for twenty years. His expertise in this arena is excellent. And he's one of the smarter. And most capable leaders. I know I asked him to prioritize protecting my time since I have other things I prefer to work on to proceed with whatever budget. He needed to pursue the facts in this matter perks of being billionaire. Here's a piece of context. My ownership of the Washington Post is a complex afire for me. It's unavoidable that certain powerful people who experienced Washington Post, news coverage will wrongly conclude. I am their enemy President Trump is one of those people obvious by his many tweets also the posted essential and relents unrelenting coverage of the murder of its columnist. Dramatic shaggy is undoubtedly unpopular in certain circles back to the story several days ago. An M leader advised us that Mr. pecker is apoplectic about our investigation for reasons. Still to be better. Understood the Saudi angles seems to hit a particularly sensitive nerve a few days after hearing about Mr. Packers apoplexy we were approached verbally at first with an offer. They said they had more of my text messages and photos that they would publish if we didn't stop our investigation. My lawyers argued that am I has no right to publish photos since any person holds the copyright to their own photos and since the photos in themselves, don't add anything news. Pretty that is the case, by the way, the Peter Thiel and Hoke HOGAN made against Gawker, and basically bankrupted Gawker am is claim of newsworthiness that the photos are necessary to show Amazon shareholders that my business. Judgment is terrible. I founded Amazon in my garage twenty four years ago and drove all the packages to the post office myself today. Amazon employs more than six hundred thousand people what those results speak for themselves. Okay. Back to the threat to publish intimate photos of me. I guess we me my lawyers and Gavin de Becker didn't react to the generalized start with enough. You're so they sent this. And then the chief content officer he pays an Email from the chief content officer of AM I to the litigation counsel for tobacco about Jeff Bezos. And it says Mari leaving the office for the night. However in the interest of expiating, the situation, and with the Washington Post poised to publish unsubstantiated rumors of the Washington inquirers initial report I wanted to describe to you the photos obtained during your news gathering in addition to the below the belt selfie, otherwise colloquially known as a bleep pack, the Enquirer obtained a further nine images, and then they described the. Images, including the including images from bee's owes to his lover whose name and Sanchez and pictures of his crotch and all the rest Bezos says that got my attention, but not in the way, they likely hoped any personal embarrassment. Am I could cause me takes a back seat because there's a much more important matter involved here if in my position, I can't stand up to this kind of extortion. How many people can on that point numerous people have contacted our investigation team about their similar experiences with 'em. I and how they needed to capitulate because for example, their livelihood were at stake in the AMA letters, I'm making public. You will see the precise. Details of their extortionate proposal. They will publish the personal photos unless Gavin to Becker, and I make specific false public statements in the press that we have no knowledge or basis for suggesting that AMA's coverage was politically motivated or influenced by political forces. If we do not agree to affirmatively publicized that specific y they'll say, they'll publish the photos and quickly and there's an associated threat, they'll keep the photos on hand and published them in the future, if we ever deviate from the UAE assured, no real journalists ever proposed anything like what is happening here. I will not report embarrassing information about you. If you do X for me, and if you don't do X quickly, I will report the embarrassing information. Nothing I'm at right here could tell the National Enquirer story as eloquently as their own words blow, and then he just dumps out all of their emails. So here is why this is relevant number one AM I was being used as a go between by President Trump during the campaign to pay off various women, and that obviously has been reported on the dot that has yet to be connected, and the one the media are jumping on here is the suggestion that President Trump both hates the Washington Post and used AM is a go between. So maybe the reason that AM I was going after bees is because visas was going after Trump. So basically, am I was afraid that Pisa's was going to discover some sort of corrupt relationship between the Saudi government, and am I on the one hand in Saudi government and the Trump administration on the other and his corrupt triangle colluded together to go after Jeff Bezos. And then am I tried to blackmail us to that notion? Apparently Becker has now been telling Rick. Quarters that he thinks that he's those text message. We're actually obtained maybe by a government source meaning that the phone wasn't hacked instead government. Data gathering allowed the Trump administration to grab the text messages. And then hand them off to AM. I obviously if that's true Trump gets impeached. Right. I mean, if that's true, then it's the end of the road for the Trump administration using government resources in order to grab the text messages of your political opposition in the reports Oriole field and then blackmail that would be the end of the line for president. I mean forget about impeachment. He'd go to jail. I mean that that's an actual crime for a variety of reasons. But beyond that, they're trying to now connect us that have not yet been connected. Nobody really understands why am I was going after Bezos? It doesn't make a lot of sense from going after bas make sense in the sense that Trump doesn't like visas he rails about him routinely. He calls it the Amazon Washington Post. He he's been going after zones for years on Twitter. But the idea that AM I was blackmailing Bezos to stop reporting about their connection with the Saudi government were they doing that on their own if they're doing it on their own interests demonstrates. We've already known which the AM I is basically just a payoff organization and is used by various rich people in order to shutdown stories. They don't like also they blackmail people. Right. This is this is pretty well known. All of this is going to come out. We're gonna find all of this out because remember that David pecker and AM I are currently in a plea arrangement with the southern district of New York into the the US district attorney for the southern district of New York. They're in a plea arrangement by which they are obligated to cooperate with the southern district of New York. So if you think that all of this is gonna stay secret. It is not I will say this all credit to be really like, I, you know, I'm a fan of Amazon, I think it's a great company. I was one of the first subscribers to Amazon prime I've been a member of Amazon since nineteen ninety eight but putting aside my own business interest in this journalist blackmailing people people blackmailing people, generally, he's really disgusting and trying to suggest that you're going to reveal personal information about someone unless they do what you want is not only a violation of law. It is a breach of basic human decency. So good for us. I mean the man can't afford to do it. And honestly, what does he have to lose at this point? People are going to see his junk, what does he care? He's the richest man on planet earth. So what really I shouldn't. He has the same junk everybody else does. And he's feeling the same way. So honestly good for bees, though, good for bees. A lot of people today are saying we'll be brought this on himself because he was cheating on his all. That's true. Right. All that's true. In terms of you shouldn't be sending text messages of your junk to other people. You shouldn't be cheating on your wife. All that's true. That is a separate issue from should personal issues be used by journalistic purportedly journalistic organizations to blackmail. You the answer, of course, is no so good for bees for exposing that that's good for the country. And frankly, it's good for it's good for the world. I mean that that is just it's well done by Jeff visas. They're all credited him. All right in the second. I want to get to the botched roll out of the green new deal by the Democrats because it is pretty wonderful. We'll get to that. In just a second. First. Let's talk about the debt you have racked up and how you can solve it. For decades. Credit cards have been telling us to buy now and pay for it later with interest despite your best. Intentions that interests can get out of control pretty quickly with Lyndon club. You can consolidate your debt or pay off credit cards with one fixed monthly payment since two thousand seven lending club's helped millions of people regain control of their finances with affordable fixed rate, personal loans, no trips to a Bank, no high interest credit cards, just go to winning club dot com. Tell them about yourself. How much you wanna borrow pick the terms that are right for you. And if you're approved your is automatically deposited into your Bank account in as little as a few days when club clubs the number one peer to peer lending platform with over thirty five billion dollars in loans issued go to lending club dot com slash Ben check that rate minutes by up to forty grand that his lending club dot com slash Ben. Once again lending club dot com slash Ben all wounds made by web Bank member FDIC, equal housing lender. Check them out lending club dot com slash Ben ensure that you are able to pay off that debt that you've been racking up and you haven't been doing enough about again, check them out at lending club dot com slash Ben. Where you can check your rate in minutes and borrow up to forty ran wants more lending club dot com slash Ben go check them out right now as I say all wounds made by webbank member FDIC, equal housing. All right. So final note on the AMA saga. So AM. I has now announced that they are going to do an investigation of themselves. So Jay's going to search for the real killer. Then that is that is very exciting stuff from AM. I obviously, it means nothing. But there are other shoes that are going to drop here. Here's the statement American media made in response to Jeff Bezos. He said American media believes fervently that it acted lawfully in the reporting of the story of Mr. Bezos further at the time of the recent allegations made by Mr. zones, it was in good faith negotiations to resolve matters with him. Nonetheless in light of the nature of the allegations published by Mr. Bezos, the board has convenient determine that it should promptly and thoroughly investigate the claims upon completion of that investigation. The board will take whatever act appropriate action is necessary. He's not making claims, he literally took her emails, and publish them. That's the whole thing as a claim that's evidence. So AM I has got some serious troubles of its own. Okay. Meanwhile, I am highly amused by the reaction of. Everyone to green new deal. So if you didn't listen to yesterday show, you should go back and listen to yesterday's show where I broke down in full detail AOC's green new deal. There's a resolution put forward on the floor of the house that was basically a series of aspirational motions about what we should do with the energy industry in the United States. And then AFC had the temerity to put online a six page summary of all the things the green new deal stood for this was a very bad things at turns out because it turns out that AOC and her team have the combined brain wattage, become quote. It was I mean, the document is Justice donning, and is one of the worst political documents. I have ever seen put together by human hands. It's it's incredibly stupid in every every aspect and yet and yet it was endorsed by every single top democrat running for president of the United States. Cory Booker Spartacus. He said excited to join AO C and Senator Ed Markey on a historic green new deal. Resolution to address the peril of climate change and worsening inequality. Our history is testimony to the treatment of what some think is impossible. We must take bold action now. And then for some reason people started drumming in the background just like in his campaign videos, row, weird Senator Elizabeth Warren says if we wanna live in a world with clean air and water we have to take real action to combat climate change. Now, I'm proud to join AO see and Senator Markey on a green new deal resolution to fight for our planet, and our kid's futures because I want to paint with all the colors of the wind Senator Elizabeth Warren, and then you had and then you had comma Harris, the brilliant newcomer from from California who spends her days going after the knights of Columbus and Spencer evenings going after gang rape allegations against brecca them shows. I'm proud to cosponsor ASEAN, Ed Markey's green new deal. We must aggressively tackle climate change, which poses an existential threat to our nation. And that wasn't all there's one more. We also had Kirsten gillibrand who said a green deal is ambitious. It's bold. And I'm co sponsoring this resolution. ASEAN Senator Markey. Because exactly the kind of action. It will take to conquer the biggest threat of our lifetime. Also, I'm against the resolution but also for the resolution, but I'm against the resolution and also for the resolution Kirsten gillibrand with her typical savoir-faire and still liberty in support for ideals. So all four senators who are currently running for president on the democratic side endorse. The green new deal Bernie Sanders had nothing to say about it. He was busy presumably eating pudding, so all of them endorse this, and none of them apparently have read anything else he has to say. And what's even more amazing that the media have not asked any of them, do they support? What's in actual statement? Remember AOC sponsored at every single one of those tweets mentions AOC because she is the fresh face so fresh so face. None of them have been asked. None of these senators have been asked about her proposals, for example, replace all air travel by rail including presumably from Hawaii, which led mazy run the Senator from Hawaii. Who was the Democrats say what? Now are he's like. And then the proposal says that we should. Pay for full benefits retirement vacation for anyone unable or unwilling to work. She says we should retrofit or replace every building in the United States in the next ten years. She says that we should get rid of Cal farce by getting rid of the internal combustion engine. All of this was put in writing we went through the entire document yesterday like word for word, and it's funny because then you have the media coverage, which has don't take her seriously. I don't take her literally just take her seriously. We shouldn't take little income on come on. Why would you? Why would you read her words? And then say, she means the words that she re that, you writes, why would you possibly do that? Here's Politico's headline v impossible green dream of Alexandra Akasha Cortez. The green new deal will never happen. The way it's laid out. And that's also kind of the point. What now way since when is somebody proposed legislation like it's not going to work the way, they say it will. But that's exactly the point. Like when you go to a modern art museum, and it's just a blank canvas in what is this? And like, it's nothing you're like, well, then what does it mean? It means nothing that's the point. Hey, this a policy proposal. So Michael run wall is a senior staff writer for political magazine. Let's get real the United States is not going to achieve net zero greenhouse gas emissions in ten years. The key goal of the green new deal resolution unveiled Thursday more. Real talk Americans won't get one hundred percents of its power from zero mission sources within a decade either. Another audacious green new deal goal, and we're not going to upgrade the energy efficiency of every single building in the country as the resolution proposes if we were getting all our energy from zero mission sources, it wouldn't even make sense to try. But here's one more reality check. None of it matters the official role out of the green new deal on Thursday was met with a barrage of skepticism from well fact, checkers badly intention climate trolls and desperate to save pundits all focusing on logistical and political impossibilities of transforming the economy is rapidly. The green new deal envisions and the right? It's goals really do seem impossible to achieve. But they're all missing the point if anything they're hoping the green new deals backers make their point which is that climate change is an unprecedented emergency. Okay. No. That's that's actually not what happened here. This is basically just issues a version of Republicans pounds. That's all this says it's versions its version of Ailsa put out something so ridiculously stupid that it makes her sound though. She was dropped multiple times on her head is baby. I mean, this is this proposal is so bad. It can only have been written by somebody who is mentally deficient in some way. It is it is it is seriously ridiculous proposal on its face on its face. No sane person could think otherwise. And so the comeback from the media is well, you guys are pouncing because the real point is to open mind. That's the real point is make you think to make you think, you know. It's it's a thought it's a conversation. It wasn't meant. Seriously. You know, like sponsor co-sponsor by six senators and sixty congress people know, it wasn't meant seriously. It was meant to open your mind and broaden your horizons. They I'm sorry. This isn't this isn't some sort of trip to Europe junior year of college. The legislative proposal that envisions redoing the entire United States economy, by the way, if we were to do all the things in this proposal, you noted due to climate presumably nothing seriously, nothing because if you actually spec out the impact on climate if the United States were to achieve full zero emissions, you know, what happened over the course of the next century. It would lower the temp the global temperature according to the IPC by something like zero point two degrees celsius why because it turns out that the real threats to the climate if you believe in climate change man-made climate change, the real threat to the climate is coming from not industrialized countries at this point. But. In countries like China and India who have no interest whatsoever in lowering their emissions. So none of it makes any sense. But that's not the only idiotic media. Take today. There's also the New York Times which can always be counted on to cover for the stupidity of Democrats in the reporting. We'll get to that in just a second. First. Let's talk about how you protect your internet usage. Let's talk about your own security and privacy. So maybe you're one of these people who has things that you don't want people to know about like, you wouldn't want American media international actually coming after you. Well, maybe you actually want to protect your data from hackers and spies. I don't want. My emails compromise for my credit card number online, linebacking, passwords, stolen. I don't even have pictures of my junk out there yet that happens to hundreds of millions of people every year. So how can you protect yourself the company I trust to defend my online security and privacy is expressive VPN express VPN secures. An anonymous is your connection bankrupting one hundred percents of your network data and hiding your IP address? 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Again, they're consistently rated the world's number one VPN service for a reason and operates in the background of your computer seamlessly. It's not going to slow up your computer because they've got blazing fast speeds and VPN locations in ninety four countries. You have nothing to lose pricing, a less than seven bucks per month. Express VPN dot com slash Benza cleaner discount, again that is express VPN dot com slash Ben. To learn more. Go check it out right now. Okay. So we ready politicos take. Here's the New York Times is take your ready for this. On this idiot. Glenn that legitimately says we're going to pay people not to work, quote, Liberal, Democrats, formerly call for a green new deal giving substance to a rallying cry. Now, you may be wondering did write this piece for the New York Times. No, she didn't actually turns out. It's written by Lisa Freeman and Glenn Thrush both topnotch reporters at the wonderful incredible New York Times, listen, I listened to to have covered Liberal Democrats. Put flesh on their green new deal slogan on Thursday with a sweeping resolution intended to redefine the national debate on climate change by calling for the United States who eliminate additional emissions of carbon by twenty thirty the measure drafted by freshman Representative and Senator Ed Markey of Massachusetts is intended to answer the demand by the party's restive base for grand strategy that combats climate change creates jobs and offers an affirmative response to the challenge to core party values posed by President Trump, the resolution has more breadth and detail and is so ambitious that Republicans greeted it with derision. Well, no actually greeted with derision not because jam vicious, but because. Does it legitimately has no plan for cheating anything that says it wants to achieve other than completely destroying the United States army other than that? It's great. It's legislative plus prospects are bleak in the foreseeable future. Speaker Nancy Pelosi of California has no plans to bring the resolution in its current form to the floor for vote, according to democratic leadership eight why because Nancy Pelosi still has to brain cells to rub together. But listen to listen to the New York Times as a blueprint for liberal ambition. It was breathtaking imagine that Republicans said we have a plan. Here's our plan full employment for everyone taxes of zero and abolition of seven eighths of the federal government. No details. Just that. Do you think it would be talking about how it's breathtakingly ambitious? You think that's where that would go? It's breathtakingly embassies. We media bias is. So I mean, this is nauseating, nauseating stuff nauseating. Now. It's Larry's is that the New York Times suggests that miss Pelosi Nancy Pelosi is on the wrong side of history. People online yesterday. It was delicious. I mean, it was so delicious as neon taste. Put it that. It must be fattening people online on the left were suggesting that Nancy Pelosi is now a climate denier because she was not supportive enough of the green new deal. But the New York Times reports miss Pelosi is likely mindful of her own past mistakes a decade ago. She pushed the last major climate change measure hard it ambitious Bill to cap emissions of climate warming pollution. She got a cap and trade measure through the house the next year Democrats were swept from power. So now, she's afraid, but she is letting her critics in on the left know about her own past efforts and saying she's make climate change the flagship issue of her first speakership proponents of the green New Zealand cyst that Democrats are unified Okaz, yo Cortez was said, I think it is a green dream because Pelosi kind of dismiss yesterday Pelosi said, well, you know, I'm enthusiastic here's what Nancy Pelosi had to say because she again, she's not a complete dolt when it comes to running the congress. Here's what she had to say. Yesterday about the green dream. Jio proposal it useful based. I haven't seen it. But I do know that it's enthusiastic and welcome all the enthusiasm that are out there. The green deal points out. The fact that the public is much more aware of the challenge that we face imagine good thing because the public sentiment will help us pass the most bold common denominator, volt initiatives. I'm very excited about it. All and I welcome renew deal, and then the other proposals that people have that. Okay. What she actually means. There is I welcome the green new deal. This is a very stupid thing. But I'm going to pretend to be enthusiastic because I don't want people yelling at me. That's really what she is saying there. Now, what's hilarious about all of this? What's Larry is about all of this is that I can't even keep her herself straight on what exactly this necessitate so yesterday yesterday morning? She was asked whether in fact, this green new deal would necessitate massive government intervention. And again for all the people out there saying that she is savvy and smart, I I don't know what to tell you. I I really don't. I mean, if you are of the view that is some sort of brilliant newcomer, I'm gonna play two clips in a row, and you gotta tell me how exactly she's a genius here. She goes saying that saying that maybe this might necessitate massive government intervention, as you know, congresswoman one reason that people were politically conservative or skeptical of efforts to combat climate change is that it sounds to them. Like it requires massive government intervention, which they just don't like are you prepared to put on the table that. Yes, actually there. Right. What this requires massive government intervention? It does. Yeah. I have no problem saying that fast forward about six hours. Here is A O C with meet the press is Chuck Todd one way that the right? Does try to mischaracterize what we're doing as though it's like some kind of massive government takeover. Obviously what we're trying to do is. Well, obviously, it's not that. Because what we're trying to do is release the investments from the federal government to mobilize those resources across the country. You know in the real world, we call that being a a damned liar. Raymond. We just call that being Aligarh like within six hours. She goes from sure to massive government intervention. And then after the blowback she's like, well, no, these Republicans there pelleting, they keep characterizing it as a massive government takeover, the massive government takeover to massive government intervention. But sorry sorry. I shouldn't say that is that a massive government intervention. It's unleashing investment. It's losing investment. So we're all supposed to take her seriously. We're all supposed to pretend she's not a damn liar. She's a dim liar. Because all you have to do is read the words on her own website, which were so stupid that her own campaign had to take them off website. She memory hold her own six page from Jose yesterday. But we're supposed to believe according to the media, that's an act of genius. And also we are not supposed to ask Corey Booker. Elizabeth Warren, comma, Harris or Kirsten gillibrand about any of the details in proposal. We're not supposed to ask them about that. I very rarely get angry at media bias anymore because it's just a fact of the world. It's just like the sun rising every morning, but it is absolutely stomach-turning. How disgusting the media at their job and the mainstream media who will not ask any one of the top democratic nominees? They feel about things like partial birth abortion. They won't get an answer a straight answer from any of the top democratic nominees about what should happen with sexual assault allegations against Lieutenant governor Justin Fairfax in Virginia. They won't ask anyone of these top democratic nominees if they believe that those unwilling to work should be paid for unwillingness to work, according to plan or why they think he's planning so brilliant. They're not going to be asked about a single detail to abolish air travel. They're not going to be asked about any of those things. Instead, we'll just get the New York Times assuming that it's a breathtakingly ambitious proposal. And if we look at the details, it's because we are not looking closely enough, it's because we're not looking closely enough because if you if you push away all the details, if you push with thickets of details of that six page proposal where you get to a gem a gem of genius. Which is that we should care. What absolute unbelievable horse bleep or Cal fart? I mean, it's just it's unreal. It's unreal. We're gonna get more democratic insanity in in just a second. Plus, I wanna talk about a sad piece of news from the supreme court. We'll get to that. In just one second. I you're going to have to go. Subscribe over daily wire dot com for nine hundred nine month. You can subscribe over a daily wire one you do you got the rest of the show live yet to additional hours of me every single day. I mean, we are working our fingers to the bone everyday to bring you that show in the afternoon, and I will say, it's pretty awesome. We had a lot of good fun with our subscribers yesterday during the breaks. I take questions during some of the wrecks, and it is a blast. You're going to want to be part of that. Also, you could those questions during the daily wire state of the union backstage, we have one coming up for the Oscars as well. That's going to be awesome. And we have our Sunday special which allows you to get the if you're a subscriber you get the last question of the Sunday special. You can't get it. And also you get a day early. So becomes the Saturday special for you are next Sunday special. There's another none other than the Greg Gary Sinise. And if you're a subscriber you and only you can watch that episode of full day early not only that upcoming Sunday, special episodes will be available on Saturday. But only if you are a daily wire subscriber. 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And then he tells her that the lighter not actually lower on the lamps. Right. He lowers lights on the lamps. And then she looks around. She. She's like why is it seemed darkened or says, it seems to me and the whole point is to drive for crazy. That's what the media are doing every single day. And they're doing it particularly about a OC because they are declaring her the fresh face. They're giving her twenty minutes on MSNBC this morning. They are pitching her. They literally pitched for all day on MSNBC. They running counter on the bottom of their of their screen, saying eight hours until we interview the brilliant magnificent Tayo say they put her on the covers of magazines how many covers of magazines Malania Trump done recently. But I mean, forget that how many how many covers of magazines. Has at least stuff Anik who is a very young Republican congresswoman how many how many has she done right shoes. First elected at the age of thirty. She's now thirty four she's also from New York have you ever heard of her? Of course, not. But we have been told that ANC is deeply important figure in democratic politics. And then when you come on how dumb she is than it's you're obsessed with her maybe if you guys would I mean, it's just gas lighting and just basic gas lighting, so Democrats are going to have to own. You got you broke it you bought a guys you broke it. It's yours now. So you're going to have to own comments like this. Here's AFC yesterday explaining that ice should be abolished and does not deserve one dime of funding here to say that an agency like ice which repeatedly, and systematically, violates human rights does not deserve time. They do not deserve a dime until they can prove that they are honoring human rights until they can make a good faith effort to expand an embrace immigrants until they can prove good faith to an American ideal. They do not deserve any resources for their radical agenda. Unbelievable. So we're going to abolish. But then she goes even further, and then she says, you know, what forget about abolishing is what if we just didn't have a border, basically, what if it turned out that everybody who is descended from Latinos or from native Americans the can't commit crimes in the United States. Let's just assume everyone in the United States legally is not actually here illegally because their ancestors were here before we were. So here's here. She is legitimately making the argument. We didn't cross the border the border crossed us which full on the Rosza radical argument here. She is making that argument yesterday publicly in front of microphones, but we're all supposed to ignore it because we only pay attention when eo see is on the cover of a magazine smiling. Or when she's dancing on rooftop. We don't pay any attention to the dumb crap that falls out of her mouth on a regular basis. We are standing on native land and Latino people are descendants of native people, and we cannot be told and criminalized simply for our identity or our status. Okay. Quick quick note. Latino people are not all descendants of native people if by native people should means people. Who occupied the continental United States? There are lots of new. There are lots of people by the way who are from, you know, like south and Central America, and whose ancestors came from there. So the notion that everybody coming up from Honduras is actually a descendant of person who's living in Arizona in seventeen twenty two is obviously untrue. But it's also a dumb argument where sovereign nation we've control of our own borders. But according to her no will any of the other Democrats be asked about that any of them. Of course, not one of the one of the great annoyances that I have with the way the media covered these things if a Republican does something bad ever Republicans asked whether they agree or disagree and has asked to own it or disown it when Democrats something bad, then every democrat is asked whether they like cheese right there just random questions that have nothing to do with the topic. And they're never there's never any follow up questions. So yesterday, for example, Kamla Harris who is the Democratic Front runner for the twenty twenty nomination. She was asked about the situation with Justin Fairfax in Virginia who has now been credibly accused of sexual assault. And she says that the accuser is credible. But she does not call for Fairfax's resignation. Now, the natural follow up question would be and should be weird because you've talked to Brett Cavanaugh should be disqualified from the supreme court by an accusation alone. Does that follow up question happen? Of course, not I think that the. The letter written by the woman reads as a credible account. And I think there should be an investigation to get to the bottom of it and determine the fast, certainly her letter reads as is quite detailed and suggested there's credibility there. But there needs to be an investigation to determine what exactly happened? Oh, interesting investigation. Well, I don't remember you saying that an investigation would be enough to exonerate Cavanaugh. In fact, there wasn't FBI investigation and found nothing, and then you still called for him not to be put on the supreme court. So in other words, lady earleir, but nobody asks you a follow up question because that's the way this nonsense works Democrats can say whatever stupid garbage, they want to say six months ago. And then when they say precisely the opposite, no questions can say two opposite things in the course of eight hours, and there will be no follow up questions. She can release a proposal so bad that makes a hamster book like a great legislator. I mean that. Puzzle. Yesterday was so bad that you know, they say that, you know, a thousand monkeys type in front thousand years might eventually be able to type all of Shakespeare interro. No monkeys would ever be able to create that proposal given an infinite amount of time. It is too stupid for the animal kingdom that proposal. It is just dumb, but we're any of the Democrats and the Democrats openly owned it, they openly said, I mean, it's it's so maddening the Democrats openly tweeted we love this proposal. It's great. And then the proposal comes out and do the media even ask them. So how do you feel about like a bashing air travel? How do you how where where are you on the issue of paying people who are unwilling to work where are you on the issue of plant a lot of trees? That's what it actually says. We're are you on Cal farts? What a joke. What a joke. Our media are. I mean, there's no one takes them seriously. And they shouldn't take them seriously. All right. Let's let's get to some mail bag because I need to calm down. So let's let's do some unrelated stuff for a second. Oh, yeah. Yeah. It is. It's it's absolutely frustrating to see some of the dumbest. In the world says some of the dumbest things and then be as the smartest people in the world by some of the dumbest people in the world that that that's a summary of our current political situation. All right. So mailbag time David says, hi, Ben major fan. I really appreciate all the great work. Do I go to UCSD I headed discussion with my professor regarding unconscious bias and discrimination. And I held that affirmative action policies make generalizations based on race that are unnecessary given accessibility to individual information of applicants he's I rented me to a number of sociological studies that seemed to demonstrate racial discrimination in employment. Hiring with the disparities in response to white and black applicants being statistically significant over the last couple of decades. Well, I can think of some alternative explanations that it can explain away some of the relation the data seemed to be reliable. I was wondering what your opinion was on the sociological research. I don't believe in anti-discrimination laws, I'm libertarian, but I'm not sure I can ignore some of the data. Thanks for all you do. Okay. Well, a couple of things first of all since I don't have the exact studies that you are referring to here. It's hard for me to respond. I don't want to give short shrift to sociological studies that I have not I will say this the sociological studies that are most. Often cited things that suggest for example, that people with black first names get hired less often than people with white. I names are ignoring other studies that also suggest that if he's black last names white last names, there is no discrimination. In other words, what people are discriminating against is an assumption that may or may not be justified about culture and not in assumption about race per se. In other words, if you're gonna receive an application from a Jewish person, and it were to say on the application Yuccas go as a first name and then your receive an application from a Jewish person. Just a David you might treat those two applications differently. Because because go probably implies the person keeps Sabbath and is not going to be able to work from Friday night to Saturday night. For example. That's because one is a Hebrew name, and one is named that also applies in English the same thing can apply to first names. So if that's the study you're talking about that's my response to that study as far as antidiscrimination law. My feeling is that if people are being dumb enough not to hire productive black citizens. Then that's a competitive advantage for a lot of businesses. That are willing to hire competitive black citizens. So I'm I'd like to see the sociological studies, frankly before I analyze them again. I don't want to give short shrift to studies that I haven't read that's sort of the basic response. And also again, affirmative action programs would not actually counter man, the unwillingness to use individual data very often people are using generalized data about groups because they're not allowed to ask about individual data. So for example, the Obama administration refused to allow federal contractors to ask about prior criminal status for people. They were hiring this led to less black employment. Why because a lot of companies were simply using group data on prison statistics instead of individualized data about whether this person went to jail in the absence of individual data Melissa's, Mr. Shapiro. My husband, and I have very different opinions on how the twenty twenty election will pan out. I think that the Democrats have been United by such loathing for Trump that they will come out in droves to vote in two thousand twenty my husband thinks that Trump defile Ajit again because that's just what he does. What do you think? Well, I'm not a big fan of the we'll defy odds in spite of data it just. Because there's a seventy thirty shot that Hillary was gonna win the last election that doesn't mean the thirty percent doesn't exist. Seventy percents is not one hundred percent. So it wasn't impossible for Trump to win. It was very unlikely he would win. And in fact, he did buck. The odds by losing by two and a half million votes in the popular vote, and then running an extraordinarily narrow gauntlet twin three separate states by combined total of eighty thousand votes. I think that Trump does have an uphill battle. But that said could Democrats blow it you bet your ass? They could blow it there's a new poll out today from Optimus that shows that in the national race between Donald Trump and comma Harris, it is Trump forty five Harris forty four all Democrats had to do was not be bat bleep insane. And they just couldn't do it. They just can't stop themselves. They are this crazy. And Michael says, greetings, Mr. Schapira. I'm writing essay on common stereotypes of conservatives. And how it is harmful to the group I seek your advice on what you believe are those common stereotypes, there's one that has been put out by Eric from it's been used for now sixty years, basically, suggesting that conservatives are authoritarian that they have too much respect for authority, and therefore they're big fans of governor. Telling people what to do that is a lie. Conservatism is about limited government we ever specked for moral authority. But that does not mean that we have lots of respect for governmental authority, very very different thing. The there also stereotypes about how conservatives are racist and bigoted, and sexist and homophobic, again, those stereotypes are unjustified by the realities, but it is simply a way for the left to suggest that the politics with which disagree are motivated as opposed to simple disagreements Stevens says, hey, Ben, what do you do to decompress when you're frustrated this podcast? Right. This radio show. I yell at people. But but really what do I do? Well, you know, same things everybody else does presumably I I watch TV. I go home. And I practiced violin and play music. Mostly I play with my kids. That's that's the best way to decompress. I put down my phone is. Honestly, the best thing you can do like thank God for Sabbath because Sabbath is necessary over says Hello, Ben have you asked forgiveness from Michael Knowles Yom Kippur for bullying him for years. No, I pay him. No. Why would he should ask forgiveness for me considering that his productivity has significantly? Lacked behind what what exactly we pay him? He owes me a constant apology on a daily basis. Stephanie says, hey, Ben in your opinion. Why do you think African Americans align themselves with Democrats when largely they're socially conservative, especially when it pertains to abortion, transgenderism, etc. Well, I'm not sure that they are socially conservative on abortion, their socially conservative on same sex marriage. And transgenderism is is what I've seen from the poles. Not sure that's the case on abortion African Americans. Historically, speaking started to align with the Democratic Party long before the nineteen sixties Civil Rights Act and welfare programs came into effect. They started to do the FDR administration. And then they continued to do. So over the years as the Civil Rights Act and the Voting Rights Act move forward and mainly as a lot of welfare programs began to come on. Because why not I mean, if you're disproportionately receiving government benefits, then why wouldn't you vote for an increase in those government benefits, but to suggest that that is solely due to the politics of the nineteen sixties to ignore the trend lines which began in the nineteen thirties of. Black Americans moving away from the Republican party and the Democratic Party in large numbers. Samuel says Ben how do you suggest young people get involved in local politics, successfully, we'll get involved in local politics. I mean, the here's the nice thing about local politics. No, one cares about them. All you have to do apparently is when fifteen thousand votes in the primary, and you become the most powerful congress person in America, which is what happened AFC. So local politics can matter as long as you also have social media savvy tempers has been huge fan. I'm senior at a private Catholic high school today, we were discussing poverty and its causes. And I being an outspoken person brought up your points for how not to stay in the United States and how cultures in cyclical poverty stricken areas have reinforced these bad habits. My opponents insinuated I was racist. And my generalizations were disrespectful to the poor. And bathing this issue in any good sources, I could reference. Yes. I always referenced the Brookings institute. The census bureau has numbers that prove that this is the case every study ever done his shown that single motherhood is linked to intergenerational, poverty and crime. And again when people suggest a your first response should be. Well, you're jackass because you have no evidence. Racist. You just want to ignore the point of my argument. It's it's really a pathetic move by people to say that when you say, you know, people should make responsible decisions to avoid poverty. And then they respond by calling you racist that that somehow. Okay. It is not okay. It is nasty. It is gross in. It is on justifiable. Racist says, hey, Ben was a seventeen year old conservative from Vermont. I was wondering how you think generation Z will affect voting in the country over time since for our age, we are pretty conservative. I know also many others my HR secretly conservative. I wonder if you think this would affect polling data, I think over time it will. I think there's a backlash to the P C S J W culture, mainly because they're so boring and annoying. Honestly, there are there any less fun people than the s j w class on college campuses. And in the media and people who make you feel like you have to look over your shoulder every minute of every day. So you have not offended. They're shifting moral standards. That apparently do not include killing babies up two point of birth. But do include random microaggressions that they justified in the last two minutes, David says haven, thanks for spending more than six hours of of your state of the union Tuesday in front of a camera for our pleasure. Best ninety nine bucks. I've ever spent. Thank you, David. Appreciate it. I noticed that Trump said in the address his administration was in negotiations with the Taliban. How if at all do we reconcile this with the US's policy? We do not negotiate with terrorists. Thanks. I don't think we can frankly, I think negotiating with Taliban mistake, I think that we should have gone in. And we should have basically installed a dictator and gotten out because democracy is not going to flourish in Afghanistan. Now, you can install a dictator who is friendlier to particular rights that we hold dear. This is the case in for example, Qatar the United Arab Emirates, the those areas of the world are dictatorships that have respect for certain basic rights like freedom of religion in a way that a lot of democracies so called democracy, like HAMAs STAN in the Gaza Strip. Obviously do not does that mean that's the ideal. No, it's not the ideal. But to pretend that every culture and every tribal situation is equally prepared for democracy that will end with a Neo liberal style. Democracy is just foolhardy and untrue. Charles has I'm a first year medical student starts in August. How did you and your wife manage loans from school? Are there any books? Recommend on the subject. Thanks loved the show. I mean, I'll be honest with this. I paid off my wife's medical school loans as we went. I was already earning. I was a little older, and she was so I was already in the workforce. And we spent an awful lot of money as we went through with me like paying off bills. We went so she came out of medical school that free. But that is because we were a couple already as far as taking loans. You know, there's some people like Dave Ramsey who say suggest that you shouldn't take loans even for medical school. You should go out and work for a few years build up. You're you're you're not basically, and then go out and spend that on medical schooling. I'm not of the opinion that that is necessary. But you know, you find the Welsh interest loan you can and then don't get behind on the payments. If you have to take a side job, you take a side job every says, I'm a freshman and James Madison university in multiple classes this year professors have used the two thousand eight financial crisis as evidence that the free market must be regulated. They say the conservative government's leading up to the crisis and the deregulation of financial markets directly caused the recession is this characterization of events. Correct. No is not correct. Hey deregulation of the financial markets combined with. Massive government intervention in the financial markets is what caused this. So the United States does not have a full scale free market system. It has closer to a corporate system in which government policy skews incentives. So to take an example, the subprime mortgage crisis that was caused that melted down beginning in two thousand seven and then extending into two thousand eight that was caused largely by the government, guaranteeing loans from particular from particular companies because they wanted more minority homeowners to get into houses at subprime mortgage rates. Prime mortgages were created for people with poor credit scores who wanted to get into housing, and the government prop this up. The government was happy tobacco out of those loans through Fannie Mae, and Freddie MAC, and then all those went belly up. It turns out a lot of people were going bankrupt. Now, what happened is that while there was still demand that was artificially boosted by the federal government than the basic assumption made by the market forces was, okay. Well, let's say we give alone subprime loan and somebody doesn't pay off. While we go back, and we seize the house, we flip it and the next week. We sell it for more. So we don't actually lose money on the deal. That's only true as long as the market keeps going up. So they were slicing and dicing all these subprime mortgages. And they're creating derivative products where they were combining the subprime mortgages with higher value mortgages, and then grading all of it. A plus basically and selling it on the open market. That's why it had ramifications. When all the subprime mortgages melted down. It took down all these derivatives with them those derivatives have been used in trades by a variety of financial firms and those financial firms went bankrupt off the back end. So when people say that it was really about glass, steagle and hedge funds being able to both invest and also to do banking. It really wasn't about that. It was about the government skewing the incentives in creating a false bubble that eventually burst because people were being told that there was no consequence if they put out a mortgage to a person who could not pay back the mortgage, it was Fannie Mae, and Freddie MAC all the way that was really involved in causing the subprime mortgage crisis. And then as far as government interventionism, it is probably true that absent government interventionism in order to. Save those financial firms the fallout from the meltdown is broader and wider. It is also true that maybe if that fallout had been a little bit broader and wider it would have taken down a lot of the irresponsible financial firms. But again, the problem with government involved systems that the solution very Offerman is very often. Unfortunately to prevent further fallout is more government involvement, which is exactly what happened. Okay. Final question that see Amelia says hi, Ben, I recently got into an argument with someone regarding the gender pay gap. I told her that the statistics, she stated didn't include factors like job, choice, hours, etc. Her about it was that further. Studies were conducted included these factors and have the same determination. I know this is wrong. But I want solid evidence to prove my point. I'm asking for a few good resources. I can turn you for this argument. Well, Heather McDonald's has written extensively about this. Christina have summers has written extensively about this. I do not know of a single study that takes into account gender gender inequities in job taking in number of hours worked in time in the workforce. I I don't really really I don't know of. Single study that takes into account all of those things that suggest that the gender pay gap is for example, Twenty-three cents on the dollar, which is the which is the proposal of many of the folks who are pushing this nonsense. Okay. Time for some things. I like, and then some things that I hate so things that I like today. So sees green new deal proposal is basically the fire festival. It's we're all gonna party it up on a beach. How how are we gonna pay for it? We're not gonna pay for guys all you have to think about is your shared prosperity. That's all that matters. And that was the pitch of the fire festival. So there's a great documentary over a Netflix on the fire festival aptly titled fire. Here's a little bit of the preview. In the Bahamas. The mice insane festival. The world has ever seen island getaway turned disaster became very are bear. This wait until you see what year getting yourselves into. American rappers Yarwood isn't the Bahamas with his business partners. Really McFaul amazing entrepreneur he could convince anyone pretty much anything. They just bought an island hobble Escobar's island. Oh my God. We're going to talk. He didn't forty eight hours a sold out. These guys are either completely full or the smartest guys in the room. Well, then then there you have it the green new deal on an island. Basically, everybody ended up living in tents and beating each other up for bottles of water so worked out just spectacularly over at the fire festival well-done everybody. And I guess we can apply that nationally now. And we will basically ANC is Billy McFarland that right hanging out with all the cool. People genius salesperson also complete fraud, but we're supposed to ignore all that because it's breathtaking in tension. You know, what else was breathtaking emission the fire festival. It ended quite poorly. Okay. Time for a quick thing that I hate. The thing that I hate today. I'm old enough to remember when people like me, meaning me when people like me. Suggested that perhaps John Roberts would be a bad pick for the supreme court because he did not have an established record on key issues. And then there are people like me who suggested the breath Cavanaugh also may not have been the world's best pick for the supreme court because his record was a little bit spotty on certain issues, like for example, abortion. Well, now, it turns out that this court has ruled in favor of left in a key case from Louisiana according to Morrissey over at hot air, he says say weren't five four decisions supposed to go the other way. Now chief Justice John Roberts sided with the four liberals on the supreme court to issue a stay on the tough new abortion law in Louisiana. It's temporary. But it's curious a divided supreme court stopped Louisiana from enforcing new regulations on abortion clinics and a test of the conservative courts views on abortion rights. The justices said by five four vote late Thursday, they will not allow the state to put into effect a law that requires abortion providers to have admitting privileges at nearby hospitals. Chief Justice John Roberts joined the courts four liberals and putting a hold on the law, pending a full review of the case. And then it turns out that. Brad Kavanagh also wrote in dissent that the situation was not ripe for the courts scrutiny. He said between us the case largely turns on the intensely factual question of whether three doctors can obtain admitting privileges. If we denied the stay the question could be readily and quickly answered without disturbing the status quo or causing harm to the parties or the effective women and without this courts further involvement at this time. So basically, he his logic actually spelled out the same logic as John Roberts. He just dissented. But the bottom line is it looks like Robertson Cavanaugh are the new swing votes on the on the supreme court and that the replacement of Kennedy with cavenaugh and the replacement of I'm trying member who went down for for Roberts to to take over. But in any case, the the putting of John Rao, whose Rehnquist I think it was Rehnquist re rank was going down Roberts taking over that did not result in a new right wing majority on the supreme court or even and constitutionalist majority on the supreme court and ended up with two center moderates who are now a new swim. Block on the court. So well done everybody. Well, done every we'll find out the final result of this. But relying on supreme court to protect all your hopes and dreams when it comes to the pro life position is a fool's errand. All right. Well, we'll be back. Your later today for two more hours. We got a lot coming up on today's radio show. You're gonna wanna subscribes you can listen or listen live on your radio station, depending on where he left go. Check that out. Otherwise, we will see you here next week make sure to tune in for Sunday special and subscribe, so it becomes a Saturday special with Gary Sinise world famous actor and terrific director, go check that out. We'll see you here on Monday. I'm Ben Shapiro. This is the Ben Shapiro show. The Ben Shapiro show is produced by sending Villarreal executive producer, Jeremy boring, senior producer Jonathan. Hey. Our supervising producer is Mathis Glover, and our technical producer is Austin Stevens. Edited by Adam sigh of its audio is mixed by micro Meena Herron makeup is by just over production. Assistant Nik Sheehan. The Ben Shapiro show is the daily wire production copyright, daily wire twenty thousand nine is over on the Matt wall show today. We're gonna talk about of course, the green new deal which was unveiled by Alexandra. Okay, zero Cortez. It is hilarious. It's also terrifying. It's stupid. It's insane. It's childish, it's so many things. And so we'll go through it point by point. Also, speaking of Cortez. She claimed yesterday that all Hispanic people have a natural birthright to enter the US because all of them are really native Americans and that is a completely wrong claim. And it's also ironic coming. From her. And I'll explain why today over on the Matt Welsh show.

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September 19, 2019

POLITICO Playbook Audio Briefing

04:09 min | 11 months ago

September 19, 2019

"Thursday morning on Anna Palmer and welcome to your politico playbook audio briefing stay tuned after the show for a message from that Voice Foundation and I'm Jake Sherman today's Day's big story in the Washington Post is reporting a whistleblower complaint has triggered a fight between the Intel community and Congress and it involves trump's communication with the foreign leader and a promise the president made to the foreign leader that was so disturbing a whistleblower complaint was filed is unclear which foreign leader trump was talking with the Intel. Oh community expected generals expected to break the House Intel Committee today at nine. Am and Joseph Maguire is testifying next Thursday in a public hearing also at nine. Am In the last twenty four hours to potential rival camps for the presidency have asked us to suspend our disbelief president. Donald Trump's White House said he's Legislative Affairs Director Eric and Bill Barr were walking around the capital canvassing for support for a gun plan that the president did not support and Senator Elizabeth Warren told reporters in the capital that she has endorsed Senator Ed Markey and he was a great partner in the Senate but if it was ill advised for representative Joe Kennedy to launch a primary challenge to Marquis Warren said I have no criticism in case you were wondering all is awesome between Speaker Nancy Pelosi Judiciary Chairman Jerry Nadler Heather. Ko reports the Pelosi said in a closed door meeting that Corey Lewandowski deserve to be held in contempt of Congress there and then for his performance before the panel this week. Donald Trump uh-huh spoke to reporters again on Air Force One this time from San Diego to Washington and he said he expects to give San Francisco a notice environmental violations related to the city's homelessness his problem he also talked about Rock Obama's net flicks production deal and said that if people are looking to him they should be looking into that and Obama's book sales no idea what he's talking about a bear on one time oh trump's at a cost too much to house prisoners and he also pull a wad of cash out of his pocket when answering about Reuters photo published yesterday which showed twenty dollar bills coming out of the back of his pants trump said he doesn't carry a wallet because he hasn't had to use credit cards in a long time but said he likes to leave tips in the the hotel. Daniel has a scoop that trump's former national security adviser John Bolton harshly criticized the administration's foreign policy in a closed door meeting in New York City and like we told you in playbook. PM Politico is now reporting that the White House has withdrawn Jeffrey Baird to head FEMA. The White House's is expected to nominate Peter Gainer current acting administrator of FEMA. We've got first playbook. S. K. Decay is handling public affairs and public relations for the UAW which is striking striking against General Motors. They're heading the rapid response effort out of the Detroit Marietta Renaissance Center. Here's something t Mitchell be interested in the Lexington. Herald leader reports that Kentucky State Police have taken a computer from Alison Leonard Grimes Office as part of an investigation into how she and her aides use voter data on the Twenty Twenty Front Chris Cadillac. They go reports. Kamala Harris and her team are betting it all on an Iwa strategy planning to visit the State weekly and nearly double the size of her sixty five person ground operation Russian Holly Otterman and transpired a report that the sanders campaign is trying to crackdown on leaks and the New York Times reports at Thomas J Barrick Junior the billionaire investor and and longtime friend of the president's attended a fundraiser at a private home in Beverly Hills Barrick has come under scrutiny by federal prosecutors investigating possible foreign influence influence during the two thousand sixteen campaign. The president has nothing on his public schedule today. Subscribe to playbook politico dot com slash playbook as veterans as we took an oath to protect our country but now America's public lands are under threat our best hope for protecting them as the land and Water Conservation Fund. This program is critical to preserving sites like the nine nine eleven memorial Gettysburg battlefield and more than forty two thousand projects across America for too long. This program has been underfunded. Congress has allowed our communities and public lands to suffer join the vet boy sanitation and calling on Congress to fully and permanently fund L. W._C. F. We did our duty now. It's Congress's Turn Visit Vet Voice Foundation Dot Org to learn more.

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Will the Green New Deal Change the Debate on Climate Change?

Knowledge@Wharton

24:55 min | 1 year ago

Will the Green New Deal Change the Debate on Climate Change?

"Podcast is brought to you by knowledge award. New York congresswoman, Alex Andrea, Cossio Cortez and Massachusetts Senator Ed Markey unveiled the green new deal. The non-binding resolution calls for the US to move off a fossil fuels provide health care for all increase wages and expand human rights over the next decade. Senate majority leader Mitch McConnell says he will bring the Bill up for vote, but Democrats are dismissing that move as a political ploy rather than a series debate on the merits of the plan to review the aspects of the green new deal on how likely it is to garner. Supporting congress for joined here in studio by Eric ords, professor of legal studies and business ethics at the Wharton school as well as director of the initiative for global environmental leadership and also with us is David Driessen, who's a professor at Syracuse university's law school and a visiting scholar at Harvard Law School and David Spence professor of business government and society at the university of Texas mccombs school of business also holds a chair in law. Law at the university of Texas law school, Eric great. See again is always good to see a thank you, David and David Smithson, David Driessen. Thank you for your time today. Thank you. Thank you. All great to have you with us. So David, Spence. Give us your sense of all that has been laid out. Is there is there some positive feelings that you can you can see something that will address a lot of these issues moving forward in the next few years. Yeah. It's it's a it's a big ambitious plan. Maybe it's a little misleading to even call it a plan. It's really a statement of goals so far, and I'm talking about the the resolution the text of the resolution that Representative Cortez introduced it's it's big and broad. It definitely aims at a rapid transition to cleaner energy mix. It also aims for a lot of other things in Rama sort of job creation, social Justice. It's a it's very very ambitious. There's a lot of questions about sort of how you get from a to z on each of these questions, and there's a lot of strategic political strategic questions about whether you can garner majorities for something this big and broad. We have probably behind the Senator Senator McConnell's political strategy here. David raising your thoughts while I agree with every. David said, I guess what? I would add is. In fact, if you look at vicious climate policies around the world, they usually have multiple goals. They're not simple regulatory policy. So I was pleased to see the breadth of this both in terms of the Visteon and in terms of the Gauls and I see its primary potential as being the tension. The populist political party that we can pass. Now proposal a proposal that might not pass now, but my dun-rite rights and messaged, right? My founds the capac- to help change electoral souls, and I think that's needed. I think we're going nowhere unless there's bowl proposals. Put forward messaging shifts where the policies out on these things. Eric your thoughts. Yeah. Well, I think I basically agree. I'm David David Spence lays, it out correctly with respect to the the fact that this is not an people should not be confused about this. This is not a detailed plan that gives some specific outcomes. It's a framework proposal, and it's a resolution, and as you indicated the top it's nonbinding. So so I think it's helpful to be thinking about this. It's not the other thing is it's not a new idea. So there's not something that just Representative Cossio Cortez came up with she's obviously giving it a lot of attention. It's getting it's getting on the it's getting on the on. Apparently, it's going to go on the Senate floor, which I think I personally think it's a miscalculation by Senator McConnell on this. I think they're trying to I think they think that the Senate Republicans appear to believe or some of them believe that this is going to be embarrassing. Somehow for Democrats to have to take a vote what I would suggest that the Democrats would be to call their bluff, volt this end. And it's not a all of the all the presidential candidates. I believe almost all have have basically said, yes, we're four a green new deal. And as as indicating it's it's not new so Thomas Friedman of the New York Times, I think is the first I expression of this idea that I know of and that was in two thousand nine so this is really an old idea that that is now coming back, and the basic the basic thought here for listeners who might not be familiar with the issues is that you if you look at the energy situation, and you look at the climate change problem there really does need to be a major investment and shifting where we're sourcing our energy. Basically, you need to move to a more electrified economy. And you need to move away from fossil fuels, particularly coal and oil. And right now, we're about twenty percent and the world is still. Avast majority of our energy use is fossil fuels. And the fact is that just doesn't match up with dealing with the climate problem. So you really do need and many people have been calling for this. And I include ING men and many other academics. And scientists you need a really major effort that can only be directed by national government policy to move this. So that's what's behind this. And then just to pick up on one of the thing that drives and said, which also agree with this. You got in order to do that you have to give co benefits to everybody else. So the idea that you can just put a a charge on carbon and everybody will say, okay. Let's do it that way. The problem is there's no political sell ability for that. Right. So people just see this. It's ceus job killing or business Kelly. And so I think the the the the the the reason this is a good idea, and my point from my point of view as you're combining the challenge, which is big. Challenge that requires significant government investment with a commitment that this is gonna mean, really good jobs, not his temporary jobs, but they're going to be major jobs in the construction industry, and and pledges to to to really help the people who you need to have on board to pass this. So in those general terms, I think it's really very encouraging development, David, Spence, then with all that is is kind of been thrown out here and I- energy and climate change or some of the areas, but they're talking about family leave. Higher education deal with that unions as well. Is there a natural starting point with one of these topics that really could be able to almost like dominoes. If you hit one, then maybe other ones fall in place. Yeah. Good question. I the point that Eric was just making about sort of tying climate change policy to these other issues as a political strategy could. Well, be very right. Could be right. But you know, when you add additional dimensions to a piece of legislation. It might help build a broader coalition or might cause people to peel off. And I honestly have no I can't I don't have a crystal ball. And I can't predict how people react to these things. But there there are some trade offs associated with trying to accomplish two things at the same time. So let's take jobs, for example. Right. You know, there's a lot of as Eric noted. There's a lot of construction jobs in green energy and solar industry right now has completed many more people than the coal industry in part because we're building a lot of rooftop solar, and those are construction jobs. The the green do deal talks about permanent union jobs. There are more permanent union jobs in a coal plant at the operational. Stay. Or a nuclear power plant at the operational stage than there are in a wind or solar or even a hydro station which the modern versions of which are typically operated remotely from control room with nobody on site. Right. So so we have to think through these various trade offs. And there's gonna be some really hard decisions that have to be made. When we translate these goals that are in the current resolution into actual policy. And so maybe what the green new deal proponents are thinking of our manufacturing jobs for say, solar panels or the other parts of the green the manufacturing part of the green economy. And and you know, once we start shifting production of say solar panels from China to here, we're talking about a more expensive solar panel than so sure. So every step of this process is going to involve trade offs that are kind of paper it over right now in this resolution. I'm not saying they can't be resolved. Or can't be adjudicated, but they are tensions. And when we get to the implementation stage with. Legislation. We're going to have to face those Dave Driessen your thoughts. Yeah. I agree with all that. I also think it goes too little bit some messaging fos Radha G and all sorts of policy design that is you know, there's a lot of focus on the loss. Apostle fuel jobs if that's unique green new deal, but there's been an industry campaign to eliminate fossil fuel jobs for years, and it's based on things like sparing labor by removing mountaintops instead of real mining. It's based on trying to cut corners on safety and oil finery. And so on I think they gotta make that clear or they're going to get blamed for the job loss in the fossil fuel industry and also have to be serious about addressing the problems that David flags on a regional basis. That is I don't think enough to say, well, we're gonna we're gonna get some jobs. I think they'll. Get some green energy and also overtime ears you cost to fall. So we're gonna have a lot of indirect job benefits. But I think they have to figure out how to take care of this group of workers in certain regions that produce oil or mine coal, and how are they gonna take care of those folks, and that'll be an important piece because otherwise they're going to be syphilis opponents, no matter what could things happen the rest of the economy. Well, David b because just use the WALE industry for a one example, the numbers of jobs that are in the oil industry in the state of Texas right now, if we go away from oil as a as a as a significant entity, then you're talking about a significant loss of jobs in the state of Texas. So where are those people going to go are they going to have to move to other states to be able to work in other industries as well? Yeah. You know, target some of this production of renewable energy impacts. And there should be a lot of job opportunities in the energy efficiency part of this right because they're talking about retrofitting all buildings which is amazing because you know, in in countries are states with really ambitious energy efficiency policy for buildings. It's usually focused on new buildings, right? And and barely touches even Vig renovations. But it never gets almost never gets because this thing buildings that's super vicious. That's a ton of stolen blunt. They're serious. You know that can be done finance. I think that's a pretty good source of jobs for a long time. A lot of work there. David Spence you wanted to add something. Yeah. And you question about two loss of oil gas jobs. I think you know, we have to remember that the decarbonisation process is going to proceed by sector, and it's a lot easier, and we can see the re to to the goal in the Elec. Trinity sector fairly clearly as we moved to other sectors were further behind further. You know, we're really around the learning curve and transportation electric vehicles are minuscule percentage of our transportation fleet the oil and gas sectors oil sector is serving that market. It's also serving manufacturing markets that are even further behind on the electrification processes technical hurdles that have to still be overcome their that don't have to be overcome either in the electricity sector or the transportation sector and David recent says buildings or another sector, agriculture's and other sectors. So there's a lot that has to be done in. I guess I'm that's a long way of saying. I'm kind of skeptical that in that ten year time period being discussed in connection with this proposal that jobs in the in the Permian basin and west Texas are going to disappear there. Yeah. Why think this is a this is a point that I think goes to the strength of the framework of the green new deal. But it also highlights the difficulty on the detail. So the strength is if you're going to do some serious change with respect to doing doing something that really moves the needle on climate change. Right. You need to have these big changes, and that's going to be disruptive to the jobs that you're talking about. So the jobs and taxes. You're gonna ultimately changed that long-term goals would want petroleum to move into more of being a stock for plastics and things like that. And you're not burning it in the short term. There's gonna be some use for that. But you're absolutely right. It's going to be a job hit. So I think it's smart to say we're going to combine this with a new deal style. This is what was done in a crisis situation in the in the original new deal as you're saying we're going to have government support for some of these jobs and changing. Over into a new model. And so there's going to be disruption, but just to think of one thing and Texas already there's a lot of jobs in wind in Texas. So they have a lot of wind energy. So this would be scaled up while imagine, Texas, and if you had a smart grid, you could also imagine a lot of decentralized solar power going online, Texas is a big states in the south. There's a lot of sun. I thank David. They've been driving. I'm sorry, David. Let's get berm that. But you know, it's going to take some time one other point on the on the timeframe, and this is worrying about the time for the scientists are giving us now is only twelve years. I mean, we've been sitting on our hands people like all three of us on the on the on line. Now been talking about talking about dealing with this in a serious way the academics. The scientists have been ringing alarm bells for what twenty twenty five thirty years now. And we basically have been getting the diamond right now, the the Karna ministration the US has thrown it solidly in reverse. Right. We're going full bore. Let's burn all the oil and call that there is on gas. There is and in the alliance we have an alliance with Saudi Arabian Russian doing that and Wall Street's role streets calculating right now that we're gonna burn all that up. Well, the scientists are saying if you do that we are really in extremely bad shape. It's going to be a civilization ending kind of. That people will still live, but we're going to destroy the entire world economy. If we do that. So you gotta stop doing. So you need a big plan like this. I think on that score. You're not going to be able to shift it probably and going to David Spencer's point. You can't it's really real are looking at this. And it's not going to happen within a ten-year frame. Right. And so, but that doesn't mean it's not a good idea to get behind this program. I'll give you one example from history, you know, when the clean water act, the Clean Air Act went online. They said stuff in legislation actually that's not a resolution the the the waters in the United States will be sworn mobile and drinkable by five years from now. Enact that. That was impossible. Nobody thought that that could be possible. But if you look out what has happened since then in in both the case of the Clean Air Act and the clean water act. You set a goal and you don't make the goal to any kind of -ssume that you've got to try to make that goal. Right. And then you actually have had progress in the decades since those, and so I think that's the right way to look at this is that there is a real need to declare an emergency. And that's another thing. I don't know Senator just to make one footnote, I don't know if you saw that Senate Rubio pointed out that one reason for Republicans devote against the national emergency idea for the southern border as you might have democrat gets into power and declares a national -mergency on climate change. Yeah. And probably get a lot done. If you do that. I'm not advocating that, but I'm just saying that it is at the level. I think of a serious emergency. And so you need to try to move the move the ball forward. And even though there is. A lot of there's gonna be a lot of difficulty in how to do that. David. Day, spence. I I want to underscore a couple of things Eric said, I think you he's right that states like, Texas and in other states as well have other options, and and can transition to this new economy. We have about more than ten gigawatts of solar in the queue waiting for permission to get built. That's a lot. And as I look out my window. It's sunny here in Austin. And the high today is going to be eight degrees. You're better off than us in Philadelphia today. But that what what is saying, and I entirely agree with him is that this will require in some ways a heavy handed effort top down leadership. So let me give you an example building the kind of grid that would connect all the windy and sunny areas to the places where the electrobi- is needed will require a lot of transmission print mission life. It's really really hard to build transmission line because of political and local opposition. And because of some impediments that are built into the the way we sites transmission lines, legally changing all that is not popular people. You know, we would have to essentially ram it down to throw up states and local governments order to get that done in the kind of timeframe we're talking about. Now there some governors Jerry Brown, for example, was willing to sort of use all of his political capital to get. So big solar stations built in California over the opposition of environmental groups who were worried about endangered species even was quoted as saying that about the opposition we will crush them. And they did right. And so we if we if it's business as usual in terms of how we solicit support and get approval for these things, it's not going to happen on the timeframe, we're talking about it will require a much stronger form of leadership that some might end up seeing kind of heavy handed, and David reason, I almost think that if you have that type of scenario laid out, I sit here, and I think to myself, I almost see it as impossible to be able to put all of those element. Together because of all of these factors that they kind of play in. And so I wonder if you know being able to pick two three four pieces that you know, that really are the most important pieces. That's the way to approach it. Well, I I don't think. So I think first of all these things this is a house resolution. It's not even legislation right? What a sleigh Shen is going to have compromise. And this case the compromise is going to be necessary to make it feasible. Right. You know, and that's fine. But I think you have to look at that is not realistic to get anything yearly. I'm vicious enough con in this congress. The Republican Senate will not permit it. So the goal of this has to be to have a messaging strategy or coalition or both that will change the electoral dynamic, and therefore the breadth of this not gonna have to everything that's in it. Nothing couldn't have more detail. But the. The breath of this and the messaging and the tide high-wage jobs is crucial to having having it have potential to ship the political landscape not to get ten years. But to get you know, fifteen or twenty maybe not all renewable. I mean, you know, one of the tensions not facing. Is there? A lot of people who think that hundred percent normal is impossible period on the people who think as possible overlying technological advances and battery storage that haven't happened yet. It seems to me if you need a shorter timeframe that strengthens the case for new actually, and then that's the price tag. But you know, you you get you have some baseload power. There's really hard to manage a grip based only on intermittent power. So David, Spence. I think saying so, you know, I don't think now. The way to go. But I think it's good thing that it will have to pass reportable compromise thing later on. I'm not upset about having overly ambitious goals now and getting something maybe really good quite this. You know, I later. Eric. Yeah. I I agree with that. I think it's very it's important to have the political context in mind. And I guess, you know, one one question. So I think David's actually, absolutely right. You're not gonna get a you're not gonna get anything through the current congress. Now one thing I'd be hopeful we had we had Senator coons on here recently, and he has a proposal for carbon dividend kind of project and one problem. He hasn't found a Republican cosponsor for that. He had Senator flake lost last term. But one question that you have to have for the Republicans. Wait, a second more than seventy percent of the people. Now, really clearly see that climate change is the problem, and they wanna see some action on that. So it's not enough to just come in and say, let's barris the Democrats by bringing this to the floor and calling it socialism or something like that. The there has to be something that you're bringing. So what what's your plan? What's the Republicans plan? And I think that unless the Republicans start to get serious about this. Then if you want to do something about. Change your throwing everything over to the Democrats. And then I think the strategy for the Democrats is while we're going to the already see the major political candidates signing onto a green deal of some kind. And there will be debates about what that will be. And the long term is that you're gonna get you're gonna get something from that. I mean, I think Senator Whitehouse made a good comment. You said why in the world there's all this other legislation being bottled up in the Senate? But then suddenly Senator McConnell says let's have this a vote on the floor on something. He knows he's gonna vote against. Why don't we why don't we try to kinda compromises and vote on stuff that people are both on both sides can come and you have a you have an agreement about where you're going with something trying to bears the other side one last thing I'd say, and this goes on both sides is that the labels that have been used? I think are really not useful. So our whole conversation here has been based. And I think I condemn tend to do this. You look at the problem. And then you're looking at okay, how do we do this? How do we have a smart grid? How do we? Make transition what are the policies that we can put in place where what what makes sense ecconomic -ly. What makes sense for business? What makes sense for people are just going to hurt jobs? You look at the actual details and throwing around labels like this is socialism or this is Neo or the Neo liberals are bad. I really think we should get away from the labels and just get to the actual problems. And then try to make progress on. Let's agreed. Forget about the fights. Let's agree to look out climate change, the problem, we have to make these changes. Yeah. How can we come to from Reema about how to make those changes? Great having you all with us today. David, Spence, David Driessen. Thank you for your time. Joining us on the phone today. All the best. All right. Thank you. Thank you. Eric orch curtsy. Thanks for for more insight from knowledge Warton, please. Visit knowledge dot Morton dot U, Penn dot EDU.

David David Spence Democrats Texas Eric Senator McConnell Senate United States David Driessen Representative Cossio Cortez Senator congress Senator Ed Markey university of Texas Visteon New York David b David Wharton school
Rep. John Lewis Is The First Black Lawmaker To Lie In State In The Capitol Rotunda

Radio Boston

47:35 min | Last week

Rep. John Lewis Is The First Black Lawmaker To Lie In State In The Capitol Rotunda

"This is Radio Boston. I'm TC on daring and that is music from a ceremony in Washington today honoring the late Congressman John Lewis. DC leaders paid tribute to him in the Capitol Rotunda his Casco was driven around Washington DC and then placed at the center of the Rotunda, and they are members of Congress listened to a recording of these words from the former congressman himself about his message for young people, keeping up the fight for justice inequality in the US that might meals, thumbs setbacks. Some delays some disappointment, but you must never ever give out again. You must keep faith and keep. Show is on a price that is show call in show. That more. That is show mandate. Get out there and do it. Kennedy's away. Yesterday Lewis's body was marched across the Edmund Pettus Bridge in Selma Alabama. The very bridge that Lewis walked across with other protesters on what's now known as bloody Sunday in March nineteen, sixty five. We want to start today reflecting on the life of John Lewis with two local leaders and we want you to join us to. Did you watch the ceremony today? How Are you remembering the Congressman Did the music spark memories in you? Are you feeling inspired? Sad looking to what's coming next. Call us at one, eight, hundred, four, two, three, eight, two, five, five. That's one eight hundred four to three talk with us now as Reverend Marianna White Hammond Pastor at the new routes Ame Church Dorchester reverse. Ama- welcome back to Radio Boston. Monitor be here. Also with us. Is Tito Jackson former Boston city councillor, and now O. of her medical cannabis company. Tito will come back to you as well. Thank you for having me. I will start with you, you know my first thought is that it's a sad day, but sad doesn't seem like the right word. It doesn't seem to run deep enough. What's on your mind today as you reflect? I just think of the legacy that was lived here, but also the baton that John Lewis worked so hard to pass to the generation that Maruyama and I occupy, and just thinking I'm forty five now he started. His walk. When, he was fifteen, and just to think about what that means, and then also you know he, he said every generation leaves behind a legacy. What that legacy will is will be determined by the people of that generation. What legacy do you want to leave behind? That questions should urge all of us to stand up every day to get up every day to do things that will create a more just and fair world society, country and municipality. Seven Marianna. Let me just turn to you and invite you to reflect as well to start. So I had the opportunity to meet. Congressman Lewis twice. The first time was when I was fifteen there west is part of a civil rights tour for many years I let a youth organization that took young people on civil rights tours, but this is when I myself was a young person just the summer before my. Junior high school and We got to meet him in his office. And his message was exactly what people are hearing today? He was very encouraging of young people This was only the second year. That tour was happening with project hip hop and he made space in his busy schedule to meet with a group of young people from Boston. Going south to study learn about the civil, rights. Movement So you, know He. His legacy is one That I I. I'm glad we're taking the opportunity to honor. and. It is a sad day to an extent. But I think. In our faith, tradition, we believe. That death does not have the final word, so yes, I do believe that It is tough to see him crossover from this side to the ancestors. But. We believe that the the legacy that one leaves doesn't end with your time on earth, and he has left a powerful. Legacy and Just, I I am grateful to have met him. Rachel to out known a lot of the sort of lesser known people that he organized within the student on violent. Coordinating Committee. But for me, this is a moment of deep reflection. and I hope many young people. Even if they are just being introduced to him now. Will. Take this as an opportunity to reflect because we need. Folks to rise up in this period, we need folks to really ask what the soul of this country should be, and then to fight for it and I think. You never stop doing that. Let me, pick up on that specifically, because in listening to you reverend. Mariann my also think Tito about what you said at the beginning of your comments about the passing of the baton. What what is that Baton Tito? How would you characterize? What's the baton that's been passed to your generation and that is now starting to be passed in the next. Miami is kind of interesting. We've actually never had this conversation. I got to meet John Lewis twice also one in Boston during a March and then before that in two thousand with the Dunphy family and the baton though. Is the time that he has always been passing the one one of purpose one of standing up for righteousness, and it's the time that we're seeing with the folks soaring the streets on a daily basis ensuring that there's accountability for black lives that have been destroyed and that are being harmed and I think we can't I know people there. There are those who would like to. not acknowledge on that. What's happening today? The young people who are in the streets today, the young people whose voices are out there today there is inextricable link to the movement, and this is our civil rights movement. And what are we gonNA do in our time to ensure equity in education. What are we going to do to close the gap when it comes to in Massachusetts or Boston two hundred? Hundred Forty, seven thousand five hundred dollars, the network of White folks than eight dollars at the network, the network of black folks disparities and Beth disparities in health disparities relative to to cove it nineteen. There are so many things that we have to do, and the question is. What are we as an individual on a day to day basis wanting to do and give to stand up for righteousness and justice. Let's go to the phones here. One, eight, hundred, four, two, three, eight, two, five, five. That's one eight hundred four to three talk to join and reflect with us today we have Mary on the line from Lancaster Mary go ahead. Hi Yes, I just WanNa, say that we keep hearing the question who's next to step up and we're all next, and also if they could stop to black Americans to simply just black men, black women just include them in America. Thank you I'll take my I'll I'll drop the call. Thank you. Thank you Mary Revenue I want to focus on that first? We're all WHO's next. I've heard a lot of reflections on whether or not. We have the leadership we need in this moment, and how local and grassroots is a place of great promise for us right now. What do you think of that? Well I think it's interesting as someone who's gotten the opportunity to go visit Little small towns in Alabama and Mississippi and meet folks who you know John Lewis. Yes, his legacy is amazing, but he started off as a young person with a dream and a young person who refused to accept. The status quo, and that's something every single one of us can do I think it's important to celebrate him an honor, but sometimes we lie is people in such a way that it makes it feel like the work they've done is inaccessible to the rest of us, and the truth is every single. One of US can choose to be discontented with the status quo and stand up. And while we do need leaders. I'M NOT GONNA. Deny the that leadership matters. We also could be a more leader. Full Society where many of us are stepping up and doing. And our backyard. That's how movements are born. They're not I think people tend to think some great leader just comes in whole cloth, and suddenly there's a movement. Reality is movements. Take off because lots of people in in small communities who at the beginning may not even know each will. Find Courage, and then the courage of each of those folks begins to feed off of. Each other so I celebrate his legacy, but I think he would be much more excited to see hundreds and thousands of people stepping up then the C, one one more great leader a much. And we have talked a lot about grassroots in the last several weeks. Especially here on Radio Boston. It is notable that today was data here from Washington from from our elected leaders in Washington and I. Do want to note will also have representative Ianna Presley on the show tomorrow to talk about her. She's thinking about John Lewis's legacy. I want to hear a little more from the ceremony from some of those voices and I'm going to start here with Republican majority leader Mitch McConnell who spoke about what he admired about Congressman Lewis. John Lewis lived. And worked with urgency. Because the task. Was Urgent. But even though the world around him gave him every cause for bitterness. He's stubbornly treated everyone with respect. And Love. All so that as his friend Dr King once put it. We could build a community. Peace. With a child. Today. We, pray and trust that this peacemaker. Now Rush and peace. Tito. This was a man who was beaten so badly by state troopers and Selma. In nineteen, sixty five that his skull was fractured, he was arrested over forty times from nineteen sixty to nineteen, sixty six, he did remain positive and loving, but I'm also mindful of Dr King's teachings about righteous love and John Lewis talking about making good trouble. What about peace and love and good troublemaking all at the same time? So I I also it hard. The majority leader Speak About Slavery and the to finally finally acknowledge It was America's Sent understand that love and and peacemaking is not docile. It it actually shows strength and It requires you know to to for someone to get beat, and to not fight back. as was the training at the time I required people to have a a a level of inner strength on that many had a difficult would have a very difficult time. experiencing so I. Think you know the leader in in addition to observing John Lewis I think he would do well to actually begin to ingest and mimic what John Lewis did in his lifetime, and there was a lot to be said about what can and should happen in Washington for folks to do that and as As as was stated a little bit earlier, leader full I love that terminology Reverend It's it's that's a great way to think about it because if we all do a little bit, the no one individually has to do a lot, and that's what this is about in in terms of building a movement. Reverend Mariann I WANNA. Play you some sound from John Lewis himself. His illness left him. Sidelined during the massive protests, we saw over the killing of George Floyd this spring, but he said he cried watching the video of a floyd being killed, and he told CBS that he was moved by the magnitude and diversity of the protests that followed. The people from all over the world. Taken to the streets to the roadways to stand up to speak up to speak out to do that. Cole getting in trouble. And with the sense determination. And commitment and dedication. There would be no turning back. People not understand where to struggle was all about. To part of the reason that that was so striking, Reverend. Marianna was that he did an interview on Radio Boston twenty thirteen, and he said then he thought people were too quiet. It sounds like before his death. He had become satisfied that people were too quiet. No longer. What's your reaction to that? Yeah I mean that's again. The message that I heard from him as a young person You know he was very clear that they had done some great things during the civil rights movement, but the struggle was far from over in one of the things, he sort of reminded us to to learn about the history, but not in an effort to lionize it, but in an effort to think about what our role is I concur with Tito this whole theme of passing the torch I think the truth. Is that A lot of the challenges we've been seeing. That have been exposed by Kobe that have been Lifted up by the death of George Floyd. These are not new things they have existed. What has changed is our will to do something about them and I'm really thankful that he got to see this before he passed on. I think those of us. Being willing to take. The streets is probably one of the best gifts. Harding gifts, we can give to him. His work is done, and he did more than his fair share more than his fair share for us. I agree wholeheartedly with Tito. We don't need. Each individual person to do quite as much if all of us pull our weight. and. I think over these last few months. More of us have said what can I do? What sacrifice can I make? How can I put some skin in the game to really do something about transforming this country so I'm really excited. I've had the opportunity to walk the pedal. Edmund Pettus Bridge. Many times I'm excited about the idea that it might be named after him He deserves that and he is a much greater figure to lionize. Bed the Mister Peres has who. Was a white supremacist so. I think you know I. Interrupt you there Reverend Mariann I'm so sorry to interrupt you I? WanNa get a little more sound and have a little more time for t to respond to that so I apologize. Give me just a second because I. DO WANNA play one more piece from the ceremony today, which is House Majority Leader Nancy. Pelosi John Firmly focused on the future on how to inspire the next generation to join the fight for justice and his quote to find a way to get in the way as one of the youngest leaders of the Freedom Rides, March on Washington. They said and March to Montgomery. He understood the power of young people to change the future. So? We're hearing that and we're hearing what? Reverend Murayama was just saying Peter Jackson resonating all over the country now in our last little minute or so. I JUST WANNA. Ask What what is the Exaltation to Young? People that his passing now lays out. Get up. STAND UP! Stand up for your rights. it's absolutely critical that young people now, and they are doing this and I understand it's. It also is a message to older folks I guess. I technically am and that category now. To step back. And let young people step forward and lead. Let voices be heard. And their truth be told there's a component as we saw from congressman John Lewis. He did that. He embodied that and it wasn't only about him. It was a life of passing the torch, and he has lived a life that was well lived and his dash that will go on on his headstone. means something, and it means that our country is better. A different and many things have changed because of his living. And Reverend Mariann let me give you thirty seconds to just add your last reflection didn't sit right with me to interrupt you like that. No, no, it's all good I mean I think I'm honored to have known him and I hope that so many more folks will get out there by the book March share with a young person It's not gonNA be overnight. The change happens, but we can hold his legacy. And move forward. And that is Reverend Mariann await ham and pastor of the new routes Ame church in Dorchester thanks for being with us today. To be here. And Tito Jackson former Boston Boston city councillor now CEO averted medical cannabis company Tito. Thanks to you as well. Thank you. Voters have little more than a month before the September first primaries and Senator Ed Markey and representative Joe Kennedy continue to struggle to differentiate themselves in a race for the US Senate a seat Marquis currently holds the two squared off last night in the latest democratic debate, and though sparks did fly. It's not clear whether that's going to be enough to start any fires for either candidate with Democratic primary voters who may still be undecided, so joining us to talk about the state of the race is w our senior political reporter. Anthony Brooks Anthony Welcome. So, if you've covered lots of campaigns, how would you describe the mood and tone of this primary right now? Well I guess. A couple of ways to answer that. If you talk about the sort of energy in the debate, it's getting pretty angry. But you know I've been saying from the beginning. This is a tough race for Massachusetts Democrats process, because despite all the heat in these debates, and that was surely some heat last night Markian and Kennedy agree on just about every major issue so. Do you give credit to market for being one of Washington's most consistent progressives, and if you do, why do you throw him out of office or do you buy Kennedy's argument? That markey's part of this old system that got us to where we are today, and it's time for new leadership and Kennedy's a guy who kind of looks like new leadership, and he's a Kennedy, but I come back to this idea at the end of the day. There aren't like some huge defining political issue around policy that separates them not at all, so it's A. It's a confusing race. I think. Is Interesting. Let's talk a little bit about where they are trying to land blows the Boston Globe is out with a new report today. Analyzing Markey's travel records, which was something he had promised to put out in the last debate. It find he spends less time in Massachusetts than the rest of the delegation. It really struck out to me that in two thousand seventeen. He spent just seventy seven nights in his home state how he responding to these accusations into this data. Yeah. From the globe of these travel records is interesting. You mentioned the fact there. That's important. You know. I would put it this way. So from January two thousand seventeen through this past spring. That's a two and a half year period marquis spent less than a third of his time at Maldon home the rest of the time. He was living in Chevy Chase Maryland. So at a campaign event in Medford just today. I ask Marquis. And he defended all that time out of state, and said he sought to balance the time between Washington and Massachusetts. Here's a bit of what he said I've. Managed this balance between Washington and a Massachusetts throughout the years and obviously. I do so in a partnership with all of these local officials and I think ultimately the question is going to be did I deliver. Up and light for in deliver for these communities and I have done that over. And teach, we should mention that that Marquis was speaking there. In Medford, where a bunch of local officials including the mayor of Medford the state senator there gave him credit for among other things, securing hundreds of millions of dollars in federal spending for the Green Line extension. So this is the kind of thing that Marquis talks about that. He's not only leading. He's delivering and that that was part of his defense today. But this is a place where Kennedy is going after him trying to distinguish himself. Is that right? No it's absolutely a place where he's where he's doing that. You heard it in the debate last night. You know Kennedy is accusing Marquis of absentee leadership, and he's saying that it's important to be here in the state, and you know I think by releasing these travel records. It's just going to give Kennedy more fuel to pound away on this issue here. He is speaking at the debate last night. I want to around the country trying to. Campaign for other Democrats so that we could re regain control in passive aggressive agenda Senator Markey. His to mission went nowhere, but he wasn't at home. either. You Talk to folks around Western Massachusetts. You Talk to folks across communities like Roxbury Dorchester in Madison and field and Worcester and he wasn't there. There is so much more than is needed at this moment, then just somebody that files the right bill and says that that's enough. So you know Kennedy later in that debate, said know. We need to have elected officials who are in fact hearing the concerns across our Commonwealth and advocating for those voices and his claim. Is that by spending so much time out of state? Marquis isn't doing that. So, we said we were going to try to sort of illustrate the blows. They're both trying to land. So what blows market trying to land? How see painting Righty Yeah Well Markey's main pitch that he has a long record of successful progressive leadership, and this goes way back way back. The nuclear freeze movement in the nineteen eighties more recently, he co sponsored Medicare for all in the green new deal with Alexandria causing cortes. He's pushed for net neutrality lgbtq rights, and his main case against Kennedy is that the congressman doesn't have a credible record. Record as a progressive that he's shifted positions over time for example, he points out that after Kennedy graduated from law school, he went to work for Cape and Islands District Attorney. Michael O'Keefe a tough law and order conservative, and there have been other policies that Kennedy is shifted his stance on and Markey asked the question last night in the debate is was this political convenience you know, or was it conviction, and obviously his suggestion is that it's political convenient so that he can you know the so that he can get into the Senate? I don't think that the stakes are low here, but as you talk about them, trying to distinguish themselves from each other think about when I was in academia, there was a saying that the battles are so fierce because the stakes are so low and I do find you talking about this battle over. Who's more progressive when they hold similar. Policies is one of the more progressive than the other. Well. It depends who you talk to, so it's interesting I mean if you say they're both progressives and I've said this in my reporting I got absolutely hammered on twitter by Marquis. Supporters who you know basically say it's just absolutely absurd to call Kennedy a progressive because of of of his past some of his past positions, and because Marquis. Does deserve this reputation as a solid consistent progressive advocate in Washington for decades. Now that said there are places that actually measure. There's a website and I'm I'm blanking on the name that actually scores per progressive votes in Congress and Markey got like a ninety eight percent score and Kennedy got a ninety seven percent score, so in terms of how they vote and the issues they support. They're very very similar but I think it is fair to say that you know. Mark He's been in office since before. Kennedy was even born. He's been in Washington since before he was even born. He has a much longer record as a progressive I think you can say that without without getting much debate so that that's where it is, but again on the issues there's there's not a dimes width between them. So then we've got to turn to the differentiation that we can see I'm asking thinking you know polling numbers fundraising numbers according to that stuff. Where does the race stand right now? Well? When Kennedy jumped into this race, he jumped out according to the polls with with a pretty sizable lead, and a lot of that had to do with just because how well Kennedy's name polls in this in this state. If, you're young. If you're handsome and your name Kennedy, you're GONNA. Pull better than just about anyone in the state, but as the race went on that. Difference tightened in the last poll. which is still months ago before the pandemic showed that it had tightened quite a bit. So, we don't have recent polling numbers. My guess is it's close. in terms of the fundraising numbers marquee might even have a slight edge the market people are very happy with the latest. Quarter that not only showed them raising a lot of money, but lots of donations and small amounts of donations, but they're basically tied in terms of their fundraising marquee had a slight edge. Now mark is out with his first ad in the race, and it's a clear response to Kennedy's attack because he really plays up his Maldon routes and service to the community. We can listen to a little bit of that if you want. This is where I'm from. My father was a Milkman. I drove an ice cream truck to pay for college lessons. I learned here still drive me today. Don't be scared the tough fights. That's why I was an original sponsor of Medicare for all. The why I wrote could renew deal to fight climate change. Remember where you come from. Stand up the People County on. Always be a leader in the fight for justice. Now DC on of course you can't see the ad, but among other things you see. Marquee walking through the streets of Maldon, his sleeves are rolled up. He's wearing his air. Jordans which is a very in kind of thing, and the ad makes the point that not only this is where he's from, but how different is blue collar background is from Kennedy's world of privilege, but but in a campaign between two people agree on most major issues Kennedy is hoping to convince voters that by spending so much time away from Massachusetts market, he's the son of a Milkman, but he's also become a creature of Washington. So we'll see if that sticks, but that's clearly. What Kennedy is hoping to do? Well we'll keep watching it with you. That's WBZ, our senior political reporter Anthony Brooks thanks a lot, anthony, my pleasure, t shown messages for social change come in all different forms over the past few months, students from Berkeley College of Music turn their into song for an annual contest wr's Andrea Shea spoke to three winners along with their professor about their submissions. Associate songwriting professor mark. Simoes has facilitated Berkeley's songs for social change contest for about a decade this year, he an eight judges from different departments assess ninety submissions. Students had to record and produce at home after the schools shift to remote learning view songs all submitted really before the pandemic hit in full, although there were some songs that dealt with that theme and Madison Song Quilt. Big The fold as about the AIDS epidemic winds up having some eerie significance. Now which I'm sure she can talk about. Hello. My name is Madison Simpson. I'm from Concord New Hampshire. When I was writing this song. The first line that came to me was the refrain line. Nancy. SMART girl. But all you do is sit all. Simpson says her song is inspired by the AIDS memorial quilt is constantly growing. It's the largest piece of community folk, art and like. So large that it can't even be shown in one place anymore. You can hear the threads of the quilt in the way that the melodies and lyrics are woven together in the Song Simpsons characters stitching fabric square to honor a loved one who contracts the disease. She got sick. Own. Simpson who's bisexual, says a lot of people don't know about the millions of lives lost to AIDS. This crisis was a really large part of our history. Whether you're you're straight or whatever, and it is still impacting us as a society today, whilst Simpson Song is personal, it's not biographical but Berkeley senior guy. A man's privileged to dream is it's about her family's experience as immigrants in Doha Qatar. She says her dad migrated there from India. In nineteen, Ninety were still on a visa. It isn't necessarily a country where they give out citizenship so despite having given most of our lives to those place when contributing to its economy and building a family home there. We're deprived of a lot of privileges. Certain rights like owning land. When the. Simoes points to manage choice to repeat questions that probe that concept of privilege in both Qatar and the US where she's also on a visa as an international student, asking the question is a really powerful way to kind of invite the listener in and kind of up that space. We don't choose the circumstances that we're born into. And therefore I shouldn't have to be defined by that to. mean. I'm sure for all of the writers. It feels a little awkward to be talking in this way about what they've so artfully. Put into the song itself. As songwriting teachers, we actually encourage people to trust the song to do its own work. The Sun doesn't way better than anything that I can say. That's Al Reardon of Newcastle Australia. Her winning song is listen and love. A song. To. Who Uh. Story. Too. We're told. I was coming from my own experience as a woman has been raped and sexually assaulted, but I really wanted to try and extend the message to. All kinds of pain from all different people, if that makes sense weird in Rhode and mixed her song the day before the contest deadline after coming up with these lyrics. Who? would be would, and so there's A. To. Their own your songwriter. There are certain lines that just kind of kill you. Wish written. Like a lot of the songs submitted this year, Simo says rewritten channels and next level of social awareness about what it means to be an ally in today's world. ENGY. Fat Story from W.. B. U. R. as Andrea shake. Stay tuned. There's more ahead on during. This is Radio Boston. Films. To Say Yeah. Pay. In the past week alone, the Atlantic white shark conservancies shark tippety APP has logged at least twenty seven shark sightings in Massachusetts, waters, most of them right off the Coast Cape Cod sometimes yards from the beach. It is a busy time of year for sightings. especially as the thermometer hits well, what feels like one? Hundred and folks are looking for some relief by social distancing at the beach now last summer we spoke with conservationist William, mckeever about. And how they're not human eating killers like in jaws, but essential parts of our fragile ocean ecosystem, and they need our protection. He had just released his book. Emperors of the deep sharks, the oceans, most mysterious, most misunderstood and most important guardians. It's now in paperback so today we want to revisit our conversation, which began with what he thinks. We everyday people misunderstand about sharks. I think that what has happened in this country that ever since jaws came out. There's been this perception that sharks are man eaters in that if they come across a human being, they're gonNA. Take advantage of that and attack. The reality is very different. sharks have been around for four hundred fifty million years, and their program to eat fish and seals and see lions, not people so when they do come across a person. They typically swim away now there are times when sharks make mistakes and there are bites, and sometimes something untoward happens, but these are very very rare events, sharks, sir in the surf constantly and considering are thousands of miles coastline. It's remarkable that they're only fifty to fifty five bytes a year. That just shows you that they're not interested I. Hear you and I. I do understand what you're saying. I find myself thinking at the same time you know. There was a death of a twenty six year old Arthur Medici last Summer Cape Cod I know that was a mistake, but that is a costly costly mistake from a shark. Shouldn't that put healthy fear into people about this Apex Predator? I think if we need to put it into perspective TCI on, and that is that whenever you go into the Ocean you're entering a wilderness area much in the way as if he were going into yellowstone park in the back woods. No what you're going to encounter and when you deco in that area I think you have to be respectful of sharks. They are apex predators there at the top of the pyramid, so you don't WanNa have an interaction with them, and I think that that's the takeaway message here. It's not that we should be afraid. The fact is there are three million surfers in this country and this is. Is the time of the year when they're out enjoying the ocean, and there are plenty of youtube videos of showing sharks, actually swimming amongst the the surfers and I think it's a tragedy for people to waste the psychic energy. Now I think if you see a shark in the water. Obviously, it's best to to leave until they. They swim away, so you wanted to be respectful, but in terms. Terms of bringing this fear I think that's misplaced in a when when I was reading your book, emperors of the deep one of the things that you reframed in my head for me and reading the book is I always think of sharks as being biters, but after reading the book what I find myself thinking of is their mothers like like a baby into encounter. Something puts everything in its. Its mouth right because that's how it encounters. What's new and my sense from your book? Was that often? That's what sharks are doing. It's how a touch or check things out. Am I understanding that correctly. That's a very good point TCI, and in fact, you see many times on Youtube underwater camera operators. We know when that annoyed cameras is actually sending electrical signal that attracts attention. Do they read? Yes they? They are the every animal. Every creature in the ocean sends off than electric field, and the sharks have evolved over this time to be able to sensit- and so as an example, so you're a photographer. You've gotTa Tiger Shark in front of you. That shark is looking at the camera and take a bite just to see what it is there. Are they similar to our hands. You know we we'd like to touch and feel Moore. Shark gets a little NIP, and so that's how they get information so I think your point is well taken. You went out and. You KINDA, use your hands to touch and feel sharks yourself, but the before you went into the water, you went to a shark hunting tournament. What was that like? That was just one of the the saddest events I've ever been to in my life so here I am a walking in in Montauk and I love the ocean and Excetera, and so I'm walking along I. See all these sharks, Mekos, Tiger Sharks thresher sharks. They're hanging from yard arms as if they were common criminals who had to be executed for some crime. And it made me so sad. Because here are these beautiful animals. They've done nothing wrong, so it got me going to find out. What's the real story here? Maybe they do deserve this kind of treatment. So I ended up going two and a half years around the world, talking to scientists in diving with sharks to find out what the truth was, and I was shocked at what I learned, and I learned so much and I. Put it into this book. Emperors of the deep the shark to tell people that they're the views of sharks are. Are just these missed that have been created over decades, and we need to to revisit them, and so I look back now on that, Shark tournaments and it energize me to do everything I can to stop the tournaments, but more importantly to think about ways we can shape sharks around the world because they are being massacred. Hundred million sharks are being killed every year. Sharks are experiencing the greatest threat to their existence in a four hundred fifty million year history, and that's something that I think is a great tragedy and makes me sad. that. Those numbers are especially you know anxiety inducing when one reads as you as one dozen your book about the important role of sharks in balancing ocean ecosystem. That's not how I'm used to thinking of an apex. Predator, while there's this fragile eco-systems. Something's gotTa. Keep it in balance, and it's been a sex Predator who does that, but you right that that actually is a really important role that the shock plates. Yes it is and you know. The old view is well apex predators kill. This actually should be flipped on its head. Apex predators give life they keep systems imbalance. The best example just to very quickly may be easy to grasp. The concept is that you may remember in? Yellowstone took the wolves out thinking that well, we'll have all these deer we cannot, and it was a ecological disaster. The rivers actually started to meander more and several species of animals. beaver links started to suffer, and they were rightly. Rightly so brought the wolves back, and it had a dramatic transformation on yellowstone. The rivers flowed straighter again in the beaver came back, and and it was a dramatic, and so we go now into the ocean, the same concept applies to at the Apex Predator in the ocean is the shark, and when that shark comes into the ocean, it prevents any one species of fish from monopolizing resources whether it's on a reef for SEAGRASS system. So by keeping that balance, we keep the oceans healthy there plenty of fish that we can eat and provides jobs and I I mean I could go through I spent hours with you on this, because it's fascinating about every ecosystem, sharks are doing something very important whether it's egress systems or reefs. Her open water systems. The sharks are there, and they are keystone species in the ocean that we need yeah I haven't really thought of them before. A sort of Jeddah is who keep balancing the force of the ocean. It's really different way to think about them. And I want it th. There's one other subject I wanNA. Make sure that we get to with you because you talk in your book about the tensions between sharks in the commercial fishing industry. You call out the tuna industry with us, not the only industry you call out as you I'm sure no fishing industries quite important here in the Commonwealth. Is there a way to have commercial fishing and half sharks thrive. Yes there is an and that's a great question because I think there's this view that well. If sharks cost jobs, reduce income then that's just the the price they have to pay. The reality is that we can construct a regulatory system that allows sharks to survive at allows fish to be caught sustainably so that we can continue to fish. For Tuna, or whatever it is for the indefinite future and the current regulations that we have are just antiquated. They should be thrown out now I'll be the first to say in the United States. We do a pretty good job of managing R. E. R., R., fish populations, but when you get outside of the United States and he go on the high seas, the Pacific Ocean. It is the wild wild west out there. These fishing boats are sending lines that are one hundred hundred and fifty miles long. They're catching seabirds and turtles, and all kinds of bycatch and killing them by the hundreds of thousands, and that's where sharks are. Are Getting massacred because those fishing vessels which are by slaves, surprisingly there thinning those sharks to get the fin to sell them, so they can get some money because they're not being paid a living wage, so you get this massacre of sharks, you get overfishing in the areas like the Pacific Ocean and is detrimental to all mankind, and the my book makes the point that if we step back and put in the right kinds of regulations, this does not have to happen. We can make different so in our last minute or so if you could pick one change to shark policy, either domestically or globally if you could pick one. What would it be? I I would I would do this I would create more marine protected areas, and what I mean by an MPA or marine protected areas where you set aside area the ocean where there's no commercial fishing at all. And all the fishing there, get a chance to breed. Grow Up. Expand go elsewhere. This is where we create the ability of fish populations to recover from commercial fisherman. The United Nations has called for twenty percents of the oceans to be an MPA's by I believe it's twenty twenty. The scary thing is that today? Only three percent of the oceans around marine protected areas, so if we were to agree, piece is called out for this and I and I agree with them. We should put thirty percent of the oceans in rain protected areas by twenty thirty. That can that can perceive save sharks save tuna and the commercial. Fishing industry around the world. In ten seconds or so, what would your message be to our? CAPE COD listeners are folks who are headed out into the water today or this weekend. I would say enjoy the beach. You were tired. You deserve this vacation. The ocean is is a is a wonder. And Be Respectful be careful. Don't swim at night. sharks are nocturnal swim in the within the the brake line and. Keep an eye out, and you'll be fine and just enjoy it, so take advantage of that great ocean. The Cape and the islands offer people who live in Boston. William mckeever is a conservationist and founder of safeguard the seas. He spoke with US last summer when his book emperors of the deep sharks, the oceans, most mysterious, most misunderstood and most important guardians first came out.

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Despite Few Details And Much Doubt, The Green New Deal Generates Enthusiasm

Environment: NPR

04:28 min | 1 year ago

Despite Few Details And Much Doubt, The Green New Deal Generates Enthusiasm

"Support for this podcast and the following message. Come from Newman's Own foundation, working to nourish the common good by donating all profits from Newman's Own food products to charitable organizations that seek to make the world a better place. More information is available at Newman's Own foundation dot org. Let's hear more about one thing. Kelsey mentioned there. We heard a lot on the program yesterday about congressional Democrats new plan to address climate change the green new deal as it's being called. What also transform the US economy. This plan is getting a lot of attention. Even though it's unlikely to pass both houses of congress and pears Jeff Brady has more the green new deal aims to eliminate the US carbon footprint by twenty thirty. Our energy future will not be found in the dark of eight mine, but in the light of the sun, Massachusetts Senator Ed Markey announced the resolution on Capitol Hill with Representative Alexandria, Oko Cortez, all great American programs, everything from the great society to the new deal started with vision for our future. The vision in the green new deal is more framework than a specific plan. It doesn't even mention some of the usual ideas for addressing climate change such as carbon taxes or cap and trade programs. It does call for more renewable energy. Public transportation and lots of spending to make that happen. Environmental groups generally support the resolution, but a few like Nicole GIO with friends of the earth wanted a specific call to end fossil fuels we have twelve years, according to science if we're going to need the challenge of the climate crisis, and to do that we have to tackle Foucault feels head on and the resolution just doesn't quite get us. There. The wheel industry says it's already reducing greenhouse gas emissions in the electricity sector as coal plant. Switch to natural gas these days transportation accounts for the largest share of greenhouse gas emissions. Green new deal backers say, they want more high speed trains to make air travel less necessary and more electric cars and charging stations energy expert. Amy Myers Jaffe with the council on foreign relations says changing the existing fleet of cars in the US would be an extraordinary effort. There's three hundred fifty. Million liquid fuel cars on the road today in the United States and most Americans don't buy a new car, except every decade backers say they also want to eventually phase out nuclear energy that industry argues. It's electrobi- is carbon free and should be a part of any program addressing climate change. And the proposal takes aim at methane from cows, methane is an especially potent greenhouse gas and cows produce a lot of it. Call in Woodall with the national Cattlemen's beef association says responding to the resolution is difficult because details about his industry are thin. They need to do a whole lot were homework and much more research in analysis before we can ever really even gauge in this discussion, so far the plans. Biggest success, maybe energizing thousands of young activists. Welcome to the launch of the twenty nineteen green new deal 'em pain. A group called the sunrise movement held a web meeting with support. Others around the country. Organizers plan three weeks of activism, including visits to pressure members of congress to sign onto the green new deal. Eighteen year old Jeremy Ornstein says if that doesn't happen by February twenty sixth from rights hubs across the country are gonna take over our representatives offices Manding that they support the resolution for green the deal. It'll be epic. Some have criticized activists for not understanding the scope of what they're demanding Amy Myers jaffey hopes older more experienced policymakers won't do that not to discourage them, you know, they have an energy and a will the innovation that is not only infectious, but inspiring hand Jaffe says that could be what's needed to address a problem as big as climate change. Jeffrey, NPR news. This message comes from NPR sponsor. Comcast business. Business has always been driven by innovators. That's why Comcast business is helping you with technology that provides better experiences. Comcast business beyond fast.

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Rhiana Gunn-Wright: Discusses the Green New Deal

The Electorette Podcast

1:09:25 hr | 1 year ago

Rhiana Gunn-Wright: Discusses the Green New Deal

"I'm Jim Taylor Skinner. And this is the electorate on this episode. I talked with riana gun right about the green new deal. Nice. Today's guests ran a gun, right? Is the policy director of the progressive think tank new consensus, and she's also one of the architects behind the green new deal addressing climate change as an enormous clinical challenge. But most of the conversations we have around addressing it at least in a political context. I think they've been a bit reductive or over-simplified especially conversation specifically around the green new deal. But I think my conversation with Ron a gun right is a departure from that. I got into this conversation with a plan to ask all of these in depth questions about climate change and the green new deal and to have this really analytical and political discussion, and we did have that conversation. But it didn't quite go as I plan. And I mean that in a good way. So first off let me say that riana is one of those people who's thinking twenty steps ahead. You know, while you're still hunt step one and trust me that is the kind of stinker that you want hammering out a climate change resolution. So instead of talking about this on. It's really high level. We talked about things like what the green new deal would mean in the context of our own lives, or in the context of marginalized communities and also our entire economic and cultural framework, which shift if this problem were solved in the right way. You know, riana shifted my thinking to places that I hadn't considered before in relation to climate, change and social Justice. I learned a lot. So without further ado, here's my conversation with riana gun rights on a gun. Right. Welcome to the podcast. Oh, thank you. I'm so excited to be here. So the green new deal. So it was unveiled by Alexandra Cossio Cortez, and I'll just call her AFC from from. And Senator Ed Markey of Massachusetts about I think it was a little over month ago. And you know, it kind of made a big splash. Right because it was an -ticipant it for months, and then finally the document comes out, and you know, I I have a lot of questions, and, you know, of course, if any big piece of legislation comes out, there's a lot of criticism, and there's a lot of questions, but one of my first impressions was that. It was really big and broad, right? But at the same time, it seemed it seemed I'm gonna void using the word ambitious because I I don't like the fact that the word ambitious it was used as as as in which I don't understand. But anyway, I felt originally that it was skeletal in a way, you know, what I mean? Yeah. Yes. I was curious about you know, how a piece of legislation like, this is crafted, you know, did did did she sit down and writer self in the new K men's so how did that happen? So this is really interesting because. Is what I'm going to describe is somewhat similar to how a lot of legislation gets drafted. And also, not similar advice. Very different from how a lot of legislation gets drafted. So, but I think what might be helpful is a little bit of conversation about how legislation generally gets created. Because I think it's different than people. Imagine it is. But is that? Okay. Or will that be like bit too reductive? Maybe people already know. But I mean, I'm asking because I don't know because I was wondering when I saw it who wrote this. Yeah. So legislation so very few to no real representatives write their own legislation. That's not say those who do are not real. But in the sense that. Basically, no one does because they have a lot more work to do. And so most legislation is drafted by staff now that can be legislative staff that can be chiefs of staff it's really up to an office. So in this case AFC staff drafted it now elected will often review legislation, right and make changes to language and whatnot. So it's they're still involved in the process, but the actual writing of the words on paper, usually they don't do. There's also usually some amount of import from outside experts or communities or external actors, and that's largely because a lot of congressional offices are under staffed, right, but either way most legislative staff cover more than one area policy. I think Senate is a little bit. Different. They have different structure. I think a bit more money, and they tend to be more specialized, but on the house side, especially you will have a legislative staff person. They're usually called a legislative assistant. They can cover six issue areas. Four to six so they're moving a lot. And so a lot of the indepth research that you would need to do. They don't always have time to do. So that's where think tanks come in academics will work lobbyists actually do a lot of policy making because they're focused on just a few issues or if you buckets or if you industries, and so they have a lot of time so often they will come with pieces of legislation drafted or they will work with away in with offices to draft or whatnot. So usually it's actually a bit more of a collective process than people think of and then, you know, people draft legislation, and then, you know, it introduces they introduce it, and then goes through various pathways committee. Eighty things referred to committees, etc. Etc. Now where the green new deal sort of splits off. And why you notice that the resolution was skeletal is because the green new deal, actually. And the resolution requires that it's developed in democratic and participatory policy making process ease. The resolution was actually only it was never designed to be a fully fleshed out policy document, it was meant to act as a marker. So to put out the goals, and the projects that have to be in something for it to be considered a green new deal, and the things that agree new deal has to consider and it also talks quite a bit about how the green deal has to approach problems, which is you know, policy solutions have to help create jobs. Those jobs have to be high quality, they have to, you know, have access to collective bargaining into a living wage those shops have to, you know, invest in disinvested air, you know, the those. Policies the programs attached renewed you'll have to invest in disinvested areas right in front, line, communities, and etc. How that differs is that a lot of policy doesn't stop at that marker phase. So within offices and whatever coalition they have they'll be sort of figuring out those goals, and then with that same coalition, they will figure out whatever policies are in there. Whatever policy language, and then it goes out, and there is sometimes consultation with community members. And you know offices do often try to do that. But usually it's after policy has already been drafted. So the language has already been drafted. And then they're running it by commu members to say does this work does not getting feedback like that. And to the degree new deal departure from that. Because it basically says here are the goals. Right. And now with those goals and this approach and these projects and mine, let's actually open up a sp-. Face at the very beginning of the process and continue it throughout that keeps communities involved frontline communities. Involve activists really creates a very open space. So that people very different actors labor. Environmental Justice activists environmental activists, right business, folks, all of the elements of society, right which that have to participate in this transition, which is all of them essentially can weigh in on the crafting of this plan, and sort of come to consensus around policies together that is a lot of the work at new consensus that we do which is figuring out. How do we bring those voices in? How do we treat them as experts? Let's try to have these debates together and figure out if we can design out a solution that makes sense for first frontline communities, and then everyone else, you know, who's involved. So that's why it's a little bit different. So a lot of. Policy. You see you don't have that sort of holding space open moment you go straight to policy solution. And once you have those you introduce it to the world, and you are having a conversation about those. But the green new deal wanted to instead have conversations around the goals in the projects and the aims and then work together with a large collective as broad a collective as possible to figure out what are the policies within that? Right. Right. And you know, that that actually clears up a lot of questions for me. I think it does. Because I think, you know, one of the early criticisms was that, you know, this is this is an unserious piece of legislation rate in it's it's too broad in. There aren't many details. And so I think that what I saw happening in the space. I'm not gonna talk about the conservative criticism because I don't think there's really any point in addressing that. Because you speaking of speaking of not being serious. You know, they don't even think this is the problem. So I'm just talking specifically on the left because that's where. We need to solve this problem. Right. So I think that a lot of the criticism earlier was this confusion around ill is a serious document. And if so why isn't there more detail, and you've just explained that? Because when I looked at it. I thought these are goals isn't a policy, and it wasn't intended to be policy. So it wasn't. And because I think there's a couple reasons one is that was something that I think of at least from policy design standpoint. And also a bit of a political standpoint is from a policy designed standpoint when you are designing something that's this comprehensive, and is going to affect this many groups, you are going to have a lot of unexpected not unexpected. But what I like to call second order knock on affects. Right because you're an assistant. So if you change one thing other things down the line have to change to and in this situation, your changing a lot of things, and that can mean that like actually second order affects become less of an issue because. You're sort of doing more of the constructing of the world in which the thing happens. Right. Whereas like most policies, you're focused on one thing. So you change that. And then you have to be thinking about other things or you can just have a multiplicative effect where you have way more knock on affects than you expect it and the best way to figure out how knock on affects are going to hurt people, especially people in front line communities is to talk to them and often we talk to them too late where because and figuring out what policy mechanisms what policies you want to put in place. There's a lot of bargaining that already goes down. So when you come to a community after you chosen a particular path forward and ask them away in what runs the risk of happening is that you've already made all these bargains around why you chose this path. And so if they don't like that pass that they're fundamentally Opposers going to hurt them. Sometimes it's too late to change the path right because you've already made peace with whatever industries you're gonna affect or you've, you know, run it by. By the particular power actors, and they prefer the solution in you know, communities don't so you run into that issue until the best way to not have to foresee negative. Second order affects in design them out or design around them or put in place, a policy to like buffer against them is to have folks involved from the beginning an income version, and so that's one of the reasons in the other reason, I think is a real political reason, which is that like I said there's a lot of debates about how you decarbonised well, and especially how do you decarbonised equitably? And if we were to come out right now on any side of those debates without doing proper consultation. We will break the coalition, and we will break the collective before it even starts and some opponents know that. And that's also why they push for details really early because they know that. This is a big tent approach. And because of that like maintaining relationships is really key and also really difficult and rushing or making people feel like they aren't included or you know, weighing in on one particular pathway before you've been able to talk to folks who are opposed to that pathway really think about that. It's going to cause you problems, and that's been a lot of the issue with a lot of environmental legislation and efforts before was this sort of issues maintaining coalitions, and so we're trying to be really thoughtful and intentional about that. And the side effect is that that can make us seem I think sometimes less serious because we're not as prescriptive at the front, but to me, I think it's more judicious because you're actually sort of thinking long term about how to you help not only create the best policy, but actually create a coalition that can help shepherd it and pressure, and you know, and push forward and keep it at the top of the agenda. Until it gets passed. Yeah. Yeah. That makes a lot of sense to me because you can have a big goal like, you know, get to net zero emissions, right? But there's you know, half a dozen to a dozen ways to do that. So that makes sense to me. But you know, the thing is is that I guess I the reason I started with that is because I think between the original version and the version that that you've fleshed out that it's evolved so much, but a lot of people, and I don't even know how much this matters. But a lot of constituents right? Or is you know, who were runs the original one? They haven't given it a second look. Right. And that was kind of my worry, you know, to to get a second look because you know, how could we not agree on these goals? So yeah, no, I agree until that that's been attention that I think we've seen in fell Emmett we've tried to navigate by returning. So various folks tried to touch once. And so we're returning to some of those relationships and tummy those constituencies, but we think that. That's an organizing problem. Because what at least I found is that even folks looked at once, and I'm like, I don't get it. If you go back and do some of this work explaining and invite them into the process, they're still open, right? The door actually hasn't shut. But it's on us to get in there. Right before it completely shuts and invite them to the larger process. Yeah. Ben, you you have a lot of support because you know, I think all of the hundred eight democratic candidates. Yes, we have. I saw tweet that's like running for president the new year abroad for mill. I I don't know on his we I say, so I actually kind of like it. I think primaries make better candidates, and the fact is I think Democrats for a long time have tried really hard to March under this mantle of unity, which makes a lot of sense. But I think often it hasn't been real unity is just been suppression of ideas that were less hegemonic or were considered more radical. But you know, ideas and criticisms that were still very valid and needed to to be addressed. And I'm really excited because for such a y primary field because I think it actually opens up that space for us to try to get to real peace right in the sense that it's not based on all appearing to March in the same direction. Action. But we're actually hashing out having conversations about these ideas and really figuring out. What is the direction that? Most people wanna go, right? Like what I d is actually have legs and legs outside of Washington. Because I think there's also different calculus for what has legs on the capital like in the capital among folks who've been there for a really long time because it can be a super insular place, and what has legs for the actual electorate, and what do people actually want. And so I'm really I'm really excited because I think was a Milquet. I forget there. He makes a distinction between is not real peace. But he talks about peace. That's actually built upon real understanding and engagement of difference of a piece at fake in which everyone is just pretending to go along in order, not to get censured. And how the ladder is actually not useful. It's just another tool of oppression. Right. I. That's a good point comparison, you know, but they've all signed on. They've either expressed some support or they come out and formally endorsed it, which I think is I think that's remarkable. But in a sense, it's not really remarkable. Because you know, Obama did something very similar with the stimulus package, which is often overlooked in a lot of people don't know. Oh, yeah. Yeah. He did something very similar. So it's not really that kind of you know, outside of the bucks. So during the sim. Oh, yeah. It's not I mean to do, you know about this? Yeah. A little bit. But I mean, a lot of our investment in in renewables and cleantech that comes directly out of the stimulus package, right? Like that was our last big infusion into cleantech from federal level as far as I know, you know, I could be wrong. And then also when you drill down to what the green new deal actually is is just and so many wages good old fashioned industrial policy. Yeah. Right is just good old-fashioned. Let's invest in infrastructure. Invest in need it or nascent industries and technologies. Let's build a well educated workforce with access to training that is flexible and mobile and not just not flexible because their jobs are precarious. Have an offense right and their fulltime. Freelancers on the flexible in the sense that they have there's an actual safety net. Right health insurance is not tied to employment. Right. You can move and have access to training programs. I will help you find another job hopefully, fairly quickly that we don't have this incredibly by for Kate at workforce where a ton of people are not skilled efficiently because their educations are not not up to par because we find k through twelve education higher Ed in ways that don't make sense. Right. So it's it's very much about like things that we have done before. And things that have largely worked before. These tactics have acquire actually a long history of success. But we just haven't done them in a really long time. And this idea of embedding in a real economy versus propping up sort of financial ization and growth entirely through financial markets, and sort of just thinking about our economy in a less neoliberal framework is just really it's just a departure. But we forget that just because it's a departure from recent history. Doesn't mean that it's a departure from all history. Just just the history that we remember I think most vividly. Yeah. And I do wanna talk about that. But I want to go back to because I think this is important because because it hasn't been given enough attention, right? So Obama tried to address climate change in the stimulus package. You know, it was it was successful. Right. It was the biggest cleaner energy Bill in in history. And I think, you know, ninety billion dollars was a lot to clean trysofi into renewable fuels, and you know, all this kind of thing, and I think the stimulus package overall was I think eight hundred billion something like that. And so this was ninety billion of that. Right. I mean, so so we have done something like this before. Right. And so my question is this like, you know, what happened to that? What happened to the outcome of that? And and in comparison the green new deal. How does that compare it to the package within the stimulus? Right. So the green deals much larger and a much more. Coordinated mobilization if that makes sense. So a lot of the investment pieces could look similar to the stimulus package, but it's also wrapped up in like infrastructure improvements and an attention to public employment. Right. And I think a focus on equities. I think is a bit larger than the stimulus in which the stimulus package and lots of senses, but they mirror one another in the sense of recognizing not only one investing in in cleantech in and clean industries, and recognizing that those are going to be incredibly crucial not only in the global economy. But just in the next iteration of the US economy because the fact is like beyond, you know, being incredibly detrimental to the health of our planet, costly, destroying, you know, the foundations of civilization down the line. Fine, fossil fuels are just economically just purely in a market sense, not really very viable anymore. The price of renewables is dropping batteries are getting better all the time. Coal fire power. We're at the point where renewables are in Lhasa parts of the country cheaper than the operating costs of fossil fuel plants. So shutting down coal plant and building entirely renewable portfolio is cheaper than keeping those coal plants running, right? So the fact is just like the markets are changing fossil fuels will be getting outmoded. And I think the green new deal recognizes that and takes it seriously in a way that the stimulus package also did, and I'll be honest, a lot of things that we're proposing in the green new deal would not be possible at the stimulus package not happened. Right. Because those investments in solar meant that. We're far enough. Off with solar. Right. Those investments in batteries helped bring down the cost curve. Right. All of these things that are making a green new deal possible and feasible in a way that it wouldn't have been ten years ago. The majority of that I would probably say eighty to ninety possibly very close to a hundred but at least eighty percent is due to the stimulus package. And so I think repeating some of that investment often, I think maybe in a more targeted way, and as part of a larger package in program for innovation and for transitioning our economy, that's a lot of what the green new deal is. Right. You know, actually this interesting. So it can because Al Gore mentioned something Al Gore. I missing something recently about the cost of renewable energy in hell was, you know, plummeting so quickly that we were going to that we were going to meet the goals of the Paris climate agreement despite not being in that is that still true. Yeah. I could totally see that happening. Now. I think with the Paris agreement the. Thing that those agreements bring I mean, among I mean, they have multiple benefits, but a really key one is essentially making a commitment, and then that sending a signal to industries, and you know, to the country, and to you know, reps that this is a problem that we take seriously, and we are joining the global community and fighting it. So I think that that is useful in the price of renewables is dropping and I mean, businesses utilities like state cities are committing to moving. And so I think that that's another big factor. It's the prices coming down, which enable these commitments. But also, regardless of the pairs commitment, individual communities individual actors are committing to dealing with climate change. And they're committing to using these technologies in the more those technologies are used and deployed the cheaper it becomes so. Yeah. I mean, I'm definitely not arguing about climate. So he's totally right. On a lot of levels. But it's I think sometimes it can be a bit of a chicken and egg situation. But we definitely couldn't pursue such a quick like a ten year timeframe had renewables, not gotten as cheap as they are or batteries. Like, we're I mean some figures project that the EV's will be like seventy percent of the market and five years. Well, and that's you know, with no government policy, and we we would do well to take them seriously. And to actually be proactive about planning how we want to engage with those industries how we wanna grow them. How we want to treat workers in them. How we want to think about automation in the context of of the switch to these technologies, and you know, what that means for supply chains and all of that we wanna be proactive about thinking about it. Instead of just letting it happen and letting the same market forces in the same actors who. They into make a lot of money and don't have a stake in doing the stuff equitably take the lead. And that's really what the green new deals about. It's about saying this transition is coming. Let's take seriously. Let's do some real thinking about how we want it to happen. How we want the outcomes to be how we wanna protect people through it. How we want to help them transition how we wanna use it to rebuild communities. Let's do that. Instead of letting it just happen to us. Right. So in case someone's listening in they don't know what e v stands for it stands for electrically electric vehicles. Yes. So I I like now since I work on a long us all these terms, unlike EJ and people are like what like mental Justice EV is an electric vehicle. J G is a jobs guarantee 'em for a is Medicare for all keep up IPE. He up. Okay. So speaking of EJ dig at the right? So let's talk about that. Let's talk about the community and some of the other goals in the green new deal around. You know, imagine transforming the economy and addressing wage stagnation, you know, Rachel wealth divide. Why do those have to be completed in this resolution? Why do we have to keep equity at the center and communities? No come on. No. I didn't mean mean. Didn't mean an like an A L bet sounded so shady I'm sorry. And I think I think my job is it showing because it comes. That's usually actually the question. I get why do you have to do them? And repair I'm like in my ju jitsu mode. I'm like let me take down that question to like. I'm just really honest open question about how things are connected. And I'm so sorry. I was like ready to fight and I need to put down my arms. We're not fighting. Now. That's fine. I thought it was cute. So nobody no seriously. Like why I didn't even know what? My question is anymore. If you like smart podcasts about politics and foreign policy with an injection of humor. You're going to love deep state radio twice a week. This podcast will take you on a smart and director of the inner workings of American power hosted by noted author and commentator, David Rothkopf deep. State features regular guests like Rosa Brooks of Georgetown law school or Corey Schalke who's the deputy director general of the International Institute for strategic studies. Deep state radio features regular rotation of guest experts from legal national security and foreign policy communities who provide an incident perspective that you can't find anywhere else. So subscribe to deep state radio wherever you get your podcast or visit the DS our network dot com. For more information about becoming a member. Well, also, so is your question. Like why connect like why? I guess maybe I just answer my own question. I understand why. They're connected, right? But why conflict them in the same in the same resolution got right because you can address the well I'd outside of you know, a climate change was Lucien. Right. So I think there's a couple reasons the first is an I don't mean this flippantly, although is gonna come up flippantly is that you can walk into gum at the same time in the sense that a lot of the solutions related to wealth inequality are the same type of solutions that you would pursue if you were dealing with climate change, particularly from an industrial policy perspective. And so what I mean by that is that the wealth gap has become so there's also. Income inequality, and there's a wealth gap. So those are actually two related but separate issues. So let's that out there to deal with income inequality. Essentially be amount of any quality that we have in our society has become too much to deal with purely through redistributing money through the tax system, which is often how we tried to deal with income inequality particularly over the less three like three decades, particularly since Reagan. And there's a really interesting paper up forget the the name of it. But there's an economist Stanford name says, and he was working with a couple of his colleagues, and they did this like national sort of like a national income portfolio to figure out how the gains from economic growth have passed to different folks on the income level. And to one of the like finding the net that I thought was incredibly interesting but with small which is that since the nineteen eighties. We have had more means tested assistance programs largely through the Texas. System, but we've gotten to a point where tax and post tax income for the vast majority of Americans. But particularly if you're talking about the like, lower half of the income spectrum are essentially the same which means that even though we have all these programs. They income inequality before is so drastic that even when you're trying to even it out through the tax system. It's not working. And so that means that you're going to need to sort of intervene in labor markets more. And that's where you've heard people talking for years about like public employment programs because obviously it pulls people out of unemployment, you can raise, you know, wage standards, etc. Etc. But the issue of public people get really sort of touchy about with public works programs is that in less, you're doing something productive or something that is going to grow the real economy or that the real economy needs it can become redundant and actually drive. Flation and draft sort of other negative economic impacts. And the really cool thing about if you take an industrial policy perspective to how you deal with climate change with necessary because when you change your energy source, you change everything. Right. And so you need to be thinking about how do we, you know, plan cities better. How do we reduce emissions through buildings right because our built infrastructure buildings particularly take a lot of energy, and they produce a lot of missions. I think it's like thirty percent. But if you're taking this industrial policy perspective that creates a lot of work to be done, which means that all of a sudden, you have all this productive work that needs to be done. And you need almost if not full employment almost will employment, which means you need everyone sort of working in these productive capacities. And so it creates a natural link between a public works program and a climate change program. And we think that that's really. Portent because the fact is like you said earlier, you can decarbonised in a lot of ways. Right. So what we're saying is essentially like if there's a way where you can decarbonised decarbonising also deal with inequality and inequity and the solutions for that are really difficult to pass, you know, outside of a crisis or whatnot. Why don't you just link them together and have a cross cutting solution? Right. Isn't that more efficient than trying to do one? And then try to do the other especially if you actually are going to have to flip all these things in your built environment. If you are actually going to have to invest in in all of these new industries and create jobs, right? Why can't you have a solution that does both? And that's where we're coming from. And that's why we connected, and then there's also just the bare facts of like, why inequities is connected to climate change. We know there's increasing amount of evidence says, particularly in rich countries, the more income inequality. You have the more emissions. You. You have. And there's like arguments about the mechanisms like why that happens? But it's a fact that it happens, right? And so if we're trying to fix climate change, and we're not dealing with inequality in income and wealth, then you're kind of shooting yourself in the foot. And then the other thing is just from a purely. I think at least for my view, it makes a lot of sense for lots of reasons. But if if you're only even thinking about it from a Justice perspective, the same people who are most likely to be left out of a transition to agree in Konami because of skills, or you know, discrimination right are the same people who are most at risk of dying or being just negatively impacted by the most severe effects of climate change by the weather affects and these are also the same people who have been losing their lives and their bodies to fossil-fuel pollution, right? Seventy percent of African americ-. Live within thirty miles of a coal fire power plant, and then we wonder why black kids are three times more likely to have asthma and are more likely to die from asthma. How I think something like eighty percent or more of Latinos live in areas with air quality violations. Right. These are people who are getting cancer who are having heart attacks who are having asthma attacks because of our reliance on fossil fuels. So to ask them to also pay the price for transition to a green economy and possibly to an economy that again has goods and services that they cannot access because of where they are in the economy, and the kind of work that they that is available to them. How is that fair? How is that just in house that at all in keeping with any of the principles that we espouse to have in America? Yeah. Yeah. That makes sense. So what does the question that you normally get that? You've. That I react to too. So it's the same question. I think, but it often comes from a different place at least it feels like to me. So it's less like let me hear your logic for connecting this, and it starts from a place of why would you connect this won't this make it harder to pass. Right. So there's a certain, you know, a certain like assumption that this was a dumb decision work questionable one instead over during the logic is and I also think that. I mean, you're you're a woman of color to if. I'm correct. Yes. Yes. Yeah. Yeah. I mean, I saw your picture. But you know, I'm not trying to make no assumptions girl. I want you to identify yourself and you had to. How you had to? But like as a black woman, I think it's also I often get those questions from white folks, particularly white men, and it's difficult for me. I think because I don't think there's always a recognition of the promise of equity coming later that I have lived through in my family, and like my ancestors have lived through. And how often that promise has come broken this and not fulfilled. And so when you ask me like well can't we do equity later. Yeah. No. I it sounds like, oh, how long can you all suffer some? Twenty years. Like is that cool. And also the fact is that we know people like to talk about like, oh climate change legislation is very difficult to pass which is true. But you know, it's also difficult to pass policies related to racial equity. Right. Why are we acting like there's ever a wonderful political moment where all of a sudden wants something gets tagged as like a minority issue that it'll be that much easier to solve because that's been one of the main barriers to solving it so far, right? Is that we treat equity issues not as American issues. Although that's changing I think, but we largely treat them as like issues, a particular constituencies, those constituencies have less power, and then that much harder to make those policies move. And also, we know that there are political world is very polarized. And a lot of that polarization is around race. So also once you race a policy right once it's not let's have equity for all people. And it's let's have or you know, let's have a public works program that supports these goals, but let's have public works programs because black people are poor right is how that then gets raced, and that makes it that much harder to pass, and you know, on an I'm not for just like making policy universal just so they're easier to pass. I'm not saying that I'm just saying like, let's be real about the fact that like equity policy is never easy to pay us. We don't have a great history of it in this country. So the idea that you can just roll up to me and be like, oh, but we're all gonna die. You know? We're all gonna die. So can we just deal with some people, dying sooner or later? It's like a kind of a crazy. Me. And so I think that's why react. And I, and I think often, you know, folks, just don't recognize that there is a lot of history on the other side of the equation. And that I'm a grew up in the history. I lived at history I come from a family of agricultural and domestic workers down south, right? When you're talking about them, not being included in social security for fifteen years how much wealth was that that they lost right? Like worldwide. My life have looked like. Yeah. Me too. Yeah. Exactly. And so I think people don't recognize when you're saying let's deal with it later that you're really saying like. Is not just a number of years until that group gets that, you know, right that they are owed and is not just a certain number of years until people get their just do. These are reprecussions I felt for generation right like wealth compounds every year that someone is left out of a policy that helps them make more money or gay more wealth, you know, that compounds as money that they're losing their spending elsewhere that they can't save right that they can't accrue interest on that they're that they can't pass down to their descendants. And that's a decision that those descendants than have to make later on in their lives about how they wanna live. What path they wanna pursue? Right. I always tell people like if I have been on bombs sculptor. I don't think I would have been a sculptor. I had do, you know big ups to all the people of color who go onto artistic pass and. Don't have a you know a safety net. But like for me that didn't ever feel like an option. And so I'm living in a world where like I want that to be an option for my kids. Right. If you are the next Basquiat like I wanna be able to support you I want you to be able to make those choices even like looking at the neighborhood that I'm from there were so many kids who were just as smart as me who didn't because my mom went to college. Right. And because you know, I got some luck in life like didn't have that. And the fact is like we should not be essentially, creating hunger games for all of these populations in order to make it, and I don't think that folks always connect a delay. Because for them. It's just years for me. It's generations right now. Oh, right here. So brilliant. Well, I think it's not always calibrate is I try to give benefit of the doubt. But I know it hurts me in my heart. When people ask me that I get it. And I have to answer it. But it hurts to be to just wonder like how many years is enough for you like when when will it be a good time because the fact is yes climate change will kill us. All but is going kill some of us. I. So like it will kill some people. I and those people are going to be vulnerable population. So what you were a sculptor. What? No, I said if I wasn't. I don't have any artistic talents. Thank god. I I don't have it. So I do have any to to invest in that mo- like I right? But what if I had been it would've been a great source of pain in my life? Right. Like, I I mean, and I say that jokingly, but like I wanted to be a journalist and beyond the fact that like I'm terrible when people like turn down interviewed on like, well, I don't wanna talk to you either. Fine. We're done here. It makes me not very good journalists. It was also like a lot of a work was unpaid internships. And I couldn't do that. Or you know, you have to spend a ton of time at the college paper. But like I had a scholarship that I had to keep a certain GPA to keep. And so I was very nervous about taking those sorts of opportunities or committing to those things because I couldn't lose that money. Or I knew that I would going to have to present a particular way. If I wanted to go to grad school or have high grades, right? And I don't think people recognize the way that that shapes your world and how you move in. And. Yeah. And the decisions that you make. Yeah. We could talk about that forever. I have thoughts. But what else do you wanna talk about? Well, I mean anyway, so we're back to this. So the the reason I asked this question in the reason I asked at the way it was it wasn't from that place because I would never come from that place. It was coming from. If it's wrapped in this larger this larger resolution, will it get short shrift genuine. I mean, Secondly, if you pull it out like why couldn't it be just as big, you know, or close to you know, what I mean? Yeah. And it's so funny because there's a lot of people who are like we'll come to in and say things like this is just a progressive wish list of policies. I'm like would you like to see my wishlist because it is far larger? Like, we're not talking about voting rights. We're not talking about a lot of things. And that's because the policies that we chose are actually policies that are necessary to support an industrial like mass mobilization. So they're progressive policies that make sense in this context, we didn't just add a bunch of stuff in. But that also means that there's a ton of things that right that are related to equity. I mean, there's some stuff about housing in the resolution, and but housing is a huge issue. Right. Like, we need still d- Carceres, right? There are so many things that are not here for the reasons that they didn't fit within our framework. But the reason I'm actually not worried about them getting short shrift. And I'm glad they're include. It is because I think often we think of equity as a thing that happens on the side. And so you'll have like particular offices or particular programs, but the fact is that like equity and inequity is is the result of systemic failures or successes, right? Equity is is a systemic. I think success inequity is generally a systemic failure the things that ties together that they both come from systems. And so of you want equity, you need to be thinking about how do you see power to folks who have generally been disinvested, how do you so power into their communities? How do you so investment into their communities through policy, right? So equity has to be the Lind through which you design a system. And if you are not doing that, you're going to be really hard pressed to get equity at the end, and the other reason, I think that it's really important in this is going to get like a little theoretical, but essentially policy mechanisms are not a political, right? So they are invested in upholding shifting. However, you want particular power relationships, right? And so equity in an inequitable society. Like, we have right now requires a rewriting of power relationships. It requires give. Being some more power to some groups, and in some cases, taking away power from other groups who have too much power, or you know, are largely using their power ways that disempowers other people, etc. And now if you are choosing policy mechanisms that are predicated on keeping existing power relationships in place right 'em. What I mean by that is that one example is you design a policy that will sort of like keep fossil fuel industry at the center or give them particular. This is the community that you're really or the industry that you really sort of focused on if that is your policy, then you're not going to get equity at the end because the reason that that policy is getting past the reason that is getting support the reason that it's moving is because it keeps those same power relationships in place. So if that is your mode, you're not going to get a different outcome. Right. So. If your method doesn't match your outcome, then they're gonna be odds. And so when you put equity at the center, it also shapes what tools, and what mechanisms are on the table. How you will design those mechanisms and ultimately like what you can use. What's in your toolbox to create the future that you want? And I think that's why it's really important to keep it at the center because it changes not only how you approach the question. But what solutions you sort of keep in play? Does that makes sense? Yeah. Yeah. That does make sense. And I and I'm assuming that that has been the issue with some of the other proposals. That's been put forth, right? Yes. So I think it's equity if you read the Feinstein resolution, which has you know, a lot of good things in it. None of it really talks about equity or renegotiating these power relationships, which is also really wild to me because deep deep carbon. Like on the level that we need to do it in order to. I mean karma chains. I mean, we just figure out that the Arctic will warm regardless, but if you were to mitigate the worst effects of climate change and really be aggressive that deep decarbonisation is going to like, I said changing your energy source changes everything it's going to change drastically the economy, and is going to transform the economy, and that transformation is going to touch a lot of people. And so if you aren't thinking about how to protect if you are silent about how to protect people through the economic transition what you're essentially saying, I'm just gonna leave it up to the market, right? And we know what that leads to right. We'll come back to it. No. Yeah. Yeah. Right. Yeah. We will leave it up to the market or one problems that we should have foreseen, right? Or that we saw coming down the pike. When those problems come up, then it's gonna be a -mergency, and we're going to have to like. You know, do all these things to try to to deal with it. And of course, when something's done in emergency has never done as well. As you need it to be done. Right. And so you're essentially just creating a system where either you leave all of this economic transformation up to the market and the market is going to be responsible for like protecting people for figuring out which workers wants to value, the most, etc. Or you're going to have these like new jobs that could be great come up in this ecosystem of precarious labour where you know, we don't have to provide health insurance, and you can be a time freelancer, and you know, it's a gig economy or whatever, right? Like, you are saying that these new jobs will emerge in this ecosystem. And therefore, we'll have to adapt to this ecosystem or whatever or at best. You're just leaving all those questions to the side. And you'll deal with them later, which is also if you know that the issue is gonna come up. Why would you just decide? To deal with it later. You know? There's a lot of tensions. But I think what it also boils down to is that like what does it mean to be a politically feasible solution? And what it often means is that what's feasible. It's whatever upsets existing power relationships. The least for the people for whom those power relationships are the most profitable. Yeah. Yeah. Exactly. And so if that is the sort of bargain that you are driving, right? The goal for this policy is for to be feasible, and therefore not, you know, upset those relationships, then why would you think that that policy is going to create equitable outcomes? At the back end. I mean, it will be transformative. But we all know that all transformation is not right or positive in the long run. Even while you're making think because it's often been the narrative is often been that this is about political expedience and not about profitability. You know what I mean? Yeah. Yeah. But the fact is what makes it politically expedient the profitability, exactly. No, no, exactly, especially when you know, the GOP. I mean, thank God. More republicans. I think are starting to get hip to climate change or to recognize that the Republican that the GOP dis a real strategy a unreal sort of alternative proposal. What what have you? I mean, that's great. But at the end of the day like there's a whole political party that takes a ton of money from fossil fuels. I forgot like some of the senators that made the fiery as floor speeches against the GED and like I think like a couple of weeks ago. I mean, these are folks who've taken like over a million dollars from oil and gas companies, right? And so you have an entire political party. That is largely slow walk denied right resisted action on climate change in part because of who they're funded by and your solution is about. About being politically expedient for them will. So what about your plan is going to appeal to them, Mike, right? Like, why would it be politically expedient for them if they represent a fossil fuel industry, and you are trying to bring them on board. What does that mean? Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. That makes total sense. Yeah. I mean have so many questions I can just talk to you forever. Because I'm taking like, you know, if you're not being judgmental about the greed, then, you know, those same people who are getting money from these industries like the oil industry, and you know, the people who are getting these big checks now, they could shift their focus, and they can get wealthy from these new sources of energy, right? Or, you know, like say the EV industry, we'd be back in the and I get this thing where it's like it's not to say, no one can can profit. No one can make money, right? A lot of like we talk about World War Two, and as a model for a mass economic mobilization in the US and a lot of people may money through. That right. A lot of private companies made a lot of money from that. And I'm not saying that that's the goal. But I'm saying that industry does have to be involved in this the market is a part of this. And so the question is really how do we want to shape the market? How do we want markets? How can they drive the changes that we need them to make right? And how do we want to involve private capital in wear and on what terms right? These are questions that we are dealing with agree new deal that we have to confront. I mean, a partnership between them and investing an industry like the goal is for some industries, and like some folks, you know, to profit, but the fact is we want them to profit from behaviors that we need them to make. And we want so much of that prophet to go to workers. Right. We want a situation where all profit doesn't accrue just to capital, and none of it ever makes it to labor every somebody's gonna make money. The question is how how much where? How much is going to workers Ryan married fairly compensating on are we making our society more equitable. It's going to come across as me standing up for greed, like she I think, but I think it's real it's, you know, I mean greed is bad. But the fact is like there's money to be made and some people will make money, and that's inherently a bad thing. The the question is how much wealth of they accumulating how much are they returning to society? How much our workers making? Because what we've seen now is largely if you want to put it the most harshly theft. Right. We've seen a company like bottom lines, grow and wages are stagnant. Why how is not because you're not making money. So I think a lot of agree new deals about using this moment of transformation because it's going to happen to proactively think about. Out. What are the set of power relationships? We want in the next phase of the US economy because the ones that we built particularly since Reagan are not working out. So how do we want to change it? Yeah. And wanted to ask you about because one of the things that did get some criticism is about modernizing transportation. Right, which we talked about ready. But specifically about you know, trains, right? How do you envision that working in? Is there a model somewhere in the world that we're trying to, you know, model this after when it comes to high speed rail? Yeah. Yeah. I'm not an expert in high speed rail. I know that there are definitely functional in and successful international examples, I think for high speed rail the engines investing in public transit more generally is that we understand that yet all all of the cars can be electric vehicles. And that is wonderful. I mean, especially if EV's are paired to clean electricity, right generated by cleaner renewable sources than that's awesome. And it greatly reduces emissions. But. Part of reducing emissions is also about consumption and consumption practices, which include, you know, how many miles we travel, etc. And also, how do you plan sort of denser hubs, right? There's a lot of interest in that because you know, denser communities more walkable communities communities with more public transit options also will reduce emissions. And so I think high speed rail is part of a larger just attention to public transit options with a recognition that if we are going to be asking people to change consumption practices, particularly in relation to transit. We have to give them reliable viable alternative is upgrading the buildings. How do we because I think the line is that we want to upgrade all existing buildings. Right. And what does that look like how do we do that? So. So so the building was actually one of my favorite projects because there are so many ways you could structure it, and I learn more about it all the time so upgrading all building. So there's a few things to think about when it comes to upgrading all building. So I is that there are different types of buildings, obviously, there's commercial residential, and then you have like public buildings, which, you know, generally owned by some form of government and. Now, the interesting thing about that is that upgrading doing upgrading for energy efficiency for commercial buildings pays a lot more than it does for residential but residential is easier to train people for into to like do through sort of public works programs or that that sort of setup. And so you deal with a couple of things like that's a clear sort of issue of equity. So there's some discussion of like how and we're doing something about how would you structure the residential arms? So that it is actually a source of good jobs. How do you know, make sure wages are at appropriate levels. How do you make sure that people get benefits? How do you make sure that it's connected to additional training, etc. So that is one where like we're thinking a lot about the jobs guarantee there, and and how jobs program there could work, but there are other options. The other thing about upgrading buildings is new construction and existing construction. So new construction that is in some ways easier to deal with because new construction has to abide by codes. Now, those codes are generally set at the municipal level sometimes at the state, but if you can get really strong energy efficiency codes for new construction you just save yourself from having to deal with the problem down the line. So you can do new construction that way and then for existing construction. That's when you have a question of how do you do that because co doesn't apply to existing buildings so most existing buildings. I just was in a meeting and learn that something like eighty maybe higher percent of New York buildings are existing buildings are actually out of code because if they're not new construction they don't have to. But there are periods in the life cycle of a building say when you get a new owner, a lease changes, etc. Where you can do improvements and upgrades. So a lot of what we're trying to think about when we thinking about structuring that program is how do you do on cycle upgrades? So that's like in periods of within buildings lives where things need to be updated, especially with large commercial buildings and how much do you wanna do off cycle? Which is a off cycle means that you're just doing it. Even if the building is a net like sort of inflection point in its life. So that was a very long way of saying like, we're basic skeletal structure that's possible. But there are a lot of questions and the crazy thing about the GED is like that was one program, and we have to do that fourteen more times. Yeah. Actually, I think that you know, all these it's really long answer. I think that kinda sums up the debate in the conversations around this whole thing is because people want to talk about it on a much simpler level than it than it warrants. Right. It's multifaceted so complex, right? And the same goes with my final question, right which. Not going to ask you. But I know you get asked a lot which is how are you gonna pay for it? And you know, now that I've been talking to you. And I've been reading about it the I don't think that that's the right question. Right no-no, Iran. Did it's like what's possibly what's the best way to pay for it? Or what ways we can look to? Yeah. Rhianna requested is actually which ways and also pay for do you mean real resources, or do you mean money right has real resources? Like, the reason you have things like a job guarantee or Medicare for all is because real resources in terms of which means like people and physical capital. But in particular, we think about people right like getting the resources to pay in terms of workers in people will be far more complex than people think it will be because for the level work that will be going on. Right. I think Rocky Mountain institute has data where they estimate that. If you were to decarbonised. Is on the like the level of a green new deal. You would be growing the economy two and a half times. Right. You'll be over doubling the size of our current economy. That's a lot of work. And you gonna slow yourself down. You're gonna cause problems. If you don't have enough people. And so a lot of the thinking about social safety net is how do you get the people like the physical people that you need to be working? How do you scale them up? How to get them where they need to be. How do you make sure that jobs are not just going to populations at are ready to do them, which is very useful in some ways. But is also generally leaves out the same types of people who most need those jobs who could most benefit and also like cower, you creating ownership opportunities to and so all of that is part of how you figure out how to pay for something like this. Now, what we actually talk about who's they how do you pay for? It is how do you finance it? How do you get the money, and that is actually? Me a much easier question, there's a ton of private capital, obviously, the government has multiple ways of creating revenue etc. And that's not to say that it's easy. But there are tools in our tool kit. Right. And so actually, I think how do you finance? It is one of the easier parts of this the policy design, and the system design is really the the toughest part or even financing it there isn't just one single. I feel like when people ask not that. They're thinking of it. It's like which credit card are we gonna put it on where like which Bank account. Are we gonna take it out up? And even that isn't a simple one answer answer. Yeah. And there's like there's so many ways, and so many mechanisms I mean, people love to talk about taxes. There's also bond like how do you want to engage a bond market, right? Like there are so many ways that you can crack this nut and a lot of them. You will. It's not even like you said choosing one. It's really how do you? Assemble a package that makes sense co Riyadh. Thank you. So so much for talking to me. I've got a lot to think about. Oh, I yeah, I'm sorry. And also like I tend to like answer in very long ways. And yes, so yeah. Just I'm trying to modulate it. But I just get so excited to talk to people about it. And I think it's so important, and I think it's so important to be having these conversations in a way that lets people ask questions and engage, and so I get very carried away to 'cause I'm also in the in the midst of thinking about all of these things because they're open question so many of them. And so it's a I think a little bit less like someone who's like this is a problem that settled, and they're like, here's my three sentence answer. I'm like, actually, you asked me about something that I think about all the time, and let me talk to you about maybe. No, I think no. I think that's good. I think is really getting the thing is I just wish I just wish more people were like that. Right. You know, instead of having this kind of like flat, overly simplistic conversation about those it would be nuance and had the depth that this problem requires. We just don't have some. I guess I'm very glad that you are behind us. Thank you. Yeah. So I just wanna thank you for taking this on and for doing the hard work. I really appreciate you. If you enjoy this episode and you'd like to help spread the word about the electorate, please leave us a five star review and ask your friends to subscribe, please also support the electorate by following us on Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, and that's at electorate, and if you'd like to further support the electorate, please visit us at patriot dot com slash electorate. Thank you again for listening and until next time keep up the good fight.

US Obama director AFC Senator Ed Markey Senate Massachusetts Alexandra Cossio Cortez Jim Taylor Skinner legislative assistant Ron writer Washington
Green New Weeds

Vox's The Weeds

1:26:10 hr | 1 year ago

Green New Weeds

"Matt usually does this product. I remember you gotta wave your hands in the air and say. Welcome to another episode of the weeds. I'm as recline. I think we should just use that. Low another episode of the weeds box media podcast network. I Ezra Klein here Jane coast in and special guest star for an episode and been waiting to do a long time. David the Roberts. I l. Hey there. Hello. So we've been trying to get this green new deal episode done for a while. We kept getting hit by the truck of the news. We were going to do it on the day. The Muller report came out instance in that didn't that didn't quite go. But we are way overdue on this and Dave excited. Have you heard a talk about it? So let's start. What is the green new deal? Let before actually get into what what is in it. What is it? What is that document to be policy is an ideologue G is it what what what is the green new deal on? A really good question. And I cannot unfortunately, I cannot nail down. It's onto logical status for you it somewhat indeterminate particle or wave is what I wanted. In the broadest in the broadest terms, I would say, it's an aspiration. It's an aspiration for the US to respond to climate change on the scale that is necessary with a government led investment led mobilization. Yeah. I would say that's about that's about as as general as you could put it. And that's about the one thing you could say that's going to cover all the all the species genus species of the green new deal beyond that you get into specifics in different people, see it in different ways and are using it in different ways. But but in the broadest terms is just mobilized the government in the in the American people to respond to climate change with with a series of investments that create a lot of jobs and in and bring everyone on board and involve everyone. But but so if I had that aspirated that before the green new deal was released, and I have at that after then what is the green new deal? Right. Like, what does it say that changed date or somehow gives people pot from on which to work that they didn't have before? It's gotta be more than an aspiration people had this aspirin before. I I think the best way to understand is sort of is sort of worked backwards. So you know, these activists mostly spun out of the of the Bernie Sanders two thousand. Sixteen campaign. They started this group Justice dims, they recruited these young candidates AFC and others and a few of them one. It was a big deal in all of those young candidates ran on something called the green new deal, which at the time was very vaguely defined as this kind of mobilization. And so when they got an office the idea is we're gonna have a two year period here where Republicans are running everything and nothing's going to pass. There's no there's no legislating to be done in these next two years. So let's use these next two years to put together a legislative package on climate change that Democrats can then run on and went on and pass quickly. If they win in twenty twenty that's the sort of strategic logic. So the green new deal resolution that a o c and Senator Ed Markey and others introduced last month or guy or long ago. It was now it seems like forever that document was just here are the. Goals of the green new deal. Here are it's aspirants in. Here are a few of the principles that were are going to guide it so these are sort of broad goals and principles that are meant to guide the process of creating policy. That's that that is the intent of the resolution. So I it's only it's it's very not restrictive hits. It's not policy as I as I've said a million times. It's just some goals and principles that the whatever policy we come up with has sort of Hugh to these goals and principles. So one question, I have is that you know, I think looking at this and the explainers you've written on this. This seems to be not just a platform from which to launch policy but platform from which to rethink what the Democratic Party wants to emphasize and making it clear that climate change isn't emphasis, but as is the idea of using reshift in the American economy towards one hundred percent clean energy as a meal. To get two full employment through a better economy. So my question is this about a forward moving shift on policy or is this a forward moving shift for Democrats on everything will both very very much both. I think it's meant to be a sort of a sort of highlight policy demonstrating the new with these new young left. Democrats are all about you know, sort of interesting is that the new turn in the Democratic Party is an old turn. So when I talked to Ed Markey. What he said was if you look at that stuff in the resolution all the stuff about jobs and health care and union, wages, and all this kind of stuff all of it is taken almost directly from FDR's famous second inaugural where he sort of made the case that freedom only comes with economic security real freedom. Only comes with economic security with a job you can rely on that can feed your family, etc. Etc. All those principles in the green dealer lifted almost str-. Rate from that document. So in a sense it's forward, but in a sense. It's also a hearkening back to sort of more active government, led aspirational, liberalism, generally. But, but yes, I think it's and I think that the strategic logic on climate changes. I think sort of like the climate community has realized that climate change in and of itself is never going to be a motivating factor fishing to create this sort of public will necessary to do the big things necessary. So if you want to create that public will you've got to yoke climate change to these other things in other words, you've got to make sort of solving climate change also a program of national economic renewal that can actually promise something to the working people of the United States. So I wanna I want to zoom out here for minute because we're we're talking about the new deal, but we haven't defined what it actually says. So as I understand it, and Dave you should expand on this. It. Has we almost might think of his two part? So that people wanna say there one part, which is one piece of it is laying out a series of measures and goals and metrics for are you producing climate policy and are you producing climate progresses. Fast enough to chord with the scientific community says you need to do to prevent global warming from getting completely out of control right in and instead of instead of just kind of backing out like what can we get done it reframed as what must we get done that? I think is fair for the first part. You wanna talk about what those goals are. Sure. Sure. It's not. The resolution is a little a little odd in that it sort of drifts close to policy sometimes and then stays very vague at other times. But in terms of the sort of climate specific goal that just focuses on resiliency the ability to to whether damages folks on infrastructure electrobi- electricity grids buildings the manufacturing sector like in. This one section about about decarbonisation. It just gets a little bit into the specifics of all the sort of economic sectors. You're going to have to have policy for the health impacts of climate change reforestation et cetera et cetera et cetera. Which are all pretty familiar goals and familiar sort of a language in in climate policy debates, but there's a speed there too. Right. I mean, it's not just the Electric's Mischer trucks. Are it's about how fast she sure everything derives from the speed. And that's something I want to emphasize again, and again because one of the sort of fatal kind of fun. Xenakis the fuzziness of the climate conversation comes from this sort of fuzziness about goals because the goal of reducing emissions is one thing. And it's wildly easy to achieve his super super easy to reduce emissions a little bit. Right. So how much are we reducing them and how fast, and so the whole point of this is to peg this at this sort of goal and then work backwards from there. So yes, you get from millier tranches of policy, but much more aggressive and again, much more kind of government led because that's how you get the speed. And again, also the the social parts to that that you're going to get to next are also derived from the speed the ideas, if we're going to do something this big this fundamental to our Connie this fast. There's gonna be a massive amount of disruption. There's no way around that. There's no talking around that you're gonna have whole regions whole industry. His disrupted whole economies that you micro economies disrupted. And if you want people to go along with that if you want the American people to sign up for that go along with it, you need to promise them that you'll keep them safe. I e you owe protect their healthcare. You'll make sure they have a job if they if they want one you'll make sure that the job pays decent wages etcetera etcetera. So everything sort of falls out of the speed so on that social policy side. So the other things that it says green Diaz to have his it says quote guaranteeing job with family sustaining wage, adequate family disability, leave paid vacations and retirement security, all people of the United States strengthening protecting the right of all workers to organize unionize, collectively bargain, an acting and enforcing trade. Rules, procurement standards and border adjustments with strong labor environmental productions ensuring a commercial environment where every business person is free from unfair competition and domination by domestic or international monopolies, providing all members of society with high quality healthcare, affordable safe. And adequate housing economic security and access to clean water, air, healthy and affordable, food and nature. And so in this way, we really really got role in there. Yeah. Right. So Sean Kelly said of this. He said the green deals what it means to be progressive. And that actually seems to me like the thing that has made it makes sense to me. It's a vision of just how you define progressivism where climate changes in the driver seat to Jane's point about prioritization. And then these are all the other parts of the green new deal seems much more like a statement of like, an ideological agenda. Like, what is it mean to be a member of this of this eighty logical tendency in America in twenty nineteen it's a bid to define that more than it seems to me to be a policy statement or even a policy agenda? It seems in some ways a south itself defining because no sense that it's like these all these pieces are like are linked together. Where it seems that this is this is a fully rounded platform. But it does not seem to be itself a fully rounded. Policy platform. It's like a fully rounded reconsideration of what it means to be a democrat in. It's it's very much like the new deal was right? It's sort of like, we're facing this sort of crisis, the set of circumstances in this country that have us, you know, we've got a bunch of veterans returning from World War Two we got all this going on. And we need a new compact among us of how we're going to treat each other. And how we're going to what it's going to mean to be an American citizen. And I think the green new deals has those lofty aspirations is certainly not no one's going to create a green new deal Bill that has universal healthcare and unionization anti-monopoly provisions in it. I don't think anyone envisions this being a Bill or even I mean, it's as you say, it's an agenda. It's a definition of what it means to be what it means to be liberal. And I think it's an attempt to sort of present liberals with an alternative to sort of this tepid. You know, I hate to use the word neoliberalism guys band that word on this podcast. I love I love the word neoliberal. The sort of tepid, whatever you call. We have now. Yes, is an alternative does get to my another thing just thinking about is that the original new deal, which we can actually break into two parts because there was a I knew deal in nineteen thirty three nineteen thirty four. We think of the first hundred days, and, you know, major banking reform like basically direct response to what caused the great depression in the eyes of president Roosevelt in a bunch of other Democrats at the time in the of the second new deal which results in social security and labour relations, all of this is reflective of something that I think was widely recognized by everyone who wasn't Herbert Hoover as a catastrophe and actual real life giant catastrophe that took part one over a specific unit of time. It happened to virtually everyone. There's been a lot of really interesting writing about how the new deal in some ways help to hinder the rise of American fascism, which was on the March. In nineteen thirty four nineteen thirty four. Tint right, part of intense sort of one of the things meant to do. And I think something that's fascinating is attempting to corley the green you deal with the original new deal. I think that something I keep thinking about is how we talk about climate change is a real crisis. And I know you've written about this a lot that it is indeed a crisis. I'm interested to see how the people who are thinking through the green new deal who are trying to make policy out of it are trying to make the same argument about the immediacy of the crisis because I think that that's been a big challenge. And I know you've written on this. And I've talked to conservatives about this is just that even when you get conservatives on board with climate change is real, and it is man made the idea of and it's time for immediate government action. That's the part that seems to be a separation, and so I have two questions on this one. How how do you bring that immediacy to bear and two if this is? Something that you this is something that's not going to result in a green new deal Bill. This is supposed to be something. That's about kind of restructuring what it means to be a progressive. How does that work in brass tacks politics when you are being opposed by say, Lindsey Graham? Well, these are those are very good questions. You're right. That these severity of World War Two sort of self self evident, right? It did not need much argument made on its behalf. But you know, I've been watching climate people wrestle with exactly this problem for twenty years now, and it's in it's it's the the severity of the crisis. Innocence has always been available to those who go looking at the information. Right. And it's all about communicating it. I don't know why. If it's just sort of like. Plugging away for so long, or if it's young people coming up into more positions of power what exactly shifting but something about this last IPC report, the one that came out last year something about that report broke through in a way that all the previous reports hadn't really in regard to the gency because it's sort of what the report did that sort of kicked all this off. As was looking at the difference between holding global temperature rise to two degrees celsius which has sort of been the traditional target of climate politics and holding it to one point five degrees celsius, which is what sort of low lying countries vulnerable countries are saying is necessary to protect them. This is a debate in the in the UN, and sort of the official language in the Paris agreement is hold it to to make all possible efforts to hold it too. One point five. So the question was what what's the big? What's the big deal about this point five degree difference? And that's what the report is about an interns out the difference between one point five and two is hundred you know, millions of lives entire ecosystems the world's coral. It turns out. It's it's it really matters a lot. And so how do we hold it to one point five? That's where these sort of ten year twelve year goals that you hear thrown around by the green new deal people. That's where those are derived from. So so just to make this clear because there's a lot of fusion about this wandering around the internet IPC said if you want to hold temperature rise to one point five degrees celsius, which is sort of what Justice demands the only way to do that is to completely decarbonised the world globally by mid century by twenty fifty and to get on a trajectory to do that you need to be about halfway there by twenty thirty. So the world needs to slash its greenhouse gas emissions by half by twenty thirty. That's the sort of ohficial IPC goal. So that's referenced in the green new deal. But also, there's an additional consideration which has caused debate in the last a couple of weeks if the world needs to decode is by twenty fifty how should the remaining emissions that we're allowed be divided up. It makes sense that developing countries who haven't had the long runway we've had in haven't had the use of unlimited fossil fuels like we got and are behind her trying to bring people out of poverty deserve more of those emissions. So in other words, if everybody has the decarbonised between fifty developing countries need to go faster to leave more room more slack for developing countries. And that's where this goal of twenty thirty decarbonisation comes from. That's what the green new deal activists are pushing. They're saying. On an equity basis, the US needs to move faster than other countries that needs to get all the way to total decarbonisation by twenty thirty that is a level of gency that I can't quite sign onto because it's fantastical. But but so the urgency is sort of I guess what I'm saying is a lot more evident now. And I think a lot more publicly. Understood and is in in part of that is because of the green new deals shoving it into the spotlight. So let's get really concrete here, though, if we wanted to decarbonised America or eighty percent decarbonised America by twenty thirty. What does that look like for me for you for somebody living in Ohio for somebody living in California for somebody living in Florida? I mean, that's that's a kind of set a words that I don't think means a lot to people. But sometimes you hear no say that we can do it like getting ready for climate change earning climate change. We just had the will it's fine. And then sometimes you get this kind of it's a World War Two style. Compl-? Overhaul of the American economy and intense mobilization such that UNITA federal jobs guarantee to make sure we don't have bread lines in the street. So what are we looking at like paint the picture for me of what America would have to do to meet any of those goals? The honest answer from anyone US that question too is I dunno knows exactly what that's going to look like, but it's twenty twenty. I mean by twenty thirty we we don't have that much time to figure it out to show. What I wanna say what I mean? My I mean, this is just my opinion in opinions on this very considerably. But I think the goal of of total decarbonisation by twenty fifty and halfway there by twenty thirty is right out at the edge. Maybe even a little past the edges of what is even conceivable to me in the context of American society and politics sort of like how fast could we possibly push that's about as fast as I can envision total decarbonisation by twenty thirty. Is is a different not just in degree. But in kind so so for instance, there are all kinds of energy applications for which we do not yet have a zero carbon alternatives in our unlikely to have them within ten years. So if you want to say, totally decarbonised the airline industry by twenty thirty a lot of that is going to involve just not letting people fly, right? And there's in there are industrial processes that. We don't yet know how to decarbonised, and if you get to twenty thirty and they're still going you just shut them down. So I'm not even convinced that do doing it by twenty thirty would involve something like martial law. It would involve something like the government literally taking control of multiple industries deliberately shutting them down deliberately sort of abandoning billions of dollars in assets fossil-fuel assets that have not depreciated yet. I it cetera et cetera et cetera means something like. I don't wanna say police state, but something something along those lines of urgency like a total total government takeover and management of the economy. And even even if we could manage that it would be difficult to do by twenty thirty. I just think insisting on it by twenty thirty is kind of crazy you kind of define yourself sort of us right yourself out of the conversation. If you do that, but but opinions differ. So sort of sunrise movement, the youth movement behind the green new deal has taken it upon itself to sort of define this as the edge. They're insisting on twenty thirty. And that's why they've criticized some of the plans, so far I think if we if the US could totally decarbonised by twenty fifty that would be the greatest collective accomplishment in all of human history. I mean, it's a really really really big thing is really fast to do it by twenty fifty doing it by twenty thirty is like Orwellian. I don't think it's on the conceivable menu of possibilities absent like. Meteor striking or I don't even know. What would I don't know what would enable that? But to me like twenty fifty is absolutely. Like a stretch goal that we can wrap our minds around and sort of plan around and some sort of coherent way. So I wanna move a little bit within the green new deal but away from the specifics of climate to talking about you made the point that the green deal involving so many large scale investments would make it a program that you end, quote, you can involve everyone and help everyone theoretically gained support from everyone even those in red states who do not care about climate change. Can you talk a little bit more about the green new deal as jobs program because I think that it's interesting how you're starting to see a couple of twenty twenty candidates, and I've heard this from a couple of candidates who have been somewhat appealing to some on the right that the idea of kind of the returning to new deal the regional new deal programs that basically encourage. The federal government to get involved in encouraging hiring jobs guarantee is of real interest specifically for people who are very concerned with having very low on with the fact that we have very low unemployment rate, but that doesn't necessarily bear out in whether or not people are working in the way, they want to be Royd or working good jobs. Right. This this is sort of one. Area the new deal that is both kind of packed with promise. But also a little bit of a roszak blood. So the notion that you want to design a national climate policy such that it creates a bunch of jobs is old hat, right? That's been in every sort of democratic climate plan or agenda or white paper in history and his in every climate plan. That's being released by candidates today. The reason I think the green new deal resolution freak people out is that it went beyond that sort of boilerplate language about let's focus on creating aunts of good high paying jobs and said, let's guarantee that everybody gets a good high paying job in that. And that kind of flipped everybody's lid got a bunch of a communists, including even some progressive, economists sort of arguing about about whether the feds could actually manage something like that or whether it was something like that is even possible. I think it's probably at this stage to early to get hung up on the word guarantee. I think. Instead, we just need to think about what kind of government policy creates a bunch of jobs, and even on that there's several categories when a sense if you create a bunch of regulatory mandates, forcing utilities to clean up our cars to clean up or industry to clean up. You're going to create a bunch of new products new cleaner products in new cleaner industries, you're going to create jobs by forcing economic change at all in a sense. But I think what the green new deal people want. At least. I think the activists at the heart of this green deal thing have this sort of more old-fashioned dim notion of reviving US manufacturing. So the idea is stand up our manufacturing base. A we're the ones manufacturing, the solar panels and wind turbines and electric vehicles and that in and that's how you restore these good jobs that appeal to people in middle America. And then, of course, there's beyond that. There's just. Brute force job creation, something like a government program that just hires thousands of people to go plant trees, you know, there's also that as an option on the far end. So exactly what people are supporting on the job creation front is a little fuzzy. But I think everybody is United around the notion that clean energy is away. Maybe the only way we really see of stimulating enough manufacturing activity in enough old school sort of physical economic activity to create good jobs. I think that's conventional wisdom almost at this point. Are let's take a break. And then I want to come back and talk a bit about the political theory behind this project. Hiring used to be hard multiple job sites. Stacks, resumes, confusing review process, but today, hiring can be easy, and you only have to go one place to get done. Ziprecruiter dot com slash weeds. Vox recently turned five and hitting that milestone realize it's all about the people. It's all about finding the right people. 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Subscribe for free to be the first to hear them on apple podcasts or in your favorite podcast app. All right. So let's start here. Dave what what is the political theory that the green new deal proponents have for for the green new deal? Like, how do they explain what they're doing here and why it will work? Sure. The best way to sort of work backwards the status quo in American politics right now is gridlock in it. Looks like all the forces driving that are robust and only expected to continue. And and and as, you know, very well as the structure of US politics puts us in this fifty fifty nation. And so even if dims take the presidency and the house and the Senate in twenty twenty which is very very far from sure thing, you know, McConnell's just gonna filibuster every Bill like he did with Obama like he said he was going to do. And then did so so if. Things stay the way they are in American politics. And I mean in broad terms, the the sort of balance of power, we we get nothing. Nothing's going to happen in this. I want to drive this home the choice. Here is not asking for some big massive thing. Like the green new deal and getting nothing or asking for small incremental steps and getting small incremental steps. There's no reason to think that McConnell's going to sign off on small incremental steps either the default here is nothing and if you understand the urgency of climate change and the the the the real suffering. It's going to impose in the speed at which is acting in the sort of crucial window of time. We're in right now that is disastrous. That's just disastrous for the US to abdicate action in leadership at this juncture is just disastrous. So the question is what can break us out of this. So it's not. Gonna be messaging, right? The climate people tried every version of messaging under the sun dims or obsessed with messaging and framing. But clearly that's not going to do. It is just power that's going to do it. This some form of power has got to break up this terrible balance. And so what power do we have access to on the left on the Green Left its people power, right? We don't have reliable billionaires. Really? We don't have a giant centuries old fossil fuel industry and all its attendant dependent industries. We don't have any of that. All we have is people. So how can we get a people movement? A grassroots surge going that is sufficiently strong that it can overwhelm this gridlock. Kill the filibuster. Maybe even carry along some Republican working people or at least put Republicans on the defensive scare them about this put them on the defensive and break. The the the gridlock that way from an outside in. So if you if you look at this sort of two thousand eight to two thousand ten democratic climate Bill strategy, it was kind of the ultimate the ultimate version of of inside out start with corporate actors start with businesses start with the centrists reach out to the reasonable people on the other side start in the center workout from there. And it was just a spectacular failure. I think everyone agrees because there's no center left. The Republican party has no left. There's no one to talk to anymore. So what's left is outside in? I think if you ask the activists involved, they're gonna tell you. Yeah. We're super confident that this is gonna work. We're confident we're gonna get Ezra's movement. Started is gonna scare the crap out of the democratic establishment. They're going to kill the filibuster. And then they're going to go crazy passing embarrass bills. It's obviously a long shot. But but the alternative to the longshot is stay. Acis and gridlock in disaster. So you mentioned killing the filibuster a bunch of times. But as far as I can tell the green deal say anything about doing that. And a bunch of people say the support the green new deal don't support killing the filibuster. So that seems like I mean, something even less than table stakes here to me like before you can even think about anything, you gotta think about the filibuster here. But of the many things in the green new deal from guaranteeing every American jobs passing Medicare for all the filibuster is in here. And I I don't know what markings on the filibuster. He may be a proponent of reforming it, but a bunch of the people come out and said there for the deal, Cory Booker and others. They don't support getting rid of the filibuster. So people it doesn't seem to me that for all of the ideological policing happening around this proposal that is actually part of it for reasons, I genuinely don't understand I share your your mystification into your obsession with subject. I don't know what Cory Booker thinking. I mean, I literally I cannot reconstruct in my head. Head a coherent line of reasoning that could lead Cory Booker to the conclusion that he's even in my most charitable, I don't know what he could possibly be thinking or club char- who said the other day like I can get Republican cooperation. Oh how and and if so why haven't you in the last ten years? I just don't know what anybody's thinking I asked Marquis directly actually about that. And he and he basically dodged she said, we don't have to decide that. Now. Let's let's make that decision once we win. So so I think one thing is I'm not sure that any politician, or at least a lot of politicians are necessarily saying what they honestly think about the filibuster. I think there's a lot of sort of strategic thinking going on here. Should we reveal that? We're after this should we give McConnell any bad ideas. I don't know exactly what the thinking is inside the democratic establishment. And I don't know why the activists are not more exercised about this other than the sort of general fact, you very hard to get people worked up about procedural issues. But but. Like you. I think if you leave the filibuster in place, none of this matters. It's all talk. It's all empty talk. That's that's the one to me that you're right. That's table stakes for anything else to happen big or small so that actually leads me to something. So the weeds Facebook group, which is always a den of thoughtful commentary, and I mean that that sounded more sarcastic than I meant it so much shade on our graphics. I don't mean to I broken inside. But anyway, so wretched hive of intelligent commentary. But good. Jeff whites on our Facebook page. I'd like a good analysis of the pragmatism and political economy of marrying economic Justice with climate change mitigation, and he knows how to have a natural synergy and that sink thinking of green new deal as kind of this overall revolution. That's going to transform our political economy from top to bottom, and I think that that matches because you were talking about how okay, we're not obviously going to be Democrats are not going to be able to find common cause in this particular issue with Republicans in this time or ever, but you the democratic base is we keep having this conversation over and over again is not as progressive as a lot of people think it is. So I'm interested of how tying together I'm if a little concerned perhaps about that idea that economic Justice in full employment tying that together with climate change mitigation efforts. How do you view that all working together? I think that we were talking about that is kind of a. Reconsider conceiving of what it means to be a progressive. But who who does that? I that seems to leave out a lot of people who think of themselves as part of the democratic constituency. It's a very good question. And I don't have firm. I don't have firm or great answers to it. But I think it it again, it depends on whether you're looking at this as an insight out or an outside in effort. If you're starting inside out starting at the center, then yes, you do what the democratic policy approach to this has been now for twenty years, which is strip away everything not directly climate related even strip away any use of revenue any sort of hint of policy that might offend Republicans. We'll just do a carbon tax, and then we'll give the revenue directly back we won't grow. The government. We won't do any regulations the sort of illness effort to craft a climate policy that is so denuded of anything else. So laser focus on carbon that no one will have any reason to complain about it, and we'll get support that way from Republicans that way that's been the approach for a long time. And I've seen a lot of climate people begging pleading arguing bargaining down their policy asks again, and again, and again, and it's just been an absolute and total failure the hoped-for. A support from fiscal conservatives has not come forth in any number at all it failed in Washington state. It's it's not going anywhere in congress. That approach all that's done is make Democrats water down their solutions and watered down their rhetoric for nothing for nothing. They don't get any credit for it. They don't get any support for it. So let's not pretend that that's the successful way to do it. That's what's been tried and failed. So this alternate strategy is just outside in. So the kind of things that get ordinary people excite. Did are different than the kind of things that Washington insiders excited. So if you yoke these kinds of policies together it scares away DC insiders scares away centrists because it seems like additive makes it more difficult. But if you look at polls of the public, the more of these things, you yoked together, the more they like it like when the when the green new deal resolution was first released they did a bunch of polling a bunch of people, including data for progress did a bunch of polling testing this language in testing it against counter messages, and even saying even if it costs a lot of money like really really stress testing all these parts of the green new deal and they pull through the roof. They were getting like seventy percent across immigration people like jobs, they like national purpose. They like clean energy. Everybody loves clean energy. Everybody likes. Good jobs. Everybody would like, you know, to to have healthcare that wasn't a giant hassle in wasn't threat. With vanishing. If you lose a job. So so those things add support public support. But they seem to subtract support from sort of insider politicians, and that's the dilemma, and I think the choice of the green deal. People are just the former strategy hasn't worked and isn't going to work. So all this left is the ladder strategy sort of make this into a big vision. A big exciting vision that so Tena Bill, and so clear that it can activate an interest people who aren't that into politics, and who don't follow politics very much activate a public ground swell. And that more than anything will shift. Those those insiders that's the that's the play. That's the idea. So there couple things here that are tricky one. I really think a lot of this approach to polling just wrong. The one thing that I believe in pulling is it just depending on how you ask the question. You will get whatever answer you want. And I'm not saying anybody's doing bad polling here. I think actually a lot. The pulling data politics has done is good, and there's like good work here, and you can get some information. But the reason DC insiders blanche at this kind of thing is that they've seen how it goes before you start with something, it seems very popular. We're gonna pass healthcare insurance and more people are going to have healthcare. And that pulls great universal care has always pulled great. You know, more people getting healthcare always always post great. And then you get into the debate and wa- actually, but like by hospital or what you didn't tell me they're gonna be higher taxes to do this healthcare. I didn't I didn't think it would have to pay anything for this healthcare or there's an individual mandate. Now. So I have to get healthcare or you're gonna take away my private insurance or way, I bought a shit policy for years ago that doesn't cover anything, but it's cheap. I can't have that. Like, you're going to take that away from me. Even if you're giving me I don't trust your subsidies. Like, I don't like you. They're detrimental Sarah Palin told me she told me there on Facebook. She told me their death panels and let put that on Facebook. If it was. True. Right. You can't Mark Zuckerberg would never let you put something on Facebook. And the the the difficulty with this kind of conflict expansion is it every single one of these things has a counter argument to begin scaring people. And moreover, like the experience a lot of people have of trying to pass these really really big bills is at once you really get into the guts of it. People get nervous about the government doing big leagues. They don't like the government much. We got them look at it. Right. Like look at Washington. It's not crazy that people don't totally trust it to do huge things. And so the fear. I think a lot of people have is that when you begin tach ING all these things how do you do jobs guarantee who gets that guarantee? What happens if people begin talking about the folks who don't desert who like in the public mind don't deserve to get their job guaranteed. You know, what about the people don't show up to the job? Right. Like, you get all these things that are going to be part of the counter attack. And now if you've tied the whole thing to everything right like passing one big thing is really really hard. Passing. Lots of big roses is even harder. So on the other hand, it's if there was evidence that you would mobilize this mass movement. Great. But also isn't really evidence of that. I mean, it it does we don't have a lot of examples. Mobilization of that level is the continuous white whale of politics and always always everywhere. People say that it's because the underlying idea it wasn't ambitious enough or it wasn't or got to compromise. Or like the politician forgot what they were doing. But I actually just think it's hard. I think that the reason we don't have more and better examples of this kind of mass mobilization around leftist policies upending American politics is because it's hard like why don't we have single payer in Vermont right now 'cause mass mobilization is really hard. And so I'm not against the green new deal as sort of like to me it reads right now as you're creating there used to be a new deal democrat and creating the green new deal democrat. But I I'm very skeptical this mass mobilization theory. I don't see like why haven't we seen it? In the states in this way. Like, you know, -cational get something like there's a like a ballot initiative for minimum wage or something, and that'll do really well to do better than the Democrats do, and it provides some sucker for this theory when you get to the really big ambitious stuff. You just don't see California's tried single payer and a lot of different directions enders other kinds of health expansions in different directions. And it keeps not going through despite it not being very heavily compromised down there. There's something in here about the kind of leftist critique of how much power tends to control political outcomes, which I think is correct. And it's depressing. And then this idea that it'll be swept away, and you don't need to do any kind of combination without power and just I'm not necessarily saying I have like different answer. But I don't know that this one seems convincing to me as people wanna make it out to be a I'll start this way. If you wanna look at the examples of what seems to work look at the states, you elect a bunch of Democrats. So they're in charge. And then the public is like, yeah. Do something about climbing clean energy in the in the lawmakers. Go off and work out the details in the public doesn't care much in the in the in the lawmakers pass it and the public is like, yeah, you did something about climate change and everyone's happy that's the model that works, right? Put Democrats in charge. The public doesn't actually want or need to be super involved in the details of the policy, but that is foolproof at the state level. But but apparently impossible the federal level because of the filibuster and everything else. So so you're left with crappy implausible options. And I totally agree with you. I there's one thing. I want to emphasize there's one sort of step. I think you left out there that's crucial here. So so you start with a big broad positive ideas like this, and they pull well, and you're absolutely right. Like, you can get positive poll numbers for positive things like clean energy yet. Good. I like it like jobs. Yeah. Like more. More money more good things. Yes. What about bad things? Oh, no. I don't like those like you can you can get whatever pulled numbers you want. But what you said is voter start hearing this in they start hearing that and they start hearing this been they started, you know, like, it doesn't just occur to them these fears about repulses don't just sort of spontaneously occur to people. They're driven into their heads in. This is a wrote a post about this. The other day is right now the right has a giant machine. A giant multifaceted media think-tank social media machine that is devoted to shaping public opinion in a conservative way, which usually just means scaring, the shit out of people, but the left has no such machine the left is sort of dependent on quote unquote, objective mainstream reporters to convey, its perspective, you know, and how many of these cable news panels have we seen? We're sort of the debate is between objective. Mainstream journalists and right wing ideologues. That's sort of like the ideological span you get in in in DC politics. So yes, it's true. Any big good idea that dims come up with anything dims tried to do period. Full stop the right has the ability to utterly poison it in in the heads of roughly forty percent give or take of the electorate almost immediately. At will the left does not have the commensurate ability to fire up any sort of intensity of support any of the same sort of like, you know, mobilized active freaked out support that might counter that intensity of opposition. So as long as that structural media, a symmetry is there, there's no good solution. There's there's no message that will sell itself. Right. There's no there's no policy that can't be lied about or demagogued. There's no way to make these things immune to. That unless you have some sort of machine to counter the other machine you're permanently structurally at a disadvantage here. And there are no good answers. So I don't have a good answer for you. But, but you know, no one else is either. Jane, I feel like you're more learned on this of left and right deep histories. And then Dave is like what do you think about these theories of of mass mobilization in contemporary politics? What would you look to as an example for that working or failing, historically, it's it's a complicated issue? Because the when even using term like mass mobilization, I would ask who is the mass because when we're talking about the polling numbers reflect on numbers reflective of who's getting pulled in these specific instances. And so I was I was reflecting on your example of Washington state, and I interviewed a Jay Inslee, which you can find past episode of the recline show, and we talked about some of the failures that have happened in Washington state with regard. Hard to the car tab fee fiasco and a couple of other aspects as I think that something that I notice one with regard to kind of conservative media infrastructure. It's fascinating. Because I I've been talking a lot about how a lot of conservative media is not so much pro conservative as it's focused on a fulcrum of anti whatever liberals are doing. And so when you ask okay like, what is your response? The ideas that they don't need to have a response because conservatism, I think in some ways at this point movement. Conservatism is pretty okay with stasis. And it's pretty okay, you know, because the idea of conservative, you know, there's the famous William F Buckley, quote about, you know, standing thwart his history. Yelling stop. No right now. Reverse. No, right. You've got. Well. I think that there's you you try to stop what you can. And then on the things you can't reverse. You say you're a libertarian now. That's a great line. And so my question, though, is that the issue that you brought up earlier about Ezra did about how people are supportive of these policies until they then till they're like what about my taxes and you sell that in with Washington state as well how even green policies on the most local of Basi's with voters who think of themselves as being really focused on climate issues. You people are not it's kind of climate issues or my ability to get my car where I needed to be to do the things I need to do. I come a terrible person because I'm like, whatever happened to practicality. And I, but I I'm curious as to your thoughts on that issue. Because I think that that's something that I think conserve conservatives have a fascinating ability to both attempt to mimic what they think the public is. Already saying, and then make the public Sates you've done some really great writing on how you know, Fox News influence the perception of the green new deal. You know, the green new deal that has not resulted in anything yet. You don't this point a concept, and then you hear from certain commentators on the right that like, you people are already opposed to this thing when they are the only people talking about the thing they're opposing so I am curious about how you think about this. When you see something like what happened in Washington state or you see on the local level certain climate mitigation efforts being getting bogged down, and I think that, you know, someone raised in the Facebook thread the issue of nuclear energy. And I think that's something where I would be really fascinated to hear your take on how nuclear play into this. And how the the on a larger how the elements of practicality play into these into these concepts on the local level. That's a lot. And I don't have great answers. I mean, I think the the the experience of Washington is really is really interesting. So Inslee was governor democratic governor and did not have full control of both houses for longtime Republicans control the Senate for a long time. And so what happened nothing Inslee? Tried a bunch of stuff. They blocked it. All nothing, then we tried to cycles in a row direct to voter ballot initiatives, right? One was very sort of fiscally conservative fully refunded. Carbon tax with nothing else involved that would give all the revenue back very sort of very sort of inoffensive to any centrist or conservative. But whatever would have produced greenhouse gases a ton. Washington voters rejected that then we went back the next time around with a ballot initiative that was sort of the opposite approach it would it would be very revenue positive. It would raise a bunch of money and spend the money on. Clean energy projects and clean water project. Even had a list a map here all the communities local communities in Washington that are going to receive this investment that are going to that are going to see tangible immediate improvements from this program sort of a much more of a green new deal models. Like, we're gonna tax we're gonna spend we're gonna do this together. And they rejected that almost with the same numbers almost as though the total one eighty flip in policy approach didn't make any difference at all and really just people did not want to pull the trigger on imposing climate policy on themselves. And yet the very next cycle. They voted bunch of Democrats into office. Inslee now has both houses and so- Washington. Just passed a whole slate of clean energy bills. That are absolutely as or more ambitious than either of those ballot initiatives that are absolutely. Whatever fear. You may have had about any of that pass stuff should have been triggered by this stuff. But but a people elected in McGrath and be people are are thrilled. And, you know, hailing the Democrats for doing this all of which is to make my point that like, I think I'm kind of a bad person to for thinking this Jane. But I really think that most people just are like I believe climate the problem. I don't wanna frigging deal with it. I don't wanna think about it. Don't ask me about the just do something about it. Like just do something about it. I think that's what people I think that's about the depth of most people's opinion on this. So absolutely like if you ask people like get out of your house right year. Senator about this go out and March like get excited and advocate for it. Most people won't. So the question is does the left have the ability in the face of FOX, Al in the face of sort of centrist, democrat indifference in the face of total Neil list. Right wing opposition to reach a core of people and get them intensely supportive of this build a core of tints support that can rival the intense right base because to Ezra question. Like, if you look whereas the mass movement in the last that worked in the last several decades will it's the tea party. Right. I mean, and how it worked is they built a giant media machine and scared the shit out of the nation's old people, and then they got really excited. Look how low the national debt is now. Yes that was about the fans. What you mean by the word, I guess successes. Let's take a break. And then I wanna come back because I do think there's a viable political theory here. And I wanna make the argument for it. This is brought to you by the urban institute's critical value podcast for fifty years. The urban institute has been a trusted source for unbiased evidence based research. And now they have a killer podcast bringing their insights to your years. 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I think it relates Dave what you're just saying. Here's how I see this potentially playing out if there is the possibility of of a good outcome here. It's that what you're really seeing is not an an effort to change the views of the mass public, most of whom are not paying any attention to this and many who don't like it, even if they are it's too chain to these of the Democratic Party itself to Jane's point, it is to change what the Democratic Party does. And doesn't prioritize it's to change the incentives for Beddoe, aerobic a-. Cory Booker, Joe Biden for that matter. Right people want to be on the green new deal train because they don't wanna get primary. They wanna get support. They wanna co-sponsor something with Akasa Cortez, whatever it might be. And so what you're first doing is changing the nature of the Democratic Party. So that if the Democratic Party. Has an opportunity to govern which may not. But if it does that instead of spending that opportunity on healthcare, I or an. An expansion or whatever it might be. They're going to spend it on climate. And I think that's confusing in the stock because it's got this whole back section of universal job guarantees and Medicare for all, and you and redoing labor organizing laws, but but I think that what the green like abstracted out with the green effort really is is trying to push Democrats towards a more ambitious idea of climate policy and also trying to get them to prioritize it such that like everybody always says agree needles, not going to be one piece of legislation. So the piece it's going to go first at a moment when maybe you do for whatever reason have a rare instant when you can govern is going to be this. But that to me is why do harp on things like the filibuster. So there are a lot of arguments right now about what the Democratic Party should be should it be noodle. Democrats Greenville Democrats should be democratic socialists or Neo liberals or progressives or liberals or should it be about identity politics economics? They're all these debates about what the Democratic Party should be. And I'm right. Piece about this. But before you can really have any outcome. Those debates the Democratic Party needs to be about democracy. It needs to be about allowing a Geordie to govern successfully because of majority can't govern and a majority only kind of power Democrats are likely to have in an overwhelming way. Then there's stuff in for it. You're not gonna get the little things you're not gonna get the big ones done. And so to me the frustration that I have with the green new deal project is it so focused on mass mobilisation that it's not focused enough on what would even happen. If you mobilize the masses like how would you change political structures such a mass mobilization would actually be an effective mobilisation? Even if you got it there where I do think, it has been extraordinarily effective is it has moved the number credit party elites, I mean to your point about elites, you know, not being on board for this, and like, increasingly they are increasing of eight, you know, members of the Senate Democrats of the house regrets. They at least want to pledge fealty to this even if they are not probably endorse every specific outcome or their moderate alternatives to this or like wildly ambitious relative to even the far left like five years. So that feels to me like actually part of the project if you can get the Democratic Party to a place where it would if it had the opportunity to govern it would do climate. I and it would do something big on climate that is a huge unbelievable achievement. That was not truth three years ago. Right. That's not what would have happened three years ago, if the Democratic Party had had the opportunity to govern as then I think the question becomes one had you get that opportunity to govern and two are the structures or you're going to do something about the structures such that they allow you to govern when you get in there. But but to all this Beddoe Rourke Jay Inslee have come out with policy ideas that they say are green deal inflected that they say are equal to scale the challenge. And you know, I wanna get your take on this. Dave, it certainly my impression that these are much more ambitious climate propose. Cels than we saw in two thousand sixteen or twenty twelve or even two or two thousand eight totally totally. I think that's all right. I think that's all right about moving moving the policy conversation among Democrats. I think it's absolutely right. That this for the first time has created a kind of a real momentum within the party that Democrats finally feel like they can't ignore. Right. And that's and that's an you're right. It's a remarkable achievement in. It's remarkable that they did it. I mean in the comparative blink of an eye. I mean, this was like amazing. They basically went and sat and Pelosi's office in overnight like overnight, the US political systems obsessed with climate change overnight like Democrats are like arguing about change in the headlines every day, which is like, you know, been waiting and waiting for this to happen. So so it was a swift kick in the ass that actually worked too with people up and get people talking totally. I don't know if it's fair to to be. Frustrated with the green new deal people as it is to be frustrated with the whole left about this. I mean, everything is about the green true about literally any policy priority have. With everybody about this subject. I know I should I share that. I'm an equal opportunity harangue about the filibuster. Yes. All should be harangued about it. And they all should have it as a part of their the should all have it as a part of their a platform. No matter what a policy area, they're going after I totally agree with that. The question is if you're if you're looking for a practical road to policy at the federal level. Well, let me let me talk about beta. And and and James Lee, real quick. So they're actually quite an interesting contrast, especially if you're sort of down in the weeds, pardon the pun, wait is that upon pardon the reference of climate policy. So beta is sort of not a climate guy. I think it's fair to say he doesn't have much of a history on doesn't have much of a record on. It's not clearly not a thing that like animates him. And so his policy that came out with was was someone described it as the movement had a baby with a consultant, which I think is exactly right. Sort of. There's a lot of sort of like old school democratic consultant SP. Speak about mobilising private investment, and you know, unleashing markets, and all these sort of all these sort of trigger words that that that democratic consultants in interest in McCray. People love to hear but at the same time. It was the green new deal that was that that's at the root of it. It was an investment led a policy that the the headline piece of it was we're gonna mobilize five trillion dollars in investment. And that is the legacy of the green new deal. So it's sort of like, how can I take this green new deal and give it kind of a conventional democrat sheen. So that I can please the kind of green deal people. And then also, please the sort of conventional groups that I have to please in the Democratic Party. So I mean as qua- policy, it's not that interesting. And I think it'll be a federal and like no one will remember it in a couple of months, but it's interesting in so far as it reveals the influence of the green deal, right injuries is a different matter ins. Lie's been down in the muck on this stuff for years and years wrote a book about it back in was it two thousand seven I think, you know, has been beating this drum his whole career and knows and cares about the policy. So he actually doesn't say this is a green new deal policy. He says he calls it his climate mission. And this is something that he and his team been working on for a long time. Sort of like if anything the green deal people are catching up with him rather than vice versa. I think is how he would like to is how he would like to put it. So his is. I mean, his for one thing is going to come out in like five separate five separate policy releases. This first batch is just a few. You know few select sectors. He's got you know, he's got a whole piece on investment coming piece on climate Justice coming piece on the hard to reach sectors like the industry, and what to do about existing buildings all that still to come the PC releases just about new buildings and new cars. And and electricity. But what I think is heartening about Ensley in the excitement of the green new deal on the sort of mobilization of the green deal in the sort of really great branding like like climate people have been waiting and waiting and waiting for years. I some brand or slogan or something that can capture the intense complexity of all this in something inspiring and the green deal just does it. In three words, like people get it. In three words. So it's amazing, but to marry that with the policy the attention to policy detail the policy acumen that ends bringing I think it's fair to say that most people don't expect Inslee to to come from behind in this contest and ended up the next president. But I really hope that he can raise the level of policy Acura n-, so that we're getting thoughtful experienced policy hands working on this giant thing. And that's what injuries Paul. She looks like to me. And so that to me is like the most heartening thing that's come out of all this so far I was thinking a little bit about your talking kind of noting the difference between Democrats know two thousand eight two thousand twelve even twenty sixteen with regard to these policies, and I feel like the green deal is. And how Democrats are talking about the green new deal not Pelosi and others necessarily kind of democratic elites, but the party writ large. It. There's been a lot of talk about how whatever happened the centrism. And my argument has been that no one ever liked centrism and centrism is just everybody centers. No, one is a centrist. And I think that this is reflective of Democrats, particularly sectors of the democratic base recognizing that like centrism is not going to get them. Anyway, moving towards a middle of the road view of this particular issue or any issue you time and time again, the idea that they should let Mitch McConnell as Lucy pull the football away from our ba-. Beloved, Charlie Brown in this particular case, I think that's what I keep thinking about as the green you deal as signposts the green new deal as re conceiving of what it means to be progressive, not necessarily green new deal as policy or policy concept. Totally I think you're getting something crucial here, and you're getting a larger phenomenon beyond just the green new deal a larger phenomenon that's going on in US politics, which as you say sort of like conventional Democrats have had this image in their head sort of median voter theorem, this sort of bell curve where most voters are clustered there in the center, right? So if you if you want more votes, you go toward the center as sort of like a truism in that way of thinking, that's where the votes are in. And I think you're right that the leadership is sort of seems to be the last ones to be catching onto this. But I think Democrats large are starting to realize that the other side completely abandoned the center, and so when Democrats go there to make deals they're just in an empty room talking. To themselves. There's no one left to give them credit. There's no one left to reach out to them or to give them any reward for doing that. It's just become an utterly pointless waste of time. And so where once you had this sort of like single bell curve, you're getting in to getting instead to humps that are moving away from each other center is is being bake aided like which to me is fascinating like socially fascinating. Politically fascinating. You have this this political system where you have two sides that are increasingly just utterly a unified among themselves in utterly incommensurate with the other side married with this political system full of structures that makes action impossible almost without bipartisanship. You know, this is this is sort of Ezra's whole deal. He's reading a book on it. But like one of those has to give like one of one of those as given in your right degree new deal is is the climate. Wing of the party, saying the center has been abandoned there's nothing there anymore. It's not a good climate solution. There are no Republicans waiting there to cooperate with us. There's no political road forward from that. There's no point at all in targeting that anymore. So instead we're going to target sufficiency. Right. We're going to target. What needs to be done to solve the problem in quit pleading for this sort of support from the other side that never comes which again fine. Like, we've circled around this in a million different ways in conversation, that's fine in some ways. But then you're like, you got these two incommensurate camps and structures of government that don't allow either of them to ever really take control or pass their agenda. That cannot stand for long something has to give. And that's why I mean if nothing else I mean, I want the filibuster to go. I'd like Puerto Rico DC to be made states. I'd like I love to see court packing. I'd love to see gerrymandering salt, partly because I want good progressive policy, but partly also just as like a release valve for this tension like this is just building and building forever. It's got nowhere to go. No one can do anything. No one can act in you, see people, especially under Trump's base more. You know, increasingly just saying screw all this like screw the system. Screw these norms. Screw these rules like we're just absolutely out for ourselves scrapping. Every advantage. We can get you know, it's doggy dog at this point. You know, you sort of see dims moving that way too. But if both parties end up there, it's hard to see how that doesn't sort of like in in some version of collapse or violence, and I don't know any. Better than anybody else. Does like what the right how to avoid that look end in a lot of different ways. But I think people forget just how much of the political structure, we know take for granted came through contested periods of reform. And I mean, I don't think it'd be an easy period. But I I'm not sure it'd be worse than for instance, allowing climate disaster to run unchecked to just thought that that raises for me one is that say if you're trying to be committed to the value of democracy, the idea that the way American government should work is that if more people want something done, then the other thing done, that's the thing that should probably happen. At least in most cases, like that is a lot of implications. Right. Like, the electoral college, I focus a lot on the filibuster. But it's by far it's far from the only thing voting rights acts like their million things might you might wanna think about in that space, and I do think it's important to build that out his Bill that out is an agenda that emerges from principles and values and not just kind of backwards from I wanna get this one Bill done. Done. But the other thing that I just think is important, and I see it in this conversation are the green new deal. I just see it violated all the time is different actors in political system have different roles and people wanna blur. Everybody's role into being all things all the time that the people imagining the world as it should be or even as it needs to be also need to be able to see that people. Who are the most pragmatic who also need to be the people crafting the policy who also need to be also need to be who also need to be and clever communicators, of course, communicators and all that, and I just think it's very important particularly on something like climate change for there to be a group of folks out there one who are trying to demand like this is what ought to happen, right? Like, whatever you're doing. It has to be benchmarked against what happened. And if what to happen doesn't happen. That is the consequences for real people are going to be disastrous. Right. Like, it is a moral failure for what happened not to happen. And so I. Have quibbles with this. And I think they're real questions about the underlying political strategy. And are you actually making it stronger by bolting all these other things onto it? Like, I think that the best argument can make against the green new deal as it. It's too focused on one kind of person. It's too much an activist certain kind of projection like what they find mobilizing. Everybody will find mobilizing my mom will find that mobilizing. I'm not sure I think I think they're more issues within then sometimes they do, but on the underlined climate side, if it like you really do need people setting out what the system needs to do. And then you can begin asking yourself like is capable of doing it. And if this is not capable of doing it that he can begin asking yourself. Well, what does that say about the system? But if the truth of the matter is right that I'll give just one example here in it is World War One and the run up to World War One the leads to Wilson forcing the Senate to adopt a clear will for the filibuster at all before. Then you couldn't stop a filibuster. No matter how many votes you had. But there was a filibuster around a preliminary policy. Two World War One. And with Wilson couldn't break it. And in a special session of the Senate. He demanded and received from them of rule that allowed two thirds supermajority of senators to break the filibuster because there are certain things in American politics in life that we are not willing as a country to not be able to do for instance, when their support for it fight or protect ourselves in a war and climate like has a similar quality. If it is a case that our political system cannot deal with climate change. Then like the problem, there's that the activists are being unreasonable. The problem is the political system, and if I wanna see more of an agenda on the political system like that doesn't that doesn't take away from the force of that indictment in wanna say in these sort of defense of the of these activists, you know, like the favorite indoor sport of DC political people is to crap on left activists. It's it's the right loves to do at the center. Lows to do it even the left kind of loves to do it in in these poor. You know? Greenville activists have have had to shoulder everybody's complaint from every different direction. But it's worth noting that they are in a very very tricky position. Because saying as you said, here's what needs to happen. It's very easy. Given the scale of what needs to happen for you to sort of just define yourself right out of the conversation. Right. Just define yourself. So far out that you're that that you've got nobody on the inside listening to you anymore. Right. The distance between the needs to happen. And what's possible can be so great that it's easy to just you know, like you could end up like the extinction rebellion in the UK who's now decided that their demand, and I'm not kidding. Is that the u k one hundred percent decarbonised by twenty twenty five which which would basically mean turning off the UK like just shut it down third turn the machines off. And that's like that's like, I mean, I don't know. I'm not a political scientist. But that I can't imagine that that's like they've got no one outside of their club who thinks that's even remotely reasonable. So at this point like what are they doing? And I think the green deal activists have two at once be a moral voice, a clear moral voice and be pragmatic enough in offer enough carrots alongside the sticks that they actually give establishment Democrats some concrete incentive to move in their direction, and they're sort of having to handle all that. And it's and it's not clear how best to do that. And it's not clear like, you know, once again like this like a room full of like twenty seven year olds in the world has charged him with with revolutionizing American politics and completely transforming the American economy and saving the frigging world, and they're just like operating by the seat of their pants like the rest of us like, you know, be nice if like the rest of the democratic stablishment stepped up and helped. A bit. And that's what frustrated me about the response to the green deal. When it first came out is everybody's knee-jerk responses just all those kooky lefties again. But like the way you make the imperative of climate change feel urgent to people is that you just act as though it's urgent like what Democrats don't get. They read public opinion polls. And they're like, oh the public's not there yet. Well, they are looking to you like you they following elite cues like if you think climate is urgent act like it talk like it. And if and if grassroots movement behind climate action comes and parks itself, literally on your frigging doorstep use it like that should be a blessing to you. It should be a blessing to your grandchildren who you're worried about. Right. I mean, like grassroots energy is not you can't just conjure up out of nothing. It's not fungible. You can't return it and say, please give me a movement that more exactly ally. With my policy preferences, like grassroots energy is a precious thing. And here like presented itself to the democratic establishment. And all they could think of to do was say, oh, this is unrealistic. Right. Like, it's unrealistic politics is just perception. It's there's no it's all it's all mush. It's all cloud. It's all perception in this thing becomes whether this thing is a crazy lefty unrealistic thing or absolutely a moral imperative that we have to rearrange politics to achieve whether it's one of those two things just depends on which one you treat it as how you act, and if Democrats had just said, absolutely, right. This is a moral imperative. Thank you for clarifying this. We are going to make this our common, you know, benchmark then then all of a sudden, it's not unrealistic anymore. All of a sudden, it's mainstream democratic policy right like, but instead they just everybody just retreated to their familiar corners. You know, and it's like. No one. That's what like it's frustrates me. Is no one seems to be acting. As though we are genuinely in a very time limited in very extreme crisis in maybe it's time to like rethink some of your old, you know, affiliations, and and and and and beliefs like, maybe it's time to think in new about this. Maybe it's time to do something different than just this old game of center versus left. It's just so tedious. I think though that that you know, we keep getting back to this this conflict between the urgency and the pragmatism. And for some reason this keeps it I think it's challenging when you have activists that are to the left of the establishment and the idea of urgency as itself being a call for action. And I think that that is challenging democratic stabbed. Because I think that I'd generally deal with conservative movements and conservative talking about issues. They think are deeply urgent and currently if you're still a deficit hawk. Welcome. It must have been a very a couple of years for you. But you are hearing from Republicans. We're talking about like de deficit is an issue. This is a giant giant problem? We need to deal with it urgently. And then you hear people responding to them. What exactly do you mean by urgent because things seem fine. Now, it turns out debt is good everything is going to work out. Okay. And so I think translating even the idea of urgency into what you mean by urgent and urgently do what? And how do that in with a democratic big tent that is larger than it actually has ever been? And I think that that's the best. But I think Atia when you get within activist circles, the tent gets a lot smaller because I think being to make the case within the Democratic Party is important, but also explaining how one can be both pragmatic and urgent and what even urgency means in this context is important to do. I think I mean. One thing I've been waiting, and I'm hoping it's finally beginning to happen is just that sort of conventional Democrats have you'd this as a quote unquote, environmental issue for years and years decades, and they were left it to the environmental movement and most of them just are not fluent in it and don't really get it on a gut level, which which which has a bunch of one is when they're asked to speak on it like like Elizabeth Warren, God bless her love. I'm a huge Elizabeth Warren fan. I love all her plans. I love her policy literacy, but it makes it more glaring when she turns to climate change in just sounds like she is reading a bunch of a sound that she got from consultants. Right. Like, I believe in the science like, you know, when you ask someone what do you wanna do about poor health care? What do they do? They say I believe that illness exists. I absolutely believe that diseases real like, no, if you believe diseases really, you don't go talking about what's really. Talk about what the hell to do about it like so, and I don't think they get also that that this is not like healthcare in that. It can stumble along in a crappy system more or less indefinitely. Eventually you can get to fixing it. But like the fix will be just as good then as it will be now. Right. Like, you're not there's nothing irredeemable. There's nothing being lost sort of be a regained policy wise, but with but with climate literally everyday this passing we're seeing irreversible changes. These are not this is not something you can come back to next time. And I just if if Democrats would be more just fluent in talking about it in those terms and quit talking about in. These artificial sounding consultant sounding soundbite sounding fake in authentic sounding language. I think that alone would make a huge difference. If they genuinely would read David Wallace wills book, the uninhabitable earth and let. It freak them out. Like, it freaked me out in take that sense of being freaked out back to politics talk about it. As though you are really freaked out. Like, that's what people need to hear. That's how you convey it. I mean, I PCC has given us all this information. But it's got to it's got to be made more vivid in in this is where I think AFC and her crew or doing a great job like they made a video. I don't know if you have this like a like, a ten to twelve minute video ages an animated video of just AO see talking about not just a sort of danger. But it's opportunities of creating this clean green society. And you know, you've got this like visuals of this high speed rail these beautiful climate, you know, there's a solar panels and just making the whole thing. Much more real because it just sounds like a like a capital, I issue to people people don't care about issues right care about life. They care about their lives. They care about their circumstances in this needs to be made real to people. So I think we're witnessing the sort of. Stumbling awkward sometimes cringe-worthy process whereby democratic politicians really begin to pay attention to this in earnest in a way, they haven't in a long time and slowly go through that process that everyone goes through when they really start paying attention to this closely, which is holy shit. Who wait what right? Like that's point here. Like Heuer, you know, or like or like Pelosi or one of these sort of like crusty old democratic leaders. I won't one of them to get up in front of a crowd and say, holy crap. If you guys were this, do you guys know what's really going on like, it's genuinely shocking when you find out, and I just don't see that genuine sentiment hardly anywhere in evidence. Even among Democrats. I think that's a good place to bring this to a close. So Dave thank you for joining us for much over to renew to episode. It will not be our last Jane as always thank you out in the weeds universe. Being here with us. 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