18 Burst results for "Selene Ghandour"

"selene ghandour" Discussed on The 11th Hour with Brian Williams

The 11th Hour with Brian Williams

04:50 min | 6 months ago

"selene ghandour" Discussed on The 11th Hour with Brian Williams

"Right up there along with seniors and the professionals if we want to reopen school safely isn't vaccinating teachers. Shouldn't that be a premium. Yeah you know it is brian. I really do believe that as a grandfather and somebody who worked on children's health and access to education for kids for my whole career. I am really concerned that we're making terrible situation worse by keeping children out of school that said we have to return kids teachers safely. I was on call this morning with the leadership of the american federation of teachers and they were incredibly concerned in fact about them. Being asked to return to the classrooms without having the vaccinations. I think we have to deal with those very real and very appropriate up concerns that the teachers have on the other. Hand you know. We also need to make sure that we've we've accelerated return to school because the problems that challenges that will have brian with the remediation of children who saw their educational trajectory will be monstrous. Were targeted about a marshall plan level investment to try to recapture the educational momentum for so many millions of our children so we're dealing with a very tricky situation. There's reasons why we would. Why wouldn't wanna go more quickly than not. But i think right now. I think we have to do what he was saying. Dr winsome saying which is. Let's get these kids back to school. That said i think we need more testing and i i would personally pushed up teachers and not just teachers. With the staff. In schools bus drivers custodians et cetera. Up to the highest possible priority category along with the health professionals and people in the nursing homes brand dr. We had dr selene ghandour on the broadcast last night. And knowing you were coming on tonight it reminded me you. Two were the first two people. I knew as you entered our studio way back early march when we were still in our new york studios. You were the first two people to politely decline to shake hands and you explained to me that we've probably better stop doing that as a society for a good long while last night on the broadcast. She told me she is as worried. Presently about these variants as she was worried about what was coming back in early march. Does that speak for you as well. One hundred percent. Bryan you know. Listen we're we're at war basically with a very widely dangerous invisible enemy. This sars covy virus which causes Covid nineteen our army consists of two basic pieces of weaponry one is these so called. Non pharmaceutical interventions the hand. Washing the separation the mass. That's one thing and the second thing is the of course the vaccines both of those have flaws and if we don't follow them but seriously for example on the n. p. i. side. We're going to have problems which will amount to a serious prolongation of how long we're going to be dealing with covert and the other issue about the mutations. The variances people call them very dangerous. We may find that the vaccines at some point with another couple of mutations may not be as effective as they need to be or you're concerned about that with respect to their ability to ward off and prevent infection with viruses. We're in a tricky situation. And we're not winning but i'll tell you this if the vaccines villas. We're not doing the n. P. is we can expect a double it least the time that will be dealing with covid. Nineteen it could be till twenty the end of twenty twenty two for not careful and the only way to deal with that is to make sure we keep up the vaccines that they stay effective against the virus. Whatever forms a day and as dr a gander always says. We've got to maintain a very strict adherence to these Non-farm simply dimensions the mass. You can't take the mask off yet. And brian has much as i'd like to have lunch you. I'm not sure your aunt. It's nothing personal. We can do it yet. I understand will make a date for years down the road to do that But safety asked to come first doctor. Thank you those last comments. You just made Will rattle around in our heads for good longtime seems to me. We could repeat them here every night. to get public education where it should be doctor irwin redlener. Thanks for taking our questions coming up for us. He has been at the helm for years of pulitzer prize. Winning coverage while holding power accountable. Especially in our time of q went on that man. The executive editor of the washington post marty..

Bryan tonight new york brian Nineteen Two last night One hundred percent second thing early march nineteen american federation irwin redlener first both this morning dr selene ghandour Will one thing first two people
"selene ghandour" Discussed on The Last Word with Lawrence O'Donnell

The Last Word with Lawrence O'Donnell

05:45 min | 7 months ago

"selene ghandour" Discussed on The Last Word with Lawrence O'Donnell

"Americans have tested positive for covid nineteen. That's nine thousand. Nine hundred million americans who have tested positive for covid nineteen. The latest issue of the new yorker is dedicated to lawrence rights article entitled the plague year the mistakes and the struggles behind an american tragedy in that article arts right says a pandemic lays bare a society's frailties one of our societies frailties is that large segments of our population. Choose not to follow public health guidelines according to the tsa one million two hundred eighty four thousand five hundred ninety nine. Travelers were screened at us airports. Yesterday that is the highest number of travelers since the start of the pandemic more than two million people in the united states have been vaccinated. According to the centers for disease control that is far below the trump administration's goal of having twenty million people vaccinated before the end of this week. Dr selene ghandour. A member of president-elect biden's cove nineteen advisory board said this today on. cnbc will see him. Invoking the defense production act The idea there is to make sure that the personal protective equipment. The tests capacity and the raw materials for the vaccines are produced inadequate supply. Joining us now is dr darcus and associate professor of emergency medicine at columbia university. She is also yahu news. Medical contributor and cova survivor. Dhaka's thank you very much for joining us tonight New york city bore the brunt of this last spring when we were first being it hard in this country. You've just heard of the news about a record number of travelers record number of air travelers in this country yesterday What are you bracing for in new york city in the month of january. It's not just new york city at the entire country. We are seeing like specifically in la. There are no hospital beds. There are no issue. They are talking about crisis level. Care when it comes to not destroy is but admission to the hospital patients. Don't have to get these monoclonal. Antibodies and everybody who is traveling is not just risking bringing the infection from their home to their vacation destination but catching the virus advocation and bring it back to their home. Which is really dangerous with all of these new strains of the virus as well so it's really scary to those of the front lines. It's also very disappointing that people just given up on containing this we saw a december surge. thanksgiving travel. are you expecting to see january surge after the travel statistics. We just reported absolutely. There's nothing stopping. The spread of this virus have just given up. They're not traveling state to state or a request countries but they're also having numerous parties over thanksgiving christmas new year so we do expect a continued increase in the number of cases of this virus. And no matter how many people we vaccinate it means nothing if the virus continues to spread exponentially in our communities. Let's listen to what. Dr fauci said about the vaccine this weekend. Measles is about ninety eight percent effective vaccine. The covert nineteen vaccine is about ninety four ninety five percent. Measles is the most transmissible infection. You can imagine so. I would imagine that you would need something a little bit less than the ninety percent. That's where i got to the eighty five. But i think we all have to be honest and humble. Nobody really knows for sure. But i think seventy to eighty five percent for her immunity for covid. Nineteen is a reasonable estimate. Dutch cass with the delay now in the distribution of the vaccine where we're seeing much slower distribution than was promised by the trump administration What are you anticipating as the timetable for getting to that herd immunity but it's completely unknown. The distribution of vaccines has been slower. The way expected in actually very frustrating because once the vaccine is delivered to the state up to local medical centers and private offices to start distributing the vaccine at the state's recommendations and as we go to scale outside of fixed facilities. We're gonna see a lot more distribution on inequity when it comes to who's gonna get vaccinated win. And how and that's just going to be very very complicated. I don't expect us to get to any reasonable mass vaccination until the third quarter. I would say of twenty twenty one which means that we're looking through the rest of the winter and the spring really continuing to wear masks distance and stay basically Away from other people aren't in our nuclear families. What has the availability of the vaccine for medical professionals in new york city Especially people like yourselves working in the hospitals. What has that meant to the people on the front lines in these hospitals so the the opportunity to get vaccinated short of joyous It is a path towards the end of this pandemic Physicians frontline healthcare workers have really been able to stand up and say we trust this vaccine and we know that this is a way out of this pandemic and so we have seen more frustration in the inability to get back needed quickly that we have seen in hesitancy from the frontline. Health care workforce in whether or not they decide to get back to buttress dorkcast. Thank you very much for joining once again tonight..

Dr selene ghandour elect biden cove nineteen advisory board dr darcus new york city Dr fauci cova plague tsa Measles centers for disease control cnbc Dhaka us columbia university Dutch cass New york city
"selene ghandour" Discussed on The 11th Hour with Brian Williams

The 11th Hour with Brian Williams

05:37 min | 7 months ago

"selene ghandour" Discussed on The 11th Hour with Brian Williams

"Days are ahead. And he's right just as new experts say the new strain in the uk could already be circulating in our country. We'll talk about it with one of joe. Biden's corona virus advisors and later. What happens if trump turns on his most of sycophant the eleventh hour just getting underway on a busy tuesday night. There's a simple to the rest of the country. That i feel extreme confidence in the safety and the efficacy of vaccine and i wanted to encourage everyone who has the opportunity to get vaccinated so that we can have a veil of protection over this country that would end this pandemic. Dr fauci turns eighty years old on christmas eve. So you had dr fauci. You had health and human services secretary and ardent roddick trump supporter. Alex as are you had the director of the national institutes of health. All of them received moderna says coronavirus vaccine this morning tonight. The cdc says this corona virus variant this new strain found circulating in the uk could already indeed be circulating in our country. Undetected pfizer. Says it's highly likely that its vaccine effective against the new strain. It'll take roughly two weeks to know for sure but the company says it could produce a new vaccine to match the new strain in six weeks. Well for more we welcome back to our broadcast dr. Selene ghandour clinical assistant professor of medicine and infectious disease at the nyu still of medicine in bellevue hospital in new york. She was recently named to the president-elect's corona virus advisory board a doctor gander. First of all. It's great to have you back. Second what is your level of concern on this new strain. And what's the truth about. Existing testing will the testing. We have if you're lucky enough to get one. Expose it well brian. There's a lot that we still don't know about this variant. But i do think that we need to take this very seriously as a potential new threat We don't know if this new variant is in fact more transmissible we think it may be based on modeling that we don't have concrete data on that yet we don't know if this new variant could be more deadly most of those who have been infected with it in the uk so far has been on the younger side and they tend to have milder cases of coronavirus to begin with. So it's a little hard to say whether there's going to be a significant difference in severity of illness and finally we don't know for sure. If the vaccines that have been developed by pfizer by madonna and others will protect against this new variant. We think they probably will. But if there are further mutations that accumulate in these variance where the change even more. It is possible. They could evade the vaccines we've developed. Thus far i heard someone say today. We can try to use the defense production. Act to make more vaccine to keep the pipeline full of pp which just don't know how to make any more doctors and nurses a personnel staffing as becoming the issue. We have ground them all down between spikes of this disease. What are we going to do in these hospitals these regions that are running above full. Tilt we we really can't defense production act our way out of this one. You can't manufacture doctors and nurses and while you can play around the margins by promoting medical students to first year residents or trying to bring people out of retirement. That's not gonna make a huge dent in this what you really need to do. It's a supply and demand problem right and we have a major demand across the country. What is driving that is transmission and really the only way to get ourselves out of. This situation is to flatten the curve. It's what we've been talking about for months. Now which is reduced the number of cases so that health care systems. Doctors nurses can cope with the number of patients that are being asked to care for. Where do you come down on shot shaming. We have a report later in our broadcast uses as an example thirty one year old member of congress from new york in perfect health. Got her inoculation Before doctors and nurses across the country some of them who are begging for there's and putting hands on patients every day. How should people view these lines and the notion of cutting in line. I think when you have enough an elected official who steps up and wants to get vaccinated. I do think there is very important symbolic value in that to show the american people that they trust the process by which this vaccine was developed and you factored approved by the fda and so i think the value of that messaging is worth it for. Somebody like that to be back. Stated early dr selene gander. Thanks for your work. Thank you very much for agreeing to come on and take our questions. We always appreciate having you. Thank you very much coming up more on. Tonight's breaking news on this relief deal. Trump's latest raft of pardons plus the ad that apparently set a hook inside.

Dr fauci dr fauci roddick trump Selene ghandour bellevue hospital uk pfizer moderna Biden trump national institutes of health infectious disease cdc nyu joe Alex new york brian madonna congress
As Americans start to receive Moderna vaccine, questions arise about a new COVID-19 strain

The 11th Hour with Brian Williams

04:15 min | 7 months ago

As Americans start to receive Moderna vaccine, questions arise about a new COVID-19 strain

"Tonight. The cdc says this corona virus variant this new strain found circulating in the uk could already indeed be circulating in our country. Undetected pfizer. Says it's highly likely that its vaccine effective against the new strain. It'll take roughly two weeks to know for sure but the company says it could produce a new vaccine to match the new strain in six weeks. Well for more we welcome back to our broadcast dr. Selene ghandour clinical assistant professor of medicine and infectious disease at the nyu still of medicine in bellevue hospital in new york. She was recently named to the president-elect's corona virus advisory board a doctor gander. First of all. It's great to have you back. Second what is your level of concern on this new strain. And what's the truth about. Existing testing will the testing. We have if you're lucky enough to get one. Expose it well brian. There's a lot that we still don't know about this variant. But i do think that we need to take this very seriously as a potential new threat We don't know if this new variant is in fact more transmissible we think it may be based on modeling that we don't have concrete data on that yet we don't know if this new variant could be more deadly most of those who have been infected with it in the uk so far has been on the younger side and they tend to have milder cases of coronavirus to begin with. So it's a little hard to say whether there's going to be a significant difference in severity of illness and finally we don't know for sure. If the vaccines that have been developed by pfizer by madonna and others will protect against this new variant. We think they probably will. But if there are further mutations that accumulate in these variance where the change even more. It is possible. They could evade the vaccines we've developed. Thus far i heard someone say today. We can try to use the defense production. Act to make more vaccine to keep the pipeline full of pp which just don't know how to make any more doctors and nurses a personnel staffing as becoming the issue. We have ground them all down between spikes of this disease. What are we going to do in these hospitals these regions that are running above full. Tilt we we really can't defense production act our way out of this one. You can't manufacture doctors and nurses and while you can play around the margins by promoting medical students to first year residents or trying to bring people out of retirement. That's not gonna make a huge dent in this what you really need to do. It's a supply and demand problem right and we have a major demand across the country. What is driving that is transmission and really the only way to get ourselves out of. This situation is to flatten the curve. It's what we've been talking about for months. Now which is reduced the number of cases so that health care systems. Doctors nurses can cope with the number of patients that are being asked to care for. Where do you come down on shot shaming. We have a report later in our broadcast uses as an example thirty one year old member of congress from new york in perfect health. Got her inoculation Before doctors and nurses across the country some of them who are begging for there's and putting hands on patients every day. How should people view these lines and the notion of cutting in line. I think when you have enough an elected official who steps up and wants to get vaccinated. I do think there is very important symbolic value in that to show the american people that they trust the process by which this vaccine was developed and you factored approved by the fda and so i think the value of that messaging is worth it for. Somebody like that to be back. Stated early dr selene gander. Thanks for your work. Thank you very much for agreeing to come on and take our questions. We always appreciate having you. Thank you very

Selene Ghandour Bellevue Hospital Pfizer UK Infectious Disease CDC NYU New York Brian Madonna Congress Dr Selene Gander FDA
"selene ghandour" Discussed on That's What She Said with Sarah Spain

That's What She Said with Sarah Spain

04:51 min | 8 months ago

"selene ghandour" Discussed on That's What She Said with Sarah Spain

"More mentally healthy so when you get back to your work husbands dogs etcetera your sharper and you have more energy and you feel better so getting past that guilt of carving out time just for yourself. The first part the second of course is doing it. When you're not in the mood to work out or forcing yourself to put on a busy schedule and i have a solution for that. So i've been creating these month long challenges almost like bingo boards. And there's a certain number of boxes on it and there's some for yoga and pilates arm workouts in walks and other exercise classes. And then i throw in some other stuff like meditation or reading or other things that i have trouble making time for so you get the satisfaction of things off and you get the planning that sort of required when you sit down to figure out how you're going to fit them all in which as you can do what and then you have accountability because you can post the updated check boxes every day on social media or maybe with a friend that keeps you honest and wants to do the challenge as well. So he gets that motivation to check it out. it's On my instagram stories. Almost every day. Spain two three two three And give it a shot. I think it might help. There's something about that like visualizing it that i think helps you squeeze it into a busy schedule. The commission is spoken. My name is grant wall and my dilemma is getting my wife to not be so pedal to the metal all day long. Well this is a follow up to the last one. Because while i i hope you don't consider her workouts part of putting pedal to the metal. I'd like to think those are separate. Maybe just a little more relaxing. What you're looking for and I don't know that my husband urging me to put down work or would go over while. I'm not a great relaxer myself but if you made a plan in advance maybe you wanted to have a nice dinner. You cook together or a movie you on to watch or a walk you on to take together. Something that she knows is on the schedule so she can use her time appropriately before and after and feel okay about taking that break with you. That might be the key but knowing what she does and how important it is. She's probably going to be pedal to the metal for the foreseeable future. The commissioners spoken my guest. This week are the married dynamic. Duo of grant wall and doctors. Selene ghandour selena's an infectious disease. Physician internist epidemiologist filmmaker and medical journalists..

instagram Spain Selene ghandour selena infectious disease
"selene ghandour" Discussed on Hysteria

Hysteria

04:42 min | 8 months ago

"selene ghandour" Discussed on Hysteria

"Welcome back today. We're thrilled to welcome. One of the members of president elect. Joe biden's cove advisory board. Dr selene ghandour. She's a clinical assistant professor at the department of medicine and nyu grossman school of medicine. She's also an epidemiologist and an infectious disease specialist who you want guiding the president so welcome dr ghandour. It's my pleasure to be here. We're so glad you're here. We have a lot to talk about. Today there's two promising vaccine type trials a lot of depressing data one looming holiday that centers on activities that according to medical experts would be very very stupid to celebrate traditionally given all. That's going on but first how are you doing. Are you drinking enough water and getting enough son. I have not taken a day off since february. So this has been a crazy stretch even before being appointed to the advisory board and i guess is going to continue to be a crazy stretch for a while yet okay. So let's start with the bad news so we're seeing troubling spike in covid nineteen cases throughout the. Us hasn't been seen at the beginning of the pandemic. So can you give our listeners. An overview of what's going on and why that is well. yeah. I've been getting this question. Why are we seeing cases going up now and this is related to the time of year. People are indoors more because the weather's getting cooler if you look at the parts of the country where the virus is surging. The most Accident that the are parts of the country that are colder relatively speaking And so that's been a major factor. Here this is the same pattern we see with the with regular respiratory viruses with the cough. Khou flu this is why cough. Cold and flu is typically in the fall and winter and the current viruses a respiratory virus. Like the rest of those and so it's very predictable that this time of year would be would be worse so in some rare pandemic news that wasn't bad We have to vaccines one by pfizer. One by moderna but both have shown effectiveness and safety in large scale clinical trials. Another one by tech is also promising. So can you please. Just give it to us straight. Does this mean that the end of cova times are insight. Are we planning new..

clinical assistant professor advisory board president Joe biden flu nyu grossman school of medicin pfizer department of medicine
"selene ghandour" Discussed on The Last Word with Lawrence O'Donnell

The Last Word with Lawrence O'Donnell

05:32 min | 9 months ago

"selene ghandour" Discussed on The Last Word with Lawrence O'Donnell

"Today for a new coronavirus vaccine are. These are his words as good as it gets. We'll be joined by a member of president-elect biden's corona virus advisory group next. How do we get the vaccine. How do we get over. Three hundred million americans vaccinated. What's the game plan. It's a huge huge huge undertaking. If we have to wait until january twentieth to start that planning it puts us behind over a month month and a half and so it's important to be done at the be coordination. Now trae has now. Is dr sling ghandour. Member of president-elect biden's corona virus taskforce she has an infectious disease specialist in clinical assistant professor at nyu school of medicine. Thank you very much for joining us tonight. Dr i wanna get your reaction to the latest via a vaccine against today of from moderna dr anthony. Fauci says it's as good as it gets. Yeah the data. Looks really good. Both for the vaccine as well as the moderna vaccine. They both seem highly effective over ninety percent effective which is quite high especially for a brand new vaccine based on a technology that frankly we have not used in prior vaccine so this is all very exciting that we finally have some tools that will soon be available to us at our disposal. Another tool in the toolbox of speak now because you're being locked out in terms of the legal process in the transition at this stage a. Or are you going to be having direct meetings with the vaccine manufacturers. We i personally have not yet. This is something that our team more. Broadly the transition team will be looking at doing whether that's a vaccine manufacturers or others will be involved in delivering the vaccine that includes partners at both state and local health departments as well as in the private sector and what. What about a picking a vaccine is that is that what's going to happen that we're going to pick one of these and it it. It will be the pfizer or the moderna or or possibly some other than emerges of very soon. I think you're actually going to see a number of different vaccine. Deployed fewer to compare say the pfizer in the madonna one critical difference between the two. Is that the pfizer. Vaccine requires deep freezing at minus seventy celsius whereas the modern vaccine is stable at a more reasonable temperatures for up to thirty days. So i think what you're going to see is different vaccine used in different locations for example urban versus rural also in different patient populations so for example the elderly versus others. And so the good news. Is we have a number of these different. Vaccines in the pipeline. And that will be using them based on what they do best of. What would you like to know of from the trump administration that you cannot yet. No i think about this like we're at war. It would be like we're at war with a foreign power and we're supposed to take the reins on january twentieth and we have no idea where the aircraft carriers and the tanks and the troops are and that's very difficult to get up to speed on in one day on all of those kinds of logistics. We really need to know at a granular level. Not just what's available on the cdc website or in the newspapers but really the internal government information on where cases happening in much more detail at the hospital facility level. How fuller beds. How are we doing in terms of ventilators. How are we doing in terms of our supply. Chain all of those kinds of details. We really need to know now. The infection rate is increasing Were not getting up to a million a week. It seems like the vaccine. If we're gonna have. It is arriving kind of i. Guess just in time but But how do you transition from a a magic. A pandemic with no vaccine to suddenly having a vaccine option. Well the critical thing understand. is that you just. Because we've invented a vaccine developed a vaccine tested it does not mean we have the hundreds of million doses necessary to vaccinate everybody and there's a lot of logistics involved in getting it distributed getting people to come in and get vaccinated. What you'll see is in probably end of this calendar year. We'll start to vaccinate first responders healthcare workers on the front lines and certain high risk populations for example those living in nursing homes. You won't see this available to the general population until april or may at the really and in the meantime we really need to double down our efforts on the basics of public health. Control the mass the social distancing outdoors than indoors. Getting tested and cooperating with contact tracers. Dr selene ghandour. Thank you very much for joining us. Not really appreciate my pleasure. Dr ghandour gets tonight's last word. Hi it's msnbc's llc these days there's just so much news.

moderna vaccine president-elect biden moderna dr anthony Dr selene ghandour msnbc nyu school of medicine trae Fauci clinical assistant professor cdc
"selene ghandour" Discussed on EPIDEMIC with Dr. Celine Gounder and Ronald Klain

EPIDEMIC with Dr. Celine Gounder and Ronald Klain

01:32 min | 1 year ago

"selene ghandour" Discussed on EPIDEMIC with Dr. Celine Gounder and Ronald Klain

"You. Stacey epidemic is brought to you by just human productions. Today's episode was produced by Zach dire me. Our music is by the Blue Dots. Sessions our interns are Sonia Broadway Isabel Ricky Claire Halverson Annabel Chen. If you enjoy the show please tell a friend about it today. And if you haven't already done so leave us a review apple podcasts. It helps more people find out about the show. You can learn more about this podcast. How to engage with us on social media at how to support the podcast at epidemic dot. Fm THAT'S EPIDEMIC DOT FM. Just human productions is a five. Oh One C. Three non profit organization so your donations to support our podcasts are tax deductible go to epidemic DOT FM to make donation. We release epidemic twice a week gun Tuesdays and Fridays but producing podcast costs money. We've got to pay Zach so please make donation. Help US keep this going. Check out our sister. Podcast American diagnosis. You can find it wherever you listen to podcasts or at American diagnosis dot. Fm on American diagnosis. We cover some of the biggest health challenges affecting the nation today in season one we covered using mental health and season to the OPIOID overdose crisis and in season three gun violence in America. I'm Dr Selene Ghandour. And I'm Ron claim. Thanks for listening to epidemic..

"selene ghandour" Discussed on The Situation Room with Wolf Blitzer

The Situation Room with Wolf Blitzer

09:15 min | 1 year ago

"selene ghandour" Discussed on The Situation Room with Wolf Blitzer

"So as of ten o'clock this morning I had five thousand employees worth and I ever had updates since then But just ramped up our capacity and before law will be doing fifteen hundred a day but my my thing is eventually everybody should get tested and we all know about the limitations but for those people who can't shelter in place. They have to go to work every day because they're doing jobs important. I thought they deserve to be first in line. I was GONNA say mayor. You say people who are showing some symptoms checking their temperature for example but there are a lot of people apparently out there who showed no symptoms at all yet are already infected. What do you do about them? No question about it. We just tested thousand people at nursing homes and we found high infection rate of those without symptoms as those winds symptoms. And so I go to work every day on the eleventh floor of City Hall. Everybody here is tested to make sure they're negative. Everybody wears masks. Everybody has regular temperature checks in in. This is what it's going to be. It's going to be all of those things three weeks ago. We had six hundred people quarantined at the Detroit. Police Department. We put everybody through the fifteen minute. Abbott tasks got healthcare for those who are positive and those were negative. Go back to work. And when we started going to social distancing temperature chips to masks we now have one quarantine a day for the last seven For the last seven days in twenty five hundred person department this can be managed if you stay with the politics and just stick to the science. What goes through your mind. Baier when you hear of the news and we've been reporting at this hour that the governor of Georgia is now prioritizing. The reopening of gyms hair salons. And he wants to do so later this week I think again. The science does not support that. At least certainly not emission. Our governor has done a great job but in the city a Detroit is Dr Works mentioned. Today we have knocked down the rate of this dramatically. We did it without closing parks. Did it without curfews by by making a commitment as a city to care for each other. If you come through our parks today you'll see people walking in ones or twos socially distancing enjoying the parks in an appropriate way and so. I've been very fortunate that the seven thousand people city Detroit if taken this very seriously mayor. Doug in good luck to you everyone in Detroit. Thanks so much for joining us. Thanks for having me. Wolf up next an update on the push offer a reliable antibody tests experts consider essential to return to the United States. There's some semblance of normality. We'll be right. You're about to seize Kiel O.`Neil like you've never seen him before. This is show about my life just because I have more than the average guy doesn't mean I'm than the average got jack like all new Thursdays at nine on. Tnt Today The New York Governor Andrew Cuomo announced. This state is rolling out. Widespread ANTIBODY TESTING. Which experts consider a key to reopening normal business? Let's get an update from our medical correspondent? Elizabeth Cohen is joining us. Tell us why antibody testing Elizabeth is so critical right so antibody testing is not the tests that tells you if you currently have covert. It's the test that tells you. Hey you had at some time. In the past. And you recovered in your. Antibodies are present because they fought that disease off. This is super important to know wolf them both personal and sort of a public health level on a personal level. If you know you have antibodies and if it means that you're immune to cove it it could mean that you could go back to work and sort of reenter society on a larger level. If enough people have antibodies and if it means that their immune that it means that we could start opening things back up again but there are several big problems with the antibody test first of all. There's a lot of them out there. That aren't good. The FDA loosened the rules and they allowed all of these tests out there. That just simply don't work so that's a problem. Secondly the tests need certain chemicals and other ingredients to go with them and it is very very tough to get. Those governor. Cuomo spoke about that in his press conference today. Third of all you've noticed I said if you're immune it is possible. That people could have antibodies and not be immune. They could get infected a second time. This is a new virus. Viruses are very tricky doctors. Trying to figure that out right now if you have antibodies. Does that mean that you're a man that's a critically important issue Elizabeth? What more do we know about the drug treatments? Potential drug treatments like hydroxy cleric when for example the trials that are underway to determine how effective they might be so roxie. Chloroquine is interesting because there are more than twenty five. Actually I think at this point more than thirty studies in the United States alone. Looking at hydroxy chloroquine. We were expecting results from very big study. That's going on in New York. That's very well respected by a good group of researchers. We were expecting their results today. But the governor Said told us in the press conference that that's not going to happen so we're still waiting on those and so also Novartis has joined the groups that are doing hydroxy Corkman studies but we should keep in mind. There are lots of other drugs out there. Being tested This is the one that trump talks about a lot and he seems very fond of it but there are several other drugs out there that are being tested but all of these are testing. We don't know if they're going to be the answer or if they're going to be useless looking a drug called Rim Desa there as well. We'll see if that is effective. Elizabeth Cohen. Thank you very much for that report. Coming up. Our Dr Sanjay Gupta be standing by. He will answer your questions about the corona virus and the pandemic when we come back. What does leadership look like in times of crisis? I'm poppy harlow for the next several weeks. My Show boss. House is going to bring you. Conversations with business leaders who are trying to navigate the economic fallout of the corona virus pandemic in real time. We ask how. They're looking out for their employees. How they're planning for a future that will undoubtedly look very different for their business. Look for new episodes of this boss file special series every Thursday. I hope you'll join us. We continue to get lots of questions about the corona virus pandemic. We got our chief medical correspondent. Dr Sanjay Gupta with us. He's got the answers to these questions. And our viewers have tons of good question. Sanjay here's one if beaches in my state reopen. Is it safe to go? Well you know as long as you can maintain physical distance here wolf. I mean the the guidance and the advice remains the same. I mean there is a virus out there. It is a contagious virus. It can spread from person to person. I mean I'm all for getting people outside. I'm a little worried as soon as these things open beaches You make it large crowds of people. And that's going to be a concern. We just have to use common sense here. One thing to also keep in mind and I think we`ve. We've talked about this from the beginning. Is that you know. The risk is not only to yourself but if you do get exposed to the virus infected and don't even have any symptoms and then you go home to somebody in your house. Who is vulnerable. You could potentially spread the infection to that person. So you've got to use common sense people are GonNa say I WANNA follow the rules to the T- that's fine but just just consider the fact. There's a virus out there. It can spread if you're going to do this. Still make sure to maintain your distance. All right that's good advice. So here's another question from viewer. What kind of mask should I buy a paper mask or a cloth mask? Well the types of mass you want to reserve for healthcare workers are the n ninety five masks and the surgical masks what the CDC has said. Is that when you go out? If you have to go out again. I think people should pretty much stay at home. But if there's something essential that you have to go out for then wearing a cloth mask is okay. It's it's really to protect other people from you. You're trying to basically protect the virus from from getting out of your nose or mouth and spreading it in the Environment. One of our medical contributors. Selene Ghandour sort of had a good analogy. She said think of it like a hose if you put the mass right next to the hose. You'RE GONNA stop more of the water if you put the mask further away. You're not gonNA stop as much so. Having a cloth mask is going to be useful. A true surgical mask is GonNa be a better mask. I mean that is what they're designed to do no question about it so it becomes a question of. I don't want to take away masks from healthcare workers. They need them. A cloth mask is certainly better than nothing primarily. I should stay at home but if I do go out for some reason that I'm wearing the master. Protect other people from me all right Sanjay. We got more questions. We'll do more of that's coming up. Thank you very much. Dr Sanjay Gupta always helping us understand what's going on coming up one. St Announces Plans to reopen gyms. Bowling Alleys Hirondelle salons and more as early as this coming Friday as the. Us Corona Virus death-toll now tops forty one..

Dr Sanjay Gupta Detroit Elizabeth Cohen Governor Andrew Cuomo United States New York City Hall Police Department Kiel FDA Novartis Rim Desa Abbott Wolf Baier Bowling Alleys Hirondelle Chloroquine chloroquine Georgia
"selene ghandour" Discussed on Planet F�tbol with Grant Wahl

Planet F�tbol with Grant Wahl

12:14 min | 1 year ago

"selene ghandour" Discussed on Planet F�tbol with Grant Wahl

"Hey there I'm brant wall. Welcome to the planet football podcast. We're continuing to do to podcasts a week and we're going to start each episode with just a few minutes on the corona virus latest with my wife. Dr Selene Ghandour. Who's a medical analyst for CNN and the Co host of the PODCAST epidemic? Then we'll have an interview with someone interesting from the soccer world. Today's interview guest is American. Lauren Barnes of rain and Melbourne City. Who won the Australian League title on March Twenty First and got one of the last flights out of Australia back to the United States? Quick Reminder if you like the podcast. It would really help us out if you go to apple podcasts and provide a rating and review and we'd appreciate you recommending the podcast to someone you know on word pay their. We're recording this on Monday morning. March thirtieth and I'm here on day twenty of home locked down in New York City with my wife Dr Selene counter infectious disease specialist. Who's a CNN medical analyst and the Co host of the PODCAST epidemic? Thanks for joining me. Glad TO BE HERE. A few things have talked about here. We're living in the epicenter of the virus in the United States. Right now you can hear ambulance sirens all day and night right now in New York City. Are this week and next week. Going to be the worst of it in New York City. And what does that entail? Well time will tell I. It's hard to know for sure right now because we are still not yet. Sure whether social distancing measures have been adequately Implimented across the city. I think one of the things that I have seen that remains concerning is looking at use of public transportation across New York City and wild that has dropped off significantly in Manhattan. There is still pretty significant. Use public transportation whether its subway or buses in the outer boroughs so like Queens the Bronx Brooklyn just to name a few and that's concerning In part because it means people are still going out. So why are they still going out well for people who don't live in New York City? Who aren't as familiar with the city. Those are less wealthy neighborhoods. We also have a lot of immigrants a lot of people just doing very you know working class jobs so these are people who are the nannies the housekeepers the restaurant workers the drivers. And these are folks who cannot telecommute. Can't telework a work. And so in order to put food on the table to pay their rent They have to keep working. They don't really have a choice and not to mention that some of these people are considered essential workers so for example the person. You're checkout counter at the grocery store so it's not surprising that we haven't seen social distancing happen the way we would like there It's really gonNA be tough to fully implement that without somebody stepping in the New York City government. The New York state government the federal government to really pay people to stay home and to provide them with what they need to build a stay home so when we saw last week. Elmhurst hospital which is one of the public hospitals in Queens overrun with krona virus patients. That was really no surprise because they have all of the factors setting up setting them up for something like that to happen. What do you make of the President and Dr Anthony? Foudy saying yesterday that we may well be looking at one hundred thousand to two hundred thousand corona virus deaths in the US. Well to me. That's still too many deaths If you look at the population of China they have more than four times the population of the United States and today in China. They've had just over three thousand deaths from corona virus. So let's divide that by four. You should have less than a thousand deaths from corona virus in this country. So what do you say to people who are like? I don't believe in numbers in China at all. Well let's take it the opposite direction. So if you're saying that we're going to have one hundred two hundred thousand deaths from corona virus in the US. And I frankly think that's somewhat optimistic honestly but let's say one hundred thousand. Let's multiply by four. That would be on the order of about a half a million deaths from corona virus in China. That's not something that you can just hide that level of death. We're already seeing here. These refrigerated truck mortuaries for bodies just in Queens. If you had had that wide scale numbers of deaths in China we would know about that so you know maybe the truth is somewhere in the middle but I really think that even with the estimates we're hearing now of between one hundred and two hundred thousand Krono virus deaths in the US that is still way out of proportion with what they saw. In China. The president claimed without any evidence yesterday. That masks are disappearing out the back door at New York. City hospitals and hospitals here have plenty of personal protective equipment for their needs are either of those claims accurate based on what you know as a practicing infectious disease doctor here. Well first of all I thought. That comment was incredibly offensive. In the implication was that maybe we were even stealing them and selling them on the black market for own Prophet so that was beyond offensive but to give you some some numbers to give you a sense so he was. Why did we go? Why do one hospital go from needing ten to twenty thousand masks to three hundred thousand masks in a certain period of time and so let me just for people who don't work in the hospital sort of break this down for you so the average medical team that's headed by an attending physician so that's sort of the physician charge of the team It's GonNa be about twenty patients on average and so under normal circumstances between zero and one patient out of twenty has a medical condition that would require you to wear an ninety five respirator mask today with Corona virus. It's between nineteen and twenty out of twenty patients because everybody has krona virus in the hospital. Now so that's basically a twenty fold increase in your need for masks so you multiply ten to twenty thousand by twenty that gives you two hundred to four hundred thousand. So three hundred thousand is smack in the middle of that. It makes complete sense. The numbers make complete sense. That that's what the need is now. That said we don't have those masks so it's not like we're actually getting those three hundred thousand masks that he's describing but that's what the need is from the president we've had these wild swings and what he says publicly just a few days ago he was saying the cure can't be worse than the problem and saying he wanted mass gatherings and churches on Easter which is less than two weeks away. Now he's saying we should social distance until April thirtieth and that those one hundred thousand. Us Corona virus deaths with me. And he's done a good job. Do you get any sense that he has a real strategy overall to deal with as well so first of all. You can't take the cure if you're dead so I think you know to extend the metaphor that needs to be the priority. We need to keep people alive. We need to address the public health. Emergency and then we can address the economic issues And the longer we dilly dally you in terms of what really needs to be done on the public health front the longer these measures are going to need to be implemented and frankly the greater the economic pain so if you really want to get us back to working and and get the economy going again you really need to be much more aggressive on the Public Health Front I and you know do I think he has a strategy. I Kiss Strategy is frankly emotion. I think he's a very emotional president and he leads through emotion so we had a few reader questions here The first one comes from Andrea contoured. The Legend says Hi Grant. I would love your wife to answer. What is the purpose of the World Health Organization when they publish something like this So there's a tweet from January fourteenth that Is still up there actually on the? Who Twitter page That reads preliminary investigations conducted by the Chinese authorities have found no clear evidence of human to human transmission of the novel. Corona buyers identified in Wuhan China Andres asks as the Authority isn't the. Who supposed to fact check double-check doubt and be able to rebut something. That was not let alone that the source is the Chinese government. I the question here I think is how much do you trust the World Health Organization? Are they too much? Basically in bed with the Chinese government. Well look I think. The United States has completely abdicated their role as leaders globally. And so part of this is not wanting to make contributions to the World Health Organization another. Un organizations saying. That's not a good use of our money. Really not wanting to engage on the international scale if you go to places like Africa as you know you know we've traveled there extensively you go across the continent and the Chinese are everywhere. They're giving money for an helping build massive infrastructure projects in exchange for access to natural resources there mining everywhere and building. Parliament buildings bridges soccer stadiums. Yeah there you go and airports and so they are stepping up in very concrete ways for other nations that need assistance whereas we'd look at it as well. Those people are not deserving. We don't WANNA give. We want to focus our energies and taxpayer money at home. But that has a real impact. There's a real trade off there and and sadly we have we're not even at the table anymore In the way that we once were are we in a position to not be totally trusting in the World Health Organization. I remember in a Bola in two thousand fourteen the. Who did really poorly especially at first on on a Bulla. I don't know how you feel how they've done on corona virus so far. Well I think it's an intensely political organization that has that accountable to not just the United States and not just China but to many many all of its member nations But particularly in this situation where the outbreak began in China. Where China is you know. Frankly one of the biggest now one of the most important Nations globally in terms of its political and economic influence. I think a lot of people are going to be afraid to say anything critical if China and frankly that's part of what they they do have to be mindful in order to get their jobs done and sometimes there's a balancing act to be to be done. You do the right thing. Next question comes from Jason Anderson for a person with no signs of having Kobe. Nineteen what constitutes unacceptable mask for grocery store trips is my soccer. Snood up to the job Jason. I think your soccer snood is definitely up to the job here. I think what you want is something that covers your nose and mouth. You know that that's comfortable that you can breathe through. And ideally that's washable so as soon as you get that. Get home from your grocery store trip. Tie that soccer snood in the wash and wash your face wash your hands but I think that's a very reasonable approach to protecting yourself on these essential errands next question comes from Derek. Rae My friend wonderful broadcaster We've been noticing in our neighborhood..

United States China New York City soccer World Health Organization CNN Queens New York analyst president Melbourne City Dr Selene Ghandour Corona brant wall Dr Selene Lauren Barnes football apple Australian League
"selene ghandour" Discussed on EPIDEMIC with Dr. Celine Gounder and Ronald Klain

EPIDEMIC with Dr. Celine Gounder and Ronald Klain

11:06 min | 1 year ago

"selene ghandour" Discussed on EPIDEMIC with Dr. Celine Gounder and Ronald Klain

"Grant one of the world's leading experts on how to motivate people discussing how we get people to do the right thing and how we keep them from doing the wrong ones. We normally take your questions and we'll be back with that feature on Friday but today we have a very special episode of the podcast with unique insight on. What's happening right now with the corona virus pandemic in our hospitals. My co-host Dr. Selene Ghandour spent a day in a major hospital in New York City on Sunday March. Twenty second treating critically ill patients with the cove. Nineteen disease are cases of covert really dominating taking over the hospital setting. I have to say it's really weird to be at Bellevue right now. On the one hand it feels like a ghost town. Basically the hospital has cleared out largely devoting itself to Corona virus patients. It's really eerily quiet except for overhead pages every hour so for patients who are getting worse than need to be transferred to the ICU and put on a ventilator on the one hand yes we're dealing with this huge influx of patients but the normal sort of activity of the hospital where we're all working together and around each other is not the case right now. Selene you talk about the pages that you're hearing in the hospital about patients going into the ICU. So let's Talk. About the course of disease people come into the hospital obviously. They're sick but once they get there what's happening. What's the kind of course of disease for the patients in the hospital? I think one thing that's been really striking is how quickly patients de compensate with this disease. They can really turn on a dime so they can go from needing just a tiny bit of oxygen to needing to be in the ICU. Just in the course of a couple of hours just in the course of a morning the other thing that seems to be the case is it's the prior reports in the literature from China have been that around day seven or eight into diseases when people really crash and we're seeing it even earlier a day five or six of symptoms their emergency needing to be on a ventilator so it can be pretty scary because you see somebody in the morning and you think. Oh they're doing okay. They're stable and then in a couple hours they're not so stable. They're critically ill early. On in the coverage of the Z's there was a focus that only people who had special vulnerabilities serious pre existing conditions or the very elderly could be at risk of serious illness. It sounds like you saw something very different to that in the hospital. What did you learn firsthand? Yeah it's been interesting A lot of these patients have never had medical problems in the past. They've never seen a healthcare provider. Which is its own issue. That they don't have a primary care provider. Many of them have had next to no contact with the healthcare system. Before this and so you know it's been really striking. That people who are pretty healthy are getting gravely ill. Let's talk about the patients that you saw or their ages were their backgrounds. What was the profile of these patients? Well they were younger than you might expect. They range from twenty late twenties too late seventies but the median age was late forties. So you know. Basically my age about two thirds of them were men and many of them were obese. Which has me especially concerned for the US because about a third of Americans are obese and another third or overweight. The reason that matters is When you're carrying that extra weight you're able to expand your lungs less well than if you're thinner person and so if you're affected by something like krona virus you know you're going to have a harder time coping with it. Selene the main part of this is treating the patients of course but part of this is also dealing with the families of the patients. What did you see in that regard? Well this is actually one of the reasons. The hospital feels so empty right now in. Some ways is that patients are not allowed visitors for infection control reasons and so it's really patients by themselves which is incredibly isolating. Obviously I had a patient yesterday who I had talked down from having a panic attack because he was really feeling very isolated in his room by himself without anybody else there you know and then we have patients families who are terrified by the idea of their loved. One being discharged home. They are worried that that person may get sicker again. Which is not completely unfounded. But we are really trying to make a pretty good assessment as to. Who's out of the woods? And WHO's not but at the same time. If somebody does look like they're out of the woods we do need to free up those hospital beds. You have to kind of way that so those can be some really challenging conversations and then families are also worried. Well Okay so my mom my dad. My brother is coming home. But what does that mean for me and the rest of my family are we at risk for infection. You know what this is gonNA mean for the rest of us and you know. There's a lot of nervousness about how to handle that in the home so selene take a step back here. What was the morale in the hospital? What was the mindset of you and your colleagues when you were confronted with this disease. Up-close face to face yeah. I think there's definitely fear but there's there's this sort of scarcity mindset because there is scarcity in terms of gowns and masks and other protective equipment so silly interrupted there for a second and we've talked about a couple times but for our lay listeners. Why don't you walk us through head to toe? What protective gear looks like? What should they be wearing to keep themselves safe? What are they actually wearing instead? Just straight up. Surgical masks are really not adequate. If you're going to be working in a hospital and exposed to this degree to patients infectious bodily fluids and so what you really should be wearing. would include a an ninety. Five respirator mask or something equivalent to that You should be wearing something covering your face so that if you get sprayed with these aerosols. You're you're shielded from that. That's plastic face shield or maybe goggles You should be wearing something over your hair. Like a Hairnet or bonnet should be wearing a gown again to cover your clothing in your skin and you should be wearing gloves. So that's sort of the the outfit. It's not quite as it's not quite the Hazmat suit we wore for Ebola. But you know it's not so far away from that you know dominating. The news is the fact that doctors like you nurses other. Healthcare workers are facing a shortage of masks protective gears. Gowns gloves. All the things. They need to keep them safe. So what were the circumstances that conditions you had to work under in the hospital on Sunday? Well we've run out of those and ninety five respirator masks. Which really is what. The standard should be For caring for these kinds of patients. We are now running out of the surgical masks with face shields. That are probably you know as as good as we have right now but we're running out of those as well and we're also running out of gowns. So you know I. I have colleagues who because they don't want to create this mentality of shortage are actually under protecting themselves because they don't WanNa see a run on what few supplies we have left. So what does it feel like? You have to go in and treat patients with a deadly disease without the gear. You need keep you and your colleagues safe well. It hasn't really worried if we get sick than it means we're going to be even more short-staffed which means that the risk continues to compound for all of us whether it's for us as providers being that much more overloaded whether it's for patients having fewer of US per patient to help them. It honestly doesn't feel fair. It feels like we're really doing what we can an but that others who should be protecting us an arming us with what we need. Aren't doing their jobs for us. So you know selene. It's a really important point. You know the only time we had someone contract a bullet in the US. We treated many people here who we brought back from Africa with the disease but the only people who actually caught the disease in the US were two nurses in Dallas who are treating Ebola patient wearing protective gear but not the right protective gear. Nearly having some gear. Some kinds of gear. It's not gonNA cut. It has to be the right kind of protection for the threat that are doctors. Nurses and medical workers are facing well. I think that's a great point so the CDC recently came out and said well. If you're out of personal protective equipment you can wear a Bandanna or scarf. And given the level of exposure we have in the hospital that is entirely inadequate so I really appreciate people who are trying to sew cloth masks for us but I think that their energies might be better spent elsewhere. Whether it's raise money to help us get the personal protective equipment. We need whether it's just delivering food to staff working in the hospital. Those kinds of things probably will have more of an impact you know. There's really no replacement for the correct personal protective equipment. So selene you've obviously been. It's very difficult circumstances before you traded patients with Ebola in west Africa but what about dealing with Kovic patients in New York in the hospital might surprised you. Honestly Ron had less to do with the patients themselves and more to do with how the doctors were having to make decisions in terms of where I have worked in the past. I never felt like I did not have what I needed to protect myself and to be sure that other healthcare providers were protected. And I feel like here. Doctors are having to make very difficult decisions about with what personal protective equipment? We have on hand. How do we prioritize use of that? How do we ration the use of that? So it's a it's a really strange psychology of on the one hand. Why need to protect myself? I can't be getting sick because then I might transmit to other people and then I can't work but on the other hand you don't want to create fear and so that Juggling Act. I've never had to do before. It's a great point. I mean if you think about it you were in a developing country relatively poor country Guinea in.

Ebola US Dr. Selene Ghandour New York City Bellevue China Africa Ron Guinea CDC west Africa New York Dallas
"selene ghandour" Discussed on EPIDEMIC with Dr. Celine Gounder and Ronald Klain

EPIDEMIC with Dr. Celine Gounder and Ronald Klain

15:28 min | 1 year ago

"selene ghandour" Discussed on EPIDEMIC with Dr. Celine Gounder and Ronald Klain

"I'm Dr Selene Ghandour. And this is epidemic in this episode. We're going to talk about research that raises troubling question. How is the novel Corona Virus Transmitted One of the most reassuring? Things we hear from experts is that it's not airborne which we think means you can only catch it by touching something a surface that's got the virus on it so you wash your hands a lot and you think you'll be okay but last weekend wired magazine ran a story with the headline. They say corona virus isn't airborne but it's definitely born by air it turns out airborne is a very technical term in this context as the wired story lays out researchers look hard at the details of how viruses travel in the air stay in the air and potentially cause infections through the air say. There's reason for concern. I should say at the outset that this doesn't mean we should all be panicked about just walking around especially outside but people who spend a lot of time in indoor environments with a lot of sick people like healthcare workers may have a lot to be concerned about especially because this country doesn't have a great supply of respirator masks and other personal protective equipment. In the trade we call it P p. e. so that's a worry for healthcare workers and for anybody who hopes that healthcare workers stay well themselves to care for people who get sick. I've got the author of that wired story Roxanne Copsey in one of the scientists whose work she explores Lydia Reba an mit professor who directs the Fluid Dynamics of disease transmission lab. I started by asking Roxanne. How she became aware of Lydia's work. I mean I have to say that I have a weird fascination with sneezes I have had allergies actually lived with a dog growing up. My sister is a veterinarian. And I didn't know until I went to college that I'm allergic to dogs. So I spent a lot of my childhood sneezing and having allergies and blaming it on the weather so the fact that her research was about sneezes. It's a kind of selfish personal reason but I'm just fascinated with sneezes and the idea that you could see this through the Lens of physics. Just wild me. It's just floored me that that people are studying it like that so I guess it. I came to it through a very selfish reason but now I'm looking at it through a whole different lens of public health and then as I understand it you at this meeting in two thousand fifteen and you were talking to somebody about mergers at this conference. Tell me a little bit about that conversation so I was at this meeting where scientists from around the world come together and just talk about viruses and my job in the capacity as an editor and journalist is to go around and talk to people and just see what's interesting them and whatnot and I talked to a scientist and I remember we were standing outside in the sun. It was super hot and I was scribbling away in my notebook. Is that's what I do when I talked to scientists and he just kind of he started talking about murders and how people don't appreciate that it spread in air in some of the hospital systems. And you know I talked to a lot of scientists all the time. It's my job. There's not a day when I'm working that I don't talk to a scientist and every once in a while you kind of pick up. What people aren't saying but are saying? He seemed to be saying with his tone that this is something people should pay attention to that. They're not paying attention to so always in the back of my mind has been this thought with Krona viruses that they they haven't underappreciated airborne nature too than that we don't fully understand that we can't call them necessarily air one until we know them but as soon as this new coronavirus came on to our radar. I immediately started thinking about that conversation and I immediately started wondering you know. How much does it behave like? Its cousins because it is a different virus. But you know it's the Brady Bunch. It's Marsha to Janet. You know. These folks are related. But they're different and so one of them trump travels by air it just immediately got me wondering are we gonNA see reports of this being more airborne than we thought so? That's how my initially got interested and so I guess you know Lydia's just really well known in her field. She is renowned for her work in studying the physics of these Violence what is it called Lydia you had a great title for your paper at Brigham. Violent accelerations exactly violent explanations. You know she's world known for this and so I remember I think it was an article written about her and I just thought this woman knows about sneezes and she knows about coughs and I wanna know what she knows and I'd spoken with some of her colleagues like Linzie Mar who's also very focused on this and it seemed there was a consensus amongst people who study the transmission of viruses in the air. That something is here. That people aren't really looking at and Lydia. How did you get interested in studying this of all things I mean? It's it seems like a somewhat very specialized area of study? Yeah so the. The Path was first in line. Matt Dynamics but I was in Canada in fact in Montreal and SARS as you might may know candidate pretty hard and I was always interested in public health on on the side addition to pursuing a math and physics training and researching inflows But when Thursday really realized that I really strongly felt about trying to contribute in in epidemiology in particular might join lab in Toronto. That was founded a post czars for major coordinated efforts in modeling data integration. And what? I realized a relatively quickly. Is that the top down modeling approaches that we were using in more classical epidemiology Had its merits. But ultimately those major gap in scale between that kind of approach top downs population modeling which relies basically iggy demolished data which often has a recording major gaps. And then the research being done at the molecular level at the pathogen cell interaction. And they're really big gap of scale but also communication and ability to even bring these two sides of of the research world together and it. It just dawned on me that it was critical to in fact than these two sides because we have no way right now to upscale for example information gained about a virus infecting oneself to what happens in the whole host when they are infected in what happens to host in the room and therefore how is that host affecting potentially others in that room or that building or else and I realized that those do that scale at the intermediate junction is in fact. Scaling which fluids very forms are involved. Start seeing the connections And basically aiming to build framework than neighbors to study these processes. So Lydia before we turn more specifically to your research. I'm just curious you know you were in Toronto. During SARS could you just share a little bit more detail you know how that affected you or what. You observed what you experienced during that time so I was in Montreal during the I mean I was between in transition between Montreal's Montreal and Toronto be during SARS And what was really clear was how unprepared. We were and And how quickly things could really Propagate from one side of the world to the other and infrastructure ways and and that really that we were very very much unprepared and what was really striking is particularly once we started Learning more about the events of transmission. Is that how literally understood about processes that involve that That host to host transmission but he became very clear that these are notions that we really need to understand to inform even the healthcare workers of what they should be doing right. There's a lot of confusion about for example. What masks to use the different recommendations in given an studies after Have showed that indeed there were events of transmission for example even with given the conditions that were given to the healthcare workers outside more than second other striking piece was that really the protection of Health Gergen critical. Because that's where really the front line is. And these are basically groups that are the most at risk and that we need to keep going. And that's what's really striking and so is less than state with me in framed rematch. All the questions that I think about in my research related to respiratory disease and by the way I don't know if you know I'm in Montreal right now. You realize Oh yeah. I moved here in December and now I can't go back to the states rex. Maybe if you could lay out like what was the question you were asking in your wire piece so I wanted to know what air war meant. What does the word airborne actually mean when scientists and biologists talk about it because I detected that there was a debate underlying the debate? In other words. I felt that there were people debating whether it was airborne but part of me felt that there wasn't even consensus about what the word airborne meant and that that could be a huge problem in both scientists talking amongst themselves but also about the public understanding of the transmission of this disease because I have this underlying concern that if we don't understand what airborne is when we talk about it we could go off the rails and see a science communication disaster leading some people to say for example that public health officials are lying because it is airborne and they're saying it's not or vice versa. A huge swath of people saying chill-out it's not airborne at all and I think that I started to detect. Neither of those approaches would be truly accurate when one looks at the nuances of biology and physics. And things like that. There's sometimes You know a we want to put everything in Boxes Right. But sometimes things don't fall neatly into boxes. Yes Lydia that was. Actually my next question is and maybe this is what you're referring to. But what is the difference between droplet? Droplet Nuclei Aerosol. An airborne spread of disease. Yeah so I think what you're referring to was the. What was the the fact that this this dichotomy between drops and aerosols are are basically false? These economies basically falls so that that relates to your question a ceiling about Airborne Aerosol droplets. So these is all basically nomenclature that was introduced to to try to classify routes of transmission. And what the current definition Sir entail is a to basically have these very separated Dakota me and and categorical split between what we would consider big drops that fall evaporate and call that basically drops but other drugs that we would call than something else in this case would be those that in theory would evaporate so so quickly that they would evaporate faster than they fall and so it effectively the mental images than of isolated droplets that are coming out and some that Quickly and other steps evaporate faster which basically stay suspended in their four airborne and that's something that has been debated between what what are the drugs that would be airborne versus. Does that would be large drops. And that has changed throughout history. William Wells was the scientists that really introduced this notion of large drops versus small drops through series of experiments in the context to Colossus transmission in the nineteen thirties and At the time Welles actually had a lot of pushback from the medical community in introducing even the concept that things could remain suspended in the air and so welles really was similar to using some sense. The sessional subtlety. In this picture to say well actually there are other things. You might not see That are also needed and they are evaporating faster than they fall. That's why you don't see them on surfaces. And he did series of experiments to show that at twenty support that a and eventually won and and be said economy between large drops and small drops or air assaults which is the word that is being used to to distinguish them from the other drugs has been introduced but what is being used to then classify diseases to say they're large drop route or aerosols is epidemiology data right so we're back to a trying to link hostels. Transmission to epidemiology large population crosses with the issues of how data can really be used here right because we we really are not really tracking necessarily all the movements in observing what these individuals have been doing. When we're linking secretary cases coming from a person so it's a probability game which brings us into the notion of of distance associated with these customization. And that's another Place where are arbitrary classification and use numbers is is also problematic? Because we're using these three feet Wtn is using three feet safety distance to say that these droplets or large drops. If he will do not go further than three feet other agencies or guidelines or documentations in Europe or even the CDC are using for example six feet. These distances are also computed from the calculation that you would emit isolated again drops. So he will you know ball of that is being thrown out and seeing well. How far would go if it stays in a drop form? How far would it go in those models? Have a flaw that we have highlighted in the recent work that they're not accounting for the actual gas phase that is also being emitted during these relations which is changing completely the range of these Drops of all sizes can reach so in other words the six feet distances not enough. What are you observing? Once you take into account the gas phase right..

Lydia Reba scientist Montreal Toronto wired magazine Roxanne Copsey Dr Selene Ghandour allergies mit iggy professor CDC Brigham Canada Europe Wtn secretary sneezing
"selene ghandour" Discussed on Feedback with EarBuds

Feedback with EarBuds

04:43 min | 1 year ago

"selene ghandour" Discussed on Feedback with EarBuds

"That's offered today head to our social media to find links of the episodes that we mentioned or on twitter at ear buds cod call. And we're on INSTAGRAM and facebook at ear buds podcast collective. You can sign up to receive our podcast recommendation. Email at ear buds podcast collective DOT ORC. It goes out every Sunday night. This show is written and produced by me. Ariel Nissim Black. It's edited mixed designed by Daniel Terrific. Our newsletter is edited by Abby Kiosque our theme music by Matthew Sweet Checkout Matthew Sweet Music Dot Com for your own music solutions reach out on Instagram at Matthew. Sweet Oh that's S. W. E. D. O. Now it's time to thank our patriots. Supporters Thank you to Eliza Coal Corey Dan Jared Lee Michael the Retro Network and Maja. If you want to become a patron you absolutely can head to patriots dot com slash ear buds podcast collective. That's P. R. E. N. dot com slash ear buds podcast collective. You can contribute whatever dollar amount per month makes sense for you even as low as two dollars. Anything helps bus. You get this shout out at the end of every ear buds episode. What do we do with your contributions? Good question we use it to pay our editors Daniel and abby so thank you now as promise at the top of the show. Some Corona Virus podcast recommendations. It's important to stay aware and ahead of the curve during the scary time. They're a bunch of podcast who have put out corona virus specific episodes many offer practical tips on how to stay healthy for a podcast playlist featuring corona virus episodes and podcasts. Go to the cashbox out. There's a section on the homepage called cove. Nineteen updates. Here are some of the podcasts. That are listed under. Cova nineteen updates allergies. Like I mentioned has an episode called Virology Kobe. Nineteen with Dr Shannon Bennett. This podcast will kill. You has an episode called episode forty-three meme my corona virus. Like my my my Sharona start here with. Abc News has been covering the corona virus. And they've been covering it for the past few days to make sure to check in with a few of their most recent episodes there is a podcast called Corona virus. What's really going on And that's comes to us from China plus so make sure to check that out at talks about the. Us travel ban. What a pandemic means to the world. what can China share on the treatment of Kobe? Nineteen from what they did a few weeks ago. There is a podcast called epidemic with Dr Selene Ghandour and Ronald Plane and that podcast is completely dedicated to the corona virus. So make sure you check that out. Plus Selene gonder was a curator for ear buds. Once upon a time. So shout out to Selene. I WANNA shout out my friend. Katie chromosomes who has a podcast called women's Meditation Network about a week ago? She put out an episode called a meditation for the Corona Virus. So if you're anxious and you feel like you WANNA listen to. Somebody gives you a guided meditation on all the things that are going on. That is a good thing to check out. There's also another podcast called the corona virus daily briefing And that comes from ride home media so that is something also to check out daily Flash briefings of what's going on just a few minutes long. There's also a podcast called just Nah Science. So it's just na science and that comes from Nickleby and Lauren there a couple and they put out a podcast episode called Cove nineteen spreads to the US. It's a quick twenty two minute episode and it's Super Informative so those are a bunch of options to check out to stay informed on the corona virus and the spread of Cova nineteen in the US So make sure to check those out and let us know what you think. If you found something that we did not know about Please let us know you can tweet at us at ear. Buds pod call and we will share it and we'll let you know who sent it to us. We'll give you credit while it seems like everything is being canceled these days. It is pretty fun news to know that podcast can't really be canceled for now at least People are still creating. So if you're a creator thank you so much for doing what you're doing. And if you're a listener keep on listening. Keep on thinking you're creators and tweet at people tag people in facebook posts. Let them know that you're listening. Let them know that what they're doing is important to you and helpful for you. Thank you for tuning into the show. If you like what we do let us know by leaving review on apple or a comment on cast box. There's a new tool that makes rating and reviewing super easy. Just go to rate this. Podcast DOT com slash feedback? It lets you choose how you want to review this podcast without having to open the Apple. App catch you next time. Wash your hands. Stay away from large groups as much as possible and listen to podcasts happy listening..

facebook Abby Kiosque Daniel Terrific Kobe Selene gonder China Cova apple Katie Matthew Sweet Ariel Nissim Black Dr Selene Ghandour Corey Dan Jared Lee Michael Abc News Dr Shannon Bennett US
"selene ghandour" Discussed on The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

01:31 min | 1 year ago

"selene ghandour" Discussed on The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

"Found out the hard way getting the debt is easy getting out is hard especially if your credit scores in great thankfully now there's upstart dot com the revolutionary landing platform. That knows. You are more than just your credit score. Isn't that nice and offer smarter interest rates to help you pay off. High interest rate credit card debt upstart goes beyond the traditional credit score when assessing your credit worthiness they actually reward you based on your education and job history in the form of a smarter rate. They make it fast simple and easy to check your rape since. It's just a soft poll. It will not affect your credit score. That's very important. Softball will not affect your credit score. The harpole happens if you accept your rate over. Four hundred thousand people have used up. Start to pay off credit cards or meet their financial goals. You can do the same. See why aren't is top right. In their category with a four point nine at a five rating on trust pilot and hurting upstart dot com slash Dan to find out. How low your upstart rate is checking? Your rate only takes a few minutes. That's upstart dot com slash. Dan these these are live at our show with Stugatz on. Espn RADIO ESPN. Radio is presented by Progressive Insurance guests on the Dan. Lebatardshow appear via the Shell Pennzoil performance. Line Dr Selene. Ghandour join us in just a second here on the Shell Pennzoil performance line. Here's your sportscenter. Update the NHL is placed their sees it on pause..

"selene ghandour" Discussed on The 11th Hour with Brian Williams

The 11th Hour with Brian Williams

06:21 min | 1 year ago

"selene ghandour" Discussed on The 11th Hour with Brian Williams

"All state. Labs in every state in the over a million tests have been distributed before the end of this week and other four million tests will be distributed but as I said before with the deployment the commercial. Labs we literally We literally are going to see a a dramatic increase in the available vail ability of testing the CDC confirmed today that in fact seventy eight state and local public health labs across all fifty states. Now have the capacity to test up to seventy five thousand people for the corona virus as of tonight and the best available numbers. The grand total of Americans who have been tested is about eighty five hundred. We believe if what the vice president said today holds true. That number would jump dramatically by the end of the week but as the Washington Post points out trump administration has contradicted itself on Corona virus. No fewer than fourteen times in less than a month's time. Meanwhile situation in Italy has reached critical mass. The streets in the most popular travel destinations are deserted. The country is completely locked down as the number of cases. Now tops nine thousand. At least three hundred sixty six people have died thus far one hundred thirty three of those souls died just today here with us again tonight. Dr. Selene gown their clinical assistant professor of medicine and Infectious Diseases at the Nyu School of Medicine in Bellevue Hospital. Importantly she's also co hosting a new podcast called epidemic about the corona virus along with Ron Clain who ran the US response to the bowl outbreak. She also happens to be the host of the podcast American diagnosis on health and social justice. It's a lot but we need someone to do a lot doctor. Thank you very much for coming back when the president said at the CDC on Friday anyone who wants a test can get one. How far was he off the mark then and I know you don't do politics. How far does he remain off the mark tonight? Well there was certainly not enough testing to go around on Friday. And I'm not sure that we're there quite yet however it is very promising that you had the big commercial labs like labcorp inquests getting into the game. They're used to doing volume. They're used to working with big healthcare systems private doctor's offices and so on and then you have academic centers like the University of Washington which are also scaling things up and they are collaborating with the gates foundation to offer home-based testing at least in the Seattle area first. And then we'll see what happens later so there are a lot of big new players in the game. Do you think the American people are ready for how big the spike is going to be in known cases when these test results start coming back? That's a great point because we are going to see a spike and that does not mean that there's a spike in transmission to be very clear. Right there's going be a spike and people who are diagnosed because we haven't been diagnosing them all along there's been transmission occurring but we didn't know what was happening so we saw similar situation in China. When they changed their case definitions we saw numbers go up and that sort of level off as they were adjusting case definitions. And just you know if you see the numbers spike up a lot in the next week or two just realize that's probably been there all along just public health in this country have the ability to do. Everyone's history will all positive cases be interviewed wherever you Ben? Where'd you just come back from Tell us about any associations as you've been thinking about this where you might have picked this up. Well this is where actually the Seattle Project Between U. DUB and the Gates Foundation is kind of interesting because they have a web based program. That'll be part of this where people will submit that kind of data because frankly the shoot what we call the shoe leather epidemiologist who literally walks around and goes door to door and gets that data. We just don't have enough of them to do this kind of data collection so we do need to have somewhat different innovative approaches to do it. Please explain for the record and for our audience the danger in comparing this with influenza. The president has again pointed out the annual death toll to the flu as if to indicate that anything less than that is great news. Well first of all. I'm not sure that it's going to be less than that. Once this fully plays out. You know we're still looking at a case fatality rate best case scenario and the point five percent range which is still several fold higher than a traditional flu. But I do think this is different. This is something to which people have never had any chance to build up immunity. They've never been exposed. And when something is new and different that is also scary in a different way because in part we a- scientists don't have all the answers we don't know for sure learning on the fly or yeah exactly we're learning on the fly and so. I I do think that's a little bit different situation. And apparently it's so virulent that the points of contact you can infect as an active. Flu Patient are just a small portion of your level of contact with this correct. Yeah it does seem to be quite an infectious virus so that makes it that much more difficult to control especially since some of the people who may be part of that. Problem are minimally symptomatic. We do think that's not the major driver but that certainly makes it more challenging if that's at least a proportion of the transmission. We know your days begin early and you are busy and we thank you for the time you get to spend with us here at night. Where it's it's helping our understanding of this Dr. Selene Ghandour our thanks. Coming up. Voters in six more states have the potential to change the twenty twenty democratic race yet again and perhaps for good two political veterans with us next. When we come back I think we have something common everybody because this morning I made it official. I have here by endorsed. Joe Biden for president is. I'm GonNa tell you I am so fratton Doris. Joe Biden to be the next president in the United.

president influenza CDC Dr. Selene Ghandour gates foundation Seattle Joe Biden vice president Washington Post Corona Bellevue Hospital Nyu School of Medicine Ron Clain US Italy clinical assistant professor o Doris University of Washington
"selene ghandour" Discussed on The Last Word with Lawrence O'Donnell

The Last Word with Lawrence O'Donnell

03:10 min | 1 year ago

"selene ghandour" Discussed on The Last Word with Lawrence O'Donnell

"As perfect as that but pretty good today wearing his buffoonish campaign hat at the CDC. Donald Trump did everything he could to make it. Clear there's an abject clown leading the defense of America's public health. I like this stuff I really get. It was abrasive. I understand every word these doctors that had you know so much about this. Maybe I have a natural ability. Maybe I should have done that instead of running for president discussion. Now Dr Selene Ghandour the Infectious Disease Specialist in epidemiology is the host of the new podcast epidemic with throng claim. The former Abol Lazar Gene. Sperling us. He's the former director of National Economic Council for Presence Obama and Clinton and Sarah Nelson is here. She's the president of the Association of flight attendants and she has been a flight attendant for twenty four years. Dr Ghandour how would you assess the situation tonight like Intel? You based on just the deer provider letters that were issued to providers doctors and others across New York state in the last day. Or so what we're told. Is that currently Wadsworth? The New York State Lab Conducts. These tests can do about two hundred tests per day and they're hoping to scale up to one thousand tests per day but as you can imagine that's a state lab that serving not just New York City but the rest of New York state and I can't imagine that that's enough capacity to meet the demand that we're going to be seeing in the coming weeks. Well THAT'S A. That's a population of tens of millions of people Possibly a million people are more at some point needing test hopefully not testing positive. What do we know about other testing centers just even in that region if you're in Massachusetts for example or Connecticut so a lot of this is being done Really local and state health department level? Some of them may now have capacity to do testing some of them may still be sending texts to CDC Either way we know that. Broadly across the country. We still don't have nearly enough test kits to go around and there's a lot of confusion about. How do you even get a patient? Tested the average primary care. Doctor I've been hearing from from other patients and people on twitter who reached out to me saying you know I called up my doctor. They didn't even want me to come to the office. They said go to the hospital. You know I call it the hospital and asked them if I need to be tested for corona virus. Do you know how to do that? Answer was no so i. I think there's some real issues with trying to get this information out and for people to understand what the pathway is tested. Let's listen to to people on the trump payroll and the trump White House who have absolutely no idea what they're talking about when it comes to virtually anything but certainly science and medical science. Let's listen to them today. Insisting publicly that the corona virus spread in the United States is now contained. That's their words contained. I was still argue.

president Donald Trump CDC New York New York State Lab Abol Lazar Gene New York City Dr Selene Ghandour Infectious Disease Specialist Dr Ghandour America United States Sperling twitter Intel White House National Economic Council Wadsworth Association of flight
"selene ghandour" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

13:50 min | 1 year ago

"selene ghandour" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"CDC told them that they didn't meet criteria to verify that this was corona wires that you know people are looking for so they didn't recommend that they these people be tested because they didn't come in contact with Anybody traveling so my question to you you know. Why would they be do that Because there have been some cases from my understanding that there was no traveling involved Regina thank you for your question Dr Gender I mean I would really need to see some of the more specific details of those patients to know for. Sure the answer to your question. But in general so corona viruses. It's is a broader category. So it's sort of like saying primates you have humans you've chimpanzees gorillas you have a number of different kinds of primates similarly krona viruses. There are many corona viruses. Some of which caused the common cold. Sars was a virus. Moore's was corona virus and Cove in nineteen also known as SARS cove to the mouthful That is the novel Corona Virus. So I'm not sure exactly what they tested four and what? They tested positive for so. It's a little hard to to answer that one. How likely. How long is this likely to last? I mean how long are we going to have to be vigilant about about this? Particular Corona virus. I don't know the answer that honestly I mean it's GonNa probably slow down a bit over the summer months and then you'll have back to school. In the fall things will get cooler again. People will be indoors more together again. So it'll probably pick up again kind of like what you see normally with the cough cold flu season It could be it. Could end up being just another endemic. It could. Yeah Yeah and you know and and if that happens I would predict the vaccine for Corona virus might be co formulated with our you know seasonal flu vaccine depending on you know exactly the details of how the vaccine ends up being made so You know that's that's certainly possible. I'm curious have you made any changes in your life in the past couple of weeks or months in response to Corona virus spreading. Wow good question I mean I don't know we have pure L. at home anyway like I walk in the door. The first thing I do is Purell. I trained my husband to do the same thing you know. I have always been a coffin. Your elbow not in your hands person. I mean I guess I'm not shaking hands but that's probably the only thing I've really changed with. No two weeks stockpile of supplies in case you have to self quarantine you haven't and honestly you know. I I know. Some parts of the country are seeing empty shelves lease where I live in New York City. I haven't seen that yet so I don't know I'm not so worried about that. Okay and I also. I'm curious. How should parents or family members talk to their kids about this because I mean asking for a little person than I know. She's quite actually on edge because it's so much in the news all the time and friends are talking about it at school. Do you have any advice on that? I think I'd focus on the hand washing and also just say look. This isn't about you know kids. This is about grandma. Grandpa and we want to keep them safe. And how can we care for them by washing our hands? I think that's where I would. I would put the focus with okay and in the last minute that we have the like. You've answered all of our questions. Which presumably the tip of the questions people want to ask you but giving your your professional background and also your experience with Ebola. Just quickly tell me. D What. How do you think the? Us response has been thus far. I think it's been disorganized I think there has not been clear. Leadership from the top and part of that is. There's not a clear one person in charge and that was what was really smart with the Ebola response was choosing an Ebola czar. Somebody who could sort of cross The different departments so department of Health on National Security Department of Defense and really be able to bridge those And we still have a lot of confusion about. Who's in charge? Sounds like overall your message to be prepared. Be Prudent but don't panic exactly. We'll Dr Selene Ghandour. She's an internist. Infectious disease specialist and an epidemiologist as well and host of epidemic and American diagnosis. They're terrific podcasts. We have a link to them at on Radio. Dot Org Dr Gandara. Thank you so much we might invite you back again. If this thing keeps going we we come back. We'll take a look at corona viruses effect on global markets. This is on point. Hi I'm Museum Roti and I am the new host of NPR's Ted Radio Hour. I am so excited because we are working on. A bunch of new amazing episodes were exploring big ideas about reinvention making and the psychological effects of climate change our first show drops March thirteenth. Please join me. This is on point. I magna trucker Bardy. Let's talk a little bit now. About the effect that the spread of Corona viruses having on global markets just today members of the G Seven Group of Nations. Put out a statement saying quote given the political impacts of Novell Corona virus or cove in nineteen on global growth. We reaffirm our commitment to use all appropriate policy tools to achieve strong sustainable growth and safeguard against downside risks. Well how did the markets react to that for an answer? Let's turn to Juliette. She's chair of the editorial board and US editor at large for the Financial Times. Jillian joins us from New York Julian. Welcome to on point. Well it's great to be the show so first of all tell us a little bit about How world leaders I mean how how? The world market so far have been reacting over the past couple of days to increase talk from from national leaders about providing some kinds of financial supports to prop up the the world economy. What's been going on? Well what stay in the last few days is not just viruses. That can jump around the world at a scary speed. It's also panic and the markets have shown an extraordinary amount of Jesus If they on a rollercoaster ride as different types of information has come out during last week they fell very sharply as investors. Really Sasha concert worry about the economic impact of the virus and that was reinforced by predictions from groups like the OECD imperative came out and said that essentially it expected growth to be severely undermined this year at the result of the virus. But then we have the statement from the IMF World Bank and the g seven which tried to reassure investors. And we've now had the Federal Reserve. Do something quite extraordinary that we've not seen since the financial crisis which is to make an emergency cart of rates. They've cut interest rates by fifty basis points. Now what's happened is that the markets have reacted with some relief to all the scramble by the governments around the world. But there's always a danger as we saw during the two thousand eight hundred thousand nine crisis that when government starts to do emergency measures investor. Start to ask well. Maybe they know something. I don't even worse. I actually realized. So let's talk about that fed rate. Cut that half a point rate cut today which is a lot rate. The Fed says in a statement quote the corona virus poses evolving risks to economic activity in light of these risks and in support of achieving its maximum employment and price stability goals. The Federal Open Market Committee today decided to lower that target rate for the federal funds rate. How significant is it that we this is the biggest rate cuts since we saw in the Financial Crisis? In in two thousand eight. I mean the question that you're raising do they know something about the vulnerability of even just the US economy that the rest of us? Don't well it's an absolutely extraordinary moves and it's doubly extraordinary. A few are brutal and heartless and look at how many people have actually died on American soil from this far so far and it's tragic but is not that high yet so obviously this is going to lead people worried about whether there's something out there that investors don't know about but which the government does what is becoming clear is that it's not so much the virus which is really threatening the economy. It's emergency measures. Governments are implementing to combat. It like Shutting Down Schools or essentially shutting down ports or even at some point maybe aviation systems cross-border. That's what's really creating the real economic damage and so it may be the case at the Fed has looked at this situation and said we expect the American government implemented a series of emergency measures in the coming weeks. And that's why or acting now because we can see that the impact is going to be on the economy alternatively though there's another school of thought that says actually what's happening is that trump or the White House is essentially bullying the Fed to do everything they possibly can to keep the economy afloat in an election year and says almost kind of insurance card to make sure that we don't get any market panic but the issue is is playing with investors. Psychology at this time is potentially very risky the Fed and the g seven has no chart choice but to try and shore up sentiment in the markets among the public but as ever that the danger that by simply rushing at they could end up creating jitters at removing them right. And there's also this sort of larger s was philosophical. Question is perhaps a temporary slowdown in economic growth. Or even the world economy Is is that a reasonable price to pay to protect the public health of seven billion humans on planet earth? Well absolutely I mean the reality is at the. Us has just had ten years of growth nonstop. Which is a remarkably long run by the standards of history and in a sense people with forgotten. What a recessional slowdown looks like. Anna terrified of experiencing it and the other point to make is that in the run-up to the two thousand eight financial crisis. The system got hooked on lots and lots of cheap debt row private sector that then ended and central banks jumped in and now the system is hooked on lots of cheat cheap public sector debt and also lots of support from central banks. And what some people in the Markeith. Ross king is it if the Fed is using all the bits bullets now to try and stave off a panic. What will it have left in its arsenal? If something really unexpected happens or it gets even worse right. I think that's an excellent point right. Because the Fed could keep cutting right. It could keep making borrowing But ultra cheap. But that doesn't really do anything. It does nothing to actually stop the spread of the virus to be sure that productivity stays high that we don't have so many workers staying home or as you're saying supply chain so many of which originate in China. Don't get Disrupted that there are. There are myriad ways in which a global pandemic can continue to disrupt the global economy. The Fed can do nothing about well. Typically speaking economists think that when the Fed cuts rates that helps economy in two ways it makes borrowing cheaper not supposed to spur consumers and companies to go out and invest and spend money. But that's not going to happen if I was panicked about the future in relation to coronor us But obviously also affected caught boosts asset prices and boost equities and that is happening now. And that's kind of reassuring because people go home at the end of the day. Look there for a one K. And say Oh. It's not as bad as I feared and that just helps it. Dampened down the overall level of panic but the critical point realizes this Ten Year Treasury rates are hovering at almost below one percent There at record lows We haven't seen anything like this before in the lifetime of most of your listeners and if the phone keeps cutting and if concerns about recession keep growing the really big question now is odd tenure rights going to go negative if so what will that do to the system and what will ordinary mark. Voters and consumers feel like as financial system goes into Allison Wonderland because a world of negative rates in many ways is alice in wonderland and you can look at Europe and Japan and see that having negative race doesn't necessarily deliver growth. How close are we to going down the rabbit hole? Well we've seen quite a shop slide in the market rates in the last week And so I imagine it suddenly entering the Rubber Possibility. Oh the Federal Reserve has always said. It won't actually brought a negative rate policy so if it keeps cutting rates down to zero. It's always said it won't go negative thoughts there again. Many of the presumptions we had about the way that finance world happy ripped up in the last decade Never say never as many people are starting to say so Julian. Let's talk a little bit more for a moment about the fall. Attila the that. We've been seeing in a stock markets around the world people watching the SNP or the Dow or the Nasdaq or the footsie. The new name the global market..

Federal Reserve US flu vaccine CDC Regina cough Moore Federal Open Market Committee New York City Ebola NPR Attila Novell Dr Selene Ghandour Purell Financial Times IMF World Bank department of Health
"selene ghandour" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

Outcomes Rocket

13:58 min | 1 year ago

"selene ghandour" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

"The can't the MGM in Las Vegas so so excited to see you there don't be afraid to say hi and we're going to learn a lot there so h l t h DOT com. Today I have the privilege of hosting Dr Selene Ghandour she's a doctor and a disease detective Anna Story tell her she's a president CEO and founder of Just Human Productions a nonprofit multimedia organization she's also the host and producer of in sickness unhealth podcast it's a podcast on health and social justice she's written for the New Yorker at the Atlantic The Guardian US though imposed Reuters courts and many others and she's a frequent expert guests on many National News Agencies in early Twenty fifteen Dr Gardner spent two months volunteering as an ebola aid worker and Guinea in her free time she interviewed locals to understand how the crisis was affecting them she's done a lot to work as well as been a consultant to Ted Med on Ted's editorial advisory board and Between Ninety Eight and twenty twelve studied TBN. I've e- in South Africa though Malawi and many other countries she's practicing physician and lives in New York her husband grant so with that I wanna I wanNA give Dr Ghandour a warm welcome and Eh countered that anything out in the intro that you want to August about well that was pretty comprehensive I do still see patients so I am still a practicing doctor I'm with the Nyu School of Medicine and I see patients at Bellevue and you know I have a former life working in global health so I get to scratch a little bit of that with my patients at Bellevue as well as working at some Indian Health Service and tribal polities across the US well I do not know how you do all the things that you do but it's awesome some great work and I think you're doing a bunch of things a little bit I mean you really get deep and so really excited to learn more about you and for the listeners to learn more about the work and the incredible content that you're you're putting out there in the difference that you're making so why did you decide to get into the medical sector well I think the short answer is that I saw it as a a way to use science in the service of others. I think the longer answer has to do with where my dad is from in particular so I'm a first generation American a father was from India but not one of the big cities he was from a very very rural village rice and sugarcane farming village he was the first person send to leave for advanced studies they only had up until elementary school in the village and he was the first person to go on for higher studies to college to Grad School for that entire generation it took another generation before anyone else did that and my life would have been very different if my father hadn't ad that story hadn't had that journey and it's not that my life would have been bad I'm not saying that at all but I am very appreciative of the of the journey that he traveled in a and really want to do what I can in service of others as a sort of a way of showing that appreciation I love that it's a it's a great story and using science in the service of others your dad really Kinda pave the way for you and and I think it's great that you're honoring him by mentioning him here so you you're focused on a lot of things selene so what would you say is the hot topic that needs to be on health leaders agenda and how are you in in your work approaching it will really over the entire arc of my career as you've mentioned I've done a lot of different things over time for me the consistent theme has been health and social justice and drew the work that I'm doing now what I'm really trying to achieve is to change the way that people think about these issues and two bills community and in collaboration around the so sort of the the tools that I use are using inspirational stories but at the same time being very evidence based and providing solutions I think it's very pressing sometimes about these stories is that you're just faced with the problem and then no solutions are provided and I think that's where you can help people act and do something and then finally I think it's about giving voice to the voiceless so making sure that their concerns are brought to the fore and their experiences understood because I think sometimes we think we know what people need and that's not necessarily what they need dad's a great thought in definitely the theme of Health and Social Justice something on the minds of a lot of folks listening oaks I I want to recommend that you check out Salinas podcast go to in sickness and in health podcasts dot com the organized it in a beautiful way different seasons last season was on gun violence in America something very close to me hear in Chicago it's a big problem and she dives into a deeply and the opioid crisis was seasoned to the opioid overdose crisis another problem that all of us are thinking about and her very first season being youth and mental health as you can hear these are all very very important topics that we're discussing here on the outcomes rocket and I invite you to go check out what she's done beautifully the website is in sickness and in health podcast and obviously you could pick that up on I tunes Google spotify any application where you're listening to us on you could also fine her so she wanted to give you a plug because your work is is outstanding well thank you I saw I really appreciate that absolutely so out of the things that you've done I love to hear an example Dr Gone there of what you've done to me robot comes or awareness by doing it differently well I'll give you an example with the most recent season of my podcast which focuses on gun violence in America and you know having also written for mainstream publications and appeared on CNN and so on I can tell you that in the mainstream media you're really not going to find this kind of analysis the focus tends to be on the latest mass shooting and things like bump stocks and you know Ar Fifteen is and debates about the second amendment but no one else has really pulled together experts from across the field whether it's public health or criminology or other social science this is to really understand first of all why we have this problem in the US what's unique about the US in terms of our history our culture issues of intersection analogy and then also what's the evidence what actually has been shown to work and there's actually a lot that does work has nothing to do with the Second Amendment and you never hear those programs really talked about in the mainstream media now there are some other podcasts that have done a nice job of touching on gun violence chew and other places you can go I'll get the plug to hopkins they have great online course on gun violence but those types of programs tend to be limited to the resources within that institution I hopkins is going to highlight their professors and nowhere you're going to find really people from across the board and not just from the US but you know the U K Australia others who have a lot to teach us on on what works well I'll tell you what it's a great thing that you're doing and the nature of healthcare and not just healthcare but we're very guilty of it it's very silent and so the approach that you're taking selene is is a great one because you are connecting a lot of silos and and providing exposure a lot of sources of information in perspective so appreciate you doing that so tell me about something that hasn't worked it hasn't always come together easily maybe you could share a story when it didn't work and what you learned well I'm still trying to as I think you we always should be learning and improving on what we do and I think you know with the podcast I've been really trying to hone the kind of storytelling I want to be doing and I think one of the things I've learned is frankly the average listener is less interested in hearing from experts and more interested in hearing narratives lived experiences personal experiences as just what people engaged more and that's how they learn they learn all stories not as much from data and Statistics and and frankly the supplies teaching on the hospital wards to patient residents learn better from learning based on a patient's case than if you go and you give a chalk talk so no I think it sort of applying that and figuring out how synthesize the evidence and the data and have it in there but to really focus on on the storytelling in the lived experience and doing so love that yeah it's something that is important the I forget where I learned this but it was a leader in healthcare or that shared that when you make it about a person and you give confidentiality is important too right so you don't necessarily have to call that person's name out but when you meant in a person's name and you talk about their story just becomes that much more real than just stats in anecdotes so I love that you're you're so far focused on being better at this craft selene and making it personal yeah I think it has to start with the personal while that and so what would you say one of your proudest the leadership experiences has been today well I don't know if I'd have any one I could point to but maybe an example of one when it comes to science communication then you know if you recall back to all of the coverage that was happening you know twenty fourteen twenty fifteen and what the focus of that coverage was an a lot of it was not on the people who are actually affected it was on oh my gosh is this going to spread in the US Craig venter the physician who came back to New York and was actually at Bellevue after he became sick with Ebola you know a lot of the questions were well could I get it from a bowling ball can I get it from touching subway poll that he touched should we be closing the orders and I a lot of what I tried to do when I would go on air was to say look let's talk about the people who are actually getting sick and dying from this and what's going on with them and what do we need to do to address the problem on the ground so I'm really proud that I was able to at least to the degree that I could as an individual steer the conversation in that direction had the platform in ability to do so and it's not easy to do it's easier to get seduced by where it's easy Z. to go versus where you feel like the attention should be yeah absolutely absolutely yeah I don't watch the news so then I do not want watchet just because I feel like it's irrelevant to anything that I can do for the most part maybe maiming may one percent is relevant into the day to day difference that I'm trying to make an we need more people like you the news and then maybe maybe I'll start watching it you know what's funny Saul is I don't the news either you and if I go on I don't watch it mostly a NPR podcast for York Times worker Washington Post reader and you know in terms of my regular news not medical news so yeah I I hear you man sidetrack what would you say today is one of your most exciting projects well I'm starting to report season four of in sickness and in health which is going to focus on indigenous health and as part of that I think I'm going to be doing a book also around that same reporting and so as I mentioned earlier I've been spending part of the year working at Indian Health Service and tribal health facilities and it's not that I report on what I see you know in my clinical work it's that that sort of helps me focus on what the issues are and understand what's happening and then I do my reporting sort of separate from that but you know it's some of the topics that will be hovering include issues like historical trauma and what the impact of that is on problems like mental health and substance use since suicide access to natural resource says and then also in terms of resources mining in what the impact of mining near or on reservations has been for the healthiest populations or other interesting areas especially as we talk about reforming our criminal justice system which is really a retributive system so it's really about punishment the indigenous approach is on what they call indigenous peacemaking is really more of a restorative justice approach so it's more about how do you rehabilitate how do you get people to function better within the community how do you address people's needs in terms of healing and that has huge implications for health so it's been really eye opening for me to learn about some of these issues even as an American having grown up here I still feel like there was so much I didn't know row and what would you say is the is the inspiration behind and your work you know I think to me justice is a major issue I think I also really fascinated by different cultures different ways of thinking so I think that's part of what led me to do global health work also part of what led me to work with native Americans trying to understand different points of view and and learning from that I think definitely a lifelong learner and so I guess those kinds of things drive the work that I do I love it very cool so this is the point of the podcasts approve healthcare outcomes focus on health rather than healthcare and stop treating social problems with health care what is the.

Dr Selene Ghandour Bellevue Ted Med Indian Health Service MGM Las Vegas US Reuters ebola India Anna Story Nyu School of Medicine New York Dr Gardner Just Human Productions host and producer Guinea advisory board