34 Burst results for "Selena Simmons Duffin"

"selena simmons duffin" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:52 min | 10 months ago

"selena simmons duffin" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"YouTube SnapChat and TikTok face questions on the Capitol Hill today about whether their platforms heard kids and starting this week some area residents who could previously dial just 7 numbers to make a call are going to have to add some digits Wet weather of flash flood warning for much of northern New Jersey be careful out there It's Tuesday October 26th the news is next Live from NPR news in Washington and core of a coolman Officials from three social media companies who usually don't face questioning from lawmakers will appear on Capitol Hill today that SnapChat TikTok and YouTube And Pierre's miles park says lawmakers want to know more about their influence on kins Generally this issue of how kids are affected by social media apps and online video is among the most bipartisan issues when it comes to why lawmakers have a problem with big tech right now And these specific three companies play a huge role in that The parental control software company custodio released a report earlier this year that found screen time overall was up 36% in 2020 compared to 2019 NPR's miles parks reporting Drug maker Pfizer is asking the Food and Drug Administration to authorize a smaller dose of its COVID-19 vaccine to children as young as 5 as in Paris Selena Simmons duffin reports a group of outside scientists advising the FDA gathers to discuss and vote on whether the agency should grant an emergency use authorization for this age group Pfizer's study of 5 to 11 year olds found that its vaccine was 90.7% effective against symptomatic COVID-19 with no serious safety concerns The FDA's advisory panel will consider the risks and benefits of vaccinating this age group part of that analysis is that children tend to get less sick from COVID-19 than adults says doctor Celine gounder infectious disease specialist.

Capitol Hill NPR news SnapChat TikTok Pierre's miles park YouTube custodio FDA Selena Simmons duffin New Jersey Pfizer Washington Paris COVID Celine gounder
Judge Orders Missouri To Implement Medicaid Expansion

NPR News Now

00:54 sec | 1 year ago

Judge Orders Missouri To Implement Medicaid Expansion

"Judge in missouri is ordering the stay to expand medicaid immediately. Mpr selena simmons duffin reports more than two hundred fifty thousand residents will now be eligible for health insurance through the program. Missouri voters passed a referendum to expand medicaid last november. But it's been a political saga. Since then the republican legislature refused to fund it and the governor said he wouldn't implement it last month. The supreme court ruled the state must move forward with expansion. That means all adults making less than about eighteen thousand dollars. A year would be eligible for coverage the state. Ask for a delay. But now a federal judge has ruled the state needs to start enrolling people in this group immediately. Medicaid expansion was a key part of the affordable care act and has been a huge political fight for years. Twelve states still have not expanded medicaid leaving millions of people and a health insurance coverage

Selena Simmons Duffin Republican Legislature Medicaid Missouri Supreme Court
"selena simmons duffin" Discussed on NPR News Now

NPR News Now

03:57 min | 1 year ago

"selena simmons duffin" Discussed on NPR News Now

"To be rewritten. We can't allow the heroism of these officers to be forgotten. We have to understand what happened the honest and unvarnished truth. We have to face it. This comes as some republicans in congress are increasingly reluctant to look back at the january. Sixth attack or falsely claim. It wasn't violent tamra keith. Npr news as corona virus hospitalization. Start picking up again. It's pretty clear where most of the surges coming from states with some of the lowest vaccination rates coined the latest data three states florida georgia and louisiana now account for about forty percent of new. Us hospitalizations while vaccination rates are slightly better in florida than the other two states. That state's governor has been resistant to mass mandates or requiring vaccination. Kobe nineteen desperate neighbors by nearly seventy five percent over the past two weeks. A citizen scientists who documented breakthrough cases among. His friends provided. Cdc with an early signal that an outbreak was underway in province town massachusetts that spurred an investigation that helped convince cdc leaders to change the mask guidelines for vaccinated people npr. Selena simmons duffin has more. Michael donnelly is a data scientist and immature kovic watcher in new york city and like many gay men. He spent lots of holidays in province town when he started to hear about more and more breakthrough cases from province town. He started taking notes. Which turned into a spreadsheet of fifty-one cases which he sent to. Cdc doctor dmitri daskalakis who works on the covert response at cdc says that gave the agency a head start. We didn't have the heads up from michael because of what he was seeing among his friends. And you know with the statistician had on we wouldn't have heard about it as rapidly. Daskalakis says the way. The gay community collaborated with public. Health gives him goosebumps. Selena simmons duffin. Npr news importers are rethinking their strategies of moving production to china and other low cost areas in part due to ongoing supply chain problems. That are making it harder to get their goods to the. Us market overwhelmed by issues affecting ports and a shortage of transport. Many are moving at least to mexico on wall street. The dow was up two hundred. Seventy one points. This is npr one of the three congressional republicans suing speaker. Nancy pelosi over fines for not wearing mastering. Us house vote has contracted a breakthrough case of in nineteen representative. Ralph norman of south carolina tweety began experiencing minor symptoms of covert nineteen thursday and tested positive for the virus. That day would quarantine for ten days. Norman says he's been vaccinated since february last week. Norman representatives marjorie taylor green of georgia and thomas massie of kentucky sued pelosi seeking a determination. The five hundred dollar fines are unconstitutional and should be rescinded. Virginia will require state employees to show proof of vaccination or submit to weekly coronavirus testing starting september first member station. Wvu t.f. john hill has the story. It's been months since. Virginia governor ralph northam held a regular pandemic briefing and while announcing the new requirement for most state workers. He focused on taking action to retain the hard-fought progress estate has made in reducing the spread of the virus. Vaccines are the only way to stop this virus and get back to the normal lives. Many of us were rediscovering just a few weeks ago. Northerns order covers about one hundred and twenty thousand state workers. The governor also urged local governments and school districts and mandate masks for their employees for npr. News i'm jay khalil richmond authorities in northern california. Now say they are shutting down a national park there due to an explosive wildfire officials at lassen volcanic park saying the dixie fire which has been active on the east side of the park continues to rage sweeping through a small northern california mountain town there. I'm jack speer npr news..

Selena simmons duffin Cdc tamra keith Npr news Michael donnelly dmitri daskalakis npr Daskalakis florida georgia Ralph norman Kobe louisiana marjorie taylor green congress thomas massie Us
"selena simmons duffin" Discussed on NPR News Now

NPR News Now

04:19 min | 1 year ago

"selena simmons duffin" Discussed on NPR News Now

"Only one of the three has shown any symptoms the democratic caucus those who are positive will isolate for ten days while none of the covert positive. Texas democrats have been identified. Vaccinations were required for the trip. to washington. nearly sixty house members left stayed on money to block republicans from passing voting restrictions. Bill the texas democrats have spent the week in washington meeting with various members of congress. Most all of them are staying in the same washington. Dc hotel republican governor. Greg abbott has threatened to arrest the members when they return. I'm jerry clayton in san antonio krona virus cases are rising again in the us. Federal health officials say new infections are climbing particularly in places with low vaccination rates. npr selena simmons duffin reports. that's due in part to the delta variant which spreads faster than the original strains centers for disease control and prevention director rachelle. Walinsky said in a white house press briefing. The trend is clear. This is becoming a pandemic of the unvaccinated. We are seeing outbreaks of cases in parts of the country that have low vaccination coverage because unvaccinated people are at risk it's not just cases that are rising hospitalizations and deaths are rising to federal health officials. Say they aren't planning to change the national vaccination strategy or masking guidelines in the face of these trends although walinsky did say in hot spots with low vaccination rates local officials should consider reintroducing mask requirements. Selena simmons duffin. Npr news dozens of large wildfires are burning across about a dozen states west of the mississippi engulfing more than one million acres this as fears mount that shifting conditions can worsen and already dire situation. Npr's dave missed. It has more. Nearly three hundred thousand acres have burned in southern oregon's bootleg fire officials. Say the blaze is twenty. Two percent contained. Fires are also raging in northern california. Where firefighters have been working around the clock to contain the beckwith complex fire which burned more than one hundred thousand acres in his seventy percent contained. Here's jay caygill with california incident management. We're out of the woods yet. They're still wind and potentials for spots. But we have containment line. We've closed the gap on this thing so crews will be Mopping up today as well as tonight and Further operational periods high temperatures low humidity and strong winds are being blamed for the intensity of the fires in their spread. Dave mitch. Npr news and you're listening to npr news. Canadian prime minister justin trudeau says. His government is working on an international vaccine passport. That would recognize canadians. Who got mixed. Doses of the vaccine to be recognized as fully vaccinated and allowed into other countries as dan carpenter reports. Some countries may still require travelers with two different doses to quarantine on arrival canada's national advisory committee on immunization has said it safety use astra zeneca pfizer and modern shots interchangeably in certain situations. Thousands of canadians have already received mixed doses but some countries have not approved mixing doses. Trudeau says he's working to have. The international community recognized that the mix doses of cove in one thousand nine vaccine given to canadians are safe and effective ottawa's also moving to create an internationally recognized vaccine passport but officials still haven't determine how that will work for canadians with different doses. Some canadians who recently traveled to barbados encountered difficulties. And we're asked to quarantine until they have a negative for npr news. I'm dan carpenter chuck in toronto in western europe. Hundreds are still missing in floods brought on by heavy rains and as rescuers search for survivors. Emergency workers in the netherlands are on high alert today. Tens of thousands in the south have been evacuated is overflowing rivers threatened. Towns teton a a controversial film about a woman who survives a car crash then goes on to have an unusual relationship with cars has won the home door award at the cannes film. Festival and julia. Di corno has become the second female filmmaker to win that top honor. I'm janine herbst and you're listening to npr news..

jerry clayton washington selena simmons duffin centers for disease control an Walinsky Selena simmons duffin Greg abbott Npr jay caygill rachelle Dave mitch Npr news npr news justin trudeau npr
Over-the-Counter COVID-19 Rapid Tests to Be Available at Major Pharmacies

Morning Edition

00:53 sec | 1 year ago

Over-the-Counter COVID-19 Rapid Tests to Be Available at Major Pharmacies

"Available without a prescription. As NPR's Selena Simmons Duffin reports. These tests for the Corona virus could soon be on drugstore shelves. The tester Abbotts by next now test and the Quiet Del Quick View test. Both use simple swabs and test strips to give results in about 10 to 15 minutes. These aren't the first rapid at home test to be authorized by FDA for use without a prescription. Another made by a loom is not yet in stores, and it's expected to cost around $30 protest. These tests are simpler and cheaper. They're expected to be sold in drugstores in two packs for around 15 to $20 public health experts say that rapid at home testing, along with other public health tools, like vaccines could make it easier to tamp down outbreaks before they spread out of control. Selena Simmons Duffin. NPR News Police in Orange, California near Los Angeles, say a mass shooting has left four

Selena Simmons Duffin NPR FDA Npr News Orange California Los Angeles
CDC launches VaccineFinder tool to locate COVID-19 vaccine providers

Morning Edition

03:37 min | 1 year ago

CDC launches VaccineFinder tool to locate COVID-19 vaccine providers

"19 vaccine, But you can't find one help could be on the way. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has just launched an online search tool in partnership with Boston Children's Hospital. Help people identify which facilities have supplies of the vaccine. It's called vaccine finder dot org's. This initial launch is limited to certain providers in most states, NPR's Selena Simmons, Duffin has details. When you put in your zip code at vaccine, find her dot org's. You see an interactive map showing local pharmacies that get Cove in 19 vaccine doses from the federal government. You also see whether they have doses in stock. If you live in Alaska, Indiana, Iowa or Tennessee, you're in luck. Because in those states, the maps show more places administering Cove in 19 vaccines. Not just pharmacies, but private hospitals and clinics and public health sites, ideas to show vaccine providers that are open to the public. How to contact them how to book an appointment. And kind of show the daily inventory status of people are clearing where there's vaccine and where there isn't That's John Brownstein, the founder of Vaccine Finder and chief information officer at Boston Children's Hospital, he says. After this initial launch, more providers in more places are expected to join in in the coming days and weeks. That scene finder is actually not new. It began nine years ago. It all started after each one. Anyone where we want to figure out how to provide the population with the best possible insights and where vaccine was in their communities, and since then We have been building this platform usually showing people where to get the seasonal flu shot or travel vaccines, Bronstein says. In recent months, a team of about three dozen people has been working feverishly to launch this tool toe work for people looking for covert 19 vaccines. While navigating the fact that at this moment, vaccine supplies relatively low and eligibility is limited, both of which constrained how useful the tool is. In case the Kaiser Family Foundation says she wishes this tool had been around a few weeks ago. In the meantime, many states have created their own provider maps people can use, and that's added to this confusing patchwork. This idea has a lot of potential, but I think there's still some questions about what will it be like in practice. There are also concerns about how many providers will put their information on vaccine finder and whether the providers will really update their inventory every 24 hours. I've seen finders John Brown seen acknowledges. This is not a silver bullet. What we're trying to do is add a resource into the mix to help consumers. Of course not all problems get solved with a new website. And he says they have partnerships to put vaccine find her info about where vaccine providers are located and who has shot's available in lots of different places online from Google maps to the traffic app ways too Good are ex, so it's not just about coming in the website, but meeting consumers where they are. Are on making sure that anybody who's looking for a vaccine knows where to find them. The supply of Corona virus vaccine doses is growing. The Biden administration says it's now sending out over 16 million doses a week and increase of more than 70% since inauguration. Assuming that trend continues, more shots will be available and more providers like clinics and even doctors. Offices will be able to begin distributing vaccine doses as well. So people can look forward to a time when Cove in 19 vaccine doses are abundant and everyone is eligible. And you might even be able to ask your smart speaker to find a clinic nearby with vaccine doses and stock and head over to get your shot. Selena Simmons Duffin

Boston Children's Hospital Centers For Disease Control An Selena Simmons Duffin John Brownstein Vaccine Finder NPR Bronstein Federal Government Alaska Tennessee Iowa Indiana Kaiser Family Foundation FLU John Brown Biden Administration Google Selena Simmons Duffin
Biden plans to distribute COVID-19 vaccine doses immediately

Up First

02:44 min | 1 year ago

Biden plans to distribute COVID-19 vaccine doses immediately

"Rollout of the coronavirus vaccines in this country has been slow and chaotic. But there are a number of steps the us government could take to accelerate the vaccination campaign and slow the spread of the coronavirus yesterday. The biden transition team announced to plant. Try to do just that in a week. In which for the first time more than four thousand covid nineteen deaths were recorded on just a single day in the united states. Vaccines just can't come soon enough. Npr selena simmons. Duffin has more on this selena. Thanks for being with us. Hi good morning. Oh what did the biden people announce. Okay so you know. How both the pfizer and madonna. Vaccines require two shots. Well operation warp speed. Which is the federal effort. Managing vaccine distribution has been holding back millions of second doses and not sending them out to the field yesterday. President-elect biden's incoming press secretary. Jen psaki said they plan to change. Course the president-elect supports distributing most. But not all of the currently reserved doses and we'll take action to make that change when he takes office. She said this will allow more people to get those first doses and that biden would use the defense production act if needed to ensure manufacturers can keep up making second doses on time. How does this different from the one dose idea that Was getting talked about this week. And the fbi. Fda warned against it. Didn't they right so this is not the same thing. They're a biden. Team is not suggesting that you can just forget about the second dose and dr anthony. Fauci of the national institutes of health emphasized that point to npr. Yesterday he is of course a member of president. Trump's covid nineteen task force and he's been advising the incoming administration not talking about withholding and not giving the second does they are completely committed to giving the second dose on time they feel that the importance of getting as many people as possible is worth the risk. Hopefully the companies will get the doses back there in time angelina. What's been the reaction to this idea. Well public health officials and experts at. Npr talked to yesterday by and large said that this is a good move. It is a bit of a gamble. One official. i talked to aggressive. And here's claire. Hannan who runs the association for immunization managers and those are the people in charge of each state's vaccination plans. I think it's probably a good thing to get more doses flowing. She says with so many people dying every day. This may be better than keeping vaccine in a freezer somewhere. Of course there are problems that more doses won't solve like finding willing people to get shots because the vaccine hesitancy and just general disorganization and chaos. That we've heard about in different

Biden Selena Simmons Duffin Elect Biden Jen Psaki Dr Anthony Us Government Pfizer Madonna Fauci United States National Institutes Of Health FBI FDA NPR Donald Trump Association For Immunization M Angelina Hannan
"selena simmons duffin" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:24 min | 1 year ago

"selena simmons duffin" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Is wide spread. So we know currently of fourty compromised high value targets, especially government agencies, but there might be as many as 18,000 targets is actually really hard to get the specific number but a fair a fair amount of target that cyber security specialist Thomas rid of the Johns Hopkins University School of Advanced International Studies, here's top Senate Intelligence Committee Democrat Mark Warner. We have narrowed this Two companies and agencies that we know the bad guys got in, but they got in and they were in for a long time. So they're very deep. It may be ongoing. We have not discovered How we will ferret them fully out. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo has said that this looks like the cyber attack was mounted by Russia. President Trump yesterday challenged the conclusion and says that it may have been China. The government's operation. Warp speed is on track to ship 20 million Corona virus vaccine doses by the end of the year as MPR's Selena Simmons Duffin tells us the second government approved vaccine. This one produced by Moderna is now shipping having to vaccines and distribution is going to give a big boost to the effort to get lots of people vaccinated and help Slow the spread of the virus and ultimately end the pandemic. And Madonna's vaccine is also easier to handle than the fighter by on tech vaccine that we were talking about last week. It is kept at regular freezer temperatures, and it comes in smaller shipments, which helps with planning. NPR's Selena Simmons Duffin. British police are putting more officers at train stations and on highways to enforce a Christmas coronavirus lockdown in London and the East and south east of England. NPR's frank Langfitt reports. Police are being deployed after thousands fled the British capital Saturday, risking further spread of the virus. People flooded London train stations to beat the lockdowns Midnight Saturday deadline. So they can spend Christmas with family members and other parts of the country. UK Health Secretary Matt Handcock expressed anger on the BBC. There's scenes were totally irresponsible on do you know the best gift that you could give somebody this Christmas? Is to stay at home and not transmit the virus. Officials say the spike in cases here is driven by a new, much more infectious strain of the virus. Italy, the Netherlands and Belgium have responded by announcing plans to hold flights in and out of the UK Frank Langfitt. NPR NEWS London This is NPR. Live from KQED news. I'm Queen A Kim. While Congress looks like it's poised to pass $900 billion in Corona virus relief aid still left out of the package. Any direct funding for states and cities. John Dunbar is the mayor of Yonville and the past president of the League of California Cities. He says he's frustrated with the lack of support. We've lost significant revenue as well as had Significant, unplanned expenses and not just related to the Corona virus pandemic. But here in California, we've had the worst wildfire year on record and over four million acres were burned and During all of that time, our businesses were also struggling. Republicans have resisted the direct funding, claiming many states are financially mismanaged. If you were hoping to make a last minute run to the Apple store for holiday gifts, you're out of luck. The cappuccino..

NPR Selena Simmons Duffin London British police Frank Langfitt John Dunbar UK Johns Hopkins University Schoo Mark Warner Mike Pompeo President Trump Senate Intelligence Committee MPR Moderna Thomas Russia California
"selena simmons duffin" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

04:24 min | 1 year ago

"selena simmons duffin" Discussed on KCRW

"Lulu Garcia Navarro. Good morning. There is a lot of pressure on the incoming Biden administration to get their cabinet right. We'll take a look at some of the familiar faces. Plus, it's been 10 years since the Arab spring. What hasn't hasn't changed in the Middle East. Also, a Jewish newspaper chronicles the lives of those Who have died in this pandemic, and Emily Blunt on her new movie, and why drew her if you believe in that sort of whimsy and that fable esque quality that I just love to tell my Children about then those of the kind of people I want to hang out with, and we got to hang out with her. It's Sunday, December 13th. The news is coming up right now in this newscast. Live from NPR news. I'm Barbara Klein. Operation Warp speeds. Chief adviser Doctor Mance of Slough. We is laying out a corona virus vaccine timeline. He says he expects 100 million people in the U. S will be immunized by the end of March. He says 40 million doses will be distributed by the end of this month. NPR's Selena Simmons Duffin is reports the first doses will be delivered to all 50 states beginning tomorrow. Next is the rush to start getting people vaccinated to try to slow and eventually end the pandemic. The federal government is coordinating distribution to predetermine sites around each state. Then it falls to state and local health departments and healthcare providers to actually start administering the shots. It may take a few days of provider training about how to properly give this vaccine for the campaign to really get underway. Selena Simmons Duffin NPR news The United Kingdom and the European Union have agreed to continue post Brexit trade talks beyond today's self imposed deadline. They have an immovable deadline of December 30th and as NPR's Frank Langfitt reports from London. They're hoping to avoid major disruptions. British Prime Minister Boris Johnson and European Commission President Ursula von Dir land Said he was quote responsible at this point to go the extra mile. Both sides are still far apart on issues such as European access to U. K fishing grounds and the U. K's drive for as much access to the use massive market of nearly 450 million consumers while retaining as much freedom to make its own rules and regulations. The Society of Motor Manufacturers and traders. The UK auto trade body welcomed the extension of talks, saying the UK leaving the you without a new free trade deal. Quote would be nothing less than catastrophic for the automotive sector, its workers and their families and represent a stunning failure of statecraft. Frank Langfitt. NPR NEWS London Protesters gathered in Oklahoma City this weekend after police shot and killed a mentally ill black man Friday. Quinton Chandler of State Impact Oklahoma reports, among other things, they want to see body cam footage of the confrontation. Police say Benny Edwards charged it officers with a knife after they tried to tase and pepper spray him. Bystander's cell phone video shows Edwards breaking into a run in the video, he appears to move towards one officer but then veers away when police start firing. Eventually he fell, and he was pronounced dead at the scene. Edwards niece Amira Gaines says she doesn't believe the police is claims that they tried to deescalate. That was great man that gives a friend again. He gets scared and you've been here and go run. Kill me knowing that mom go what scared activists are demanding. Police release body camera footage from the incident for NPR news. I'm Quinton Chandler. This is NPR. Azerbaijan's Defense Ministry says four service members have been killed in clashes with Armenian forces in Nagorno Kata Bach in recent weeks. It's the first report of casualties since a cease fire took effect last month. In Guatemala anti government protesters gathered in the nation's capital for the fourth consecutive weekend, demanding the resignation of the country's president. Maria Martin reports, the demonstrators added an artistic spin to their call for an end to corruption. What a melon protesters this weekend used art to get their message across playing music and reciting poetry, which called for the resignation of President Alejandro Shama Day and an end to corruption..

NPR Benny Edwards Quinton Chandler United Kingdom Emily Blunt Frank Langfitt Doctor Mance Selena Simmons Duffin Lulu Garcia Navarro London President Alejandro Shama Day Middle East Biden federal government Selena Simmons Maria Martin Nagorno Kata Bach Azerbaijan Barbara Klein
COVID vaccine distribution underway as first trucks hit the road

Weekend Edition Sunday

03:54 min | 1 year ago

COVID vaccine distribution underway as first trucks hit the road

"It is a massive, complicated undertaking and it is underway. The first doses of covert 19 vaccine will be delivered to every state tomorrow. Files are being loaded up on two ups and FedEx trucks to ship to hospitals around the country. This has taken months of work and planning and here to talk us through what's next? Is NPR Health reporter Selena Simmons Duffin. Good morning. Morning, Lulu. So the vials were getting on their way. Now what? Well, next is the rush to start getting people vaccinated to try to slow and eventually end the pandemic. How it works is this. The federal government is coordinating distribution to predetermine sites around each state. And then the baton gets past a state and local health departments and healthcare providers to actually start administering the shots. I checked with a bunch of state health officials yesterday. Most say it's going to take a few days for providers to get trained up on how to properly give this vaccine. There's a lot of information coming at them really fast from Fizer and from CDC about exactly who should get the vaccine, So if there are some vaccines administered on Monday, it may actually take a few days for the campaign to really get under way. This is a really hopeful moment on D. I want to underscore that because we really need hopeful moments. But what what could go wrong? Despite all the planning, there will be hiccups. The big fear is that some of these precious vaccine doses could be wasted or it doesn't get to the right people. Remember this fax he needs to be kept ultra cold minus 70 degrees Celsius. It comes in kind of a pizza box filled with vials and try ice. The vaccine on Lee lasts a few days in the fridge after it's thought you need to dilute it before you injected. There is just no way everything will go perfectly. So our health were officials worry about that. Most of the people I talked to are confident that when issues come up, they can resolve them and learn from them clear hand and made this point. She's the executive director of the Association of Immunization Managers. Those are the people in every state in charge of vaccination plans. And here's what she told me. We're going to learn so much from the first hospitals who are vaccinating, you know how What is it really like to get this box? How long does it take to mix the vaccine with the deal you in? How long does it take to actually vaccinate someone? Lots to consider. I want a vaccine, obviously, but the next question is, who is going to be getting these very first doses? The CDC has prioritized health workers and residents of long term care facilities in what's called Phase one A. But there's a lot of hunger for details from health officials and I'm told that that should come in the next few days. So you know, we've all heard about the allergic reactions When vaccinations started in Britain, we're talking about guidance about the kind of history of allergic reaction to be aware of. And then what about pregnant or lactating people are people with immune disorders. All of this guidance is frantically getting hashed out right now, so providers can get answers as the vaccination campaign actually rolls out, and how long before it will be widely available? It's not yet clear exactly who comes after Phase one a on DATs, giving health officials some heartburn. It's also not clear how much vaccine will be available next. What pace of shipments is going to be going forward? It could be speedier if there were two vaccines and distribution instead of one, And that could happen soon. There's an FDA committee meeting to consider authorizing the Madonna vaccine this Thursday. But the short answer is the hope is that the vaccine will be widely available in the late spring at the earliest. Maybe the summer of 2021. That's NPR's Selena Simmons stuff and thank you very much. Thank you. So that is the good news and it comes as the U. S is rapidly approaching yet another horrific milestone 300,000 deaths from covert 19. The next few months, experts tell us it will be worse before it gets better.

Selena Simmons Duffin Fizer CDC Association Of Immunization Ma NPR Lulu Fedex Federal Government LEE Britain Selena Simmons FDA U.
Illinois reports more than 13,000 new cases and 126 new deaths statewide

NPR News Now

04:37 min | 1 year ago

Illinois reports more than 13,000 new cases and 126 new deaths statewide

"Live from npr news. I'm jack speer. With corona virus cases surging across the west new data released from the federal government shows just. How many hospitals in the country say they are facing critical staffing shortages. Npr selena simmons duffin reports nearly one in five hospitals in the us currently has a staffing issue states in the mid west and southwest are being hit hardest. North dakota has the highest percentage of hospitals reporting shortages. Texas has the highest number of hospitals when there aren't enough staff to treat the surge of patients. The concern is that you could get to the point where you have to start rationing care and then more people could die early on in the pandemic medical staff could volunteer to help in hot spots like new york city. But that's not really possible. Now with so many hospitals facing shortages and cases surging all over the country selena simmons duffin npr news eleanor. Like many other states seeing a big surge in coronavirus cases more than thirteen thousand new cases reported there with one hundred and twenty six deaths making it the third day in a row deaths their past the one hundred mark on governor. Jay pritzker reminding people his they've been state today. The numbers do not reflect what tomorrow's numbers might look like. You have to look at what the trajectory is. How fast it is that. They're likely to fill up. How fast they're coming into the emergency room and ending up in the bed. Laurie now is more than six hundred. Thirty four thousand coronavirus cases more than eleven thousand kobe. Nineteen deaths in the state. The death toll from covid nineteen pandemic has now reached more than two hundred and fifty thousand georgia's certified president elect. Joe biden has one that state's electoral votes but as a meal moffitt of member station w. a. b. e. in atlanta reports top georgia republicans are calling for changes to the state's election. Laws in one of the narrowest races in the country president elect joe biden topped president. Donald trump by about twelve thousand six hundred votes of the record. One point three million votes cast by mail and the state two thirds of them went to biden. Georgia's republican governor. Brian kemp echoed. President trump and casting doubt on the state's signature match program used to verify the identity of absentee voters voters casting their ballots. In person must show a photo. Id and we should consider applying that same standard to mail in ballots. Georgia's republican secretary of state also called for reform despite repeated assurances that he's seen no evidence of widespread fraud for npr news. I'm a meal moffitt in atlanta michigan state. Legislators met at the white house today with president trump as the president appears to be making an extraordinary effort aimed at overturning. Joe biden's overwhelming win. There were after the meeting. Officials said they have not been yet made aware of any information that would change the outcome of the election by one michigan by an insurmountable one hundred fifty four thousand votes on wall street today. The dow closed lower down two hundred nineteen points. You're listening to. Npr president trump's state department and foreign policy advisors to the incoming baiju administration are both expressing concerns about recent arrests of human rights advocates in egypt. Computers michele keleman reports. The arrest came after. The activists met with european diplomats. The egyptian institute for personal rights as seen three of its members arrested this week charged with spreading false information and undermining public security. European diplomats had met with them earlier this month. The state department is expressing quote deep concern about the arrests biden's foreign policy adviser. Tony blinken says he shares that sentiment in a tweet. He writes quote. Meeting with foreign. Diplomats is not a crime nor is peacefully advocating for human rights. President trump wants called egypt's leader his favourite dictator egypt remains a major recipient of us aid michelle kellerman npr news washington asia pacific summit leaders set aside their differences today issuing their first joint communique in three years among other things a group calling for free and predictable trade to help a global economy leaders of the twenty one nation apec groups as been substantially weakened by the coronavirus pandemic the group whose members include president trump and chinese leader xi jinping also about not to resort to protectionist policies notwithstanding the ongoing us trying to trade battle apec countries fell to reach agreement in two thousand eighteen in part due to discord between the us and china crude oil futures prices ended the week on an up note oil closing up forty three cents a barrel and the session at forty two seventeen barrel in new york. I'm jack speer npr news.

NPR Jack Speer Npr Selena Simmons Duffin Selena Simmons Duffin Jay Pritzker President Elect Joe Biden Mid West Joe Biden Brian Kemp Georgia North Dakota Atlanta Eleanor Federal Government Biden Southwest Baiju Administration Laurie Michele Keleman
"selena simmons duffin" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:55 min | 1 year ago

"selena simmons duffin" Discussed on KCRW

"A lot in common. But as NPR's Selena Simmons Duffin reports, there's one key difference between Madonna and Visors Vaccines. The difference is the temperature requirements. Both have to be frozen. That's because they were made using messenger RNA, and that's unstable. The cold keeps the vaccine more stable, just like a freezer keeps ice cream from melting, but only five years. Vaccine requires ultra cold temperatures minus 70 degrees Celsius, which is colder than Antarctica. Experts say. Because of the urgency of the pandemic, both vaccines will likely be needed. And the Fizer vaccine may just be directed to bigger population centers that can handle the dry ice and specialty freezers. That vaccine requires Selena Simmons Duffin NPR News The to pharmaceutical firms will soon submit the latest information about their vaccines to the federal government for approval. Two shots are needed for each vaccine to be effective. Nation's top infectious disease specialist, Dr Anthony Fauci, says Fizer and Madonna could soon make these available to a limited number of people. Hope would be but not totally guaranteed. But close is that by the end of the year you'll be able. One company will have 25 million. The other one will have 15 million. You'll have about 40 million doses for about 20 million people. As we get into January February, those doses will increase. He spoke to NPR's morning edition. Hurricane iota is weakening rapidly as it plows deeper into Central America. Top sustained winds are now in 85 MPH. It made landfall yesterday on the Atlantic coast of Nicaragua with top sustained winds of 155 MPH. Matt Hackworth of Lutheran World Relief is in Honduras, helping coordinate relief efforts. It's a race just to keep up among the was trying to help. So that's Honduras is government as well. This.

NPR Selena Simmons Duffin federal government Fizer Selena Simmons Matt Hackworth Dr Anthony Fauci Hurricane iota Nicaragua Madonna Central America Lutheran World Atlantic
"selena simmons duffin" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:57 min | 1 year ago

"selena simmons duffin" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Have showed promising results have a lot in common. But as NPR's Selena Simmons Duffin reports, there's one key difference between Madonna and Visors Vaccines. The difference is the temperature requirements. Both have to be frozen. That's because they were made using messenger RNA, and that's unstable. The cold keeps the vaccine more stable. Just like a freezer keeps ice cream from melting, but only Fizer is vaccine requires ultra cold temperatures minus 70 degrees Celsius, which is colder than Antarctica. Experts say. Because of the urgency of the pandemic, both vaccines will likely be needed. And the Fizer vaccine may just be directed to bigger population centers that can handle the dry ice and specialty freezers. That vaccine requires Selena Simmons Duffin NPR News The to pharmaceutical firms will soon submit the latest information about their vaccines to the federal government for approval. Two shots are needed for each vaccine to be effective. The nation's top infectious disease specialist, Dr Anthony Fauci, says Fizer and Madonna could soon make these available to a limited number of people. The hope with the but not totally guaranteed. But close is that by the end of the year you'll be able. One company will have 25 million. The other one will have 15 million. You'll have about 40 million doses for about 20 million people. As we get into January February, those doses will increase. He spoke to NPR's morning edition. Hurricane iota is weakening rapidly as it plows deeper into Central America. Top sustained winds are now in 85 MPH. It made landfall yesterday on the Atlantic coast of Nicaragua with top sustained winds of 155 MPH. That hack worth of Lutheran world relief is in Honduras, helping coordinate relief efforts. It's a race just to keep up among the was trying to help. So that's Honduras is government as well..

Fizer NPR Selena Simmons Duffin federal government Selena Simmons Dr Anthony Fauci Nicaragua Hurricane iota Atlantic Madonna Central America
"selena simmons duffin" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:59 min | 2 years ago

"selena simmons duffin" Discussed on KCRW

"Is she marched Montella, Tyson said She was devastated. But please, that we get one. But this was said president for the future, that police officer would be not so quick to take a level life and this is just the beginning. More protests are expected today. For NPR News and Stephanie Wolf in Louisville. President Trump will pay his final respects to Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg today when he visits the U. S. Supreme Court. NPR's Windsor, Johnston says Ginsberg died last week at the age of 87 trumps visit today to the Supreme Court, where Justice Ginsburg lies in repose comes Two days before he's expected to announce his nominee to fill her now vacant seat on the bench. The prospect of Trump making another appointment and cementing a conservative majority for what could be decades to come, has ignited a bitter partisan battle in Washington. NPR's Windsor Johnston reporting tomorrow, Justice Ginsberg will lie in state at the U. S. Capitol. She'll be the first woman to receive that honor. More than 201,000. People have died of covert 19 in the U. S. According to data from Johns Hopkins University. Well over 6.9 million people in the US have been infected with the Corona virus. The U. S has nearly a quarter of the world's corona virus cases and is the country with the most covert 19 fatalities. The federal government is preparing to crack down on hospitals for not reporting Complete Cove in 19 data every day into a federal data system. That's according to internal draft dockets obtained By NPR. NPR's Selina Simmons. Duffin has this exclusive report. The Trump Administration caused an outcry when it took the job of collecting hospital data away from CDC in July and set up a new data system using a federal contractor called Tele Tracking Now it slides from an internal CDC presentation given yesterday obtained by NPR show that the new system has a low response rate on Ly 24% of hospitals reported all metrics every day last week in the presentation, it's noted that the government is hoping to improve that figure by threatening hospitals federal funding through Medicare. For many hospitals that could mean shutting down. Selena Simmons, Duffin NPR news You're listening to NPR news. The president of Belarus, Alexander Lukashenko, has been abruptly sworn into a disputed sixth term in office. The Belarussian opposition says this summer's election results were fraudulent. Reuters news agency reports that the European Union has declared Lukashenko is not the legitimate president of Belarus and his hasty inauguration violates the will of the people. South Korea's says that a missing official was shot and killed this week by North Korean troops near the two countries maritime border. NPR's Anthony Koon reports from Seoul that the incident is likely to further strained tense ties before between the two Koreas. The South's Defense Ministry says a 47 year old fisheries official went missing Monday off the country's west coast. South Korean media quotes unnamed officials with the Joint Chiefs of Staff is saying the official tried to defect to North Korea. But North Korean forces found the official Tuesday shot and killed him and then burned his body. The South's presidential office demanded that the North take full responsibility for the shooting and punish those responsible. South Korea trying to communicate with the north by the United Nations Command, but it's so far received no response. Anthony Kun NPR news soul, The U. S Air Force Academy, has a new superintendent, Lieutenant General Richard Clarke has been installed. He's the first black superintendent in the military academies 66 year history. Clark attended the Air Force Academy himself. Starting in 1982. He went on to study at Harvard. He served in the Pentagon, where he oversaw the Air Force's nuclear weapons program..

NPR Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg NPR News President Trump president South Korea Anthony Kun NPR federal government U. S. Supreme Court official Clark Anthony Koon U. S Air Force Academy Montella Lieutenant General Richard Cla Johns Hopkins University North Korea Windsor Johnston Belarus
Only these four states have enough contact tracers, including Washington, DC

NPR News Now

01:00 min | 2 years ago

Only these four states have enough contact tracers, including Washington, DC

"US death toll from covid nineteen now exceeds one, hundred, sixty thousand according to Johns. Hopkins University Corona Virus Infections are nearing four point nine million while contact tracing is crucial to curbing the spread NPR Selena Simmons Duffin reports and NPR analysis finds the number of contact tracers isn't growing fast enough to keep up with rising case loads after serving states in mid June NPR found the were thirty seven thousand contact razors nationwide six weeks. Later, that number has only marginally increased. It's now about forty two, thousand several states didn't respond to multiple requests from NPR so the real total may be higher our. Of the staffing figures based on local case counts found only four states and Washington DC have enough contact tracers. Those states are Alaska Maine New Hampshire and Vermont Selena Simmons Duffin NPR News

NPR Selena Simmons Duffin Alaska Maine New Hampshire Selena Simmons Covid United States Washington Dc Johns Hopkins University Vermont
Whistleblower Rick Bright testifies before House panel

Morning Edition

03:34 min | 2 years ago

Whistleblower Rick Bright testifies before House panel

"Rick Bryant alleges that the White House would not listen to him today he testifies before a house committee that says it will ride used to run a top federal health agency he says he warned about the pandemic early to no effect he says he warned against unproven drugs that the president was promoting and he says that's why the administration transferred him to a different job NPR health policy reporter Selena Simmons Duffin is covering this story Selena good morning morning Steve once bright already set well he filed a whistleblower complaint with the US office of special counsel last week and that details how as director of Bardot which is part of the federal health agency he warned the trump administration about the seriousness of the corona virus any claims he pushed back against the white house's promotion of unproven cove in nineteen treatments like hydroxyl Clark win and that the administration put what he called cronyism over science he was transferred he says against his will to the national institutes of health last month now president trump has dismissed the allegations and painted bright as a disgruntled employee but late last week breaks lawyers said the office of special counsel said there seem to be reasonable grounds to believe he was retaliated against and that it recommended he be reinstated while his complaint is investigated okay so there's a complaint now that that involves both bright and this other person a man named Bowen who is testifying today as well right right so the other witness today is Mike but when he's a businessman with a Texas based face mask company called prestige Ameritech and both witnesses submitted written testimony to lawmakers Boeing statement outlines how for years he tried to get the federal government to engage with his company and other domestic mask makers arguing it was a national security issue and in a pandemic like we are in now it would be hard to get the needed supplies he told NPR last month at no one took his warning seriously everybody ignored reporters ignored it some kind of experts ignored our government ignored at hospitals in order but ignored it I don't want to say I told you so just wanna help everybody although it is an opportunity for both born and bred to say told you so anyway okay so that's bone one is bright likely to say Rick Brady also submitted written testimony to lawmakers and he emphasizes he's a scientist and civil servant and that pandemic preparedness is his expertise and the fact that his warnings went unheeded clearly pains him here he is on CBS's sixty minutes last week we see too many doctors and nurses now dying I was thinking that we could have done more to get this masking the supplies to them sooner and if we had would they still be alive today for today's appearance so great rates that he wants to be forward looking so he talks about the need for a clear voice from the federal government that is consistent and truthful even when that truth is difficult and he says the truth is really difficult he writes the corona virus pandemic could be worse than the nineteen eighteen flu which claimed over fifty million lives and he says the window is closing to prevent things from being worse in the fall writing quote without clear planning and implementation of the steps that I and other experts have outlined to twenty twenty will be the darkest winter in modern history well very briefly what's the agenda of the lawmakers will question him well anytime a whistleblower comes to testify before Congress is going to be political right as a witness democratic lawmakers want to hear from and they hold the majority in the house one thing to watch for is how Republicans on the committee engage with bright and whether or not they use this as a platform to defend the

Rick Bryant White House
Where Obamacare stands right now as Trump attacks the law

Morning Edition

00:50 sec | 2 years ago

Where Obamacare stands right now as Trump attacks the law

"The trump administration is proceeding with a lawsuit to try to strike down the affordable Care Act as NPR's Selena Simmons Duffin reports it's the third challenge to the health law heard by the Supreme Court on the side of defending the ACA in this case the democratic controlled house of representatives and many blue states led by California they say the ACA offers key protections including coverage for pre existing conditions and that the exchanges are especially important for those needing insurance during the pandemic on the side challenging the law red states led by Texas and the trump administration they argue the law is unconstitutional and should be struck down several news outlets reported this week that Attorney General Barr warned against pursuing the suit but the administration is moving forward anyway a decision is not expected before the November presidential

NPR Selena Simmons Duffin Supreme Court ACA California Texas General Barr Attorney
U.S. grapples with how to drastically ramp up COVID-19 contact tracing

All Things Considered

01:01 min | 2 years ago

U.S. grapples with how to drastically ramp up COVID-19 contact tracing

"A new survey from NPR asked all fifty state health departments and the district of Columbia how many contact tracers they have to track the spread of the corona virus and PR Selena Simmons Duffin reports even with a hiring surge the total falls short of what public health experts have recommended contact tracers are public health workers who call up every positive covert nineteen patient asked them to list their recent contacts and then reaches out to those contacts to ask them to quarantine it's a key tool to allow social distancing to ease while keeping the virus in check after serving state health departments about their plans NPR found thirty five thousand six hundred contact tracers but the number of public health leaders have been calling for is three times that more like one hundred thousand or more states said they could use help funding this effort one estimate of the cost of hiring one hundred thousand tracers is four billion dollars Congress has not specifically put that into any funding package

NPR Columbia Selena Simmons Duffin Congress
Concerns growing over access to household cleaning supplies: survey

Morning Edition

03:39 min | 2 years ago

Concerns growing over access to household cleaning supplies: survey

"A disturbing lack of protective gear medical experts equipment and supplies that is the key finding from a national survey of hospitals put out this morning by the federal government and your health policy reporter Selena Simmons Duffin was among the first to get that survey and she brings us this report this is the first survey of its kind and some of the details are alarming like the stories of hospital administrators trying to get more masks for health care workers we heard hospitals going out and trying to source these mass at auto parts shops nail salons art supply stores that's an Maxwell she oversaw the report as assistant inspector general for evaluation and inspections at the U. S. department of health and Human Services one hospital said that shipment of masks from the federal government had all expired ten years ago in another shipment half the mast for child sized yet another hospital said when trying to buy supplies masks that had cost fifty cents we're now six dollars apiece Maxwell says other supplies were also running short simple things like thermometers they need to test out we also heard cleaning supplies disinfectant food toilet paper did you catch that toilet paper is running out in America's hospitals right now one hospital said it was so short and disinfectants its staff tried to make it in house with chemicals like chlorine then there are the shortages and then a leaders in concerns about not having enough staff to operate them we had one hospital administrators say to us you can make thousands of ventilators but it will take an army to manage that equipment and to care for those patients testing is a huge problem for hospitals it's still really hard to get tests and there are delays in getting results many hospital said it took seven days or more and that has a ripple effects when a patient comes in and gets tested the hospital needs to treat that patient as potentially a positive coalbed patient so that means they are taking up a bed in the hospital for the length of time it takes but it has to come back that means when hospital staff are engaging with that patient they are in full protective gear when the test comes back negative that means tons of masks and gowns and gloves may have been wasted Maxwell says the inspector general's office hustled to get this report done the office had dozens of staffers working on it they called three hundred and twenty three hospitals around the country and they did it over five days the week of March twenty third the report isn't just a survey of challenges but also how hospitals are managing them and the ways the federal government could help for instance to help intervene and coordinate the supplies that they needed and the distribution of those supplies so hospitals are all competing with each other in this chaotic slapdash way administrators also said the government could do a better job with messaging to the public into hospital workers who struggle with guidelines that change constantly and sometimes contradictory information from federal and state authorities the findings in this report confirms what we've been hearing anecdotally says Dr Irwin Redlener he directs the national center for disaster preparedness at Columbia University and he adds it's encouraging that the federal government took the time to do the report the question now will be how will the government respond one way helps you fix some of these issues well the shared strategies help is hospitals help one another I I don't know we can only hope he says the shortages and problems aren't going anywhere and we're not at the peak of the outbreak yet Selena Simmons Duffin NPR

Are US Hospitals Ready for Coronavirus?

All Things Considered

05:45 min | 2 years ago

Are US Hospitals Ready for Coronavirus?

"To another corona virus question now which is our America's hospitals ready that is one of the most urgent questions public health experts are trying to answer right now other places in the world where the corona virus outbreak appears to be just head over here in the US they have already seen their hospitals overwhelmed thank Italy and your Selena Simmons Duffin and NPR's Marie Eisenman have this report on preparations here in the U. S. history here's why hospitals are so anxious to get ready for what's coming when hospital is flooded with more critically ill patients than it can handle more patients die the stakes could not be higher I wanted to find out what hospitals need to be doing so I went to a really busy one in Washington DC we are currently in what we call a ready room that is correct he at least he is director of emergency management at medstar Washington hospital center over to your left you'll see there's a card that has our training powered air purifying respirators this is our optimal level of rest it looks like a warehouse with exposed pipes fluorescent light streams in the floor they use it for training storage or whatever the latest emergency calls for when I visited they were getting ready to move carts of supplies out to turn this room into a patient screening area so if you show up and think you have colluded nineteen you might be screen here or in one of the tents are pitching in the parking lot when you present yourself you'll see signage that remind you please maintain your distance you'll be given a mask quickly and asked to put it even if triage goes smoothly that is just the first step people who are really sick will need to go to intensive care units I see use yeah this could be the real choke point for many hospitals in America for the average American city we would probably need twice the normal intensive care capacity than we normally have that's Dr Eric toner of Johns Hopkins center for health security he and collaborators at Harvard university and Nanjing medical university in China they looked at what happens to intensive care units in Wuhan China the first places outbreak hit we saw tens of thousands of ICU patients Turner estimates if the U. S. is the same rate of spread every hospital here it would have to take drastic steps to meet the need normally we put an ammonia patient in a medical ICO but they might have to commandeer any free beds in the ice use of all sorts of stuff lies departments in Rolla G. pediatrics the challenge those units are pretty full so already says some hospitals are planning to remodel other rooms even expand into larger spaces like auditoriums then there's the equipment people are I see you need all kinds of specialized equipment they need IV pumps that need monitors various kinds and most important for really sick people with covert nineteen you need ventilators machines that essentially breed for patients across the U. S. we have a finite number of outliers DLE told me at Washington hospital center they have extra ventilators ready to go we have twelve here in the corner I have another six in the back room he feels fairly confident about their supply and nationally there's a stock piles several thousand ventilators that hospitals could pull from but there is the issue of finding or training staff to provide all this extra care each hospital would have a surge plan will not only finding more beds but also then finding the the staff to be able to staff those beds which brings us to the problem of keeping health workers safe he d'elia is medical director of Boston university's school of medicine's special pathogens unit our health care workers are the most precious resource than this response she says if health workers can't protect themselves more and more of them will start to fall sick and so you're going through your cadres of health care workers until you get to a point now where you cannot provide the kind of care you want to do the patients they're going to need personal protective equipment masks goggles downs hospitals in Washington state have already turned to the national stockpile for those things the Delhi says her hospital has enough protective gear right now you know if you ask me in six months I don't know what the scenario might look like but nobody knows how many months this might go on for overall toner at Johns Hopkins glues that hospitals in the U. S. will just about meet all these various needs but that's on the macro level in some communities they will be okay in other communities they will be just making it and other places they will be totally overwhelmed even at a big sophisticated place like medstar Washington hospital center in DC they feel they have to get ready for the worst D. out the the emergency preparedness director says they have an ethics plan for how to make heart wrenching decisions who gets a ventilator versus who gets a bag valve mask versus who doesn't get either one of the two doctors are already making those choices in Italy based on age likelihood of survival clearly we all hope that we don't see that extreme here in this country but we have a plan if it came to that other hospitals I know have a plan as well but Turner says what people out in the community do now to slow down the virus that could change the picture for hospitals it won't be a walk in the park but I think would be manageable all the social distancing Americans are trying to do now shutting down bars and restaurants hunkering down at home might seem like an overreaction but those measures could be what makes it possible for hospitals to

America
"selena simmons duffin" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:38 min | 2 years ago

"selena simmons duffin" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Slash and PR and from listeners like you who donate to this NPR station this is All Things Considered from NPR news I'm ari Shapiro and I'm Audie Cornish eight point three billion dollars that's the total amount of emergency coronavirus funding the president trump signed into law today but will what will that money be getting us in Paris Selena Simmons Duffin is here to give us the highlights welcome back to the studio hi eight point three billion sounds like a lot how is it helpful here it really is actually a lot there are some figures for comparison here five point four billion for the a bowl of response in twenty fourteen and nearly seven billion for each one and one in two thousand nine so this is many millions of dollars more than Congress put towards those efforts one important point this is quite a turnaround for the trump administration just last week they requested only one point two five billion in new funding if they wanted to move money around to get to two point five billion and they defended that figure as members of Congress from both sides of the aisle said this really seems like a little ball the president did say last week he was open to more and that is what he got eight point three billion more than three times that initial ask experts I talked to today say it's really remarkable in this political moment that Congress was able to act so quickly to come up with this comprehensive package no one can really say whether it's enough but everyone I talked to said it's really encouraging start how is the money supposed to be spent the biggest part of money goes to the office of the secretary of health.

ari Shapiro trump Selena Simmons Duffin Congress president secretary Slash NPR Audie Cornish Paris
"selena simmons duffin" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:34 min | 2 years ago

"selena simmons duffin" Discussed on KCRW

"Now it is seventy degrees in Santa Clarita this is All Things Considered from NPR news I'm ari Shapiro and Ahmadi Cornish eight point three billion dollars that's the total amount of emergency coronavirus funding the president trump signed into law today but will what will that money be getting us in Paris Selena Simmons Duffin is here to give us the highlights welcome back to the studio hi eight point three billion sounds like a lot how is it helpful here it really is actually a lot there are some figures for comparison here five point four billion for the a a bowl of response in twenty fourteen a nearly seven billion for each one and one in two thousand nine so this is many millions of dollars more than Congress put towards those efforts one important point this is quite a turnaround for the trump administration just last week they requested only one point two five billion in new funding if they wanted to move money around to get to two point five billion and they defended that figure as members of Congress from both sides of the aisle said this really seems like a low ball the president did say last week he was open to more and that is what he got eight point three billion more than three times that initial ask experts I talked to today say it's really remarkable in this political moment that Congress was able to act so quickly to come up with this comprehensive package no one can really say whether it's enough but everyone I talked to said it's really encouraging start how is the money supposed to be spent the biggest part of money goes to the office of the secretary of health.

Santa Clarita trump Selena Simmons Duffin Congress president secretary NPR ari Shapiro Ahmadi Cornish Paris
"selena simmons duffin" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:32 min | 2 years ago

"selena simmons duffin" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"First this is All Things Considered from NPR news I'm ari Shapiro and Ahmadi Cornish eight point three billion dollars that's the total amount of emergency coronavirus funding the president trump signed into law today but will what will that money be getting us in Paris Selena Simmons Duffin is here to give us the highlights welcome back to the studio hi eight point three billion sounds like a lot how is it helpful here it really is actually a lot there are some figures for comparison here five point four billion for the of the liver spots in twenty fourteen a nearly seven billion for each one and one in two thousand nine so this is many millions of dollars more than Congress put towards those efforts one important point this is quite a turnaround for the trump administration just last week they requested only one point two five billion in new funding if they wanted to move money around to get to two point five billion and they defended that figure as members of Congress from both sides of the aisle said this really seems like a low ball the president did say last week he was open to more and that is what he got eight point three billion more than three times that initial ask experts I talked to today say it's really remarkable in this political moment that Congress was able to act so quickly to come up with this comprehensive package and no one can really say whether it's on us but everyone I talked to said it's really encouraging start how is the money supposed to be spent the biggest part of money goes to the office of the secretary of health.

trump Selena Simmons Duffin Congress president secretary NPR ari Shapiro Ahmadi Cornish Paris
'We'll get through this': Mike Pence says 'no question' there will be more coronavirus cases, but 'we're ready'

Weekend Edition Sunday

07:17 min | 2 years ago

'We'll get through this': Mike Pence says 'no question' there will be more coronavirus cases, but 'we're ready'

"You it's been a dramatic few days of developments related to the corona virus Washington state announced several first yes date the first death of someone in the U. S. infected with the virus the first health worker to be infected and the first potential outbreak at a long term care facility outside Seattle more than fifty people are being tested for the corona virus the trump administration has also ramped up its response and here to bring us up to speed is NPR science reporter Selena Simmons Duffin high Selena hi Lisa so president trump held a press conference yesterday with members of the coronavirus task force what did we hear the president announced first of all that there had been the first U. S. death trump said the victim was a woman but authorities later confirmed it was actually a man in his fifties with underlying health conditions and he was in Kirkland Washington near Seattle vice president pence also announcing that press conference new travel restrictions in areas that have seen recent outbreaks are Ron and parts of South Korea and Italy up president trump also took a few questions and some of them referred to the fact that he used the word hoax in connection to corona virus on Friday he tried to clarify he was referring to Democrats criticism of the response not the virus itself so at the end of the week there were reports of a few positive cases that appear to be community spread in California Oregon meaning not connected to travel to Asia other affected areas the contracted rate here in the U. S. and now there are several more confirmed in Washington state potentially dozens more what's going on so the big change was that public health officials started looking for cases differently the medical director for infectious disease at the hospital evergreen health explained how it happened at a press conference yesterday he said that the guidelines about who should be tested changed last week you no longer need to travel history or close contact with somebody with corona virus so evergreen health looked at its patients and sought to with no travel history who are very sick with respiratory infections with the new guidelines they became candidates to test for crown of fight virus and both tested positive so one was the patient in his fifties who sadly died the other was a resident of this nursing home life care center in Kirkland local health officials realize that a health care worker from life care was sick as well she tested positive and that's what led officials to look into this possible outbreak so these might not be new cases then right exactly the remember the symptoms look a lot like the flu and it's flu season and health officials say most cases are mild so people might not be even going to the hospital for them so now that the new guidelines for food to test has changed and there are these new abilities for local labs around the country to do more testing we will likely see many more positive cases it's hard to know at this point how many more are out there a health official from Seattle king county said in yesterday's press briefing these newly confirmed cases are likely quote the tip of the iceberg but it's important to remember overall the risk to the American public is still low the important thing to do with the thoroughly washing your hands keeping away from sick people all of those method measures that you can take to protect yourself and prevent the spread the messages be vigilant but don't panic that's NPR's Selena Simmons Duffin thank you so much thank you the US has signed a deal with the Taliban that aims to end the eighteen year war in Afghanistan the longest in American history but there's already a glitch Afghan president Ashraf Ghani says he will free thousands of Taliban prisoners as yesterday's the deal called for joining us to talk about that is NPR's Pentagon correspondent Tom Bowman he spent years in batting with US and Afghan forces good morning Tom Taylor so the agreement for less than a day old and there's already a problem how serious is it that on he says he won't release the prisoners well we don't know yet and I'm sure the U. S. and NATO officials will be reaching out quickly to Connie no the release of five thousand Taliban prisoners were supposed to be a precondition of the Taliban Afghan talks slate to begin soon Connie says he's not ready to release any prisoners before talks begin he said that prisoner release was not a promise the U. S. could make I I think it shows what many predicted the most difficult step was not a U. S. Taliban agreement but one between the Afghans and the Taliban so they're about twelve thousand US troops in Afghanistan what are they doing and and when will they begin to leave well right now they're training Afghan troops and also together with Afghan commandos going after terror groups like ISIS the U. S. troops will drop to eighty six hundred in the next several months but the military still says at that number the cans of both train Afghans in go after ISIS or other terrorist the agreement says all U. S. troops out in fourteen months no Layla that's faster told than some earlier plans to draw down in two years so either the Taliban pressed hard for a better deal or president trump just wanted the troops out faster so is it realistic than depends who you ask one official told me the time line is he called it optimistic and said the Taliban has to abide by the agreement to stop attacks break with al Qaeda and open talks with Afghan officials but here's the thing last September right when an earlier U. S. Taliban peace agreement was about to be signed the U. S. attacked in el Qaida cell in western Afghanistan and American officials told me when I was in Afghanistan at that time that the Taliban were also working with al Qaeda in the east near the Pakistan border so some question whether the Taliban will really break with al Qaeda so then how does the U. S. make sure that the Taliban is honoring the agreement well the U. S. in the Taliban will have some sort of a monitoring office in Qatar to make sure everyone abides by the agreement and yeah in in Afghanistan the U. S. and Taliban are communicating by phone or radio to report on what they're seeing on the ground the problem is U. S. troops are in small numbers in largely confined to bases and not out and about around the country like they were in past years you know patrolling with Afghans going into villages one retired general with years of experience in Afghanistan told me as a result there is no way the U. S. can effectively monitor this agreement on the ground or even witness if the Taliban are intimidating the population but the U. S. will stop the troop drawdown if the Taliban doesn't cooperate right that's what they said and it's likely even in the face of some television non compliance the U. S. will continue to draw down then military leaders have long said of course there's no military solution here only a political one resident trump wants to bring what he calls endless wars to a close no I'll be heading to Syria soon labels are check out the U. S. military mission against ISIS the president also is cutting back their their once about two thousand American soldiers in Syria now it's down to about five hundred or so that's NPR Pentagon correspondent Tom Bowman Tom

Washington
Tylenol For Infants And Children Is The Same. Why Does 1 Cost 3 Times More?

NPR's Business Story of the Day

03:10 min | 3 years ago

Tylenol For Infants And Children Is The Same. Why Does 1 Cost 3 Times More?

"Support for this podcast and the following message come from mayo clinic if you're looking for answers no one else has been able to find, you know, where to go mayoclinic. More at mayo clinic dot org slash answers. Anybody who has a kid with a fever makes a discovery at the drugstore. There are two options for Tylenol one for infants one four children. They contain the same amount of medicine, but the infant version costs, three times more. Why would that be? Here's NPR's Selena Simmons Duffin turns out. There's a backstory for a long time. Infants Tylenol was stronger than the children's stuff. It was three times more concentrated. That's in my Hernandez of the university of Pittsburgh school of pharmacy. The thinking was, you don't want to give little babies, lots of liquid medicine and you can give them less if it stronger. Hence the cost difference, deprives per milliliter was five times higher, but there was a problem parents were making mistakes with dosing babies got sick and some even. Died. So at the urging of the food and Drug administration in twenty eleven Johnson and Johnson announced a change instance title is now offered in the same concentration as children's what the price is still different with Storebrand's of acetaminophen, it's the same story. The infant version is generally three times more than the one for children. I asked Johnson and Johnson, the maker of brand name Tylenol, why the company says the infant version comes in a sturdier bottle and has a syringe for accurate. Dosing the children's version only has a little plastic Cup in Hernandez isn't convinced by that. She says what's expensive and producing a drug like this is the active ingredient, not a piece of plastic. The cab, this was this eerie inch doesn't release plane, the price difference in my opinion. But Johnson and Johnson's explanation makes sense to Edgar daursky. He's a consumer advocate, and founder of the website, consumer world is an extra thing in the box and extra things usually cost money. He says. There's a convenience element here. Thank of, you know, a spray cleaner. You can buy the spray cleaner in the spray bottle, and that costs, little more money or you can buy the refill that gives you more ounces, but it doesn't have the sprayer on top. It's kind of the same concept. But this, of course, is not a spray cleaner, it's medicine for your baby. Parents can be sensitive to marketing, because the stakes are so high Dr Shaw at children's national in Washington DC, says when it comes to infant and children's acetaminophen, the most important thing is to get the dosing right? When you start doing more than recommended. There are serious side effects that can happen. So the bottom line know what you need if spending that extra couple of dollars for the syringe will help you get the dosing just right. Maybe the markup is worth it. Selena Simmons Duffin, NPR news. Support for this podcast and the following message come from Virgo struggling to find the perfect vacation home verb. Oh, does the. Hard work for you, matching you to the perfect place to stay every time download are be o- in the app store. Let Virgo find the home that matches you.

Johnson Selena Simmons Duffin Tylenol Hernandez Edgar Daursky Mayo Clinic University Of Pittsburgh Schoo Fever NPR Food And Drug Administration Founder Storebrand Washington Dr Shaw
"selena simmons duffin" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:17 min | 3 years ago

"selena simmons duffin" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Infantile is now offered in the same concentration as children's. But the price is still different with Storebrand's of acetaminophen, it's the same story. The infant version is generally three times more than the one for children. I asked Johnson and Johnson, the maker of brand name Tylenol, why the company says the infant version comes in a sturdier bottle and has a syringe for accurate. Dosing the children's version only has a little plastic Cup. Inner Hernandez is convinced by that. She says what's expensive in producing a drug like this is the active ingredient, not a piece of plastic the cab business this doesn't really explain the price difference in my opinion. But Johnson and Johnson's explanation makes sense to Edgar door sqi. He's a consumer advocate, and founder of the website, consumer world. There's an extra thing in the box and extra things usually cost money. He says, there's a convenience element here. Think of you know, a spray cleaner. You can buy the spray cleaner in the spray bottle, and that costs, little more money or you can buy the refill that gives you more announces, but it doesn't have the sprayer on top. It's kind of the same concept. But this, of course, is not a spray cleaner. It's medicine for your baby. Parents can be. Sensitive to marketing, because the stakes are so high. Dr encore shot at children's national in Washington DC, says when it comes to infant and children's acetaminophen, the most important thing is to get the dosing right? When you start doing more than recommended. There are serious side effects that could happen. So the bottom line know what you need is spending that extra couple of dollars for the syringe will help you get the dosing just right. Maybe the markup is worth it. Selena Simmons Duffin, NPR news. All right. You might not think of prenatal checkup is a thing that brings strangers together and becomes a kind of community, but that is exactly what reporter any gold found at always imagined having a baby surrounded by my family and friends. But when I found out, I was pregnant my husband and I had just moved from San Francisco to Chicago. I hardly knew a soul. I look for friends at work in prenatal, yoga classes at the bookstore, but I ended up finding a community where I least expected it at a medical office..

Johnson Hernandez Storebrand Selena Simmons Duffin reporter NPR founder Washington San Francisco Chicago
"selena simmons duffin" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

04:59 min | 3 years ago

"selena simmons duffin" Discussed on KCRW

"And Sunday mornings at six on KCRW. I'm woman almond onto the point threats and counter threats between the US and Iran countries are now more confrontational country wants a war, but. Crossed that threshold. Next time on to the point, it is three twenty nine k c r w thanks so much for being with us on a Friday afternoon. Coming up on all things considered the health and human services department has proposed to end. Obama era rules, protecting transgender people from discrimination in healthcare could impact the Trump administration's plan to fight HIV. We'll talk more about that. Also ahead on the program. Disney's live-action version of its nineteen Ninety-two cartoon Aladdin features Will Smith in the genie role originally played by Robin Williams. NPR's movie. Reviewer Bob Mondello will be along to tell you more about that. And then in state and local news at three thirty two. Why some asylum seekers are being quarantined how striking workers can still earn some money on the picket lines. And why Maine has don't join California as one of the first to do this after these headlines from NPR stick around. Live from NPR news in Culver City, California. I'm doin'? Hi-sci kowtow. President Trump says he'll give attorney general William bar. The power to declassify documents related to the origins of the Russia investigation. NPR's Shannon van sent reports Trump told reporters he is stepping up his effort to investigate the investigators Trump calls the investigation into links between Russia and his presidential campaign, a witch hunt end attempted coup. He said he wants to declassify up to millions of pages of FBI and CIA documents and is ordering the intelligence community to quote quickly and fully cooperate with bars investigation. In response, the director of national intelligence. Dan Coats says the nation's spy agencies will provide the Justice department all appropriate information for its review. The Trump administration is redefining word the words sex in a rule proposed today. It would affect. Whether transgender people are protected from discrimination in health care settings and pair, Selena Simmons Duffin reports. This goes back to a twenty sixteen rule under the Obama administration that explicitly protected transgender people and added that to the Affordable Care Act. It said somebody could not be discriminated against on the basis of sex or gender identity defined as one's internal sense of being male female, neither, or a combination of male and female today, the federal department that oversees complaints of discrimination in healthcare announced a return to what they call the plain meaning of the word sex in other words, biological sex. Transgender advocates say without explicit protection, transgender people may avoid the doctor, and that could have serious, health impacts, Selena Simmons Duffin, NPR news. On Wall Street today, the Dow Jones industrial average closed up ninety five points to twenty five thousand five hundred eighty five that's up a third of a percent. The NASDAQ closed up eight points to seven thousand six hundred thirty seven this is. NPR and this is KCRW happy Friday. I'm leery parole. Here's what's happening at three thirty two. Sixteen asylum seekers who've exhibited flu like symptoms have been flown to San Diego. From south Texas are being quarantined authorities said today, the asylum seekers, and their families are staying in motel rooms US immigration officials are now conducting three flights a week to San Diego. From Texas Rio Grande valley. They say authorities in Texas are overwhelmed and need help processing people who've been arrested thirty two migrants facility in Texas have tested positive for influenza earlier this week, a teenage boy with the flu, who stayed there died, California, lawmakers are considering a Bill that would let striking workers collect unemployment while walking a picket line. KCRW is Terry Glazer reports the Bill sponsor says the measure would level the playing field and standoffs between striking workers and their employers under the measure workers on strike would have to wait four weeks before getting unemployment benefits. But then collect them for five months, there check would range from forty to four hundred fifty bucks. A week. The Bill is being sponsored by democratic assemblywoman Lorena Gonzalez Fletcher, who used to work for the NFL CIO. She says it could make a difference in long running walkouts, like one last summer where twenty five hundred Marriott employees from the bay area were off the job for two months. But the chamber of commerce tells the Sacramento bee, the Bill would fundamentally change on employment insurance by letting people collect benefits when they're not actively looking for work. The group says it could also lead to a hike in unemployment insurance premiums, KCRW, Sherry, Glaser reporting Maine's governor has signed a Bill that eliminates religious and philosophical exemptions for required vaccinations, in the state law will end non-medical vaccine opt-outs by twenty twenty one for students at public and private schools, and universities including nursery schools, and for healthcare facility employees may now joins California Mississippi and West Virginia to become the fourth state without religious exemptions for vaccine requirements Maine has one.

NPR KCRW Trump administration Selena Simmons Duffin California President Trump Texas Maine flu Russia US Bob Mondello San Diego Obama Obama administration Texas Rio Grande valley
Trump calls on Congress to protect patients from surprise medical bills

KQED Specials

00:53 sec | 3 years ago

Trump calls on Congress to protect patients from surprise medical bills

"The president is urging congress to address a problem that resonates across party lines as NPR's Selena Simmons Duffin reports. Trump wants lawmakers to consider legislation dealing with surprise billing for medical providers who are not part of their patients health insurance network. Lots of families have stories about this, including Dr Paul Davis at his daughter's post op appointment her doctor said this he said, oh, by the way, I would like to get urine specimen fine. She did it a year later the Bill showed up for seventeen thousand eight hundred and fifty dollars NPR and Kaiser health news. I told the story of this test is part of our Bill of the month series. Davis. Brought his surprise Bill to the White House event today. President Trump said the story was quote almost not believable. But he's right. Seventeen thousand eight hundred fifty dollars for urine tests. There is by partisan agreement on this issue and several bills already in the

Donald Trump Bill Dr Paul Davis Selena Simmons Duffin NPR President Trump Congress White House Seventeen Thousand Eight Hundr Fifty Dollars
"selena simmons duffin" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

07:48 min | 3 years ago

"selena simmons duffin" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"You news with Eric Mahoney. Reporting on a state law that requires certain businesses to display posters about human trafficking. A law that is being ignored by many. That's coming up right after the news headlines at five o'clock on ninety point three k as the you. From NPR news. This is all things considered. I'm Elsa Chang. Ari? Shapiro today at the White House, President Trump held uninventive on surprise medical bills. He announced his priorities for legislation that would end the practice and highlighted the stories of two patients who had been subject of NPR in Kaiser health news Bill of the month series NPR's, Selena Simmons Duffin reports. One of those patients is drew Calver a public schoolteacher in Austin, Texas, two years ago, he had a heart attack and was taken to the nearest hospital, although had insurance I was still build hundred ten thousand dollars. I feel like I was exploited at my most vulnerable time in my life. He spoke at the White House event today last summer after he was featured in Bill of the month the hospital reduced the charge to just three hundred thirty two dollars. Hewlett very good. Now. President Trump said he'd heard many stories like this White House officials told reporters that was what got him interested in pursuing this issue. No American mom or dad lay awake at night worrying about the hidden fees or shocking. Unexpected medical bills to come today. I'm an ounce principles that should guide congress and developing bipartisan legislation to end surprise, medical billing among the ideas, Trump outlined out of network, ER bills should always be paid at the in-network rate since patients usually can't choose where to go in an emergency before scheduled care. Patients. Must get a clear and honest estimate up front and patients should not receive bills from out of network providers. They didn't choose all of this should happen without increasing federal spending. Trump says from what I understand we have bipartisan support, which is rather shocking. It's not that surprising. There's political consensus on this a lot of families have there. Own stories four in ten people say their family had an unexpected medical Bill. According to a poll last month by the Kaiser family foundation, and a majority across party lines agree that the government should quote take action on surprise billing. Congress is starting to hammer out how they'll fix this legislation is in the works from both Republican and democratic lawmakers last month a house subcommittee held a hearing on. It Representative Phil Roe is a Republican from Tennessee. How do we do all this and put this together where it's fair the patients, and it's also fair to the providers. He's a doctor by training, and he has his own story. You have surprise Bill after surgery I had a year and a half ago, and I can negotiate it because I knew the nuances of this many people cannot it is complicated. Many congressional hearing and today at the White House agreed that the legislative solution can't rely on patients to file complaints or negotiate their bills down or for that matter turned to the media to draw attention to. Their particular story. In other words, it should be up to insurers doctors, hospitals and other providers to solve this issue. Not up to patients, Selena Simmons Duffin, NPR news, Washington. It's no accident that some products are placed near the supermarket register or on those shelves that are like at I level manufacturers pay fees to secure certain spots to crush the competition. Sally Herships and Cardiff Garcia from our podcast, the indicator from planet money. Explain why the grocery store shelf is one of the most competitive and contentious arenas in business. Imagine if you will the potato chip section at the grocery store geeze up at the chips and wonder why are there so many options for pedal cooked chips, and why is the cheaper brand of tortilla chips, always so hard to find. But you might think that the shelf would be arranged solely based on the needs and the wants of consumers like in this case Sally's need for low quality tortilla chips. But in actual fact, there is a highly complex system that governs the placement of chips and other products at the grocery store and a lot of it is based on fees that manufacturers the companies that make those chips paid a store owners and a fee structure to help determine product placement. At a grocery store may sound simple. It really is not they're all sorts of fees that manufacturer's pay grocery stores. One of the most contentious is called slotting fees. They're meant to cover the expense of the stores taking a risk on new products. Mark bow is with the food marketing institute, which represents the grocery store industry. He says slotting fees are totally normal and even necessary part of bringing new products to the grocery store you have to make new room in the warehouse. You have to make new on the shelf. You have to be able to Mark down and sell off the product that's existing on the shelf in order to make room for the new products. So if you are a grocery store owner, you don't necessarily want to use your expensive retail space as a product testing ground instead store owners want to pass those costs onto manufacturers in two thousand fifteen Goldman Sachs says consumer goods companies paid more than two hundred billion dollars to retailers placement fees that space at the front by the registers where the candy bars are is so valuable manufacturers have to pay by the inch. It's referred to as beachfront property each category. Like bread milk or Menes has what is strangely called a category? Captain the company which pays the most fees. Julia maccarthy is with the center for science in the public interest. The category captain gets to decide. Where on the shelves their product will go and where on the shelves, their competitor's products will go. Yeah. And according to Julia, there's more if you're the company that pays the most in fees. She says you also get access to your competitors data. Yes. And for us it raises real questions of antitrust. Right. And this is where congress steps in the concern was that this practice was at Regis. It was anti-competitive. So in the fall of nineteen ninety nine the Senate held a hearing committee staff talked to seventy nine small businesses, some small businesses wouldn't even talk for fear of retribution of the seventy nine. We talked to every single one said we tell our story we're going to get knocked off the shelves where we are now only three small business owners would testify at that Senate hearing and two of those were from behind screens with disguised voices. I mean, listen to this. Starship? The. Even the GAO the government accountability office tried to do a study on slotting fees and it failed. Instead it presented an eight page paper about the reasons it was unable to perform the study. No one what talk, but we did find someone Christine who owns a Canadian snuck company called super snaps their seaweed chips. This is something that is really not talked about in industry. But I have had where I would speak with a major retailer who would tell me, you're so enter competitor is paying this much. Can you offer me meaning he or she would ask additional funds? So just to be clear, your competitor. If they pay more they could either pick where their product goes end your..

President Trump congress White House Selena Simmons Duffin NPR Julia maccarthy Sally Herships Elsa Chang Eric Mahoney Kaiser family foundation Ari Senate Bill Austin Hewlett Calver
Inside Trump's plan to end the HIV epidemic and what sparked it

All Things Considered

03:22 min | 3 years ago

Inside Trump's plan to end the HIV epidemic and what sparked it

"Night. President Trump announced a plan to end HIV transmission within ten years today is administration share details on how it hopes to get there. Here's NPR's Selena Simmons Duffin, there's wide consensus among experts that stopping HIV by twenty thirty is doable. And this plan hits many of the right notes to get there. It focuses on so-called hotspots where most new infections are happening. And the demographic groups at highest risk of getting infected particularly in African American and Latino gay and bisexual transgender individuals women of color and people living in the south that's centers for disease control and prevention director, Dr Robert Redfield on a call with reporters today. Tools to end the epidemic. But we have to apply them. Those tools include diagnosing HIV early and getting people on treatment because people with HIV who are getting affective treatment are much less likely to spread the infection and promoting prevention efforts condom use clean syringes and a pill for people who are at risk. But not yet infected called prep. These are not new ideas. But officials today say the interagency push is new they say HIV infections have plateaued around forty thousand a year nationwide. And they're hoping this plan will turn things around Redfield from the CDC has worked on HIV for decades importance of and see the possible. I'm personally thrilled about this initiative. A plan for America's to end HIV. The goal does stand in contrast to some of the other moves by the Trump administration over the last two years, and that contrast had some HIV researchers and advocates feeling skeptical. Dr Michelle Collins, okay? Goal is one of them. She treats HIV patients in rural North Carolina. When you how people that are in our community that you are worthy of serving in the military. You are not interested in trying to end aid. When you do everything you can to make healthcare or difficult for lower income people in excess then you can't be serious about ending age. Twenty thirty Ogle used to serve on the presidential advisory council on HIV aids. But she and five others resigned in protest in two thousand seventeen at the time. They said they were convinced President Trump didn't care about the issue at all. And today, I don't feel any different others are more optimistic. Greg millet from the foundation for aids research says he trusts the people who are leading the charge. These are within the Trump administration who have always been committed to public health. They've been committed to work with the administration. To make this a success. The big question hanging over all of this is what about the money a plan? This grand will easily cost billions of dollars officials from HHS today said they were confident there would be new adequate funding for this plan and the twenty twenty budget, but wouldn't go into specifics. One reason they might be optimistic. Congress will give them what's needed is speaker of the house Nancy Pelosi. She represents San Francisco and has been an advocate on HIV for her whole career. She even spoke about the aids crisis in her first speech on the floor of the house in nineteen eighty seven today in a statement, she called President Trump's plan quote interesting,

President Trump HIV Dr Robert Redfield Donald Trump Selena Simmons Duffin Dr Michelle Collins Ogle Greg Millet NPR Nancy Pelosi HHS San Francisco CDC North Carolina America Director Congress Advisory Council
"selena simmons duffin" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:44 min | 3 years ago

"selena simmons duffin" Discussed on KQED Radio

"From NPR and WVU are here. Now, I'm Robin young. And last night in his state of the union address. President Trump made this surprise announcement. My budget will ask Democrats and Republicans to make the needed commitment to eliminate the HIV epidemic in the United States within ten years, we have made incredible strides. Incredible activists heads were spinning 2017 seventeen. Trump fired his entire HIV aids advisory council and his administration has tried to cut money for HIV aids programs in past budgets NPR, Selena Simmons Duffin has been learning more Selena high high, and we know this is a big problem. We're based in Boston they've reported six new cases of HIV infections from drug injections. Just since November. It's a problem across the country today, health and human services officials spoke with reporters, did we learn anything more? Right. So President Trump was pretty brief in his remarks during the state of the union and today, we got some more details from officials from health and human services, Admiral Brett, jer war was asked about the budget and this administration's history of cutting programs related to HIV, and he said, he wouldn't talk specifics since the budget is out yet. But he did say this. We are very confident we will have the sufficient resources provided in the twenty twenty budget for us to begin this, very aggressive plan. So certainly to execute on a plan this big it would cost billions of dollars in administration officials sound like they think they can get that now. Well, the party apparently is to focus on geographic hotspots across forty counties, where this is a, you know, been tough to get rid of what were you can you tell us, right? So they're they're talking about public health initiatives that experts in HIV have known are the most effective tools for a really long time like using profiles. Arctic medication and condoms and clean needle programs to prevent the spread of HIV and also getting people who have HIV diagnosed early on effective treatment. And that really reduces transmission as well. So the kinds of things that they're talking about implementing in those hot spots. He mentioned are tools that have been in the public health toolbox for a long time. But they're saying that what's new here is a cross agency push to really put these tools in place and funds them adequately. Look under Trump's twenty nineteen budget proposal, there's a recommendation to eliminate education centers in special project programs under the Ryan white HIV aids program named after the man who died of the disease and also you have house speaker Nancy Pelosi putting out a statement after the state of union saying the president's call for ending HIV transmission in America is interesting. But if he's serious about ending the HIV aids crisis. He must end his assault on healthcare and the dignity of the LGBTQ. Community. What's the sense? I mean, first of all why this shift do we know? Well, I think that the people in the administration who are behind this effort include people who really have a lot of credibility in the fight against HIV. Doctor Redfield is one of them and brench. These are people who experts in HIV, and advocate, advocacy, say really do have the credibility and the knowledge to be able to pull this off. And I think that they're leading the charge and the president thinks that maybe with Pelosi's history he can get he can get a compromise. And he can get a win Hearst history of being active in this arena. NPR Selena Simmons Duffin. We'll keep an eye on this for sure thank you so much. Thanks,.

HIV President Trump Selena Simmons Duffin Admiral Brett NPR president Nancy Pelosi Robin young WVU Boston United States Hearst assault Doctor Redfield advisory council America
"selena simmons duffin" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

02:08 min | 3 years ago

"selena simmons duffin" Discussed on Here & Now

"So they're they're talking about public health initiatives that experts in HIV have known are the most effective tools for a really long time like using prophylactic medication and con. Adams and clean needle programs to prevent the spread of HIV and also getting people who have HIV diagnosed early and on effective treatment. And that really reduces transmission as well. So the the kinds of things that they're talking about implementing in those hot spots. You mentioned are tools that have been in the public health toolbox for a long time. But they're saying that what's new here is a cross agency push to really put these tools in place and funds them adequately. Look under Trump's twenty nineteen budget proposal, there's a recommendation to eliminate education centers and special project programs under the Ryan white HIV aids program named after the man who died of the disease and also you have a house speaker Nancy Pelosi putting out a statement after the state of union saying the presence call for ending HIV transmission in America is interesting. But if he's serious about ending the HIV aids crisis. He must end his assault on healthcare and the dignity of the LGBTQ community. What's the? Sense. I mean, first of all why the shift do we know? Well, I think that the people in the administration who are behind this effort include people who really have a lot of credibility in the fight against HIV. Dr Redfield is one of them and brench your wa these are people who experts in HIV, and at advocacy say really do have the credibility and the knowledge to be able to pull this off. And I think that they're leading the charge and the president thinks that maybe with Pelosi's history he can get he can get a compromise. And he can get a win. And I host Ray of being active in this arena. NPR Selena Simmons Duffin. We'll keep an on this for sure thank you so much. Thanks. Okay. Let's take a break from the news now for another edition of the here. Now DJ sessions near goes..

HIV Dr Redfield Nancy Pelosi Selena Simmons Duffin Adams assault Trump NPR president Ray Ryan America
"selena simmons duffin" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

01:43 min | 3 years ago

"selena simmons duffin" Discussed on Here & Now

"Last night in his state of the union address. President Trump made this surprise announcement. My budget will ask Democrats and Republicans to make the needed commitment to eliminate the HIV epidemic in the United States within ten years. We have made incredible Skride's incredibly activists heads were spinning in thousand seventeen Trump fired his entire HIV AIDS advisory council and his administration has tried to cut money for HIV AIDS programs in pass budgets NPR, Selena Simmons Duffin has been learning more Selena high high, and we know this is a big problem. We're based in Boston they've reported six new cases of HIV infections from drug injections. Just since November. It's a problem across the country today, health and human services officials spoke with reporters did we learn anything more, right? So. President Trump was pretty brief in his remarks during the state of the union and today, we got some more details from officials from health and human services, Admiral Brett, jer warr was asked about the budget and this administration's history of cutting programs related to HIV, and he said he wouldn't talk specifics since the budget is out yet. But he did say this, very competent. We will have the sufficient resources provided in the twenty twenty budget for us to begin this, very aggressive plan. So certainly to execute on a plan this big it would cost billions of dollars in administration officials sound like they think they can get that now. Well, the part of it apparently is to focus on geographic hotspots across forty eight counties, where this is a, you know, been tough to get rid of what were you can you tell us, right?.

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Red Meat Allergies Caused By Tick Bites Are On The Rise

Morning Edition

04:18 min | 4 years ago

Red Meat Allergies Caused By Tick Bites Are On The Rise

"The ticks range expands npr's alison aubrey reports one day last summer lars sterling took her doug governor for a walk on a trail near her house she lives in savannah park maryland later that evening she realized she'd been bitten by a tick i found it three or four inches to the left of my hip it bone and didn't think anything of it i just took it off and threw it away but about three weeks later she ate an italian style pork sausage for dinner and had a horrible reaction i would say it was probably six hours after i ate it it was in the middle of the night and i woke up covered in hives she was itching and scratching she felt lightheaded she also noticed stomach aches so she went to see an allergist he asked me did you change your detergent did you change anything in your diet and i said no and he said in the last month where you bitten by a tick and i said yes after a blood test the allergist told her she was allergic to red meat and maybe dairy too i thought it was completely crazy because i've eaten dairy and i've eaten red meat all my life her story is pretty typical of people who develop a red meat allergy after a tick bite says allergist scott commons he's an associate professor at unc chapel hill and he was among the first to identify the allergy in patients with tick bites about ten years ago he says back then there were just a few dozen known cases but now we're confident that the number is over five thousand at least in the us alone there are also cases in sweden germany and australia likely linked to other species of ticks now coming says in the us cases of moved beyond the southeast to new york maine and minnesota absolutely we're gonna find this continues to expand the reach of the tick is expanding and equally i think we have a blood test raising awareness and the word is getting out there's still a lot to learn about this allergy it's known as an alpha gal allergy alpha gallison's sugar that animals make including cows and pigs but we don't as humans we don't make this alpha gal sugar we all make an immune response to it so how does it tick bite 'cause as the allergy well it's possible that ticks inject alpha gal into people's bodies when they bite the ticks likely get it from feeding off wild animals such as mice or squirrels come and says it's also possible that ticks activate the response in another way whatever the tick is doing it seems that it's a very potent awakening for our immune system to produce antibodies and in this case it is antibodies to a very particular sugar in red meat as for laura sterling she now avoids all dairy and all red meat once i was told just stop eating it i was fine felt great allergies usually give their alpha gal patients epipens because reactions can be dangerous but the good news is that people can outgrow the allergy this is most likely to happen if they avoid further tick bites allison aubrey npr news all right when you're pregnant you know the doctors want you to get a few key vaccines and now the american college obstruct obstetricians and gynecologists is trying to make that a little bit easier for the first time it's put together a one page immunization guide for obese and midwives npr selena simmons duffin who happens to be pregnant at this very moment went to find out more the guide pulls together information about which shots pregnant women should skip which they can get an which they should definitely get the two and that should get category are the flu shot since the flu can be really dangerous for pregnant women and teed up the tetanus diphtheria protests vaccine would you have samuel you'll like it that's medical assistant kimberly johnson getting ready to give me teed up a few weeks ago at thirty weeks pregnant from spain the idea here is to protect newborns against pertussis or hooping cough people are like i never heard of who've been caused what's the big deal like why do we even have to worry about this that's dr laura riley she's the vice chair of obstetrics at massachusetts general hospital and helped write the.

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