35 Burst results for "Selena Simmons"

Over-the-Counter COVID-19 Rapid Tests to Be Available at Major Pharmacies

Morning Edition

00:53 sec | 2 months ago

Over-the-Counter COVID-19 Rapid Tests to Be Available at Major Pharmacies

"Available without a prescription. As NPR's Selena Simmons Duffin reports. These tests for the Corona virus could soon be on drugstore shelves. The tester Abbotts by next now test and the Quiet Del Quick View test. Both use simple swabs and test strips to give results in about 10 to 15 minutes. These aren't the first rapid at home test to be authorized by FDA for use without a prescription. Another made by a loom is not yet in stores, and it's expected to cost around $30 protest. These tests are simpler and cheaper. They're expected to be sold in drugstores in two packs for around 15 to $20 public health experts say that rapid at home testing, along with other public health tools, like vaccines could make it easier to tamp down outbreaks before they spread out of control. Selena Simmons Duffin. NPR News Police in Orange, California near Los Angeles, say a mass shooting has left four

Selena Simmons Duffin NPR FDA Npr News Orange California Los Angeles
"selena simmons" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:56 min | 3 months ago

"selena simmons" Discussed on KCRW

"A request for comment on its plans. Selena Simmons, Duffin NPR news This'll is all things considered from NPR news. Now two questions about a song that is more than 100 years old and whether it is still appropriate. The song, the Allman Mater at the University of Texas after months of review of panel has decided eyes of Texas is not quote overtly racist. School song is played before football games after football games, student athletes have been required to stand for it. But protests erupted on campus as the racial reckoning reverberated across the country. In this past year, Jimmy Moss of member station Kut joins us now with the latest and one thing to note. So it's newsroom is independent. KUTV broadcast license is held by the University of Texas Jimmy Welcome. Thank you. So what's the history here? Where did the song eyes of Texas come from? Well, Thea eyes of Texas began while the common law or was it started around the turn of the last century? The then president of the school had this is the way the Lord went that had a fondness for the way. Robert E. Lee finished speeches with the eyes of the south upon you or upon you, and then he subsequently crib. Some of those lines and Put them into his own speeches. The eyes of Texas are upon you so much so that the student body at the time all white men would Spoof that in a song and perform it at popular entertainment of the time minstrel shows, And while they don't have exact evidence of that, they probably weren't black face when they did it. So the committee of course, took that into account but must have found other things in its research to conclude that the song is not overtly racist. Well, as you know, when you like I said, this is the Lord and they actually put you know They went down and did the deep research as academics tend to do And they went to Washington University, where Washington college at the time where Robert E. Lee was president. Apparently there is no evidence that he ever ended. Any of his speeches with that phrase, and so he may have had absolutely nothing to do with the origin of the song. And like I said, while they understand that probably it was performed in blackface. They also talked to the people who are descendants of the people that wrote the song, and they looked at their notes and whatnot. And they found that Really It was just just to make fun of the school president at the time, and of course, he embraced the song, and that's how it sort of came to be what has been the reaction there to today's decision. Well, there is it's there's a lot of frustration and anger from alumni and the donor base over time since this committee was announced in the fall. And, uh, there He threatened to stop contributing to the university because the university and others weren't supporting this symbol that was important to them. Today, University president said. Everything a Texas comes down to research teaching and changing the world, he said. The eyes History Committee has done the research. And now it's the school's turned to focus on teaching and fostering an inclusive campus, where all are welcome, also spoke with committee member former UT football player Quan Cosby, he said. The committee was focusing on the song while much the university and elsewhere turned to discuss racial reckoning in debates about standing for the national anthem going on in the U. S. I just started it got really political. It wasn't about the song. It wasn't even about you. T. It just was about a bunch of folks voice in there. Political perspectives. Then beliefs in China turned the song into being anthem opposed to Longhorn nations kind of sitting back and finding the best resolution. He's just one of 26 members on that committee. All right. Jimmy Moss of member Station Kut in Austin, Texas, reporting there on.

Selena Simmons Jimmy Moss Robert E. Lee Quan Cosby KUTV Today NPR Austin, Texas U. S. today two questions more than 100 years old last century Duffin Texas Station Kut this past year Washington University University of Texas T.
CDC launches VaccineFinder tool to locate COVID-19 vaccine providers

Morning Edition

03:37 min | 4 months ago

CDC launches VaccineFinder tool to locate COVID-19 vaccine providers

"19 vaccine, But you can't find one help could be on the way. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has just launched an online search tool in partnership with Boston Children's Hospital. Help people identify which facilities have supplies of the vaccine. It's called vaccine finder dot org's. This initial launch is limited to certain providers in most states, NPR's Selena Simmons, Duffin has details. When you put in your zip code at vaccine, find her dot org's. You see an interactive map showing local pharmacies that get Cove in 19 vaccine doses from the federal government. You also see whether they have doses in stock. If you live in Alaska, Indiana, Iowa or Tennessee, you're in luck. Because in those states, the maps show more places administering Cove in 19 vaccines. Not just pharmacies, but private hospitals and clinics and public health sites, ideas to show vaccine providers that are open to the public. How to contact them how to book an appointment. And kind of show the daily inventory status of people are clearing where there's vaccine and where there isn't That's John Brownstein, the founder of Vaccine Finder and chief information officer at Boston Children's Hospital, he says. After this initial launch, more providers in more places are expected to join in in the coming days and weeks. That scene finder is actually not new. It began nine years ago. It all started after each one. Anyone where we want to figure out how to provide the population with the best possible insights and where vaccine was in their communities, and since then We have been building this platform usually showing people where to get the seasonal flu shot or travel vaccines, Bronstein says. In recent months, a team of about three dozen people has been working feverishly to launch this tool toe work for people looking for covert 19 vaccines. While navigating the fact that at this moment, vaccine supplies relatively low and eligibility is limited, both of which constrained how useful the tool is. In case the Kaiser Family Foundation says she wishes this tool had been around a few weeks ago. In the meantime, many states have created their own provider maps people can use, and that's added to this confusing patchwork. This idea has a lot of potential, but I think there's still some questions about what will it be like in practice. There are also concerns about how many providers will put their information on vaccine finder and whether the providers will really update their inventory every 24 hours. I've seen finders John Brown seen acknowledges. This is not a silver bullet. What we're trying to do is add a resource into the mix to help consumers. Of course not all problems get solved with a new website. And he says they have partnerships to put vaccine find her info about where vaccine providers are located and who has shot's available in lots of different places online from Google maps to the traffic app ways too Good are ex, so it's not just about coming in the website, but meeting consumers where they are. Are on making sure that anybody who's looking for a vaccine knows where to find them. The supply of Corona virus vaccine doses is growing. The Biden administration says it's now sending out over 16 million doses a week and increase of more than 70% since inauguration. Assuming that trend continues, more shots will be available and more providers like clinics and even doctors. Offices will be able to begin distributing vaccine doses as well. So people can look forward to a time when Cove in 19 vaccine doses are abundant and everyone is eligible. And you might even be able to ask your smart speaker to find a clinic nearby with vaccine doses and stock and head over to get your shot. Selena Simmons Duffin

Boston Children's Hospital Centers For Disease Control An Selena Simmons Duffin John Brownstein Vaccine Finder NPR Bronstein Federal Government Alaska Tennessee Iowa Indiana Kaiser Family Foundation FLU John Brown Biden Administration Google Selena Simmons Duffin
"selena simmons" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:11 min | 4 months ago

"selena simmons" Discussed on KCRW

"Shots. Selena Simmons Duffin. NPR NEWS. Former Kansas senator and Republican presidential candidate Bob Dole is ill. In a statement. Dole says he has been diagnosed with stage four lung cancer and we'll start treatment Monday. Facebook is blocking Australian news sites from being shared on its platform. This comes in response to a proposed Australian law. It would force social media companies to pay Australian news outlets for their work. NPR's Shannon Bond says Facebook opposes the measure. The way this proposal works, you know, the part that says the platforms have to reach deals with publishers for payments. But Facebook says the law quote fundamentally misunderstands its relationship with news outlets. Its view is that Newspapers. News outlets choose 2 FT Post on Facebook and that ultimately, the publishers benefit more than Facebook itself. Does NPR Shannon Bond reporting, Australian officials say the tech giant has siphoned massive amounts of revenue from online advertising? Facebook is a financial supporter of NPR. On Wall Street, the Dow was down 233 points. This is NPR. It's 804. I'm Cherry Glaser. With KCRW News l. A county's Coben 19 situation continues to improve daily case numbers are down 85% from where they were early last month, an average daily deaths have dropped more than 90%. But to keep that up, public health director Barbara Ferrer says. Everyone has to continue taking precautions. These numbers are continuing to decrease is not a given. This will only continue if we're all in the game, and we're all using the tools we have at hand. If people didn't take those measures during Super Bowl weekend and over the President's Day holiday, we could start seeing an increase in cases starting next week. Yesterday, the county announced another 162 covert related deaths in almost 2400 new cases. Governor Gavin Newsom toward a farm worker vaccination clinic at the Coachella Valley packinghouse yesterday. He thanked the workers and pointed out the produce, they're helping to harvest even in the middle of the pandemic. Are folks out there every single day and 120 degree.

Shannon Bond NPR Bob Dole 233 points Barbara Ferrer Super Bowl Cherry Glaser Dole yesterday Monday Facebook 85% Republican 120 degree next week Governor Yesterday KCRW News Selena Simmons Duffin Coachella Valley
Biden Shares Covid-19 Relief Plan

All Things Considered

01:40 min | 5 months ago

Biden Shares Covid-19 Relief Plan

"Items goal As soon as he gets sworn in next week, I'm convinced we can get it done. This is a time to set big goals to pursue them with courage and conviction because the health of the nation is literally at stake. That is Biden, speaking today in Wilmington, Delaware, laying out his covert 19 vaccination plan and joining us now to talk about that plan is NPR's Selena Simmons stuff in Hey, Selena. Nelson. All right, so just give us the broad brushstrokes of what Biden laid out today. Well, he released a detailed plan. It's about four pages long, and it has several big principles. Here is how he laid those out in his speech this afternoon. Our plan is as clear as it is bold. Get more people of actually it for free. Create more places for them to get vaccinated. Mobilized more medical teams to get the shots and people's arms. Increased supply and get it out the door as soon as possible. A few details that stood out. He said FEMA would help set up 100 mass vaccination sites in his first month in office, and he mentioned the Defense Production act, He said Cos that could ramp up making supplies like tubes and syringes and protective equipment had already been identified. He said his administration would quote manage the hell out of this operation. He pledges transparency. And he had some notes of caution that there would be stumbles along the way, and it would take a while before the effect of these initiatives would become a parent. There still rough days of this pandemic ahead of us. Absolutely well, you were on the show on Tuesday, laying out some last minute changes the Trump administration was making to the vaccine rollout.

Selena Simmons Biden Wilmington Selena NPR Delaware Nelson Fema Trump Administration
Biden plans to distribute COVID-19 vaccine doses immediately

Up First

02:44 min | 5 months ago

Biden plans to distribute COVID-19 vaccine doses immediately

"Rollout of the coronavirus vaccines in this country has been slow and chaotic. But there are a number of steps the us government could take to accelerate the vaccination campaign and slow the spread of the coronavirus yesterday. The biden transition team announced to plant. Try to do just that in a week. In which for the first time more than four thousand covid nineteen deaths were recorded on just a single day in the united states. Vaccines just can't come soon enough. Npr selena simmons. Duffin has more on this selena. Thanks for being with us. Hi good morning. Oh what did the biden people announce. Okay so you know. How both the pfizer and madonna. Vaccines require two shots. Well operation warp speed. Which is the federal effort. Managing vaccine distribution has been holding back millions of second doses and not sending them out to the field yesterday. President-elect biden's incoming press secretary. Jen psaki said they plan to change. Course the president-elect supports distributing most. But not all of the currently reserved doses and we'll take action to make that change when he takes office. She said this will allow more people to get those first doses and that biden would use the defense production act if needed to ensure manufacturers can keep up making second doses on time. How does this different from the one dose idea that Was getting talked about this week. And the fbi. Fda warned against it. Didn't they right so this is not the same thing. They're a biden. Team is not suggesting that you can just forget about the second dose and dr anthony. Fauci of the national institutes of health emphasized that point to npr. Yesterday he is of course a member of president. Trump's covid nineteen task force and he's been advising the incoming administration not talking about withholding and not giving the second does they are completely committed to giving the second dose on time they feel that the importance of getting as many people as possible is worth the risk. Hopefully the companies will get the doses back there in time angelina. What's been the reaction to this idea. Well public health officials and experts at. Npr talked to yesterday by and large said that this is a good move. It is a bit of a gamble. One official. i talked to aggressive. And here's claire. Hannan who runs the association for immunization managers and those are the people in charge of each state's vaccination plans. I think it's probably a good thing to get more doses flowing. She says with so many people dying every day. This may be better than keeping vaccine in a freezer somewhere. Of course there are problems that more doses won't solve like finding willing people to get shots because the vaccine hesitancy and just general disorganization and chaos. That we've heard about in different

Biden Selena Simmons Duffin Elect Biden Jen Psaki Dr Anthony Us Government Pfizer Madonna Fauci United States National Institutes Of Health FBI FDA NPR Donald Trump Association For Immunization M Angelina Hannan
"selena simmons" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:22 min | 6 months ago

"selena simmons" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Find challenge. You retrieve the ax ourselves like why is it no worthy and even change you? I literally feel like I'm a different person. Yes. Do you feel that way? Ideas worth spreading from Ted. And NPR. I'm a new summer roadie coming up. Everybody cares about money. We like to pretend that the financial wolves that many Americans are experiencing are not systemic. The billionaire since country have gotten much much, much richer in the pandemic. He was a recipe for disaster. It created what we now know as the Great Depression on the show today, a century of money. First this news Live from NPR news. I'm Barbara Klein. Operation Warp Speeds. Chief Adviser Doctor Moncef Slough. He says he expects 100 million people in the U. S will be vaccinated against the coronavirus by the end of March. He says 40 million doses will be distributed by the end of this month. NPR's Selena Simmons Stephens reports. The first doses will be delivered to all 50 states tomorrow. Next is the rush to start getting people vaccinated to try to slow and eventually end the pandemic. The federal government is coordinating distribution to predetermine sites around each state. Then it falls to state and local health departments and healthcare providers to actually start administering the shots. It may take a few days of provider training about how to properly give this vaccine for the campaign to really get underway. Selena Simmons Duffin NPR news Meanwhile, the Corona virus continues to take a deadly toll in the US more than 2300 people died of covert 19 yesterday. At the same time, 219,000 new infections were confirmed. France is loosening restrictions on nursing home starting next week so that residents conspired time with their families. NPR's Eleanor Beardsley reports they'll be able to receive visitors even if they've tested positive for Corona virus. The deputy health minister in charge of elderly affairs, said that injecting the spirit of Christmas into nursing homes is essential to maintain family ties and fight loneliness. About a third of France's nearly 58,000 coronavirus deaths have occurred in retirement homes where residents have been subjected to strict confinement measures. France has just emerged from a second national lockdown. The tight restrictions helped curb new cases, but the prime minister says the country is still in the midst of a second wave of the virus. Eleanor Beardsley. NPR NEWS PARIS The Electoral College convenes tomorrow to officially vote for Joe Biden as the next president. But many Trump's supporters aren't giving up. NPR's Amy held reports for the second time in a month. Thousands descended on the nation's capital Yesterday. Pro Trump ralliers are still rejecting the reality of the results, including the proud boys who call themselves a Western show. Veniste organization, the Southern Poverty Law Center, calls them a hate group. Black lives matter. Protestors came out to police tried to keep the group's apart, but by night, some met and thought some two dozen were arrested. Earlier, the president indicated the support was mutual at the pro Trump rally. Wow, he tweeted thousands of people forming in Washington, D C for stopped. The steel be cheered as Trump passed overhead and Marine one. But in dozens of cases all the way up to the Supreme Court. Any notion of a stolen election has been rejected. Amy held NPR news. This is NPR. This is w. N. Y. C in New York. I'm Yasmeen Khan. The electors that make up New York's electoral college are still set to meet in person tomorrow in Albany, despite a surge in covert 19 cases. Governor. Cuomo says the law requires an in person meeting and that precautions will be in place, such as testing, wearing masks and social distancing. State's electors are a group of prominent state Democrats that includes Cuomo Bill and Hillary Clinton and Attorney General Leticia James. President elect Joe Biden won. New York Congress will meet in a joint session to formally count the electoral votes on January 6th. Representative Max Rose, a Staten Island Democrat, appears all but certain to enter the mayoral race in New York City. The New York Times reports that Rose is exploring a bid and casting his potential candidacy is a sharp rebuke of the DiBlasio administration. Rose recently lost his reelection bid to Nicole Mallia Takis, a Republican of the State Assembly. If he runs Rose would join the field of about 30 contenders listed with the city's campaign finance board. There's been a surge in handgun permits a hand gun permit applications on Long Island News Day, reporter Thomas Maier says police are likely to reject applicants who've committed felonies or who have a history of mental illness. I think overall from the standpoint of law enforcement Mortgage guns that are out there, the more concern they have about protecting public safety. Applications are up 80% in Nassau County so far this year compared to all of last year. Suffolk County's five largest towns have also reported a 143% increase, though crime in both counties is down compared to last year. Currently a warm 58 degrees in New York City. Temperatures will go down tonight to 39 degrees..

NPR New York City president Trump France Eleanor Beardsley Joe Biden Max Rose Cuomo Amy Selena Simmons Stephens Ted Selena Simmons Doctor Moncef Slough federal government Nassau County Southern Poverty Law Center Suffolk County
"selena simmons" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:12 min | 6 months ago

"selena simmons" Discussed on KCRW

"Jay Allison. And this time I got you stories of solidarity from strangers, friends and family. Sometimes they have your back and sometimes you have there's even when they don't expect it. Now I'll spare you the details, but it's Marty got into his eighties He was sicker and sicker. Every time three or four times I see you surgery, we'd call the funeral home and the sucker would come right back. That story and more coming up next on the moth radio hour from directs right after the news. Live from NPR news. I'm Barbara Klein. Operation Warp Speeds. Chief Adviser Doctor Moncef Slough. He says he expects 100 million people in the U. S will be vaccinated against the coronavirus by the end of March. He says 40 million doses will be distributed by the end of this month. NPR's Selena Simmons Stephens reports. The first doses will be delivered to all 50 states tomorrow. Next is the rush to start getting people vaccinated to try to slow and eventually end the pandemic. The federal government is coordinating distribution to predetermined sites around each state. Then it falls to state and local health departments and healthcare providers to actually start administering the shots. It may take a few days of provider training about how to properly give this vaccine for the campaign to really get underway. Selena Simmons Duffin NPR news Meanwhile, the Corona virus continues to take a deadly toll in the US more than 2300 people died of covert 19 yesterday. At the same time, 219,000 new infections were confirmed. France is loosening restrictions on nursing home starting next week so that residents conspired time with their families. NPR's owner, Beardsley reports, they'll be able to receive visitors even if they've tested positive for Corona virus. The deputy health minister in charge of elderly affairs, said that injecting the spirit of Christmas into nursing homes is essential to maintain family ties and fight loneliness. About a third of France's nearly 58,000 coronavirus deaths have occurred in retirement homes where residents have been subjected to strict confinement measures. France has just emerged from a second national lockdown. The tight restrictions helped curb new cases, but the prime minister says the country is still in the midst of a second wave of the virus. Eleanor Beardsley. NPR NEWS PARIS The Electoral College convenes tomorrow to officially vote for Joe Biden as the next president. But many Trump's supporters aren't giving up. NPR's Amy held reports for the second time in a month. Thousands descended on the nation's capital Yesterday. Pro Trump rally years are still rejecting the reality of the results, including the proud boys who call themselves a Western show. Veniste organization, the Southern Poverty Law Center calls them a hate group. Black lives matter. Protestors came out to police tried to keep the group's apart, but by night, some met.

NPR France Doctor Moncef Slough Eleanor Beardsley Selena Simmons Stephens Jay Allison Marty Selena Simmons Southern Poverty Law Center federal government Barbara Klein Trump prime minister Joe Biden US PARIS Amy
"selena simmons" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

04:24 min | 6 months ago

"selena simmons" Discussed on KCRW

"Lulu Garcia Navarro. Good morning. There is a lot of pressure on the incoming Biden administration to get their cabinet right. We'll take a look at some of the familiar faces. Plus, it's been 10 years since the Arab spring. What hasn't hasn't changed in the Middle East. Also, a Jewish newspaper chronicles the lives of those Who have died in this pandemic, and Emily Blunt on her new movie, and why drew her if you believe in that sort of whimsy and that fable esque quality that I just love to tell my Children about then those of the kind of people I want to hang out with, and we got to hang out with her. It's Sunday, December 13th. The news is coming up right now in this newscast. Live from NPR news. I'm Barbara Klein. Operation Warp speeds. Chief adviser Doctor Mance of Slough. We is laying out a corona virus vaccine timeline. He says he expects 100 million people in the U. S will be immunized by the end of March. He says 40 million doses will be distributed by the end of this month. NPR's Selena Simmons Duffin is reports the first doses will be delivered to all 50 states beginning tomorrow. Next is the rush to start getting people vaccinated to try to slow and eventually end the pandemic. The federal government is coordinating distribution to predetermine sites around each state. Then it falls to state and local health departments and healthcare providers to actually start administering the shots. It may take a few days of provider training about how to properly give this vaccine for the campaign to really get underway. Selena Simmons Duffin NPR news The United Kingdom and the European Union have agreed to continue post Brexit trade talks beyond today's self imposed deadline. They have an immovable deadline of December 30th and as NPR's Frank Langfitt reports from London. They're hoping to avoid major disruptions. British Prime Minister Boris Johnson and European Commission President Ursula von Dir land Said he was quote responsible at this point to go the extra mile. Both sides are still far apart on issues such as European access to U. K fishing grounds and the U. K's drive for as much access to the use massive market of nearly 450 million consumers while retaining as much freedom to make its own rules and regulations. The Society of Motor Manufacturers and traders. The UK auto trade body welcomed the extension of talks, saying the UK leaving the you without a new free trade deal. Quote would be nothing less than catastrophic for the automotive sector, its workers and their families and represent a stunning failure of statecraft. Frank Langfitt. NPR NEWS London Protesters gathered in Oklahoma City this weekend after police shot and killed a mentally ill black man Friday. Quinton Chandler of State Impact Oklahoma reports, among other things, they want to see body cam footage of the confrontation. Police say Benny Edwards charged it officers with a knife after they tried to tase and pepper spray him. Bystander's cell phone video shows Edwards breaking into a run in the video, he appears to move towards one officer but then veers away when police start firing. Eventually he fell, and he was pronounced dead at the scene. Edwards niece Amira Gaines says she doesn't believe the police is claims that they tried to deescalate. That was great man that gives a friend again. He gets scared and you've been here and go run. Kill me knowing that mom go what scared activists are demanding. Police release body camera footage from the incident for NPR news. I'm Quinton Chandler. This is NPR. Azerbaijan's Defense Ministry says four service members have been killed in clashes with Armenian forces in Nagorno Kata Bach in recent weeks. It's the first report of casualties since a cease fire took effect last month. In Guatemala anti government protesters gathered in the nation's capital for the fourth consecutive weekend, demanding the resignation of the country's president. Maria Martin reports, the demonstrators added an artistic spin to their call for an end to corruption. What a melon protesters this weekend used art to get their message across playing music and reciting poetry, which called for the resignation of President Alejandro Shama Day and an end to corruption..

NPR Benny Edwards Quinton Chandler United Kingdom Emily Blunt Frank Langfitt Doctor Mance Selena Simmons Duffin Lulu Garcia Navarro London President Alejandro Shama Day Middle East Biden federal government Selena Simmons Maria Martin Nagorno Kata Bach Azerbaijan Barbara Klein
COVID vaccine distribution underway as first trucks hit the road

Weekend Edition Sunday

03:54 min | 6 months ago

COVID vaccine distribution underway as first trucks hit the road

"It is a massive, complicated undertaking and it is underway. The first doses of covert 19 vaccine will be delivered to every state tomorrow. Files are being loaded up on two ups and FedEx trucks to ship to hospitals around the country. This has taken months of work and planning and here to talk us through what's next? Is NPR Health reporter Selena Simmons Duffin. Good morning. Morning, Lulu. So the vials were getting on their way. Now what? Well, next is the rush to start getting people vaccinated to try to slow and eventually end the pandemic. How it works is this. The federal government is coordinating distribution to predetermine sites around each state. And then the baton gets past a state and local health departments and healthcare providers to actually start administering the shots. I checked with a bunch of state health officials yesterday. Most say it's going to take a few days for providers to get trained up on how to properly give this vaccine. There's a lot of information coming at them really fast from Fizer and from CDC about exactly who should get the vaccine, So if there are some vaccines administered on Monday, it may actually take a few days for the campaign to really get under way. This is a really hopeful moment on D. I want to underscore that because we really need hopeful moments. But what what could go wrong? Despite all the planning, there will be hiccups. The big fear is that some of these precious vaccine doses could be wasted or it doesn't get to the right people. Remember this fax he needs to be kept ultra cold minus 70 degrees Celsius. It comes in kind of a pizza box filled with vials and try ice. The vaccine on Lee lasts a few days in the fridge after it's thought you need to dilute it before you injected. There is just no way everything will go perfectly. So our health were officials worry about that. Most of the people I talked to are confident that when issues come up, they can resolve them and learn from them clear hand and made this point. She's the executive director of the Association of Immunization Managers. Those are the people in every state in charge of vaccination plans. And here's what she told me. We're going to learn so much from the first hospitals who are vaccinating, you know how What is it really like to get this box? How long does it take to mix the vaccine with the deal you in? How long does it take to actually vaccinate someone? Lots to consider. I want a vaccine, obviously, but the next question is, who is going to be getting these very first doses? The CDC has prioritized health workers and residents of long term care facilities in what's called Phase one A. But there's a lot of hunger for details from health officials and I'm told that that should come in the next few days. So you know, we've all heard about the allergic reactions When vaccinations started in Britain, we're talking about guidance about the kind of history of allergic reaction to be aware of. And then what about pregnant or lactating people are people with immune disorders. All of this guidance is frantically getting hashed out right now, so providers can get answers as the vaccination campaign actually rolls out, and how long before it will be widely available? It's not yet clear exactly who comes after Phase one a on DATs, giving health officials some heartburn. It's also not clear how much vaccine will be available next. What pace of shipments is going to be going forward? It could be speedier if there were two vaccines and distribution instead of one, And that could happen soon. There's an FDA committee meeting to consider authorizing the Madonna vaccine this Thursday. But the short answer is the hope is that the vaccine will be widely available in the late spring at the earliest. Maybe the summer of 2021. That's NPR's Selena Simmons stuff and thank you very much. Thank you. So that is the good news and it comes as the U. S is rapidly approaching yet another horrific milestone 300,000 deaths from covert 19. The next few months, experts tell us it will be worse before it gets better.

Selena Simmons Duffin Fizer CDC Association Of Immunization Ma NPR Lulu Fedex Federal Government LEE Britain Selena Simmons FDA U.
"selena simmons" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:00 min | 7 months ago

"selena simmons" Discussed on KQED Radio

"NPR's Selena Simmons, Duffin. Thanks for all your reporting, Selina. Thank you. Now to Iran, where some Iranians were saying they're caught in the middle of the continued confrontation with the U. S. Those with illnesses are having trouble getting medicine, and they believe US sanctions are at least in part to blame. Here's NPR's Peter Kenyon for a Hella, a 65 year old living in the Iranian coastal city of Rushed the sanctions have caused problems for her and her husband. She says her husband is diabetic and needs insulin daily, and not long ago there was a serious shortage. Hello herself suffers from the neurodegenerative disease, myasthenia gravis, and she says she hasn't had this much trouble finding medicine since the Islamic revolution more than 40 years ago. Reached in Iran via WhatsApp, she said, the sanctions don't target medicines. But she can attest to their scarcity. What a man has another thing. I've heard a lot in the news that they say sanctions don't include medicine, but I don't really understand how I don't know why this is happening. But however, it is many medicines are disappearing from the market, including mind. The Trump Administration says the sanctions were intended to deprive Tehran of the resource is it uses to fund its quote maligned behavior in the region. But even though the U. S says it's not targeting medicines, I had Abedini, a doctor who works in the pharmaceutical sector in Tehran says American sanctions are definitely one cause of some of the medical shortages. But any says because the government has reduced the legal import of medicines a dangerous black market trade has grown up. Martha Leap Landrum billet these limits and direct in 40 says have brought about an increase in fake medicines. He says the squeeze on Iran's oil exports has left the government with less money to devote to healthcare. Meanwhile, Iranians air hoarding what medicines they do find an imported medicines have grown scarce Ballot My island. Does that mean there are many examples from diabetes to cancer medicines where we have big limitations and importing them, he says. Health Ministry official told the state News agency recently that Tehran is planning to logic complaint with the International Court of Justice over the sanctions. Analyst Divide. Salahi Isfahani, professor of economics at Virginia Tech University, says the Biden administration could make an immediate difference if the new Treasury secretary simply eases up on the aggressive enforcement of sanctions. Especially financial sanctions on that myself, who open up some opportunities for Iranians, especially to import medicine, something they need badly. Which is not under sanctions right now. But because movement off funds between Iran and other countries is prohibited, very few companies that sell this either the equipment or the medicine Are willing to trade with Iran. It's not clear how quickly Biden might act on the Iran sanctions, but Iran's foreign minister, Mohammad Javad Zarif, says the process wouldn't be time consuming It all requiring.

Iran US Tehran NPR neurodegenerative disease Selina Selena Simmons Mohammad Javad Zarif Martha Leap Landrum Duffin Peter Kenyon Trump Administration Salahi Isfahani Biden International Court of Justice Analyst Virginia Tech University Abedini
"selena simmons" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:08 min | 7 months ago

"selena simmons" Discussed on KCRW

"Kind of NPR's Selena Simmons stuff and thanks for all your reporting, Selina, Thank you. After winning global praise for aggressively tackling the pandemic. South Korea is now dealing with a third wave of infections, and the government is facing criticism for flouting its own rules. NPR's Anthony Kuhn has the story from Seoul. New cases recently jumped to their highest level since March, averaging more than 400 new cases a day over the past week, according to the government's own rules, That means social distancing measures should be increased to the second highest level. But the government is hesitated to go that far. On Friday, Sonia Hong Lei, spokesman for the Health ministry, downplayed the importance of alert levels, some Wakanda to conclude that we think citizens, voluntary cooperation and participation account for most of the results, he said. And her more crucial than the government's forcible restrictions. But Professor on June cheek and infectious diseases expert at Gotcha on university and Inchon City, says that by not following its own guidelines, the government is muddling the message. So kick you to know. John, and if the government doesn't stick to its standards and principles, he says, How can I persuade the citizens to follow guidelines and restrictions? The government claims it's trying to minimize economic damage. But on questions whether suppressing an outbreak quickly costs more than allowing it to drag on coming up, took ingrown 100 E think it was a spontaneous decision to dodge strong complaints, he says, rather than the result of quantified predictions and comparison of economic damage. Amid this third wave. South Korea's gearing up for the annual national college entrance exam which is seen as crucial for young South Koreans, career prospects, Education Minister Ewan Hey, pleaded with the public to cooperate. But it will mean more to guard something. We're going to my mama. I ask all citizens to act as if their Children are taking the exam and paws all everyday social activities for the next week. Unlike previous waves, South Korea's third wave is made up of small community clusters, which makes it harder to suppress. South Korea's case numbers are low by international standards, but I'm doing Sheikh says South Korea should not squander the achievements. It is one through decisive action. Cornell Woman I'm gonna With covert 19 responses, he warns. A momentary lapse of judgment or loss of control can lead to irreversible consequences. Anthony Kuhn, NPR NEWS Seoul Thank you for listening to your NPR member station. Which brings you morning Edition. You can stay in touch with us on social media, visit the morning edition Facebook page and follow us on Twitter. Steve Inskeep is at NPR. Inskeep. Rachel Martin is that Rachel NPR? David Greene is at NPR Green. Noel King is at the well King. I'm Lulu Garcia Navarro, and you can find me at Florida's G. Navarro..

government NPR South Korea Anthony Kuhn NPR Green Seoul Lulu Garcia Navarro Rachel NPR John Steve Inskeep Noel King Selena Simmons Sonia Hong Lei Rachel Martin Selina David Greene dodge Professor Ewan Hey Inchon City
"selena simmons" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:44 min | 7 months ago

"selena simmons" Discussed on KQED Radio

"And NPR's Selena Simmons. Duffin. Thanks for all your reporting, Selina, Thank you. After winning global praise for aggressively tackling the pandemic. South Korea is now dealing with a third wave of infections, and the government is facing criticism for flouting its own rules. NPR's Anthony Kuhn has the story from Seoul. New cases recently jumped to their highest level since March, averaging more than 400 new cases a day over the past week, according to the government's own rules, That means social distancing measures should be increased to the second highest level. But the government is hesitated to go that far on Friday, so Myung lays spokesman for the Health Ministry downplayed the importance of alert levels somewhere condition critical that we think citizens, voluntary cooperation and participation account for most of the results, he said. And they're more crucial than the government's forcible restrictions. But Professor on June cheek and infectious diseases expert at Gotcha on university and Inchon City, says that by not following its own guidelines, the government is muddling the message from the way the kitchen juna. John, and if the government doesn't stick to our standards and principles, he says, How can I persuade the citizens to follow guidelines and restrictions? The government claims it's trying to minimize economic damage. But on questions whether suppressing an outbreak quickly costs more than allowing it to drag on coming up, took ingrown 100 who I think it was a spontaneous decision to dodge strong complaints, he says, rather than the result of quantified predictions in comparison of economic damage. Amid this third wave. South Korea's gearing up for the annual national college entrance exam which is seen as crucial for young South Koreans, career prospects, Education Minister Ewan Hey, pleaded with the public to cooperate. But it will mean more to guard something within my mama. I ask all citizens to act as if their Children are taking the exam and paws all everyday social activities for the next week. Unlike previous waves, South Korea's third wave is made up of small community clusters, which makes it harder to suppress. South Korea's case numbers are low by international standards, but I'm doing Sheikh says South Korea should not squander the achievements. It is one through decisive action coordinator woman who isn't gonna with covert 19 responses, he warns. A momentary lapse of judgment or loss of control can lead to irreversible consequences. Anthony Kuhn, NPR NEWS Seoul Thank you for listening.

South Korea government NPR Anthony Kuhn Seoul Selena Simmons John Selina dodge coordinator Ewan Hey Inchon City Myung Sheikh Professor Health Ministry
"selena simmons" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:23 min | 7 months ago

"selena simmons" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Story shared over dinner tables next holiday season about how happy we are that both 2020 and covered or over. Officials in Europe, meanwhile, see that vaccinations against the Corona virus could begin there. By Christmas. The European Union has contracts with six suppliers and could potentially have access to more than one billion doses of vaccine. That's more than double the Blacks population. Local and federal prosecutors say California's Employment Development Department has been paying benefits to tens of thousands of inmates costing the state over $140 million from NPR member station KQED Julie Chang reports The fraudulent claims were filed between March and August. They even included some high profile inmates like convicted murderer Scott Peterson. State Assembly member David Chu says this adds to a long list of failures by the state agency. So many of our constituents make a single typo. And then he did the application and they're denied income for months when an inmate on death row can use a fake name to get benefits paid out. Prosecutors said the department didn't cross reference unemployment claims against the list of prisoners like some other states do. The state agency has been overwhelmed with millions of benefit claims since March that resulted in a backlog that led to a two week shutdown in September for NPR news. I'm Julie Chang in San Francisco. In the final day of trading on Wall Street. Before the holiday, The Dow Jones industrial Average closed down 173 points to finish a 29 8 72. The NASDAQ closed up 57 points, finishing a 12,094. The S and P 500 closed down five. This is NPR. The federal government made a move today to add more hospital beds to a health care system that strained by the nationwide surgeon Covert 19 cases. But as NPR's Selena Simmons Duffin reports, beds aren't the biggest problem right now. Early on in the pandemic, the federal government allowed ambulatory surgical centers to apply for hospital status so that those facilities could be used to treat seriously ill patients that regular hospitals didn't have room for. This new announcement builds on that policy. But Critica I mean of the Kaiser Family Foundation points out. The critical issue right now is not beds, its staff. We have as many nurses as we have. We're trained to take care of severely ill patients. This isn't going to add more work first capacity to assist some, she says. It's not known how many of these centers have taken this option and whether it's making a difference for hospitals. That's one of many data points related to covert hospitalizations. The federal government has not made public Selena Simmons Duffin. NPR News officials of the company that hopes to develop Alaska's Pebble mine project say they're dismayed by U. S government decision to reject to permit for the mine. The company says it will appeal the ruling. The Pebble Mine would produce 70 million tons of Goldman lived in them and copper or a year. He would also create a pit almost 2000 FT deep and leave behind massive amounts of mine tailings. Pandemic may have changed many holiday plans, but one thing will remain the same. The annual Macy's Thanksgiving Day parade will still go on on Thursday. People will not be allowed to crown the parade route, which has been shortened from 2.5 miles. Just one block. I'm Dale Willman. NPR news in Washington. Support for NPR comes from I drive providing cloud backup full system Back up and on site I.

NPR federal government Selena Simmons Duffin Julie Chang David Chu Pandemic Employment Development Departm Europe European Union Dale Willman Scott Peterson Goldman Kaiser Family Foundation State Assembly San Francisco Macy
Illinois reports more than 13,000 new cases and 126 new deaths statewide

NPR News Now

04:37 min | 7 months ago

Illinois reports more than 13,000 new cases and 126 new deaths statewide

"Live from npr news. I'm jack speer. With corona virus cases surging across the west new data released from the federal government shows just. How many hospitals in the country say they are facing critical staffing shortages. Npr selena simmons duffin reports nearly one in five hospitals in the us currently has a staffing issue states in the mid west and southwest are being hit hardest. North dakota has the highest percentage of hospitals reporting shortages. Texas has the highest number of hospitals when there aren't enough staff to treat the surge of patients. The concern is that you could get to the point where you have to start rationing care and then more people could die early on in the pandemic medical staff could volunteer to help in hot spots like new york city. But that's not really possible. Now with so many hospitals facing shortages and cases surging all over the country selena simmons duffin npr news eleanor. Like many other states seeing a big surge in coronavirus cases more than thirteen thousand new cases reported there with one hundred and twenty six deaths making it the third day in a row deaths their past the one hundred mark on governor. Jay pritzker reminding people his they've been state today. The numbers do not reflect what tomorrow's numbers might look like. You have to look at what the trajectory is. How fast it is that. They're likely to fill up. How fast they're coming into the emergency room and ending up in the bed. Laurie now is more than six hundred. Thirty four thousand coronavirus cases more than eleven thousand kobe. Nineteen deaths in the state. The death toll from covid nineteen pandemic has now reached more than two hundred and fifty thousand georgia's certified president elect. Joe biden has one that state's electoral votes but as a meal moffitt of member station w. a. b. e. in atlanta reports top georgia republicans are calling for changes to the state's election. Laws in one of the narrowest races in the country president elect joe biden topped president. Donald trump by about twelve thousand six hundred votes of the record. One point three million votes cast by mail and the state two thirds of them went to biden. Georgia's republican governor. Brian kemp echoed. President trump and casting doubt on the state's signature match program used to verify the identity of absentee voters voters casting their ballots. In person must show a photo. Id and we should consider applying that same standard to mail in ballots. Georgia's republican secretary of state also called for reform despite repeated assurances that he's seen no evidence of widespread fraud for npr news. I'm a meal moffitt in atlanta michigan state. Legislators met at the white house today with president trump as the president appears to be making an extraordinary effort aimed at overturning. Joe biden's overwhelming win. There were after the meeting. Officials said they have not been yet made aware of any information that would change the outcome of the election by one michigan by an insurmountable one hundred fifty four thousand votes on wall street today. The dow closed lower down two hundred nineteen points. You're listening to. Npr president trump's state department and foreign policy advisors to the incoming baiju administration are both expressing concerns about recent arrests of human rights advocates in egypt. Computers michele keleman reports. The arrest came after. The activists met with european diplomats. The egyptian institute for personal rights as seen three of its members arrested this week charged with spreading false information and undermining public security. European diplomats had met with them earlier this month. The state department is expressing quote deep concern about the arrests biden's foreign policy adviser. Tony blinken says he shares that sentiment in a tweet. He writes quote. Meeting with foreign. Diplomats is not a crime nor is peacefully advocating for human rights. President trump wants called egypt's leader his favourite dictator egypt remains a major recipient of us aid michelle kellerman npr news washington asia pacific summit leaders set aside their differences today issuing their first joint communique in three years among other things a group calling for free and predictable trade to help a global economy leaders of the twenty one nation apec groups as been substantially weakened by the coronavirus pandemic the group whose members include president trump and chinese leader xi jinping also about not to resort to protectionist policies notwithstanding the ongoing us trying to trade battle apec countries fell to reach agreement in two thousand eighteen in part due to discord between the us and china crude oil futures prices ended the week on an up note oil closing up forty three cents a barrel and the session at forty two seventeen barrel in new york. I'm jack speer npr news.

NPR Jack Speer Npr Selena Simmons Duffin Selena Simmons Duffin Jay Pritzker President Elect Joe Biden Mid West Joe Biden Brian Kemp Georgia North Dakota Atlanta Eleanor Federal Government Biden Southwest Baiju Administration Laurie Michele Keleman
"selena simmons" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:55 min | 7 months ago

"selena simmons" Discussed on KCRW

"A lot in common. But as NPR's Selena Simmons Duffin reports, there's one key difference between Madonna and Visors Vaccines. The difference is the temperature requirements. Both have to be frozen. That's because they were made using messenger RNA, and that's unstable. The cold keeps the vaccine more stable, just like a freezer keeps ice cream from melting, but only five years. Vaccine requires ultra cold temperatures minus 70 degrees Celsius, which is colder than Antarctica. Experts say. Because of the urgency of the pandemic, both vaccines will likely be needed. And the Fizer vaccine may just be directed to bigger population centers that can handle the dry ice and specialty freezers. That vaccine requires Selena Simmons Duffin NPR News The to pharmaceutical firms will soon submit the latest information about their vaccines to the federal government for approval. Two shots are needed for each vaccine to be effective. Nation's top infectious disease specialist, Dr Anthony Fauci, says Fizer and Madonna could soon make these available to a limited number of people. Hope would be but not totally guaranteed. But close is that by the end of the year you'll be able. One company will have 25 million. The other one will have 15 million. You'll have about 40 million doses for about 20 million people. As we get into January February, those doses will increase. He spoke to NPR's morning edition. Hurricane iota is weakening rapidly as it plows deeper into Central America. Top sustained winds are now in 85 MPH. It made landfall yesterday on the Atlantic coast of Nicaragua with top sustained winds of 155 MPH. Matt Hackworth of Lutheran World Relief is in Honduras, helping coordinate relief efforts. It's a race just to keep up among the was trying to help. So that's Honduras is government as well. This.

NPR Selena Simmons Duffin federal government Fizer Selena Simmons Matt Hackworth Dr Anthony Fauci Hurricane iota Nicaragua Madonna Central America Lutheran World Atlantic
"selena simmons" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:57 min | 7 months ago

"selena simmons" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Have showed promising results have a lot in common. But as NPR's Selena Simmons Duffin reports, there's one key difference between Madonna and Visors Vaccines. The difference is the temperature requirements. Both have to be frozen. That's because they were made using messenger RNA, and that's unstable. The cold keeps the vaccine more stable. Just like a freezer keeps ice cream from melting, but only Fizer is vaccine requires ultra cold temperatures minus 70 degrees Celsius, which is colder than Antarctica. Experts say. Because of the urgency of the pandemic, both vaccines will likely be needed. And the Fizer vaccine may just be directed to bigger population centers that can handle the dry ice and specialty freezers. That vaccine requires Selena Simmons Duffin NPR News The to pharmaceutical firms will soon submit the latest information about their vaccines to the federal government for approval. Two shots are needed for each vaccine to be effective. The nation's top infectious disease specialist, Dr Anthony Fauci, says Fizer and Madonna could soon make these available to a limited number of people. The hope with the but not totally guaranteed. But close is that by the end of the year you'll be able. One company will have 25 million. The other one will have 15 million. You'll have about 40 million doses for about 20 million people. As we get into January February, those doses will increase. He spoke to NPR's morning edition. Hurricane iota is weakening rapidly as it plows deeper into Central America. Top sustained winds are now in 85 MPH. It made landfall yesterday on the Atlantic coast of Nicaragua with top sustained winds of 155 MPH. That hack worth of Lutheran world relief is in Honduras, helping coordinate relief efforts. It's a race just to keep up among the was trying to help. So that's Honduras is government as well..

Fizer NPR Selena Simmons Duffin federal government Selena Simmons Dr Anthony Fauci Nicaragua Hurricane iota Atlantic Madonna Central America
"selena simmons" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:59 min | 9 months ago

"selena simmons" Discussed on KCRW

"Is she marched Montella, Tyson said She was devastated. But please, that we get one. But this was said president for the future, that police officer would be not so quick to take a level life and this is just the beginning. More protests are expected today. For NPR News and Stephanie Wolf in Louisville. President Trump will pay his final respects to Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg today when he visits the U. S. Supreme Court. NPR's Windsor, Johnston says Ginsberg died last week at the age of 87 trumps visit today to the Supreme Court, where Justice Ginsburg lies in repose comes Two days before he's expected to announce his nominee to fill her now vacant seat on the bench. The prospect of Trump making another appointment and cementing a conservative majority for what could be decades to come, has ignited a bitter partisan battle in Washington. NPR's Windsor Johnston reporting tomorrow, Justice Ginsberg will lie in state at the U. S. Capitol. She'll be the first woman to receive that honor. More than 201,000. People have died of covert 19 in the U. S. According to data from Johns Hopkins University. Well over 6.9 million people in the US have been infected with the Corona virus. The U. S has nearly a quarter of the world's corona virus cases and is the country with the most covert 19 fatalities. The federal government is preparing to crack down on hospitals for not reporting Complete Cove in 19 data every day into a federal data system. That's according to internal draft dockets obtained By NPR. NPR's Selina Simmons. Duffin has this exclusive report. The Trump Administration caused an outcry when it took the job of collecting hospital data away from CDC in July and set up a new data system using a federal contractor called Tele Tracking Now it slides from an internal CDC presentation given yesterday obtained by NPR show that the new system has a low response rate on Ly 24% of hospitals reported all metrics every day last week in the presentation, it's noted that the government is hoping to improve that figure by threatening hospitals federal funding through Medicare. For many hospitals that could mean shutting down. Selena Simmons, Duffin NPR news You're listening to NPR news. The president of Belarus, Alexander Lukashenko, has been abruptly sworn into a disputed sixth term in office. The Belarussian opposition says this summer's election results were fraudulent. Reuters news agency reports that the European Union has declared Lukashenko is not the legitimate president of Belarus and his hasty inauguration violates the will of the people. South Korea's says that a missing official was shot and killed this week by North Korean troops near the two countries maritime border. NPR's Anthony Koon reports from Seoul that the incident is likely to further strained tense ties before between the two Koreas. The South's Defense Ministry says a 47 year old fisheries official went missing Monday off the country's west coast. South Korean media quotes unnamed officials with the Joint Chiefs of Staff is saying the official tried to defect to North Korea. But North Korean forces found the official Tuesday shot and killed him and then burned his body. The South's presidential office demanded that the North take full responsibility for the shooting and punish those responsible. South Korea trying to communicate with the north by the United Nations Command, but it's so far received no response. Anthony Kun NPR news soul, The U. S Air Force Academy, has a new superintendent, Lieutenant General Richard Clarke has been installed. He's the first black superintendent in the military academies 66 year history. Clark attended the Air Force Academy himself. Starting in 1982. He went on to study at Harvard. He served in the Pentagon, where he oversaw the Air Force's nuclear weapons program..

NPR Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg NPR News President Trump president South Korea Anthony Kun NPR federal government U. S. Supreme Court official Clark Anthony Koon U. S Air Force Academy Montella Lieutenant General Richard Cla Johns Hopkins University North Korea Windsor Johnston Belarus
Only these four states have enough contact tracers, including Washington, DC

NPR News Now

01:00 min | 11 months ago

Only these four states have enough contact tracers, including Washington, DC

"US death toll from covid nineteen now exceeds one, hundred, sixty thousand according to Johns. Hopkins University Corona Virus Infections are nearing four point nine million while contact tracing is crucial to curbing the spread NPR Selena Simmons Duffin reports and NPR analysis finds the number of contact tracers isn't growing fast enough to keep up with rising case loads after serving states in mid June NPR found the were thirty seven thousand contact razors nationwide six weeks. Later, that number has only marginally increased. It's now about forty two, thousand several states didn't respond to multiple requests from NPR so the real total may be higher our. Of the staffing figures based on local case counts found only four states and Washington DC have enough contact tracers. Those states are Alaska Maine New Hampshire and Vermont Selena Simmons Duffin NPR News

NPR Selena Simmons Duffin Alaska Maine New Hampshire Selena Simmons Covid United States Washington Dc Johns Hopkins University Vermont
Whistleblower Rick Bright testifies before House panel

Morning Edition

03:34 min | 1 year ago

Whistleblower Rick Bright testifies before House panel

"Rick Bryant alleges that the White House would not listen to him today he testifies before a house committee that says it will ride used to run a top federal health agency he says he warned about the pandemic early to no effect he says he warned against unproven drugs that the president was promoting and he says that's why the administration transferred him to a different job NPR health policy reporter Selena Simmons Duffin is covering this story Selena good morning morning Steve once bright already set well he filed a whistleblower complaint with the US office of special counsel last week and that details how as director of Bardot which is part of the federal health agency he warned the trump administration about the seriousness of the corona virus any claims he pushed back against the white house's promotion of unproven cove in nineteen treatments like hydroxyl Clark win and that the administration put what he called cronyism over science he was transferred he says against his will to the national institutes of health last month now president trump has dismissed the allegations and painted bright as a disgruntled employee but late last week breaks lawyers said the office of special counsel said there seem to be reasonable grounds to believe he was retaliated against and that it recommended he be reinstated while his complaint is investigated okay so there's a complaint now that that involves both bright and this other person a man named Bowen who is testifying today as well right right so the other witness today is Mike but when he's a businessman with a Texas based face mask company called prestige Ameritech and both witnesses submitted written testimony to lawmakers Boeing statement outlines how for years he tried to get the federal government to engage with his company and other domestic mask makers arguing it was a national security issue and in a pandemic like we are in now it would be hard to get the needed supplies he told NPR last month at no one took his warning seriously everybody ignored reporters ignored it some kind of experts ignored our government ignored at hospitals in order but ignored it I don't want to say I told you so just wanna help everybody although it is an opportunity for both born and bred to say told you so anyway okay so that's bone one is bright likely to say Rick Brady also submitted written testimony to lawmakers and he emphasizes he's a scientist and civil servant and that pandemic preparedness is his expertise and the fact that his warnings went unheeded clearly pains him here he is on CBS's sixty minutes last week we see too many doctors and nurses now dying I was thinking that we could have done more to get this masking the supplies to them sooner and if we had would they still be alive today for today's appearance so great rates that he wants to be forward looking so he talks about the need for a clear voice from the federal government that is consistent and truthful even when that truth is difficult and he says the truth is really difficult he writes the corona virus pandemic could be worse than the nineteen eighteen flu which claimed over fifty million lives and he says the window is closing to prevent things from being worse in the fall writing quote without clear planning and implementation of the steps that I and other experts have outlined to twenty twenty will be the darkest winter in modern history well very briefly what's the agenda of the lawmakers will question him well anytime a whistleblower comes to testify before Congress is going to be political right as a witness democratic lawmakers want to hear from and they hold the majority in the house one thing to watch for is how Republicans on the committee engage with bright and whether or not they use this as a platform to defend the

Rick Bryant White House
"selena simmons" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

07:49 min | 1 year ago

"selena simmons" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Jobs will be able to go back to work the analysis found that around six million people do not have affordable options to get health insurance and so will likely join the ranks of the uninsured Selena Simmons Duffin NPR news March today by federal reserve chairman Jerome Powell the corona virus induced recession could be prolong sent stocks tumbling Paul called Powell called on both the fed and Congress should take further steps to boost the economy the Dow dropped five hundred sixteen points the nasdaq was down a hundred and thirty nine points today you're listening to NPR and this is at W. NYC in New York I'm Jamie Floyd a fourth region of New York state has met the criteria to gradually reopen its economy later this week governor Cuomo saying the north country has met all the necessary benchmarks and can join the southern tier the Mohawk valley and the finger lakes regions in re opening some businesses like construction manufacturing and curbside retail but the governor says he is warning other states about the covert related condition in children known as pediatric multi system inflammatory syndrome so far it has sickened at least one hundred two children in the state of New York meanwhile in New York City the board of elections plans to mail nearly four million absentee ballot applications starting next week WNYC's Brigid Bergin reports the board faces a daunting task when it comes to meeting the demand in response to the governor's executive order to make it easier for eligible voters to mail in their vote in next month's primary the board plans to mail ballots to people who return those applications or apply now by phone or online at their weekly meeting executive director Mike Ryan warned the national envelope shortage could cause delays we will be at the mercy of the availability of envelopes Ryan later clarified although others will get their ballots the timing could be an issue given the scale of the undertaking by comparison in all of twenty sixteen city voters cast fewer than three hundred thousand absentee ballots and mayor de Blasio is closing more than twelve miles of city streets to cars starting tomorrow we want to make it easier for people to socially distance particularly as the warmer weather comes on and the open streets initiative is helping us to do that the mayor says police will be on hand at most of the sites through community organizations though community rather organizations will manage some of the closures in the city is also opening nine point two miles of protected bike lanes in Brooklyn queens Manhattan one bike lane along Broadway in the financial district is opening tomorrow the rest later this month it's forty sixty two degrees rather in Central Park support for NPR comes from Morgan Stanley a proud sponsor of StoryCorps connect providing people with the ability to conduct a remote interview with loved ones at a distance on mother's day at StoryCorps connect dot org on a Wednesday it's All Things Considered from NPR news I'm Mary Louise Kelly in Washington and I'm Elsa Chang in Los Angeles as of today restaurants in a dozen northern California counties can reopen their dining rooms they're the first to do so as part of phase two that is the second step in governor Gavin Newsom's four step plan to reopen the state's economy in Roseville California restaurant owner Cora masseuse says he is excited for business to pick up now with dining rooms opening up I think the take out and delivery that's the new norm people are going to stay with it and as well as going to be attracting more business to it so I think we will need to hire more people and put more people to work restaurants that do decide to resume business under phase two have to comply with a number of conditions including screening potential customers out the door the best way to do that sort of screening is still an open question not just for customers but for employees for more I'm joined now by NPR science correspondent Allison Aubrey and national correspondent Eric Westervelt he to both of you hi there good to be here all right Eric let's start with you you are in Roseville which is in plaster county that's one of the counties here in California were dining rooms are re opening what does it look like there right now yeah it was interesting I met this kind of restaurant plaza northeast of Sacramento and Roseville there about a dozen restaurants and cafes here and you know some of them and have been you know doing take away only since the shelter in place started March but last night the work one out you know the restaurants in the county can really start to do the sit down welcome you know sit down customers with these restrictions and you know what restaurant owners I talked to said a kind of a buzz one around with it you know we can start to partially reopen some of those restrictions including a space between tables after the cleaning plan they're gonna ask people to to wear masks when not eating or drinking among some other rules and and I caught up with Korda Masud he runs this restaurant to a Mexican restaurant here he his crew were super busy so frantically trying to pivot from take out only to sit down service as well we are excited that we are finally going to be opening up completely and we gonna be able to put all of our employees to work that's the most exciting piece that we have recorded qualify precautions everybody's gonna have face masks and then are we going to do our due diligence to keep everybody safe you know he added though that you given these new restrictions will only be about half full I only conceded you know this is going to be an adjustment it's new it's going to be a challenge it'll take time but all the restaurants are talked to here you know we're pretty excited at least start getting back to sit down Jana business he said he's expecting only about half full I mean I was just about as what about customers does it seem like people are totally ready to just go back to restaurants plop down at tables and resume normal life again yeah there was a kind of bus here when you know people showing up around lunch time for usual you know take out and were told okay you can come back and press it down mail service tonight and there's a tonight you know they weren't as was just sort of getting out and most folks I talk to her in Roseville said you know they're ready to do that at no one composite car that I've seen driving around today reached out in these public areas was really wearing a mask that was really the exception except these restaurant owners I caught up with Karen and Dave makes their retirees they wanted to come here for lunch they were not wearing masks they told me you know we just had enough of the shelter in place orders and they said you know we really welcome the freedom as they put it to choose to go out to eat or not I was so happy we're looking all these restaurants are very much you know it's like he's gonna be here for me just like driving a car we're gonna wait fourteen days so there's no accidents on the road before we let people drive you know I mean it's like realistically something's going to kill you you know we got a little I mean even my dog is losing his mind tell me why don't you he said look we're we're mindful of this year we're gonna wear masks and in the restaurant as we're told in between ordering and things like that but they emphasize you know in in their words you know we can't keep killing the economy over this and I think that's really a a common sentiment throughout some of these more rural counties that I've been traveling into Mr do you I mean with California and many other states taking steps to re open how are employers thinking about bringing people back into the work place the physical office sure I think they're really just scrambling to figure it out I mean there's a constellation of measures being tried temperature and symptoms checks to screen employees big employers such as Walmart and Amazon have been using temperature check.

Jerome Powell Selena Simmons chairman
Where Obamacare stands right now as Trump attacks the law

Morning Edition

00:50 sec | 1 year ago

Where Obamacare stands right now as Trump attacks the law

"The trump administration is proceeding with a lawsuit to try to strike down the affordable Care Act as NPR's Selena Simmons Duffin reports it's the third challenge to the health law heard by the Supreme Court on the side of defending the ACA in this case the democratic controlled house of representatives and many blue states led by California they say the ACA offers key protections including coverage for pre existing conditions and that the exchanges are especially important for those needing insurance during the pandemic on the side challenging the law red states led by Texas and the trump administration they argue the law is unconstitutional and should be struck down several news outlets reported this week that Attorney General Barr warned against pursuing the suit but the administration is moving forward anyway a decision is not expected before the November presidential

NPR Selena Simmons Duffin Supreme Court ACA California Texas General Barr Attorney
U.S. grapples with how to drastically ramp up COVID-19 contact tracing

All Things Considered

01:01 min | 1 year ago

U.S. grapples with how to drastically ramp up COVID-19 contact tracing

"A new survey from NPR asked all fifty state health departments and the district of Columbia how many contact tracers they have to track the spread of the corona virus and PR Selena Simmons Duffin reports even with a hiring surge the total falls short of what public health experts have recommended contact tracers are public health workers who call up every positive covert nineteen patient asked them to list their recent contacts and then reaches out to those contacts to ask them to quarantine it's a key tool to allow social distancing to ease while keeping the virus in check after serving state health departments about their plans NPR found thirty five thousand six hundred contact tracers but the number of public health leaders have been calling for is three times that more like one hundred thousand or more states said they could use help funding this effort one estimate of the cost of hiring one hundred thousand tracers is four billion dollars Congress has not specifically put that into any funding package

NPR Columbia Selena Simmons Duffin Congress
Concerns growing over access to household cleaning supplies: survey

Morning Edition

03:39 min | 1 year ago

Concerns growing over access to household cleaning supplies: survey

"A disturbing lack of protective gear medical experts equipment and supplies that is the key finding from a national survey of hospitals put out this morning by the federal government and your health policy reporter Selena Simmons Duffin was among the first to get that survey and she brings us this report this is the first survey of its kind and some of the details are alarming like the stories of hospital administrators trying to get more masks for health care workers we heard hospitals going out and trying to source these mass at auto parts shops nail salons art supply stores that's an Maxwell she oversaw the report as assistant inspector general for evaluation and inspections at the U. S. department of health and Human Services one hospital said that shipment of masks from the federal government had all expired ten years ago in another shipment half the mast for child sized yet another hospital said when trying to buy supplies masks that had cost fifty cents we're now six dollars apiece Maxwell says other supplies were also running short simple things like thermometers they need to test out we also heard cleaning supplies disinfectant food toilet paper did you catch that toilet paper is running out in America's hospitals right now one hospital said it was so short and disinfectants its staff tried to make it in house with chemicals like chlorine then there are the shortages and then a leaders in concerns about not having enough staff to operate them we had one hospital administrators say to us you can make thousands of ventilators but it will take an army to manage that equipment and to care for those patients testing is a huge problem for hospitals it's still really hard to get tests and there are delays in getting results many hospital said it took seven days or more and that has a ripple effects when a patient comes in and gets tested the hospital needs to treat that patient as potentially a positive coalbed patient so that means they are taking up a bed in the hospital for the length of time it takes but it has to come back that means when hospital staff are engaging with that patient they are in full protective gear when the test comes back negative that means tons of masks and gowns and gloves may have been wasted Maxwell says the inspector general's office hustled to get this report done the office had dozens of staffers working on it they called three hundred and twenty three hospitals around the country and they did it over five days the week of March twenty third the report isn't just a survey of challenges but also how hospitals are managing them and the ways the federal government could help for instance to help intervene and coordinate the supplies that they needed and the distribution of those supplies so hospitals are all competing with each other in this chaotic slapdash way administrators also said the government could do a better job with messaging to the public into hospital workers who struggle with guidelines that change constantly and sometimes contradictory information from federal and state authorities the findings in this report confirms what we've been hearing anecdotally says Dr Irwin Redlener he directs the national center for disaster preparedness at Columbia University and he adds it's encouraging that the federal government took the time to do the report the question now will be how will the government respond one way helps you fix some of these issues well the shared strategies help is hospitals help one another I I don't know we can only hope he says the shortages and problems aren't going anywhere and we're not at the peak of the outbreak yet Selena Simmons Duffin NPR

Are US Hospitals Ready for Coronavirus?

All Things Considered

05:45 min | 1 year ago

Are US Hospitals Ready for Coronavirus?

"To another corona virus question now which is our America's hospitals ready that is one of the most urgent questions public health experts are trying to answer right now other places in the world where the corona virus outbreak appears to be just head over here in the US they have already seen their hospitals overwhelmed thank Italy and your Selena Simmons Duffin and NPR's Marie Eisenman have this report on preparations here in the U. S. history here's why hospitals are so anxious to get ready for what's coming when hospital is flooded with more critically ill patients than it can handle more patients die the stakes could not be higher I wanted to find out what hospitals need to be doing so I went to a really busy one in Washington DC we are currently in what we call a ready room that is correct he at least he is director of emergency management at medstar Washington hospital center over to your left you'll see there's a card that has our training powered air purifying respirators this is our optimal level of rest it looks like a warehouse with exposed pipes fluorescent light streams in the floor they use it for training storage or whatever the latest emergency calls for when I visited they were getting ready to move carts of supplies out to turn this room into a patient screening area so if you show up and think you have colluded nineteen you might be screen here or in one of the tents are pitching in the parking lot when you present yourself you'll see signage that remind you please maintain your distance you'll be given a mask quickly and asked to put it even if triage goes smoothly that is just the first step people who are really sick will need to go to intensive care units I see use yeah this could be the real choke point for many hospitals in America for the average American city we would probably need twice the normal intensive care capacity than we normally have that's Dr Eric toner of Johns Hopkins center for health security he and collaborators at Harvard university and Nanjing medical university in China they looked at what happens to intensive care units in Wuhan China the first places outbreak hit we saw tens of thousands of ICU patients Turner estimates if the U. S. is the same rate of spread every hospital here it would have to take drastic steps to meet the need normally we put an ammonia patient in a medical ICO but they might have to commandeer any free beds in the ice use of all sorts of stuff lies departments in Rolla G. pediatrics the challenge those units are pretty full so already says some hospitals are planning to remodel other rooms even expand into larger spaces like auditoriums then there's the equipment people are I see you need all kinds of specialized equipment they need IV pumps that need monitors various kinds and most important for really sick people with covert nineteen you need ventilators machines that essentially breed for patients across the U. S. we have a finite number of outliers DLE told me at Washington hospital center they have extra ventilators ready to go we have twelve here in the corner I have another six in the back room he feels fairly confident about their supply and nationally there's a stock piles several thousand ventilators that hospitals could pull from but there is the issue of finding or training staff to provide all this extra care each hospital would have a surge plan will not only finding more beds but also then finding the the staff to be able to staff those beds which brings us to the problem of keeping health workers safe he d'elia is medical director of Boston university's school of medicine's special pathogens unit our health care workers are the most precious resource than this response she says if health workers can't protect themselves more and more of them will start to fall sick and so you're going through your cadres of health care workers until you get to a point now where you cannot provide the kind of care you want to do the patients they're going to need personal protective equipment masks goggles downs hospitals in Washington state have already turned to the national stockpile for those things the Delhi says her hospital has enough protective gear right now you know if you ask me in six months I don't know what the scenario might look like but nobody knows how many months this might go on for overall toner at Johns Hopkins glues that hospitals in the U. S. will just about meet all these various needs but that's on the macro level in some communities they will be okay in other communities they will be just making it and other places they will be totally overwhelmed even at a big sophisticated place like medstar Washington hospital center in DC they feel they have to get ready for the worst D. out the the emergency preparedness director says they have an ethics plan for how to make heart wrenching decisions who gets a ventilator versus who gets a bag valve mask versus who doesn't get either one of the two doctors are already making those choices in Italy based on age likelihood of survival clearly we all hope that we don't see that extreme here in this country but we have a plan if it came to that other hospitals I know have a plan as well but Turner says what people out in the community do now to slow down the virus that could change the picture for hospitals it won't be a walk in the park but I think would be manageable all the social distancing Americans are trying to do now shutting down bars and restaurants hunkering down at home might seem like an overreaction but those measures could be what makes it possible for hospitals to

America
"selena simmons" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:38 min | 1 year ago

"selena simmons" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Slash and PR and from listeners like you who donate to this NPR station this is All Things Considered from NPR news I'm ari Shapiro and I'm Audie Cornish eight point three billion dollars that's the total amount of emergency coronavirus funding the president trump signed into law today but will what will that money be getting us in Paris Selena Simmons Duffin is here to give us the highlights welcome back to the studio hi eight point three billion sounds like a lot how is it helpful here it really is actually a lot there are some figures for comparison here five point four billion for the a bowl of response in twenty fourteen and nearly seven billion for each one and one in two thousand nine so this is many millions of dollars more than Congress put towards those efforts one important point this is quite a turnaround for the trump administration just last week they requested only one point two five billion in new funding if they wanted to move money around to get to two point five billion and they defended that figure as members of Congress from both sides of the aisle said this really seems like a little ball the president did say last week he was open to more and that is what he got eight point three billion more than three times that initial ask experts I talked to today say it's really remarkable in this political moment that Congress was able to act so quickly to come up with this comprehensive package no one can really say whether it's enough but everyone I talked to said it's really encouraging start how is the money supposed to be spent the biggest part of money goes to the office of the secretary of health.

ari Shapiro trump Selena Simmons Duffin Congress president secretary Slash NPR Audie Cornish Paris
"selena simmons" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:34 min | 1 year ago

"selena simmons" Discussed on KCRW

"Now it is seventy degrees in Santa Clarita this is All Things Considered from NPR news I'm ari Shapiro and Ahmadi Cornish eight point three billion dollars that's the total amount of emergency coronavirus funding the president trump signed into law today but will what will that money be getting us in Paris Selena Simmons Duffin is here to give us the highlights welcome back to the studio hi eight point three billion sounds like a lot how is it helpful here it really is actually a lot there are some figures for comparison here five point four billion for the a a bowl of response in twenty fourteen a nearly seven billion for each one and one in two thousand nine so this is many millions of dollars more than Congress put towards those efforts one important point this is quite a turnaround for the trump administration just last week they requested only one point two five billion in new funding if they wanted to move money around to get to two point five billion and they defended that figure as members of Congress from both sides of the aisle said this really seems like a low ball the president did say last week he was open to more and that is what he got eight point three billion more than three times that initial ask experts I talked to today say it's really remarkable in this political moment that Congress was able to act so quickly to come up with this comprehensive package no one can really say whether it's enough but everyone I talked to said it's really encouraging start how is the money supposed to be spent the biggest part of money goes to the office of the secretary of health.

Santa Clarita trump Selena Simmons Duffin Congress president secretary NPR ari Shapiro Ahmadi Cornish Paris
"selena simmons" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:32 min | 1 year ago

"selena simmons" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"First this is All Things Considered from NPR news I'm ari Shapiro and Ahmadi Cornish eight point three billion dollars that's the total amount of emergency coronavirus funding the president trump signed into law today but will what will that money be getting us in Paris Selena Simmons Duffin is here to give us the highlights welcome back to the studio hi eight point three billion sounds like a lot how is it helpful here it really is actually a lot there are some figures for comparison here five point four billion for the of the liver spots in twenty fourteen a nearly seven billion for each one and one in two thousand nine so this is many millions of dollars more than Congress put towards those efforts one important point this is quite a turnaround for the trump administration just last week they requested only one point two five billion in new funding if they wanted to move money around to get to two point five billion and they defended that figure as members of Congress from both sides of the aisle said this really seems like a low ball the president did say last week he was open to more and that is what he got eight point three billion more than three times that initial ask experts I talked to today say it's really remarkable in this political moment that Congress was able to act so quickly to come up with this comprehensive package and no one can really say whether it's on us but everyone I talked to said it's really encouraging start how is the money supposed to be spent the biggest part of money goes to the office of the secretary of health.

trump Selena Simmons Duffin Congress president secretary NPR ari Shapiro Ahmadi Cornish Paris
'We'll get through this': Mike Pence says 'no question' there will be more coronavirus cases, but 'we're ready'

Weekend Edition Sunday

07:17 min | 1 year ago

'We'll get through this': Mike Pence says 'no question' there will be more coronavirus cases, but 'we're ready'

"You it's been a dramatic few days of developments related to the corona virus Washington state announced several first yes date the first death of someone in the U. S. infected with the virus the first health worker to be infected and the first potential outbreak at a long term care facility outside Seattle more than fifty people are being tested for the corona virus the trump administration has also ramped up its response and here to bring us up to speed is NPR science reporter Selena Simmons Duffin high Selena hi Lisa so president trump held a press conference yesterday with members of the coronavirus task force what did we hear the president announced first of all that there had been the first U. S. death trump said the victim was a woman but authorities later confirmed it was actually a man in his fifties with underlying health conditions and he was in Kirkland Washington near Seattle vice president pence also announcing that press conference new travel restrictions in areas that have seen recent outbreaks are Ron and parts of South Korea and Italy up president trump also took a few questions and some of them referred to the fact that he used the word hoax in connection to corona virus on Friday he tried to clarify he was referring to Democrats criticism of the response not the virus itself so at the end of the week there were reports of a few positive cases that appear to be community spread in California Oregon meaning not connected to travel to Asia other affected areas the contracted rate here in the U. S. and now there are several more confirmed in Washington state potentially dozens more what's going on so the big change was that public health officials started looking for cases differently the medical director for infectious disease at the hospital evergreen health explained how it happened at a press conference yesterday he said that the guidelines about who should be tested changed last week you no longer need to travel history or close contact with somebody with corona virus so evergreen health looked at its patients and sought to with no travel history who are very sick with respiratory infections with the new guidelines they became candidates to test for crown of fight virus and both tested positive so one was the patient in his fifties who sadly died the other was a resident of this nursing home life care center in Kirkland local health officials realize that a health care worker from life care was sick as well she tested positive and that's what led officials to look into this possible outbreak so these might not be new cases then right exactly the remember the symptoms look a lot like the flu and it's flu season and health officials say most cases are mild so people might not be even going to the hospital for them so now that the new guidelines for food to test has changed and there are these new abilities for local labs around the country to do more testing we will likely see many more positive cases it's hard to know at this point how many more are out there a health official from Seattle king county said in yesterday's press briefing these newly confirmed cases are likely quote the tip of the iceberg but it's important to remember overall the risk to the American public is still low the important thing to do with the thoroughly washing your hands keeping away from sick people all of those method measures that you can take to protect yourself and prevent the spread the messages be vigilant but don't panic that's NPR's Selena Simmons Duffin thank you so much thank you the US has signed a deal with the Taliban that aims to end the eighteen year war in Afghanistan the longest in American history but there's already a glitch Afghan president Ashraf Ghani says he will free thousands of Taliban prisoners as yesterday's the deal called for joining us to talk about that is NPR's Pentagon correspondent Tom Bowman he spent years in batting with US and Afghan forces good morning Tom Taylor so the agreement for less than a day old and there's already a problem how serious is it that on he says he won't release the prisoners well we don't know yet and I'm sure the U. S. and NATO officials will be reaching out quickly to Connie no the release of five thousand Taliban prisoners were supposed to be a precondition of the Taliban Afghan talks slate to begin soon Connie says he's not ready to release any prisoners before talks begin he said that prisoner release was not a promise the U. S. could make I I think it shows what many predicted the most difficult step was not a U. S. Taliban agreement but one between the Afghans and the Taliban so they're about twelve thousand US troops in Afghanistan what are they doing and and when will they begin to leave well right now they're training Afghan troops and also together with Afghan commandos going after terror groups like ISIS the U. S. troops will drop to eighty six hundred in the next several months but the military still says at that number the cans of both train Afghans in go after ISIS or other terrorist the agreement says all U. S. troops out in fourteen months no Layla that's faster told than some earlier plans to draw down in two years so either the Taliban pressed hard for a better deal or president trump just wanted the troops out faster so is it realistic than depends who you ask one official told me the time line is he called it optimistic and said the Taliban has to abide by the agreement to stop attacks break with al Qaeda and open talks with Afghan officials but here's the thing last September right when an earlier U. S. Taliban peace agreement was about to be signed the U. S. attacked in el Qaida cell in western Afghanistan and American officials told me when I was in Afghanistan at that time that the Taliban were also working with al Qaeda in the east near the Pakistan border so some question whether the Taliban will really break with al Qaeda so then how does the U. S. make sure that the Taliban is honoring the agreement well the U. S. in the Taliban will have some sort of a monitoring office in Qatar to make sure everyone abides by the agreement and yeah in in Afghanistan the U. S. and Taliban are communicating by phone or radio to report on what they're seeing on the ground the problem is U. S. troops are in small numbers in largely confined to bases and not out and about around the country like they were in past years you know patrolling with Afghans going into villages one retired general with years of experience in Afghanistan told me as a result there is no way the U. S. can effectively monitor this agreement on the ground or even witness if the Taliban are intimidating the population but the U. S. will stop the troop drawdown if the Taliban doesn't cooperate right that's what they said and it's likely even in the face of some television non compliance the U. S. will continue to draw down then military leaders have long said of course there's no military solution here only a political one resident trump wants to bring what he calls endless wars to a close no I'll be heading to Syria soon labels are check out the U. S. military mission against ISIS the president also is cutting back their their once about two thousand American soldiers in Syria now it's down to about five hundred or so that's NPR Pentagon correspondent Tom Bowman Tom

Washington
Trump to order hospitals to be transparent about healthcare costs

All of It

01:01 min | 2 years ago

Trump to order hospitals to be transparent about healthcare costs

"Care providers and insurers will be required to disclose out-of-pocket cost of patients before they receive healthcare services this from an executive order president trump will sign today on price transparency in healthcare n._p._r. selena simmons stephens has more many of trump's proposals to lower rising healthcare costs focus on showing prices the idea is people can shop around and the market will drive down costs this morning secretary of health and human services alex as our briefed reporters on the executive order the issue a rule requiring hospital to close in an easy to read haitian friendly format frightens that reflect what you're actually pay it also requires h._h._s. to come up with a proposal so that patients could see their out of pocket costs before they receive healthcare services this essentially kicks off a lengthy rulemaking process so new price transparency for patients from this executive order is a long way off silliness stephan

Donald Trump Secretary Alex Stephan Executive President Trump Selena Simmons Stephens
Tylenol For Infants And Children Is The Same. Why Does 1 Cost 3 Times More?

NPR's Business Story of the Day

03:10 min | 2 years ago

Tylenol For Infants And Children Is The Same. Why Does 1 Cost 3 Times More?

"Support for this podcast and the following message come from mayo clinic if you're looking for answers no one else has been able to find, you know, where to go mayoclinic. More at mayo clinic dot org slash answers. Anybody who has a kid with a fever makes a discovery at the drugstore. There are two options for Tylenol one for infants one four children. They contain the same amount of medicine, but the infant version costs, three times more. Why would that be? Here's NPR's Selena Simmons Duffin turns out. There's a backstory for a long time. Infants Tylenol was stronger than the children's stuff. It was three times more concentrated. That's in my Hernandez of the university of Pittsburgh school of pharmacy. The thinking was, you don't want to give little babies, lots of liquid medicine and you can give them less if it stronger. Hence the cost difference, deprives per milliliter was five times higher, but there was a problem parents were making mistakes with dosing babies got sick and some even. Died. So at the urging of the food and Drug administration in twenty eleven Johnson and Johnson announced a change instance title is now offered in the same concentration as children's what the price is still different with Storebrand's of acetaminophen, it's the same story. The infant version is generally three times more than the one for children. I asked Johnson and Johnson, the maker of brand name Tylenol, why the company says the infant version comes in a sturdier bottle and has a syringe for accurate. Dosing the children's version only has a little plastic Cup in Hernandez isn't convinced by that. She says what's expensive and producing a drug like this is the active ingredient, not a piece of plastic. The cab, this was this eerie inch doesn't release plane, the price difference in my opinion. But Johnson and Johnson's explanation makes sense to Edgar daursky. He's a consumer advocate, and founder of the website, consumer world is an extra thing in the box and extra things usually cost money. He says. There's a convenience element here. Thank of, you know, a spray cleaner. You can buy the spray cleaner in the spray bottle, and that costs, little more money or you can buy the refill that gives you more ounces, but it doesn't have the sprayer on top. It's kind of the same concept. But this, of course, is not a spray cleaner, it's medicine for your baby. Parents can be sensitive to marketing, because the stakes are so high Dr Shaw at children's national in Washington DC, says when it comes to infant and children's acetaminophen, the most important thing is to get the dosing right? When you start doing more than recommended. There are serious side effects that can happen. So the bottom line know what you need if spending that extra couple of dollars for the syringe will help you get the dosing just right. Maybe the markup is worth it. Selena Simmons Duffin, NPR news. Support for this podcast and the following message come from Virgo struggling to find the perfect vacation home verb. Oh, does the. Hard work for you, matching you to the perfect place to stay every time download are be o- in the app store. Let Virgo find the home that matches you.

Johnson Selena Simmons Duffin Tylenol Hernandez Edgar Daursky Mayo Clinic University Of Pittsburgh Schoo Fever NPR Food And Drug Administration Founder Storebrand Washington Dr Shaw
"selena simmons" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:17 min | 2 years ago

"selena simmons" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Infantile is now offered in the same concentration as children's. But the price is still different with Storebrand's of acetaminophen, it's the same story. The infant version is generally three times more than the one for children. I asked Johnson and Johnson, the maker of brand name Tylenol, why the company says the infant version comes in a sturdier bottle and has a syringe for accurate. Dosing the children's version only has a little plastic Cup. Inner Hernandez is convinced by that. She says what's expensive in producing a drug like this is the active ingredient, not a piece of plastic the cab business this doesn't really explain the price difference in my opinion. But Johnson and Johnson's explanation makes sense to Edgar door sqi. He's a consumer advocate, and founder of the website, consumer world. There's an extra thing in the box and extra things usually cost money. He says, there's a convenience element here. Think of you know, a spray cleaner. You can buy the spray cleaner in the spray bottle, and that costs, little more money or you can buy the refill that gives you more announces, but it doesn't have the sprayer on top. It's kind of the same concept. But this, of course, is not a spray cleaner. It's medicine for your baby. Parents can be. Sensitive to marketing, because the stakes are so high. Dr encore shot at children's national in Washington DC, says when it comes to infant and children's acetaminophen, the most important thing is to get the dosing right? When you start doing more than recommended. There are serious side effects that could happen. So the bottom line know what you need is spending that extra couple of dollars for the syringe will help you get the dosing just right. Maybe the markup is worth it. Selena Simmons Duffin, NPR news. All right. You might not think of prenatal checkup is a thing that brings strangers together and becomes a kind of community, but that is exactly what reporter any gold found at always imagined having a baby surrounded by my family and friends. But when I found out, I was pregnant my husband and I had just moved from San Francisco to Chicago. I hardly knew a soul. I look for friends at work in prenatal, yoga classes at the bookstore, but I ended up finding a community where I least expected it at a medical office..

Johnson Hernandez Storebrand Selena Simmons Duffin reporter NPR founder Washington San Francisco Chicago
Trump calls on Congress to protect patients from surprise medical bills

KQED Specials

00:53 sec | 2 years ago

Trump calls on Congress to protect patients from surprise medical bills

"The president is urging congress to address a problem that resonates across party lines as NPR's Selena Simmons Duffin reports. Trump wants lawmakers to consider legislation dealing with surprise billing for medical providers who are not part of their patients health insurance network. Lots of families have stories about this, including Dr Paul Davis at his daughter's post op appointment her doctor said this he said, oh, by the way, I would like to get urine specimen fine. She did it a year later the Bill showed up for seventeen thousand eight hundred and fifty dollars NPR and Kaiser health news. I told the story of this test is part of our Bill of the month series. Davis. Brought his surprise Bill to the White House event today. President Trump said the story was quote almost not believable. But he's right. Seventeen thousand eight hundred fifty dollars for urine tests. There is by partisan agreement on this issue and several bills already in the

Donald Trump Bill Dr Paul Davis Selena Simmons Duffin NPR President Trump Congress White House Seventeen Thousand Eight Hundr Fifty Dollars
Inside Trump's plan to end the HIV epidemic and what sparked it

All Things Considered

03:22 min | 2 years ago

Inside Trump's plan to end the HIV epidemic and what sparked it

"Night. President Trump announced a plan to end HIV transmission within ten years today is administration share details on how it hopes to get there. Here's NPR's Selena Simmons Duffin, there's wide consensus among experts that stopping HIV by twenty thirty is doable. And this plan hits many of the right notes to get there. It focuses on so-called hotspots where most new infections are happening. And the demographic groups at highest risk of getting infected particularly in African American and Latino gay and bisexual transgender individuals women of color and people living in the south that's centers for disease control and prevention director, Dr Robert Redfield on a call with reporters today. Tools to end the epidemic. But we have to apply them. Those tools include diagnosing HIV early and getting people on treatment because people with HIV who are getting affective treatment are much less likely to spread the infection and promoting prevention efforts condom use clean syringes and a pill for people who are at risk. But not yet infected called prep. These are not new ideas. But officials today say the interagency push is new they say HIV infections have plateaued around forty thousand a year nationwide. And they're hoping this plan will turn things around Redfield from the CDC has worked on HIV for decades importance of and see the possible. I'm personally thrilled about this initiative. A plan for America's to end HIV. The goal does stand in contrast to some of the other moves by the Trump administration over the last two years, and that contrast had some HIV researchers and advocates feeling skeptical. Dr Michelle Collins, okay? Goal is one of them. She treats HIV patients in rural North Carolina. When you how people that are in our community that you are worthy of serving in the military. You are not interested in trying to end aid. When you do everything you can to make healthcare or difficult for lower income people in excess then you can't be serious about ending age. Twenty thirty Ogle used to serve on the presidential advisory council on HIV aids. But she and five others resigned in protest in two thousand seventeen at the time. They said they were convinced President Trump didn't care about the issue at all. And today, I don't feel any different others are more optimistic. Greg millet from the foundation for aids research says he trusts the people who are leading the charge. These are within the Trump administration who have always been committed to public health. They've been committed to work with the administration. To make this a success. The big question hanging over all of this is what about the money a plan? This grand will easily cost billions of dollars officials from HHS today said they were confident there would be new adequate funding for this plan and the twenty twenty budget, but wouldn't go into specifics. One reason they might be optimistic. Congress will give them what's needed is speaker of the house Nancy Pelosi. She represents San Francisco and has been an advocate on HIV for her whole career. She even spoke about the aids crisis in her first speech on the floor of the house in nineteen eighty seven today in a statement, she called President Trump's plan quote interesting,

President Trump HIV Dr Robert Redfield Donald Trump Selena Simmons Duffin Dr Michelle Collins Ogle Greg Millet NPR Nancy Pelosi HHS San Francisco CDC North Carolina America Director Congress Advisory Council
Red Meat Allergies Caused By Tick Bites Are On The Rise

Morning Edition

04:18 min | 3 years ago

Red Meat Allergies Caused By Tick Bites Are On The Rise

"The ticks range expands npr's alison aubrey reports one day last summer lars sterling took her doug governor for a walk on a trail near her house she lives in savannah park maryland later that evening she realized she'd been bitten by a tick i found it three or four inches to the left of my hip it bone and didn't think anything of it i just took it off and threw it away but about three weeks later she ate an italian style pork sausage for dinner and had a horrible reaction i would say it was probably six hours after i ate it it was in the middle of the night and i woke up covered in hives she was itching and scratching she felt lightheaded she also noticed stomach aches so she went to see an allergist he asked me did you change your detergent did you change anything in your diet and i said no and he said in the last month where you bitten by a tick and i said yes after a blood test the allergist told her she was allergic to red meat and maybe dairy too i thought it was completely crazy because i've eaten dairy and i've eaten red meat all my life her story is pretty typical of people who develop a red meat allergy after a tick bite says allergist scott commons he's an associate professor at unc chapel hill and he was among the first to identify the allergy in patients with tick bites about ten years ago he says back then there were just a few dozen known cases but now we're confident that the number is over five thousand at least in the us alone there are also cases in sweden germany and australia likely linked to other species of ticks now coming says in the us cases of moved beyond the southeast to new york maine and minnesota absolutely we're gonna find this continues to expand the reach of the tick is expanding and equally i think we have a blood test raising awareness and the word is getting out there's still a lot to learn about this allergy it's known as an alpha gal allergy alpha gallison's sugar that animals make including cows and pigs but we don't as humans we don't make this alpha gal sugar we all make an immune response to it so how does it tick bite 'cause as the allergy well it's possible that ticks inject alpha gal into people's bodies when they bite the ticks likely get it from feeding off wild animals such as mice or squirrels come and says it's also possible that ticks activate the response in another way whatever the tick is doing it seems that it's a very potent awakening for our immune system to produce antibodies and in this case it is antibodies to a very particular sugar in red meat as for laura sterling she now avoids all dairy and all red meat once i was told just stop eating it i was fine felt great allergies usually give their alpha gal patients epipens because reactions can be dangerous but the good news is that people can outgrow the allergy this is most likely to happen if they avoid further tick bites allison aubrey npr news all right when you're pregnant you know the doctors want you to get a few key vaccines and now the american college obstruct obstetricians and gynecologists is trying to make that a little bit easier for the first time it's put together a one page immunization guide for obese and midwives npr selena simmons duffin who happens to be pregnant at this very moment went to find out more the guide pulls together information about which shots pregnant women should skip which they can get an which they should definitely get the two and that should get category are the flu shot since the flu can be really dangerous for pregnant women and teed up the tetanus diphtheria protests vaccine would you have samuel you'll like it that's medical assistant kimberly johnson getting ready to give me teed up a few weeks ago at thirty weeks pregnant from spain the idea here is to protect newborns against pertussis or hooping cough people are like i never heard of who've been caused what's the big deal like why do we even have to worry about this that's dr laura riley she's the vice chair of obstetrics at massachusetts general hospital and helped write the.

NPR Alison Aubrey Lars Sterling Thirty Weeks Four Inches Three Weeks Six Hours Ten Years One Day