23 Burst results for "Selassie"

"selassie" Discussed on RADIO GAG - The Gays Against Guns Show

RADIO GAG - The Gays Against Guns Show

05:23 min | 2 months ago

"selassie" Discussed on RADIO GAG - The Gays Against Guns Show

"Wait for your film to find out more about seventy and to get yourself. Copy this wonderful book. You can just go to her website. Seventy selassie dot com and c. b. e. s. c. l. a. as i e that seventy selassie dot com folks. That is all we have time for this week and has always thank you so much for listening and we are going to sing you with our political singing queer. Sing at louise. Thanks for tuning in. We'll be back next. Tuesday at six thirty pm take care. Oh yeah views. Today we got back to you. Don t j yard to to say you didn't got you on you guys. Hey guys. happy is a shooting. Aw you and you are through by we thought. Don jr. aw..

"selassie" Discussed on 10% Happier with Dan Harris

10% Happier with Dan Harris

04:26 min | 2 months ago

"selassie" Discussed on 10% Happier with Dan Harris

"Hey there this is. Seven a welcome to this meditation on developing friendliness and compassion towards ourselves. Research shows that when we have self compassion. We exhibit more resilience ruminate less and are able to learn from setbacks easier. A friendly and compassionate attitude is imbued with ease. When i'm kind to myself it's like my whole system starts to relax. We're going to practice bringing a friendly and kind attitude to ourselves by extending compassion for stress. Let's start find a comfortable posture. Take a few moments to settle into your body. Perhaps connecting with the breath to gather your attention. This feel that air coming in and out the breathing in breathing out. Can you rest awareness on the body feeling sensations going inwards. Just notice how you feel in this moment you can ask yourself what's happening right now. How does the body feel. What do you notice in the mind with your emotions. Not changing or trying to fix anything just notice without judgment in a moment. I'm going to invite you to say some phrases to yourself. Just remember for the next few minutes. We'll be training your capacity for self compassion. And let's begin that training by considering a major stress in your life right now. Allow yourself to feel it by connecting to it in the body notice where it is and how it feels. Now offer yourself these three simple phrases. This is stress. Stress is a part of life. May i find ease stay connected to the sensation in the body continuing to bring awareness repeating these phrases silently to yourself. This is stress. Stress is a part of life. May i find ease. You want to feel better. We all do even in the midst of your stress. You've chosen to engage with this meditation.

joseph goldstein breast cancer
A Counterintuitive Remedy for Stress with Sebene Selassie

10% Happier with Dan Harris

04:26 min | 2 months ago

A Counterintuitive Remedy for Stress with Sebene Selassie

"Hey there this is. Seven a welcome to this meditation on developing friendliness and compassion towards ourselves. Research shows that when we have self compassion. We exhibit more resilience ruminate less and are able to learn from setbacks easier. A friendly and compassionate attitude is imbued with ease. When i'm kind to myself it's like my whole system starts to relax. We're going to practice bringing a friendly and kind attitude to ourselves by extending compassion for stress. Let's start find a comfortable posture. Take a few moments to settle into your body. Perhaps connecting with the breath to gather your attention. This feel that air coming in and out the breathing in breathing out. Can you rest awareness on the body feeling sensations going inwards. Just notice how you feel in this moment you can ask yourself what's happening right now. How does the body feel. What do you notice in the mind with your emotions. Not changing or trying to fix anything just notice without judgment in a moment. I'm going to invite you to say some phrases to yourself. Just remember for the next few minutes. We'll be training your capacity for self compassion. And let's begin that training by considering a major stress in your life right now. Allow yourself to feel it by connecting to it in the body notice where it is and how it feels. Now offer yourself these three simple phrases. This is stress. Stress is a part of life. May i find ease stay connected to the sensation in the body continuing to bring awareness repeating these phrases silently to yourself. This is stress. Stress is a part of life. May i find ease. You want to feel better. We all do even in the midst of your stress. You've chosen to engage with this meditation.

"selassie" Discussed on Untangle

Untangle

05:24 min | 5 months ago

"selassie" Discussed on Untangle

"Seven it is such a pleasure to have you on untangled today. . Thank you so much for being with us. . Thank you, , Patricia for having me. . I want to start by asking you a little bit about your childhood. So . why don't you tell us what were you like as a ten year old girl? ? How would you describe yourself? ? Wow ten years old. . So I was born in Ethiopia. . My mom was GPO Oban, , my dad's Airtran, , and we came to this country when I was three. . And we moved into a very white upper middle class neighborhood in Washington northwest. . Upper northwest DC, , and at ten years old I would say I was pretty confused though. . I lived at home, , which was not very assimilated. . So we ate you in food my parents spoke to us in. . Iraq, , we were part of that point small community of Ethiopian xlt now DC the DC areas large huge argest community business country. . But at that time, , there were only a few families and. . We were all pretty tight and then my world of the neighborhood and school was very white, , very upper middle class and it was confusing to move between those two worlds. . So I was a Latchkey kid both my parents worked a so at ten years old coming home and spending time with my intellectually disabled sister who I felt pretty responsible for even though she's four years older than me. . And I was learning how to navigate these two worlds, , the world of home and Ethiopian culture and then the world of school and American media I watched a lot of TV I think I learned a lot about the culture around me from TV in popular culture, , which probably not the best place to start understand your life and world so shy introverted. . I was smart but did not do well in school at all at that age, , and honestly, , if there could have been a diagnosis at the time I was probably really depressed or at least Melancholic I. . Think it had to do a lot with not understanding how these two different realities together he added. . So in writing because at ten years old to feel that split between. . Your experience at home in your experience at school can be so overwhelming and do you feel like you tried to Numb your feelings and just do what you need to do every day help your sister go to school what was your experience going through that time in your life I was very athletic kid at that age probably found a lot of release and any joy through sports through climbing trees through riding my bike riding skateboards soberly through my body and I lost that in my early adolescence, , which is interesting. . That was probably where could find a sense of belonging or connection. . But in terms of school and relationships, , I was a tomboy. . So I didn't fit in with my girlfriends I remember going to sleepovers and friends wanting to play Barbie or dolls, , and I just had no interest in that whatsoever. . And I in a neighborhood full of boys. So . I think I took a lot of refuge in physical play in activity and when I didn't have that I remember being numbed by television I watched a lot of TV as a kid they wanna get to this later the themes of your upcoming book and these themes of belonging and identity, , and it's so interesting that. . Your world was so focused on this kind of split identity as you were growing up and I think I've read that you started learning to meditate when you were a teenager is that right? ? What was your first experience there? ? Yeah. . My brother, , who's eight years older than me was probably as confused terms of his sense of identity and he became what's colloquially known as. . Now, , when I was fifteen or sixteen So my first introduction to eastern religions and spirituality and philosophy was through him and he was reading the I ching back of Gita and. . Also had some Buddhist books at the time. . So I started reading those things also started going to the street temple in downtown DC where a lot of punk rock kids hang out too. . So it was kind of a cool scene at that point and started going to Cure Thanh chanting going to lectures and started to meditate very berry intermittently I didn't know what was doing. . So by the time I got to my first year university, , I started taking religion classes and ended up majoring in religious studies with a focus on Hindus men but. . My entry way into, , but just philosophy and thought was through that. .

Patricia Iraq Airtran Ethiopia Washington northwest Latchkey argest
Sebene Selassie on Bringing Mindfulness into Every Part of Our Lives

Untangle

05:24 min | 5 months ago

Sebene Selassie on Bringing Mindfulness into Every Part of Our Lives

"Seven it is such a pleasure to have you on untangled today. Thank you so much for being with us. Thank you, Patricia for having me. I want to start by asking you a little bit about your childhood. So why don't you tell us what were you like as a ten year old girl? How would you describe yourself? Wow ten years old. So I was born in Ethiopia. My mom was GPO Oban, my dad's Airtran, and we came to this country when I was three. And we moved into a very white upper middle class neighborhood in Washington northwest. Upper northwest DC, and at ten years old I would say I was pretty confused though. I lived at home, which was not very assimilated. So we ate you in food my parents spoke to us in. Iraq, we were part of that point small community of Ethiopian xlt now DC the DC areas large huge argest community business country. But at that time, there were only a few families and. We were all pretty tight and then my world of the neighborhood and school was very white, very upper middle class and it was confusing to move between those two worlds. So I was a Latchkey kid both my parents worked a so at ten years old coming home and spending time with my intellectually disabled sister who I felt pretty responsible for even though she's four years older than me. And I was learning how to navigate these two worlds, the world of home and Ethiopian culture and then the world of school and American media I watched a lot of TV I think I learned a lot about the culture around me from TV in popular culture, which probably not the best place to start understand your life and world so shy introverted. I was smart but did not do well in school at all at that age, and honestly, if there could have been a diagnosis at the time I was probably really depressed or at least Melancholic I. Think it had to do a lot with not understanding how these two different realities together he added. So in writing because at ten years old to feel that split between. Your experience at home in your experience at school can be so overwhelming and do you feel like you tried to Numb your feelings and just do what you need to do every day help your sister go to school what was your experience going through that time in your life I was very athletic kid at that age probably found a lot of release and any joy through sports through climbing trees through riding my bike riding skateboards soberly through my body and I lost that in my early adolescence, which is interesting. That was probably where could find a sense of belonging or connection. But in terms of school and relationships, I was a tomboy. So I didn't fit in with my girlfriends I remember going to sleepovers and friends wanting to play Barbie or dolls, and I just had no interest in that whatsoever. And I in a neighborhood full of boys. So I think I took a lot of refuge in physical play in activity and when I didn't have that I remember being numbed by television I watched a lot of TV as a kid they wanna get to this later the themes of your upcoming book and these themes of belonging and identity, and it's so interesting that. Your world was so focused on this kind of split identity as you were growing up and I think I've read that you started learning to meditate when you were a teenager is that right? What was your first experience there? Yeah. My brother, who's eight years older than me was probably as confused terms of his sense of identity and he became what's colloquially known as. Now, when I was fifteen or sixteen So my first introduction to eastern religions and spirituality and philosophy was through him and he was reading the I ching back of Gita and. Also had some Buddhist books at the time. So I started reading those things also started going to the street temple in downtown DC where a lot of punk rock kids hang out too. So it was kind of a cool scene at that point and started going to Cure Thanh chanting going to lectures and started to meditate very berry intermittently I didn't know what was doing. So by the time I got to my first year university, I started taking religion classes and ended up majoring in religious studies with a focus on Hindus men but. My entry way into, but just philosophy and thought was through that.

Patricia Iraq DC Ethiopia Airtran Cure Thanh Washington Northwest Latchkey Argest
How To Bring Mindfulness Into Every Part Of Our Lives

Untangle

03:51 min | 5 months ago

How To Bring Mindfulness Into Every Part Of Our Lives

"Seven it is such a pleasure to have you on untangled today. Thank you so much for being with us. Thank you, Patricia for having me. I want to start by asking you a little bit about your childhood. So why don't you tell us what were you like as a ten year old girl? How would you describe yourself? Wow ten years old. So I was born in Ethiopia. My mom was GPO Oban, my dad's Airtran, and we came to this country when I was three. And we moved into a very white upper middle class neighborhood in Washington northwest. Upper northwest DC, and at ten years old I would say I was pretty confused though. I lived at home, which was not very assimilated. So we ate you in food my parents spoke to us in. Iraq, we were part of that point small community of Ethiopian xlt now DC the DC areas large huge argest community business country. But at that time, there were only a few families and. We were all pretty tight and then my world of the neighborhood and school was very white, very upper middle class and it was confusing to move between those two worlds. So I was a Latchkey kid both my parents worked a so at ten years old coming home and spending time with my intellectually disabled sister who I felt pretty responsible for even though she's four years older than me. And I was learning how to navigate these two worlds, the world of home and Ethiopian culture and then the world of school and American media I watched a lot of TV I think I learned a lot about the culture around me from TV in popular culture, which probably not the best place to start understand your life and world so shy introverted. I was smart but did not do well in school at all at that age, and honestly, if there could have been a diagnosis at the time I was probably really depressed or at least Melancholic I. Think it had to do a lot with not understanding how these two different realities together he added. So in writing because at ten years old to feel that split between. Your experience at home in your experience at school can be so overwhelming and do you feel like you tried to Numb your feelings and just do what you need to do every day help your sister go to school what was your experience going through that time in your life I was very athletic kid at that age probably found a lot of release and any joy through sports through climbing trees through riding my bike riding skateboards soberly through my body and I lost that in my early adolescence, which is interesting. That was probably where could find a sense of belonging or connection. But in terms of school and relationships, I was a tomboy. So I didn't fit in with my girlfriends I remember going to sleepovers and friends wanting to play Barbie or dolls, and I just had no interest in that whatsoever. And I in a neighborhood full of boys. So I think I took a lot of refuge in physical play in activity and when I didn't have that I remember being numbed by television I watched a lot of TV as a kid

Patricia Iraq Airtran Ethiopia Washington Northwest Latchkey Argest
Ethiopias struggle to stay united

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

05:02 min | 6 months ago

Ethiopias struggle to stay united

"Ethiopia has split once before in nineteen ninety-three. Eritrea Ethiopia had annexed in one, thousand, nine, hundred, sixty, two voted to secede after a decades long war for its independence. That break was not a clean one. Another war between Ethiopia and Eritrea followed in the late Nineteen Ninety S. After which retrieve retreated into isolation militarization and paranoia because a sort of North Korea on the Red Sea. Ending hostility between Eritrea and Ethiopia officially accomplished as recently as two thousand eighteen was considered such a feat of deploying the see that it one. Recently, arrived Prime Minister B amid the Nobel. Peace Prize. I was a young soldier when well broke out between Utopia and. I witnessed firsthand the ugliness of war in frontline battles. There are those suave never seen war, but glorify romance is it They have not seen the fear they have not seen the Arctic. They have not seen the restriction or break nor are they failed the mournful and bitterness of war after the carnage WAR IS EPITHELIAL FAIL FOR ALL INVOLVED Ahmed may now face another test of his diplomatic capacities to stop another portion of Ethiopia setting up shop on its own this week the Ethiopian state of Gray held elections despite instructions from the federal government not to. Federal government prefer to correspond election because of the COVID nineteen. But the people of to. Know that the reason for postponing the election is not covid nineteen. We believe that it's political than the heads issue. So and we know how much we paid for such an election to happen or to occur. And the government the people to have paid the lives of sixty thousand people we don't want to pay lives. In order to have the constitution that we have already, we know that this is a threat to the constitutions that we have it some twenty years back. To agree is easier appears northernmost region lying along what is now the westernmost stretch of the border with era that tegray has issues with the government in outer suburbs that can be gleaned from the briefest survey of the composition of Ethiopia's national parliament the house of Peoples Representatives Ov- it's five hundred and forty seven seats five, hundred twelve occupied by the Prosperity Party a unity coalition assembled late last year by Ali Ahmed. The thirty five a held by the People's Liberation Front, and now more than ever there might be a clue in the name. To understand how we got here a brisk through the. backstory is probably in order. The teepee Aleph was founded in one, thousand, nine, hundred, seventy, five shortly after the military coup in Saba, which overthrew emperor highly selassie and installed the brutal Linens Junior, which became known as the Doug. was only two years ago that people were able to give vent the grief that shattered every family during the seventeen silent years a fear under the regime of Mengistu Highly Marian. These are the relatives of Mengistu's first victims members of highly selassie imperial government executed without trial in November one, thousand, nine, hundred, seventy, four, the year, Mengistu begun his bloodstained rise to power. The spent his formative years waging war against the Derg, and as is the way of revolutionary movements other tegray in revolutionary movements. When the Doug was finally toppled in one, thousand, nine, hundred, ninety, one. Were at the forefront of the forces which changed the regime and they made certain to stay there. Though members of the Tigrayan. Ethnic group account for barely six percent of Ethiopia's population that. was a huge influence on the eighth. European politics. In the subsequent decades, it was a dominant part of the Ethiopian People's Revolutionary Democratic. Front. The coalition which governed from the fall of the Derg until Abi Alma dismantled last year and reassembled at as the Prosperity Party

Ethiopia Federal Government Eritrea Ali Ahmed Prosperity Party People's Liberation Front Red Sea Doug. North Korea Prime Minister Covid Mengistu Peace Prize Abi Alma Tegray Selassie Saba Tigrayan Gray
"selassie" Discussed on 10% Happier with Dan Harris

10% Happier with Dan Harris

05:46 min | 6 months ago

"selassie" Discussed on 10% Happier with Dan Harris

"Is ten percent happier podcast. I'm Dan Harris. Hey guys. We're doing something a little different for the Friday bonus meditation this week. This one's from seven Selassie author of the forthcoming. Book you belong. And instead of just doing. The traditional mindfulness move of. Tuning into the breath and the body, and there's a little bit of that in here. She's also encouraging us to to work on some other trainable skills such as perspective and gratitude. With that said over seventy. Hi. This is Ebony. As it three time cancer survivor I've come to appreciate both the blessings and challenges of my life. How it's all contributed to the happiness and well-being I have in this moment. And this meditation you'll be reflecting on your life as a way to cultivate appreciation for the particular roads you've traveled to get here. Let's begin. Find a comfortable seated posture. Your is can be open or closed. said. But make sure your back is not tight or rigid. Take a few moments to settle into your body. Connecting to the breath as a way to anchor and gather your attention. Let's spend some time reviewing your life starting with childhood. Bring to mind a happy memory from when you were a kid. We all have them even if for some of us, they're harder to remember. Try and connect to where when and how it occurred. See, if you can elicit all the sensory recollections of this happy memory. That's just one moment in entire childhood of sensory memories. All the childhood experiences that got you here. Now, let's move onto adolescence. Can you remember the energy of that time? Perhaps. They were insecurities or maybe hope about the future. Neither or both. Bring to mind a memory of a challenge from adolescence. Nothing. Traumatic that something you now see with some more perspective. Can you remember how this challenge made you feel? All these moments from adolescence have gotten you to where you are today. Perhaps, you can even appreciate them. Now, let's move onto current adult life. Everyone has a mixture of happiness and unhappiness in daily life. Is there a particular challenge that you're having a hard time accepting right now? Keep. This particular challenge in mind and take a few moments to settle into an awareness of the body. Just notice what's going on for you internally. Breathing in. Breathing out. You don't need to choose or reject any particular experience. Just know that it's all part of the flow of life you've been witnessing since childhood. As we end this meditation, try extending gratitude for this pretty miraculous life you've led. Each moment has gotten you to where you are today. See if you can bring some appreciation to at all. Great job you can open your eyes now and began to move your hands and feet. Let yourself reconnect to your surroundings as we end this meditation? Thanks for your practice. See you next time. I really hope you enjoyed that meditation if you're thinking you know, I, really could've kept that going for another five or.

Dan Harris Ebony Selassie
"selassie" Discussed on 10% Happier with Dan Harris

10% Happier with Dan Harris

03:49 min | 6 months ago

"selassie" Discussed on 10% Happier with Dan Harris

"Hi. . This is Ebony. . As it three time cancer survivor I've come to appreciate both the blessings and challenges of my life. . How it's all contributed to the happiness and well-being I have in this moment. . And this meditation you'll be reflecting on your life as a way to cultivate appreciation for the particular roads you've traveled to get here. . Let's begin. . Find a comfortable seated posture. . Your is can be open or closed. . said. . But make sure your back is not tight or rigid. . Take a few moments to settle into your body. . Connecting to the breath as a way to anchor and gather your attention. . Let's spend some time reviewing your life starting with childhood. . Bring to mind a happy memory from when you were a kid. . We all have them even if for some of us, they're , harder to remember. . Try and connect to where when and how it occurred. . See, , if you can elicit all the sensory recollections of this happy memory. . That's just one moment in entire childhood of sensory memories. . All the childhood experiences that got you here. . Now, , let's move onto adolescence. . Can you remember the energy of that time? ? Perhaps. . They were insecurities or maybe hope about the future. . Neither or both. . Bring to mind a memory of a challenge from adolescence. . Nothing. . Traumatic that something you now see with some more perspective. . Can you remember how this challenge made you feel? ? All these moments from adolescence have gotten you to where you are today. . Perhaps, , you can even appreciate them. . Now, , let's move onto current adult life. . Everyone has a mixture of happiness and unhappiness in daily life. . Is there a particular challenge that you're having a hard time accepting right now? ? Keep. . This particular challenge in mind and take a few moments to settle into an awareness of the body. . Just notice what's going on for you internally. . Breathing in. . Breathing out. .

Dan Harris Ebony Selassie
Reflecting on Your Life, meditation with Sebene Selassie

10% Happier with Dan Harris

03:49 min | 6 months ago

Reflecting on Your Life, meditation with Sebene Selassie

"Hi. This is Ebony. As it three time cancer survivor I've come to appreciate both the blessings and challenges of my life. How it's all contributed to the happiness and well-being I have in this moment. And this meditation you'll be reflecting on your life as a way to cultivate appreciation for the particular roads you've traveled to get here. Let's begin. Find a comfortable seated posture. Your is can be open or closed. said. But make sure your back is not tight or rigid. Take a few moments to settle into your body. Connecting to the breath as a way to anchor and gather your attention. Let's spend some time reviewing your life starting with childhood. Bring to mind a happy memory from when you were a kid. We all have them even if for some of us, they're harder to remember. Try and connect to where when and how it occurred. See, if you can elicit all the sensory recollections of this happy memory. That's just one moment in entire childhood of sensory memories. All the childhood experiences that got you here. Now, let's move onto adolescence. Can you remember the energy of that time? Perhaps. They were insecurities or maybe hope about the future. Neither or both. Bring to mind a memory of a challenge from adolescence. Nothing. Traumatic that something you now see with some more perspective. Can you remember how this challenge made you feel? All these moments from adolescence have gotten you to where you are today. Perhaps, you can even appreciate them. Now, let's move onto current adult life. Everyone has a mixture of happiness and unhappiness in daily life. Is there a particular challenge that you're having a hard time accepting right now? Keep. This particular challenge in mind and take a few moments to settle into an awareness of the body. Just notice what's going on for you internally. Breathing in. Breathing out.

"selassie" Discussed on 10% Happier with Dan Harris

10% Happier with Dan Harris

06:34 min | 6 months ago

"selassie" Discussed on 10% Happier with Dan Harris

"Is a little this little section here where you write about a debate, we had about the use of the term white supremacy. You WanNa WanNa say more about that. Yeah. I. Hope I hope you like that little shoutout handing out. In the most flattering shut up a good. You know it's interesting because I think I shared this with you that for the final passage the book ahead to change that part of it because you know the use of white supremacy has probably increased a thousandfold in the past few months what felt daring to talk about six months ago is like old hat now that every corporation is tweeting black lives matter. So I started to in what's the final version of the book really explore what it means to maybe be able to acknowledge white supremacy externally in institutions or in avowed white supremacist but not really want to explore it internally as had earns of thought or behavior that are playing out consciously or unconsciously within us. Just to be clear the the I remember where you were you and I were sitting in Rosa Mexicano. A chain of Mexican restaurants in New York City, and you were talking about white supremacy and I raise this is way before you know the recent tobacco, this is before the pandemic before George Floyd Brown a Taylor. And I raise the question and I think I've read an earlier version of the book than the one that's coming up but. I remember saying you know is, is there some risk to you to using the term white supremacy because some of the people that you'd like to reach might get confused by that and put off by that and then you've activated their Migdal and you won't be able to talk to them. Yes was also back when we used to go to restaurants. Yes let's be clear. It's white people were talking about and I and I do address that directly to sort of imploring the white reader and maybe anyone else who is comfortable with the term to really stay with me in why this is really important to understand. The structures of white supremacy and other by sees are within us and this process of mindfulness of really beginning to understand see clearly in meet with kindness what's going on in our minds? What's going on in our hearts? That is the process for releasing it. We can't solve the issue of internalized oppression or white supremacy pending who we are and how we're experiencing. If we can't see it clearly and naming it is is a first step to seeing. A very helpfully I mean this is totally consonant with just how you are and how I know you as a person, but it definitely comes through in the book you turn the Lens on yourself and your own flaws in a welcoming way. You let you tell the story, but you tell a story in the book about your older sisters Doctor Can you? Tell that story now. Yeah. So my my sister who's intellectually disabled I'm her guardian was having surgery and I'd heard about this doctor that she was having performed the surgery because her house leader had told me about her and said she was really grade so I got to the hospital up in Hudson waiting for the doctor in the pre op room with. Only white doctors and nurses and technicians except for for one Filipino nurse, and then the doctor walked in the surgeon and she was a black woman, a dark skinned black woman and I was totally shocked. I knew a woman they referred to her as she but I was assuming that I would meet a white person. And so I could see my own. Uh of how these messages of white supremacy the doctors are white and often in the past we would think male had infiltrated my own heart. Mind and you know embarrassingly for someone who teaches unconscious bias all the time to see that playing out for myself and I don't know if I shared in the book because cutting things for space but the next day when I was in the hospital state overnight with her in the hospital I was waiting for the was the weekend. So the surgeon was off and she told us another doctor was coming and I didn't know the gender or race of the doctor. So I was just you know I didn't I didn't know I just knew the name and that was also a black woman and I also surprised in that moment. So a not only slow I'm super slow. Let's talk about another area and again, just staying with this theme of belonging where one big aspect of is. Having this. Healed relationship with yourself so that you can be. Connected with other people it's reminding me I. Don't know if I've ever told the story in the podcast before I remember. The like twenty five years old maybe even younger and I was. Having the dissolution of a relationship discussion with A. About to be former girlfriend and I remember her saying to me. You can't be with anybody if you're not with yourself. And that that was coming up for me as I was reading this book and one sort of this may seem a little counter intuitive. But of really landed for me but one area. That you talk about here is dancing. As a mode to sort of get ourselves in this direction. How is dancing related? Yeah, we took this fast teaching. In, the classical teachings called Sati and we called it mindfulness. which in some ways is a great term in other ways. It makes us think that it's all about our heads. So one of the things I really point to in my own teachings and really trying practice is how embodied are disconnection is and how we're only going to become reconnected and free through these bodies. So dance is one place for me to really see how unfree I am. Some people in our culture? Especially, those of us who are more conditioned by the dominant culture and white culture we are not so connected to our bodies and we have difficulty with dance like a lot of people I'm uncomfortable or was much more..

WanNa Rosa Mexicano George Floyd Brown New York City Hudson
"selassie" Discussed on Toure Show

Toure Show

02:10 min | 6 months ago

"selassie" Discussed on Toure Show

"Take it. Over there. But that's are you know in some art you read about giants. Jacket, the base is about. Our Selassie shrinks out and go down the rabbit all it's all art. Directing is. Different sides of your brain because you've got to have that are part that left brain where you're telling a story and working with creative artists. The actors and then all the technical stuff with the the lighting the cinematography and. I'm always impressed at how directors can deal with both sides of those. Is there one side? That comes easier to you or guest like just what is the biggest challenge for you in directing a film like this? I mean the biggest challenge I think it's I. The biggest challenge is getting done I drink it a green light. You know film has to be the most expensive expressing of art ever I mean to make an album. Maybe what you know in a good old days, they'll get a million dollar buddy you know. Whatever you know to paint or you need his campus in some pain. The player, Song, you can just really get a good song. You can make a song you know to make a movie. Jay? That's the most expensive form of art. And this particular chase an average case you know a movie cost you two thousand dollars a day. Okay and. So that's the biggest challenges to get the industry and your peers in the in the executives who give you a chance to. Play with that type of. Economic. Slump in gathering all these people, there's a lot of people to make ourselves to get everybody to come on board focus into a laser beam focused is save you wanna tell. That's the most challenging part once you get that. For me. Everything goes spores right in my own Tibia. I'm actually. I'm very.

Selassie Jay
"selassie" Discussed on Hurry Slowly

Hurry Slowly

04:40 min | 7 months ago

"selassie" Discussed on Hurry Slowly

"Pain better because that's a question sort of immediately comes up. I. Think when we go back into the body, you know start to really feel things whether that's emotional pain or its literal physical pain, and I think for a lot of people, there's a question of hat is. How can there be a positive in sitting with this? Yeah. You know just first to acknowledge that some people experience really severe pain and chronic pain, and there's different ways to work with that, and that's really on an individual basis I'm gonNA speak more generally about the. More. Kind of mundane pain. Let's call it and that doesn't mean that it's not intense, but we're not talking about really severe chronic or injuries pain. Most of our pain we perpetuate because we are in contention with it. So that pain times resistance equal suffering thing. We're in are suffering because we're actually holding onto our pain in some way So we look at, let's say emotional pain. Most emotions will rise and pass away in our experience and through our bodies and just a matter of seconds or may be minutes, and it's actually the stories that we attached to the pain to the emotion that continue that emotional pain. So, it's because we're kind of re triggering it over again by having the same thought patterns about an experience. That that emotion of fear or sadness or. Or anxiety perpetuates. So a lot of what meditation practice is just. Cultivating the capacity to stay with an experience long enough so that you can see things rise and pass away and rise pass away, and the reason why it takes years and lots of practice and people go on long retreat is because our patterns are so deeply. Woven. Or grooved as the neuroscientists say the neurons that fire together wire together, it takes time to kind of unwired those patterns so that we can see that new patterns are are able to be formed and ready and available, and the emotional pain and and physical pain or actually processed in the same part of the brain. So. There's also some correlation although it's a little different with physical pain as well that and I experienced a lot of physical pain through numerous cancer treatments and I could witness how? The pain would often have. A half-life, it would sort of rise and fall, and it was actually my anticipation of more pain. My fear of pain that was perpetuating a particular experience with that pain. But if I could just be with the actual sensation of pain, it was always changing. It wasn't a constant experience of one type of pain. It was always moving shifting changing. We have to pause for a moment to thank our sponsors, but stay with me after the break seven a and I talk about why meditating while lying down can be a useful corrective to our obsession with productivity and doing doing doing. This episode is brought to you by. Hey. I have such a strong dislike of email that I wrote a whole book about it called UNSUBSCRIBE..

pain half-life
"selassie" Discussed on Hurry Slowly

Hurry Slowly

01:51 min | 7 months ago

"selassie" Discussed on Hurry Slowly

"There's this way when we actually spend time with speak to visit with friends from other communities, actually live in community with people that are different than us. We start to be able to see things from their perspective, and that can be helped by see people. Now trying to take in different media trying to pay attention to different voices, and that's helpful. But it's actually those intimate relationships and you start to hear the experiences and witness how were treated differently how it might feel to be different so that that intimacy really reveals a lot for us. Jocelyn lie and this is hurry slowly a podcast about pacing yourself where I explore, how you can find more cold comfort and clarity do the simple act of slowing down. My guest today is seven Semi Selassie, a meditation teacher, a writer, and friend who studied Buddhism for over thirty years. Her new book, you belong due out on August twenty fifth expert spirituality and Humanity Lens of belonging. Making the case that accepting our own interconnectedness is the surest route to accepting ourselves. In this rich and wide ranging conversation, we discuss the delusion of separation which lies at the core of all feelings of not belonging. The palley concept of Papa or the mental chatter that keeps us from connecting to ourselves..

Semi Selassie Jocelyn writer
"selassie" Discussed on 10% Happier with Dan Harris

10% Happier with Dan Harris

08:08 min | 8 months ago

"selassie" Discussed on 10% Happier with Dan Harris

"You can do this solo or your friends and family and see everybody's progress. Before we start the episode special thanks to seven Jeff because we actually recorded this episode twice, we had planned to launch this challenge. Some of you may remember back in early June, but then with the racial justice uprisings happening across America we decided to press pause and reimagined the entire challenge, and hence this episode so here we go with Seventy Selassie and Jeff, Warren. Seven Jeff greetings to both of you. Hi, Dan I. Jeff Very happy to be here with you, too. Yeah. It's always actually a big boost of dopamine for me to see your faces, and so here's how this episode is going to go. We're GONNA play clips. Both from the video sessions that challenge users will see when they're doing the challenge. And voicemails from listeners to this podcast, and then the three of us will riff on whatever we hear, so the the first thing we're gonNA, play is a clip from day one of the challenge where you're going to hear seven I talking in my kitchen. We just recorded this the other day, and then we'll talk a little bit about what seven I have just talked about on the video clip. If that makes any sense, anyway, so here's the video clip. Just, as evidence of what a difficult time we're living in, we're sitting fifteen feet apart for social distancing purposes and The pandemic. It's just kind of one of the big issues. We're dealing with right now. We've got the pandemic. We've got the economic decline that's come as a consequence, and then we have the racial justice protests across the country, and not for nothing. We're also in a presidential election. That's going to be highly contentious, so I think a lot of people have trouble with the idea of even sitting still right now. What do you say to folks are worried about? Feeling over to twitchy to do this there. Yeah even easier times I think it can feel really counterintuitive to take time like this. Make Space and time to basically do nothing. We're not used to that. Our minds are not used to that. Where usually really engaged and taking information, our bodies are not used to that. We basically only still ourselves when we go to sleep if we can sleep these days. And, so it can feel really challenging and having a challenge like this to structure away to. Just make ten minutes a day to actually sit still and. Start to. Relax, the body start to ease our minds and the transformation that can come from that is to be seen. Okay so that's a clip from day. One of the ten percent happier summer sanity challenge. So, you'll see more if you actually take the and I. Hope You do actually take the challenge, but that's just a little bit of the clip and so let me start this conversation by asking you what? In your mind, what is the value of doing a meditation challenge in the midst of all of this chaos that we're living through? Well I think I'm saying something both. Obvious and an understatement to say the last few months have been really really intense for everyone at different levels, but no one has not been touched by what's been going on. So. I'm a meditation teacher. Obviously I'm going to think that meditation can have a profound effect on us to help US support us through challenges. And I think a challenge like this. Where there's guidance their structure, their great meditations offered, and also there's a sense of community could be really helpful for starting practice or reading an old practice back up again. We're just giving us a break during the day when we're all just navigating so much. Well said Jeff Bring you in here because. We. Talk about in that clip from day one of the challenge. For some people. It's hard to get their heads around the notion of doing nothing, but that is not a tough notion for you. You have a whole series on youtube called the do nothing project. So can you just hold forth a little bit on the value of doing nothing spreading my gospel of indolence? Masses Doing nothing is actually it's doing something. It's creating space. It's what allows us to resets. To then come to a place where we feel okay in the moment so that when we come back into our actions are life. Whatever's happening. We have more clarity more presence more appropriateness in our responses, so it's Sorta like were when we do nothing allow. Cleaning off the signal were cleaning out all the interference all the gum from so much activity to kind Kinda, come back into a baseline state that we give then more intelligently enter into our life from that place. I love hearing. The two of you talk. This is cool. Let's bring in a voice mail. So as we said we're going to be throughout this episode. We're GONNA play a little clips from the challenge itself, and then we're going to bring in voicemail questions from listeners. Here's the first question. Hello. Restrictions has been loosening up where I live We're allowed to go out other people obviously. Social distancing, but has been sheltering place for so long I'm actually in a bit of a panic about going out and seeing friends even with social distancing how it gets to that. This is such a great question and I want to go to you first on this question in part because I'm in the middle of reading your forthcoming book, which is called you belong, and is really good, and we're going to do a whole episode on the book, but in the book you refer a couple times yourself as awkward which I've never actually seen you be awkward, but. But clearly that's going on for you somewhere. So what I hear in that question is social. Anxiety is meditation in your view useful on the score absolutely and you know my inner teenagers feeling very held unseen right now, so I appreciate that I have been navigating in the past week or so really reengaging with going out so I really appreciate this question and the listener acknowledging that. Stuff is gonNA. Come up for us. We've spent months. Many of us isolated to some degree or another from our usual activities in. Its natural for us to have a response or a reaction even to reengaging and I know for me. A lot of anxiety was coming up the first time I took the subway last week again going into Manhattan and sort of witnessing changed world and the first thing that we learned mindfulness is to be aware of what's happening and while we're doing that, we also bring this quality of allowing acceptance. And so this listeners really already doing the practice to be aware that anxiety is a rising and the challenge sometimes is to not react in judgment or trying to push away or change things basically to bring attention to it, so we want to bring attention to it, but not tenseness so bringing that quality of just. Kindness to ourselves is really important. That's been the thing that changed. So much for me. The anxiety that I that I deal with. Jeff what do you say about social anxiety and the value of meditation there? Well, I mean just to respond to the listeners combustion I. Just think first of all is normal to be worried about this. Because we got all these messages about how dangerous it was. Go over so long and now we're getting messages that Oh. It's okay to Gordon certain circumstances of these kinds of ways, so that can be a bit..

Dan I. Jeff dopamine US America youtube Seventy Selassie Gordon Warren Manhattan
White People Talking About Whiteness

10% Happier with Dan Harris

05:52 min | 9 months ago

White People Talking About Whiteness

"Guys many, if not most white people don't think of themselves as racialist race, we might tell ourselves is a reality for people who have different skin colors than ours Black People Hispanic people, Asian people, Indigenous People, etc, but of course white is a race. Quick important side note here. Race is not a biological thing. It is socially constructed. Sadly the white people who seem to have most clearly grasped that white is race or white nationalists. But now it is time for the rest of US white people to actually see whiteness and to talk to each other about it. This many people in the racial justice world would argue. Is the key first step toward white people engaging fully in creating a more equitable society. My guest today is Eleanor Hancock. She's the executive director of group called White, awake which employs and I'm quoting here educational resources and spiritual practices. To engage white people and I'm quoting here again in the creation of just and sustainable society an quote. Eleanor was recommended to me by seven Selassie, who's one of the court teachers on the ten percent happier APP, and was on the show last week, and really powerful episode which I recommend you check out. In this episode Eleanor, and I talk about why this work is so important. Why so many white people resist it? The barriers white people face when they actually do begin the work. The role of meditation, and the problematic aspects of white woke kness in the discussions here we go eleanor Hancock. Nice to meet you virtually. Thanks again for doing this absolutely. So I'd be curious to hear how you came to this work. How and why you can't? I would star with just a little bit about my background and the different stages in my life that have led up to it. I grew up in West Texas. kind of a mid sized city very conservative environments. I'm solid GENENTECH's so I, didn't I was we had an integrated public school system? But that said there's I think a lot of kind of just default segregation that happens socially so I developed awareness of the differences that folks of color the differences of their experiences in the united. States in particular verses, my experience as a white person that began to happen for me in graduate school. It was a variety of different circumstances that led to that. One of them like. Having a roommate that was reading the autobiography of Asada Shukor, and just realizing I, knew about I knew about Amnesty International and that there could be folks who are imprisoned for political reasons, but I it was shocking to me to realize that was something that happened here in the United States, and then the other thing is very influential to me to jump in I. Hate interrupting my guest, but it might be worth explaining a little bit of a Sasha core in that back story just oh! So she's. Part of the Black Panthers and during this entire time period where the FBI. was, targeting civilians through their coin tell pro program and a lot of just extreme aggression on many different levels, including the outright murder of Fred Hampton while he was sleeping in his bed at night, and it was a really it was a political assassination, and during that time period they were able to capture Asada and create these charges against her that kept her in prison for a long time and. She escaped to Cuba. All of that history I would really encourage people to read about that. You can look up quantel pro and the FBI and understand. The destruction that occurred to a lot of the movements that brought a so much during the sixties, the fifties, sixties and seventies the ways that they were destroyed. And part of what happens when you infiltrate and destroy a movement from within is. All only harm it. Externally you create so much paranoia and violence within that then people also began to destroy one another in different ways, so in terms of my own. You know just how I came to this work I try not to Belabor the story too much, but I was in a series of classes and graduate school with a Chicano professor who was teaching performance our, and this was in the late nineties and I really. Learned a lot about what at the time we would have simply called identity politics through art. So. Yeah, being part of those performance art classes for the entire time. I was in graduate school, was really an eye opener that was also during this apetit Easter rebellion, and so we were all just starting to get online, and that was part of it was incredible about that time period. APETIT ZAPPA of southern Mexico, who are indigenous people who had risen up against their own governments specifically in response to Nafta the North American. Free Trade Agreement. And there are a lot of aspects of my world view that developed during that time period, and then as I lived in my life. You know I have a biracial daughter. Her father's African American during the time that we were married I had the privilege of spending a lot of time with his family and developing strong relationships with them, and experiencing myself as the minority I think that that's a unique experience that not every a lot of people don't have that opportunity to be inside of somebody else's space racially speaking and have to understand their norms and their experience and adapt to that. I think that's a really valuable experience.

Eleanor Hancock White United States Apetit Zappa Asada Shukor Genentech Black Panthers FBI Quantel Executive Director West Texas. Selassie Mexico Fred Hampton Cuba Amnesty International Professor Murder
"selassie" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

Stuff You Missed in History Class

11:21 min | 1 year ago

"selassie" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

"This episode of Steph. You missed in history classes brought to you by. WW formerly formerly weightwatchers. I have got some exciting news from them. WW has launched the new my ww program. It's their most groundbreaking and customize proven weight loss lost Glenn. I joined ww. Because I was really looking for something that was going to help encourage me to make healthier eating choices. They have really done that when you join the mine. WW Program Graham. You take this awesome personal assessment which asks you questions about your eating habits and your behaviors and then that scientifically matches you up with customers weight loss plan that can make losing the easiest for you. Head on over to. WW DOT COM that's WW DOT COM to join ww today with a limited time offer to add to this. There were some people thought the strides that the government did make were just too slow and unevenly evenly distributed students in particular especially those students. We mentioned who studied abroad. They complain that Ethiopia social political and economic developments. WERE WAY A to slow. They had studied marks and had all kinds of ideas of their own about land reform any quality but they were the only ones workers teacher soldiers they all wanted Ethiopia to catch up to modern times too. So it's ironic. We see sort of from the beginning to of our podcast to now. He seems to have come. I'm full circle. I he was thought of as the progressive leader modernizing the country and now he's the exact opposite. Yeah everyone advanced beyond him. It seemed tip to some people. I guess what happens when you rule for forty years or more So there were a few revolts and rebellions. Of course if you have these unhappy people but the most serious of these revolts occurred in nineteen sixty up. The emperor was the way visiting Brazil and his imperial cereal bodyguard staged a coup. A lot of university. Students supported it and they even managed to seize the Imperial Palace. Fortunately for highly early Selassie the army and the air force remained loyal to him and they squashed the rebellion pretty quickly But he knew that that things weren't stable bowl that his position was no longer staple to know even before the tells American Committee in Nineteen Sixty in this is a quote from him. The tide which sweeping Africa today cannot be stayed. No power on earth is great enough to halt or reverse the trend it's march as relentless and as inexorable as the passage of time so so he knows he's at risk and Ethiopia's at risk in as the nineteen sixties were on. This resentment really just continued to grow grow in there were a few issues added to that one was Aricha which even though it was legally an independent country it was absorbed by Ethiopia nineteen nineteen sixty two and for Ethiopia. This seemed like a pretty good deal because it gave them access to the sea which everybody wants their country to have access is to the theater and yourself better yeah But a lot of Richard's opposed it from the start and they formed the militant Arabian Liberation Nations front which the acronym for that is Elf To to protest this being absorbed into a country that they they didn't want to be part of right and there was something else that happened. That kind of added to highly celosias unpopularity. At that time age early added to it. There was a a famine caused by drought. which wasn't that unusual in Ethiopia? But the famine that occurred between nineteen seventy two and nineteen seventy four killed several hundred thousand Ethiopians and many felt that highly philosophy. Just didn't really do enough to help people. He they suggested. Also that the government had tried to cover the whole situation up yeah and though there were protests and the situation became really desperate starving people in a tensely a government cover up is going to make the the populace really angry and on September Twelfth Nineteen seventy four. The emperor was deposed. Finally successfully deposed in a revolution that led by a Marxist. Colonel named Mingas Stu Highly Mario and some accounts say that highly saucy was driven from from the Imperial Palace in the back of a Volkswagen with people in the streets. Jeering at him so really undignified exit for this Emperor of forty years. Yeah in eleven months later highly. Selassie was dead at the age of eighty three at the time report said that he died of natural causes but many actually suspect that he was murdered. Word in one thousand nine hundred six valets testified in court that when they found his body there was a strong smell of ether in the room. which suggested to them that he had been suffocated or perhaps perhaps strangled? Yeah and Minke Studio does give the emperor burial. So it's it's not as though highly slash. These body is destroyed or lost immediately But he said to have interred the body vertically head down next to his office latrine and then covered it with two feet of concrete to quote it deter a ghost who has reason to be restless and this is pretty unrelated. But I couldn't help but think of Dante's inferno this is the punishment for simony Germany which I guess if you think about it long enough with Messiah and emperor staff thrown in you. Could you'd work out some sort of connection there but Clearly a very undignified burial. No it wasn't but he did get a more dignified burial later on. His body was exhumed in nineteen ninety. Two you after the fall of Mengistu's government and at that time he wasn't buried right away his body his remains. I should say there wasn't a body at that. Point has remains were put into a small coffin that said do not open they put a sign that said do not open because they weren't quite sure what was gonNA happen really eared isn't it. I mean strange In there a few attempts to bury him you know get this. Do not open box in the ground somewhere but things just kept on getting in the way their arguments. It's about how the funeral should be run. You know whether it should be this state funeral for a former emperor or some sort of Hush Hush private family affair here and I think once when they tried to hold it elections got in the way so things kind of kept putting it off but it finally happened in November of two thousand and it was attended by one of his daughters and many many grandkids. Bob Marley's widow is even there are few Rastafarians there although it's interesting to note that most Farias don't believe that highly selassie is dead. Oh yeah how. `Bout that but Bob Marley's widowed. If she was a funeral I would assume maybe she came to pay her respects in general. Yeah but in addition to them I think there are somewhere around ten thousand to fifteen thousand the people as the total turnout so not nearly as large as you might think it would be decent. I guess but not a tiny family funeral either right and there was this great Two Thousand One story in the Canadian magazine Saturday night and it follows one of highly selassie grandsons Beta Maccagnan. who was living in Canada? The the time through all the events of the funeral. And he kind of recounts his time growing up with the emperor and I just wanted to mention it because I thought it was a really cool story and I and it really. I think shed a lot of light on who highly selassie was I mean we've been recounting through episode. What he did but what? What kind of man was what kind of man was he? So just a end off the podcast. Since it's been kind of a sort of depressing end in decline. We wanted to just say a few things about who the sky was. Yes yes he was ORCA Hollick. That's probably not too surprising He was friendly with President Tito of Yugoslavia who would actually convince him to take vacation. So that's pretty bad. If you have like a fellow president having to tell you to to kick off at the end of the day. Yeah but he did do it. He would go on vacation and take all his grandsons and daughters with him are the ones that were around at the time and So he had a little fun now and again I guess he also was said had to have a Gravitas that made even close members of his family fall silent so imposing presence He was also very concerned about decorum he didn't. I want you to interrupt his morning exercises for example because he thought that no one should see the emperor doing something so undignified so his grandson and this article relates late like running in in the morning to visit him and he said sometimes it'd be great and you'd run in there and everything would be cool but if you're interrupted him during exercises you would definitely get in trouble for that just imagining winning the barbells dropping or hollering But he he did like his grandchildren. I mean that has probably already come across with these family only visits and stuff. He spent a lot of time with the kids and his grandson said quote. You could ask them about the most serious aspect of politics when you were seven. He would answer you as if you were his equal and he'd question you and challenge you see you could see the other side so I guess he does seem to have an interest interest in youth and education. That's pretty consistent throughout his reign and That goes along with treating a kid like somebody who can converses in verses and equal with you and a really caring side too. I think I was telling Sarah earlier about the story. And how he mentions. The emperor himself would poor the grandkids milk in the evenings so they would all kind of gather and he would give them their evening milk himself and the milk ceremony right but the grandson mentioned mentioned that most people had left by the time. The revolt came around. So you know he he thought he would leave too but then when he came down to get the milk one tonight there were only two of them and highly Salafi sets left two grandkids left right and highly selassie said. Is it just youtube tonight. And he said the the grandson in the story Beta he. He realized at that point that he had to stay because there wasn't anyone else so very inching very loyal grandson and so oh just let's just to kind of give you I guess showed there are two sides to the story. Some people still disagree with his policies during his reign but there may have. I've been another side to him too. Yeah so you can have the family man. The popular ruler the unpopular ruler via long. Going on yeah a lot going on a very complex man. Mandalay really interesting went to research. Thank you so much for joining us today for this Saturday classic if you have heard he kind of email address or maybe a facebook url during the course of the episode that might be obsolete it might be doubly obsolete because we have changed our email address. Again you can now reach us at history podcasts. At iheartradio DOT com. And we're all over social media at missed in history and you can subscribe to our show uh-huh on apple podcast. Google podcasts the iheartradio APP and wherever else you listen to podcasts.

Selassie Ethiopia Imperial Palace Bob Marley Steph Glenn Africa facebook Google Brazil Volkswagen Minke Studio apple Mandalay Mingas Stu president Richard Dante Mengistu
"selassie" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

Stuff You Missed in History Class

10:01 min | 1 year ago

"selassie" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

"Some major problems to deal with that without thinking about how he was considered a Messiah by Yep in this episode of stuff you missed in history class is brought to you by. Adt would you like to get the latest innovation in Smart Smart Home Security combined with twenty four seven monitoring for the most trusted name in home security if so adt is for you. Adt has a team of professionals. That will design nine. Install a secure smart home just for you. And they're eighteen thousand employees safeguarding. You with connection to first responders. You'll get the nation's number number one smart home security provider and you will get a secure smart home with everything from video doorbells indoor and outdoor cameras smart locks in lakes all controlled from the ADT DT APP or just using the sound of your voice and you can get professionally monitored carbon monoxide and smoke detection which I know is a huge factor in safety for a a lot of families. You will also get system that is custom designed just for your home and the great thing is that all of this safety can be taken on the go whether you're in the car whether your grocery shopping shopping you're at work. Your kids are at school. You just need the Adt go APP which has a handy SOS button this episode was brought to you by Adt Pretty much as soon as he became emperor he had some issues primarily the rising tensions tensions with Italy. Here's just a little bit of background on the situation. Between Italy in Ethiopia. Italy which call an is most of the Red Sea coast in the nineteenth century three had tried to invade Ethiopia before mental. Ix Army had defeated the Italians back in eighteen ninety six the battle of Ottawa and this was considered a big victory for Ethiopians opium's and for Africa. At the time I think many sources have said that this was the first time in African army had actually met and defeated a European army and conventional battle. So Oh big deal. Yeah definitely a big deal if we fast forward though to highly selassie rain We have Benito Mussolini and power. He has by this point become dictator of Italy in eighteen twenty two and initially. It seems like he's not that interested in Africa in Nineteen Twenty eight. He even signed into this Treaty of Friendship with Ethiopia which at the time was the last African region that was free from some sort of European control? So it seems like Italy was backing off. Maybe the opium Italy would be cool with each other. That was not the case though. It wasn't long before Mussalini started changing his opinion about the country in his intentions in that may have happened for a few different reasons. Yeah for one thing. It's possible that He wanted to avenge the eighteen. Ninety six defeat some people suggest that just conjecture at this point but also Mussalini Eh as we know it was a fascist and part of the whole fascist doctrine as the state should try to expand its sphere of power and influence so that was one thing another thing thing was he kind of just wanted to stick it to the rest of Europe. At that point he thought Italy had gotten a raw deal at the end of World War. One Great Britain and France had both increase creased colonial holdings and Italy didn't really get. Its share of the spoils from his point of view. Yes so he was he was looking to make some gains In the trouble officially officially started in December nineteen thirty four and that's when a Royal Ethiopian force drove out this Italian encampment that was stationed at Wal which was way sis on the Ethiopian territory It seemed maybe from the Ethiopian perspective. Like the Italians. Were a little too close. Maybe they shouldn't have been there They were certainly a threatening presence but the Italians really used it as an excuse to go after Ethiopia the opium like look. They're not they're not treating this treaty in good faith. They're not following it. This is not a treaty of friendship if they're driving away from this OAC's and so they start to gather up their forces in east Africa or the East African colonies to eventually mount an attack on audio right so highly selassie sees this coming and he's pretty freaked out about it. He appeals to the League of nations at this point but but they really don't take any serious steps to stop the Italians from waging an attack. They issue kind of slaps on the hands threats and promises at one point they restrict trade with Italy but this doesn't really work either because countries involved especially Britain and France won't really commit to it and there's a reason for that there is mostly because members of the league particularly Great Britain and France. As I mentioned don't want to upset Mussalini too much. They he wanted to keep up an alliance against with Italy against Nazi Germany. So they didn't even really consider taking military action to defend Ethiopia the time they don't want to alienate Italy And their own European concern seemed to trump those of Ethiopia so on October third nineteen thirty. Five Italian troops start making their way to Ethiopia into Ethiopia and the Ethiopian army. Face them but they were just not prepared for modern European European warfare. At this point The Italians used airpower. And this this kind of sounds like it's right out of World War One combined with world war or to almost but the Italians basically crop dusted the Ethiopian troops with mustard gas and The GOP suffered three times as many casualties. Casualties is the Italians. A lot of the world though considers the stand made by highly philosophy and Paean really brave and noble though it's wet and makes highly Selassie Time Magazine's man of the year in nineteen thirty. Five people are impressed that They're they're mounting a fight against something so overpowering cowering. Yeah I think they almost saw it as like him. Taking a stand against the whole Nazi fascist power out there By May of Nineteen thirty six though the Italians made their way into the Ethiopian capital and they proclaimed Ethiopia part of the Italian Empire so highly selassie was forced into exile. Yeah and that June he goes back to the League and this time. He's a little more ominous he says quote it is us today. It will be you tomorrow. which is extremely prophetic coming in? Nineteen thirty six on the eve of world. War Two So so of course. In exile he has to take refuge. Somewhere outside of Ethiopia so he goes to England for about five years but it's interesting Mussolini's his own ambition to Fulfill that Fascist doctrine and acquire more territory is eventually his undoing. Eighty opium at least right in nineteen forty. He sends this enormous army to invade neighboring Somaliland. which was a British territory at the time and the British though they had fewer you were troops actually answered with a pretty well organized and well played counter-offensive? I think the Italians lost something like two hundred ninety thousand soldiers through either either being killed captured or wounded and this managed to drive the Italians out of east Africa altogether including Ethiopia. Yes so with Britain triumphant Up Highly Selassie got to return home and he was restored to the throne and proceeded to govern for forty years and he was welcomed welcome home by Winston Churchill himself. He sent a welcome home cable in which he said. Quote Your Majesty. It was the first of the lawful sovereigns to be driven within from his throne in country by the fascist Nazi criminals. And you're the first to return in triumph So that would make a really nice end for got a nice positive note. Yeah the a fairytale podcast But unfortunately it's it's GonNa keep going for better or worth. I guess there are more twists and turns to the story definitely so as the LA Z. As emperor does a lot of good things in his time him as ruler of Ethiopia he implemented some social economic and educational reforms for example Established sanitation programs provincial schools. National Sean Universities and even encourage some students to study abroad. Continue their studies. There hinted. That's partly his undoing. Yes it is He also played a significant role in the later years. In establishing the Organization of African Unity he established a constitutional government as well but the constitution and this is part of the problem onto is that it gave him most of the power. Yeah it's kind of a an outward constitutional government So you know. We've got some reforms in Mare. Some good things happening yeah. Something's to give him credit for but some people didn't like the way he was running things. And part of that was that the regional rulers or at least a lot of them felt threatened by his centralization of government he felt like or they felt like philosophy was taking power away from them and giving it to the lawmakers in Ethiopia's capital And a lot of Ethiopians who lived in developing areas. You know lived outside out of the cities Thought that too many privileges were going to the nobility which to make matters worse. A lot of these Landlords landlords these the the nobility the people who owned much of Ethiopia and were largely absent also happened to be related to the emperor so so nobody likes to see that. No not at all.

Ethiopia Italy opium selassie Britain Adt Benito Mussolini Selassie Time Magazine Mussalini European army Ethiopian army east Africa France Organization of African Unity League of nations Red Sea Europe Africa
"selassie" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

Stuff You Missed in History Class

09:05 min | 1 year ago

"selassie" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

"Happy Saturday everybody earlier. Earlier this week we talked about the rock hewn churches in Lalibela Ethiopia. And we mentioned the Solomonic Dynasty and its last emperor highly selassie and previous hosts hosts. Sarah Lena did an episode on him including his connection to the rastafarian movement in February of two thousand eleven. So we're going to share that episode today. We hope you enjoy joy. Welcome to stuff. You missed in history class. A production of iheartradio's how stuff works. Hello and welcome to the PODCAST. I'm Sarah Dowdy and I'm dobalina chocolate boarding and it seems like we're gradually stumbling upon kind of sub theme for the PODCAST here. It seems like situations keep cropping up in history in which someone's remains are discovered uncovered identified and buried elsewhere. Yeah like a variation of our main exclamation theme almost exactly for example. Take a Perron. I think the before our time Stephan you missed in history class did a podcast on Perron and how it took more than twenty years to bury her and it was for political reasons and her body traveled kind of all over the place Italy Spain before finding its final resting place in Buenos Aires and that was a little different because I think they kind of knew her body was all time. Yeah yeah they were always afraid who is gonNA get stolen though. I think that was always a concern right. And then of course there was our recent podcast about Henry the fourth. We talked about him to kick off our Bourbon series that has been ongoing and his head was recently identified and will be reinterred this year with full state honours so kind of along the same lines ends and with today's episode. We have similar sort of situation. Though with a very different set of circumstances the subject of this episode is highly Selassie he was the last emperor of Ethiopia sometimes known to his subjects as the king of kings and the lion of Judah and Time magazine wants even made him their man of the year ear members of the Rastafarian movements which is how a lot of people know him they even think of him as their Messiah yet. He didn't receive a proper burial when he died in. Nineteen seventy five yeah. It's always surprising the people who don't get the proper burial So his remains were exhumed from a makeshift tomb in nineteen ninety-two But his his official funeral didn't take place until the year two thousand so a pretty long gap between those two dates and even then when the a funeral finally did happen it was pretty controversial. It was tough to pull off. There was a lot of debate With the current government of Ethiopia of how it should happen. Yeah so why did it take nearly thirty years to bury a world renowned leader. That's just part of what we're GONNA look today as well as the conflict between Ethiopia Ethiopian. Italy that put highly selassie on the map in the first place on the international stage out there for everyone to know his name and see. Yeah but You know of course before we talk about. What put him on the map? We're going to talk about how he got to be Emperor of Ethiopia in the first place because he was not heir to the throne it was not his destiny At least so it seemed he was born too far maccagnan on July twenty third eighteen ninety two and he was the son of a prince. Ross Mekonnen Conan Ross means prints And his father was also a noted general in the chief advisor to the emperor who is Emperor Menelik the second In power at the time that far I was born And he was related to the emperor but not that closely he was emperors grandnephew view and there were kids and grandkids who are in line to take the empress place. It didn't seem like this. Relatively distant kin would eventually rise the thrown. But little did they know too far. I was pretty intelligent. And he impressed the Emperor Menelik very early on and so the emperor started appointing too far to these provincial governorships at the young age of fourteen and he became governor first of Saddam. Oh and then the Harare province so he's governing and his policies at the time were considered pretty progressive compared to what was out there he wanted to decrease the power of the local nobility by pumping up the power of the central central government so for example one of the things that he did was developed a salaried civil service. Yeah we have our minds so much bourbons to this kind of reminded us of richelieu and Louis the fourteenth centralizing the government With a with King with the emperor But meanwhile while the young too far is working on all this the emperor dies in nineteen thirteen and his grandson lease Yasu takes the throne But this man is not very popular and not popular right from the start part of it was he had converted to Islam and the majority of Ethiopians at this time. We're Christians Christian so his subjects weren't particularly happy with that point too far away on the other hand who was a devout Orthodox Christian he comes to represent resent the Christian resistance at this time so the country's younger generation they support him for this and also because they're becoming enamored by his progressive tendencies unsee. So with both of these things working for him he's able to depose leash asu in one thousand nine hundred sixteen and that makes Malik the second daughters Audie to empress. But there's a problem with that because at the time it was considered unseemly for a woman to rule in her own right so Ross is too far I is named regent and heir apparent to the throne. Yeah and it's interesting too because You normally think of a region and a ruler working at least somewhat in tandem especially if they're two adults but this was not the case. The ruler is what is a pretty conservative empress compared to rust fireeye but he seemed to be the one who was really pulling the strings he was the one moving his more progressive agenda forward and it is pretty it is pretty progressive in nineteen twenty-three he gets Ethiopia admitted into the League of nations the relatively new League of nations that point in in nineteen twenty four. He becomes the first Ethiopian ruler to ever go abroad. He visits Rome and Paris and London and by Nineteen Twenty the eight. He's sort of elevated this region position a little bit and he takes the title King of Ethiopia. A little to have a king and an empress here In it sort of shows you where the true power all in his power is elevated even more in one thousand nine hundred thirty Wednesday to dis making Rastafari Emperor. It's then that he takes the name highly selassie which means might of the Trinity. So now he's truly empower these the emperor he is the emperor. Emperor something else is happening at the same time in a land. Far Away in Jamaica about the last thing you could expect to happen yet. Ah Now of course a lot of snow the story but at the time it would have been maybe kind of surprising to some people's ears where things so when highly selassie became emperor ver- it fulfilled a prophecy or a prediction that black leader and founder of the back to Africa Movement. Marcus Garvey had made years before what he had said at that. Time was look to Africa for the crowning of a black king. He shall be the redeemer so when this comes true so to speak back in highly Selassie russifying Azam is born obvious now or that name Rastafari so a couple of primary Rastafarian rastafarian beliefs. are that the only true. God is the late Ethiopian. Emperor Highly Selassie and that Ethiopia's the True Zion which was kind of a paradise on earth and one of the key doctrines is that they will someday return to Africa from which their ancestors were taken a slave. So those of you who maybe are fans of Bob. Marley have heard some of this before. Bob marlies very famous for being defiant. So yeah but there's a there's a weird element to all of this and that's that highly philosophy himself food being revered as the Messiah Hours The only true God by Rastafarians doesn't really go along with it himself because he's a devout without Christian so he never really accepts his status as a messiah as a deliverer that these people sort of thrust upon him. I think that's Sacha Gotcha. What a strange? What a strange deal to have going on there? Yeah and I think when he was alive people asked him about it. You know did you. Did you know about this. Did you know that you're considered a messiah. And he was just kind of like yeah. I've heard that but I don't have a man. He just said He. I'm just just a man. It's no any also at the time. At least he had.

Emperor Highly Selassie Ethiopia Lalibela Ethiopia Ross Mekonnen Conan Ross Perron Africa Selassie russifying Azam Time magazine Sarah Lena iheartradio Solomonic Dynasty Sarah Dowdy Harare Bob marlies Nineteen Twenty Buenos Aires Marcus Garvey Jamaica Henry League of nations
"selassie" Discussed on News Radio 1190 KEX

News Radio 1190 KEX

01:48 min | 1 year ago

"selassie" Discussed on News Radio 1190 KEX

"An appliance get set for a very soggy day on Friday we're talking cloudy skies rain occasionally heavy at times especially the morning hours upwards of one to two inches of new rain possible in the Portland metropolitan area on the Oregon coast much more rain and also windy or high wind warnings up all the way through four o'clock in the afternoon daytime highs locally in the mid to upper fifties from the K. to storm tracker weather center I'm Dave Selassie from the gateway.

Dave Selassie Portland Oregon
"selassie" Discussed on Little Atoms

Little Atoms

02:18 min | 2 years ago

"selassie" Discussed on Little Atoms

"Happens joy more as well as the destruction and the atrocities in the med as is a lot of modernisation takes place and the existing social order shaking up so once then in forty one they talion deposed and highly selassie comes back a lot of people ambivalent about yes well this is true the biblical sorts of different reasons so for example there were lots of rebel leaders who suddenly you know they were lied and they had fought really hard for their country and you know the emperor came back and just expected to be in charge again because he was emperor and said that was always that's quite complex dynamic the italians didn't amazing amount of modernization they didn't very fast they did it you know makes you think of this whole roman empire you know they build roads everywhere whether tongues still built roads everywhere and talion roads and bridges was still there when they might replace chinese rights but the time plumbing in the hospital my memoir and it was still functioning italian plumbing common at one point they thought of retired the guy he used to do that plumbing and then promptly to rehire him because they suddenly realize that this elderly italian music only person in new role the pipes were there's there is that there's a degree of that people with grateful they were just like we have roads we have plumbing we have electric lighting in areas that maybe you know the government the central imperial government had no client bullard to provide although i have to say that one thing that did happen was when the british came so the allies in the italians were expelled with the help of britain and they saw this modernisation factories the italians had established and they thought well this is too good and they were just in up year they dismantled them and i took them for their colonies which staunching the emperor can hang on the second you don't get to do that you don't get to just take a paul factories and send them to combo some land or something which is what they still you know whatever there was chaos off clearly kales in a lot of places where people who eat a rebel fighters who there was a whole.

selassie bullard britain
"selassie" Discussed on WTRH

WTRH

01:53 min | 3 years ago

"selassie" Discussed on WTRH

"Say the twenty third psalm do you know what that is yes you know how it starts i'm not sure i'd have to have it right in front of me in k two sisters do you recognize these words the lord is my shepherd yes okay the truth is the one who created you is your lord think about it this way you've got the the literal person we call god jesus is god the bible is the trinity the father the son the holy spirit okay the lord you if you just picture jesus for a moment jesus he is the shepherd of your soul and the law when we read in the twenty third psalm there's only six versus the lord is my shepherd what i want you to do is to take charge of your thinking by this if something happens when selassie time you've had a panic attack about a week ago okay and you did you just try to wait it out just what you do i try i try to tell my husband what was going on and then he put on tv show to try to get my mind off but we're going to give you.

selassie
"selassie" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:46 min | 3 years ago

"selassie" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Closest that i got be seek highly selassie bus selma l c is not an damnedest double standard trouble via sutton candido the subtle gun to flag down what no has say cut a regulation legislation but not summa yao walking around like for same word as i wonder what the murder was a james bird thought about the generally in 1998 james bird a black man in texas was badly beaten and pistol on by three white supremacists the men then chained bird by his ankles to a pickup truck and dragged him over asphalt for roughly three miles per died when his head and arm was severed from his body the white supremacists who sported various nazian confederate symbols dumped birds mutilated body near a black church this atrocity was heavy on breezes mind when he wrote generally which is why the last verse ends in anger as he says gone the flag down though hesitating mcconnell connell was like i know some people are going to be like breezy wallen until about shooting down flag you should go of the right channels this legislation bum leg word lo what were murder was a james birth thing about a generally you know what i mean is just like at some point we gotta idols we got bernie idols to you same you told me that you were arm you've been thinking about the song a lot lately literally like a week before you called i was listens to song almost got little choked up 'cause i got dan you know what i mean it's like sixteen years later why isn't still an issue i'd like to think komo you'd better than that america.

sutton candido murder mcconnell connell america selassie texas james sixteen years