21 Burst results for "Seeley"

"seeley" Discussed on The Reigny Day Podcast | Ontario Reign

The Reigny Day Podcast | Ontario Reign

04:54 min | Last month

"seeley" Discussed on The Reigny Day Podcast | Ontario Reign

"They've only allowed one goal in the first period in five games That's a huge reason. Why they are unbeaten in regulation. And you were talking about the depth on the scoring. There is fifteen skaters on the team. Fifteen that have multiple points in the first five games so to answer more fifteen different guys and you know the other thing is yeah. Tj tyne yet three assists in one game. But he's got six assists on the year he's a plus five rating which is tied for the team. Lead so over appoint a game and he only has six shots on goal. He's not he's not really shooting he's just he's just distributing and i think what what you're going to see is he's going to become really open and he's not going to miss when he gets the shot you know i think opponents are gonna say he's passing he's passed. He's got a guard guard his passes in when he gets an extra extra room. He still has a really good shot. And we haven't even seen the best of dj tynan yet and we said that he was going to facilitate the offense. So i'm gonna throw out one more prediction here. When he gets his first goal. It's going to be a nice one for sure and to add onto that real quick. I i think one more staff that is really important and again it's been five games but through five games. This is the best start to a season for the ontario rain since their first year. In the ahl in two thousand fifteen twenty sixteen that year they were five and through through five games this year. Their four zero one one And that twenty. Fifteen sixteen team was seven one and two through the first ten games of the season so they started out really hot then. Of course that's on. The back of winning the calder cup in manchester So this year. It's coming on the backs of a season where they did not start very well. They were what what alex said yesterday. Oh intend to start the year. I did my first game for the rain in march and they were one ten and to and from the beginning of march to the end of the season they were top eight in the league and point percentage After that point so slow start then got hot this year. It's the hot start And it's the best start to a season at least through five games that they've had and now six years so I think that there are positives to take from that. You take it with a grain of salt because it has only been five games all of which were at home but it definitely is A huge positive for the ontario rain through five games Especially when you've struggled a little bit the last few years now that you have a lineup composed of the young guys some veteran guys and if you guys in between to kind of create a good collective group will someone else who's very excited about. The start is general manager of the ontario. Ramey spoke with richard seeley. Here's that conversation.

Tj tyne dj tynan ahl calder cup ontario manchester alex richard seeley Ramey
"seeley" Discussed on The Reigny Day Podcast | Ontario Reign

The Reigny Day Podcast | Ontario Reign

05:34 min | Last month

"seeley" Discussed on The Reigny Day Podcast | Ontario Reign

"Happy to be with you to talk some ontario rain hockey. this season. Jarod shafran and josh schaeffer. We're also the broadcast team for the rain. But josh this is going to be fun a little podcast and we get to delve deeper into some of the personalities. The team and and the people around the team looking forward to to jumping off here. Yeah it was a good start to the season. Two exciting starts to the season that seems four and one through their first couple games so a good start to the season could start to the podcast. We already have a pretty pretty big time. Guest episode one. Yeah we'll be joined by. Richard seeley the general manager of the rain in our first episode. I think we figured you gotta start at the top when you when you start off the new season You know. I always want to say it. And we'll continue to say throughout the year but you know if you have suggestions if you if you're a listener or fan of the team and you want to hear from somebody specific let us know. I think we want to try to have as much interaction as possible with our fans in our listener so definitely feel free to reach out. If you're looking for something specific but yeah we figured we we gotta start off with the general manager here from the top about go are exactly and who we need to hear from but yeah you mentioned josh. Four in one outstanding start. I don't think you could ask for anything better. And i just go back to keep going back to this conversation that had before the season started with john wroblewski as a coach. I think he was excited to see the home fans and see the crowd but us also a little worried. If the teen didn't start off good it was gonna be. Oh here. We go again like what happened last year. And there's no practice time into beginning to fix things so it you're going into it a little bit blind but the team may the staff proud here at the beginning of the season. Yeah you get five home games in a row you get the five game homestand anything. Okay great so you get five games in a row..

Jarod shafran josh schaeffer Richard seeley josh hockey ontario john wroblewski
US Officials To Hold Talks in Mexico & Guatemala on Migration

All Things Considered

04:37 min | 9 months ago

US Officials To Hold Talks in Mexico & Guatemala on Migration

"Migrants coming to the U. S border. Thousands of unaccompanied teens and Children in U. S custody, some held in jail like facilities. More likely on the way. This is the urgent situation facing President Biden at the border today and an echo of the one he faced as vice president back in 2014. His approach so far is similar focus on the root causes. Today, he sent three top officials to Mexico and Guatemala to discuss how to manage the increasing numbers of people trying to reach the U. S. Joining us to talk more about this is Franco or join us and Przybyl, White House correspondent and Franco first tell us just the basics of this trip to Mexico. Well, I think this is a trip that really shows how urgent the situation really is. Most of the migrants to the U. S border are from three Central American countries. Mexico had been working with the former administration to keep them from making that journey through Mexico, but that largely stopped. Biden is now sending two top officials from the National Security Council and another from the state Department to the region. Roberta Jacobson. She will be leading talks with Mexico's foreign secretary, Marcello Abroad and other top Mexican officials. She was actually an ambassador to Mexico during the Obama administration, and she'll be joined by one Gonzales, the NSC senior director for the region. Now they'll be talking about how to manage the situation and also be exploring a joint development strategy for Mexico and the Northern Triangle countries, you know, trying to work together to address the root causes of migration. Let's take one example. Guatemala What's on the agenda there? Welcome. Salas, again from the NSC and Ricardo Zuniga from the State Department will travel to Guatemala to meet with president they part of the President Alejandro Giammetti and his foreign minister, Pedro Barolo, and other economic and security officials. They will also meet with representatives from the private sector and civil society groups. You know, the big picture here is that President Biden feels that security and prosperity in Central America Are closely linked to security and prosperity in the United States. Give us some context here in terms of how Biden waiting when he was vice president, and maybe what he's doing differently this time around as president. Well, his vice president, Biden led a similar effort to Rio to address the root causes of migration. It was called the Alliance for Prosperity, and it provided a billion dollars to help police training, judicial reform and and corruption. This time around. He wants to offer $4 billion. Now I talked to Andrew Seeley about this. He's the president of the Migration Policy Institute. He said Biden is finding out the hard reality about this challenge that faces all presidents. And that it's not easy. The border is to immigration politics with the Middle East is to foreign policy. You know, every president comes in determined to do something focus on a different part of immigration. And ends up sucked into the border in some way. Frankly, Biden now owns this issue and the political fall out in a way that he didn't when he was just the vice president and one big difference in his approach this time is that the administration is going to be a bit more clear eyed about the realities of corruption at the highest level of these governments and Central America. The administration says they will on Lee give the money to community and international organizations. How has the Biden administration responded to criticism from Republicans who are claiming that Biden triggered this influx of migrants by reversing some of the restrictive immigrant immigration policies? Of President Trump's, You know, it's been a difficult thing to answer. On the one hand, the bind Administration says Look, we're going to have a more humane policy and going to rebuild the asylum system, which was largely dismantled by the former administration. On the other hand, they're saying Don't come now. And there's a sense that that message is a little bit muddied. The White House insists they've been clear they point to the thousands of radio ads and targeted social media ads in the region that they say have reached millions of people. But the numbers of people coming to the border are still high. And while the administration says that most people are turned away Children or not, and some families are not as well. And will Biden visit the board? Well, he said yesterday that heals go at some point, but there's no sense that that will happen in the near future. That's NPR.

Mexico President Biden Biden Guatemala Przybyl Franco U. Roberta Jacobson Marcello Abroad NSC Obama Administration Ricardo Zuniga State Department Alejandro Giammetti Pedro Barolo Alliance For Prosperity National Security Council Andrew Seeley White House
"seeley" Discussed on Tribe of Leaders

Tribe of Leaders

02:02 min | 9 months ago

"seeley" Discussed on Tribe of Leaders

"I didn't think i'd be quite the pearson will have the skill sets that i had if i go through Amazing tim. there's so much learning that you've had. How did that help you. Start this business. With creatively disruptive mike papa of i my business partner. He threw some la issues a new zealand. He's actually based on new zealand. He's very much the side. I'm more of the business in the the sales and your customer relation kinda guy. My partners much moldy the nuts and bolts how to build websites build campaigns bubba and we both came together. And we're like you know he's a family member and we're like you know there's gotta be a better way of doing marketing online for small business. This was a while ago six years ago at the time that was. Your every man's dog would say that the facebook expert everyman's dogs. They're online marketing experience and most of them knew nothing. And you know something on. We felt pretty good about the knowledge that we had and we thought you know. Why don't we build something. That's very transparent burying very honest we will say things to clients. They don't wanna hear because they need to hear some of them don't like it and they leave many of them do like it and that's why they stay. We don't lose many clients. They tin stick with us and a lot of it. Is that honest open. Transparency we decided to focus on small business liberia. Leon i'm so go we. We've got pushing a hundred different clients. A good number of e commerce that keeps shop because e commerce was very very difficult. So if you're good at e commerce which we saw that makes it very easy to be very good for like small business and so forth and you got retained to do a very good job with those but we focus.

Miami surges to victory in NFL Week 13

South Florida's First News with Jimmy Cefalo

00:30 sec | 1 year ago

Miami surges to victory in NFL Week 13

"Us that final scoring all kinds of good stuff. stuff. There's There's 19 19 7. 7. The The Dolphins Dolphins of of beat beat the the Bengals Bengals yesterday yesterday and and hard hard Rock Rock Stadium, Stadium, Miami's Miami's record record now now eight eight and and four. four. They They host host the the 11 11 and and one one Kansas Kansas City City Chiefs Chiefs next next Sunday Sunday and and the the pandemic, pandemic, providing providing some added entertainment Jimmy Doubleheader today, including the undefeated Pittsburgh Steelers, hosting the Washington football team, That's a five o'clock game. Not available to everybody. Don't let you've got direct TV. Apparently later, the 40 Niners will be the home team. In Arizona as they host if Seeley East leading Buffalo bills

Bengals Rock Rock Stadium Dolphins Kansas City City Chiefs Chiefs Miami Kansas Pittsburgh Steelers Football Washington Niners Arizona Buffalo Bills
"seeley" Discussed on Capes and Lunatics

Capes and Lunatics

03:40 min | 1 year ago

"seeley" Discussed on Capes and Lunatics

"Analysis spiral stuff and Using hunters was come eyesight of it and then we combined it made one thing somehow and eventually that led to work on highway when grace in turn into riga rebirth Just transferred over to writing that. But i i was rereading the grace and stuff. Oh awhile ago it was are is probably a stupid question but agent. Thirty seven was thirty. Seven a random number did have special meaning the now issue her defector comics. Thirty eight robin. I shows up so as a balance the tech detective so we were like we said well he should be agent thirty eight and then or like. That doesn't sound that good. We we were like well. Let's do the last issue of detective before robin shows up so like because he's gone right. That was are somehow rearrests. Just sounded good as thirty seven hundred better than eight thirty eight. When you say that it's it's true there is it's hard to define but there is something about thirty seven inches off the tongue. Easier than thirty eight years of the. Yeah so it has a reference but it's not like incredibly accurate or anything else but We kind of it also sort of slightly reference. Glad i guess you know there was a touch of that to it. So we're you like a big guy they Dick grayson light wing fan before you came on board. Because i mean you really seem to have like a really good grasp on the character who he is He was sort of my one of the first characters i ever saw even period just saw when he was robin When i was a kid i was telling the story. It's kinda stupid probably talks salt this point but we from when i was like five years old. My mom got me for christmas. A was supposed to be the spider mobile. I love by. It's supposed to come with them. A much marvel characters was the omega one and instead it came with robin hulk in green goblin. They must screwed up on the packet in a so. I had to play with robin. Because i didn't have a spiderman and So that it all ties together. Because i hadn't worked with a web. Spiders asian well. He had a web thing car when i was a kid so soon. All tracks but Yeah i was like character. I had red wing when i was in college when dutch dixon was on it I love the teen titans. Marv wolfman I was always a familiar with the character Always liked him because he was nice like out that was always appealed to me was that he wasn't really tormented kinda A thing about these characters that you know. I kind of always always appealing. Is that at. The heart of the dc character was sort of like just inherent goodness which you know in these in these days is hard to find so compelling to me. yeah like. I like one of my rebirth Was an issue nine. I think with him and superman. I really like him. You know like a really well written night. We in superman story. Which one was. Yeah i was something as a kid. I had read a batman and robin team. With a superman. I always loved the combination of the two of them Superman robin have more in common than batman robin. I was so that was kind of fun so was always the thing..

robin riga robin hulk Dick grayson Marv wolfman dixon titans batman robin
Delta to Use Frequent-Flier Program to Raise $6.5 Billion

Marketplace

02:02 min | 1 year ago

Delta to Use Frequent-Flier Program to Raise $6.5 Billion

"Airlines in a move that should surprise exactly nobody said the date needs to borrow $6.5 billion, an airline executives said the other day, the company is losing $27 million a day. The interesting slash surprising part of this deal is the asset. The Delta is putting up his collateral, its frequent flyer program marketplaces, Justin Hose, going to explain exactly how that's gonna work. Frequent flier miles aren't only meant to build customer loyalty there. Also a product that airlines cell Samuel Angle a senior vice president with a consulting firm, I C F. He says The buyers are credit card companies and the quite a card companies in turn, give those miles to consumers as a reward for using their credit cards. Angle says Miles are a money making machine for airlines. At the beginning of this year, the programs of the four largest U. S. Airlines together had been valued at $77 billion if they were Stand alone Businesses airlines, Khun Tap these programs to raise cash. One common method is to pre sell miles the banks to get cash upfront. Henry Harteveldt is president of Atmosphere Research group, he says an airline can also spin off the entire program is their candidate did in 2005 no airline, though, until recently has leveraged its frequent flyer program. As collateral against a loan earlier this year United put up its loyalty program is collateral for a government loan. Harteveldt says. It's a creative way to raise cash at a time when air travel demand, especially by their more profitable business fliers has fallen off the cliff. Airlines have other creative ways to raise money. Scott Hamilton with the aviation consultant Seeley him, company says it's common for airlines to pledge their planes as collateral for loans, even their headquarters and airport gates. But the frequent flyer program is to me the most creative and the most visible sign of the desperation that the airlines urine the risk for airlines, Hamilton says is taking on too much debt. That could make it harder for them to recover from the current slump.

Miles Samuel Angle Senior Vice President Henry Harteveldt Scott Hamilton Seeley Delta Khun Tap Justin Hose Consultant Atmosphere Research Group
"seeley" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

02:18 min | 1 year ago

"seeley" Discussed on WTOP

"Elie W. W. Seeley Saville diet has been checking out the roadways in northwest DC on the impacts that the corona viruses having on traffic during morning and afternoon rush the pandemic's paradox as corona virus spread spring hits its stride every day brings more green more flowers more life the metro area transportation operations coordination program cites a significant drop in gestione levels area wide and without that incessant war of traffic here along Rock Creek parkway you can hear a little more wildlife a lot of hikers and bikers out to date during this outbreak the parkway looks and sounds a little more like the scenic highway it was originally intended to be in Rock Creek park Dave goldmine WTOP news it's Friday March twentieth welcome into W. T. O. P. at three OO a pleasure with a fifty nine dollar precision furnace tune up by calling eight hundred nine four eight traffic and weather on the aids and when it breaks trucks on the scene on the you know it always just after fifty John Hanson highway exit nineteen still along the right side so once again they are blocking the end of the on ramp from I. John Hanson highway to join in a loop of the beltway so folks coming off that ramp have to merge early in the through traffic but the through lanes on the beltway are open you are getting by without delay rest of the beltway in Maryland to prince George's and Montgomery counties no other incidents or delays to report still working to seventy north and south north to route one twenty one Clarksburg southbound before nor town after a down to a single right lane in each direction as of late no reported delays in either direction they are for now still working on the westbound span of the bay bridge that remains close for overnight maintenance still running to two way traffic despite the heavy fog that is moved in over the bay bridge so please be extra careful they're low beams instead of high beams and reduced visibility now if you're traveling on the beltway in Virginia absolute headed south to read seven down toward I sixty six single file right Kunj bother works on in a little pro Ching I. sixty six you've been getting a lot of work to lanes to right now as of late getting buy in each direction without the land if you want to avoid them all together express lanes are available in both directions there as well rich hundred WTOP traffic mostly cloudy skies and mild as it gets in the predawn hours will be some patchy fog our lows mid fifties to lower sixties later stay breezy warm.

DC W. T. O. P. Maryland Montgomery bay bridge Virginia Elie W. W. Seeley Saville Rock Creek park John Hanson prince George Clarksburg
"seeley" Discussed on Talk Nerdy

Talk Nerdy

03:19 min | 2 years ago

"seeley" Discussed on Talk Nerdy

"Yeah they are intrinsically fascinating just being themselves and of course you you've shared those stories so beautifully early in your Book Thomas. Tom Sorry before we before we wrap up this chat. You know I I close every episode of my show by by asking my guests the same two questions and they're sort of big picture questions so you could obviously take a moment to think about your answers answers but I I would really love for you to weigh in especially considering the unique perspective that you that you bring to the conversation so okay. If you're ready here they come number one when you think about the future in whatever context is kind of relevant to you. It could be contextualised by the work that you do. You buy you know where you are along the developmental process of life. It could be a personal thing. Vocational thing even a cosmic thank Number one what is the thing that really does keep you up the most at night the thing that you're most worried about. Maybe you're getting to be borderline. I I don't know pessimistic. Cynical some something that you're like this is not okay and on the flip side of that. What is the thing that if you had to pick one That you're like genuinely authentically. Baxley optimistic about you're you're very much looking forward to will the first one's easier because because it's it's it's just the pervasive damage to our planet Loss of water rising icing temperatures pollution with pesticides and everything else Yeah so that. That's that's the one that keeps me up at night. I mean I just. I'm almost seventy years old and I can just see it. It's so obvious when I was a kid. The fields were filled with insects. And now they're not. If you go out. In the summer evening thing would be symphony symphony of insects. And now you just don't you don't see that you don't hear that tone. See what gives me. Hope or optimism. what it gives me. Hope and optimism is knowledge. Were learning more and more about what where we're going wrong. And that's of course the first step knowing what we're doing knowing what we're undoing the first step towards I think to getting it can unit back to figuring out how to stop doing that and and be more benign tour to her planet and thus ultimately to ourselves and to our to our children. Absolutely what a beautiful full and elegant response to those questions. Well Tom Thank you so very much for coming on the show. Today I have learned so much I I know I still. I have a million questions but I feel like my basic questions have been answered. Everybody the book is the lives of bees the untold story of the Honeybee in the wild by Dr Thomas. DT sealy thank you so much for joining me. It was. It was just an absolute blast. Thank you car for for having me your. It's been ruined my pleasure. Great Greek through showing them glad I could contribute to. Oh I'm so glad and everybody listening. Thank you for coming back week after week. I'm really looking forward to the next time we can all get together to talk nerdy..

Dr Thomas Tom Baxley
"seeley" Discussed on Talk Nerdy

Talk Nerdy

03:19 min | 2 years ago

"seeley" Discussed on Talk Nerdy

"Yeah they are intrinsically fascinating just being themselves and of course you you've shared those stories so beautifully early in your Book Thomas. Tom Sorry before we before we wrap up this chat. You know I I close every episode of my show by by asking my guests the same two questions and they're sort of big picture questions so you could obviously take a moment to think about your answers answers but I I would really love for you to weigh in especially considering the unique perspective that you that you bring to the conversation so okay. If you're ready here they come number one when you think about the future in whatever context is kind of relevant to you. It could be contextualised by the work that you do. You buy you know where you are along the developmental process of life. It could be a personal thing. Vocational thing even a cosmic thank Number one what is the thing that really does keep you up the most at night the thing that you're most worried about. Maybe you're getting to be borderline. I I don't know pessimistic. Cynical some something that you're like this is not okay and on the flip side of that. What is the thing that if you had to pick one That you're like genuinely authentically. Baxley optimistic about you're you're very much looking forward to will the first one's easier because because it's it's it's just the pervasive damage to our planet Loss of water rising icing temperatures pollution with pesticides and everything else Yeah so that. That's that's the one that keeps me up at night. I mean I just. I'm almost seventy years old and I can just see it. It's so obvious when I was a kid. The fields were filled with insects. And now they're not. If you go out. In the summer evening thing would be symphony symphony of insects. And now you just don't you don't see that you don't hear that tone. See what gives me. Hope or optimism. what it gives me. Hope and optimism is knowledge. Were learning more and more about what where we're going wrong. And that's of course the first step knowing what we're doing knowing what we're undoing the first step towards I think to getting it can unit back to figuring out how to stop doing that and and be more benign tour to her planet and thus ultimately to ourselves and to our to our children. Absolutely what a beautiful full and elegant response to those questions. Well Tom Thank you so very much for coming on the show. Today I have learned so much I I know I still. I have a million questions but I feel like my basic questions have been answered. Everybody the book is the lives of bees the untold story of the Honeybee in the wild by Dr Thomas. DT sealy thank you so much for joining me. It was. It was just an absolute blast. Thank you car for for having me your. It's been ruined my pleasure. Great Greek through showing them glad I could contribute to. Oh I'm so glad and everybody listening. Thank you for coming back week after week. I'm really looking forward to the next time we can all get together to talk nerdy..

Dr Thomas Tom Baxley
"seeley" Discussed on Talk Nerdy

Talk Nerdy

10:25 min | 2 years ago

"seeley" Discussed on Talk Nerdy

"Most beekeepers on an older be by all money beat biologists. Oh It's absolutely incredible. Incredible and of course you know you mentioned previously that the sociology and And really the communication That's unique is also really the key to their success as a species and and that they have been quite a successful species accounting for are you know almost half of of pollination that said we also know that human activities as is so often. The case are really threatening the honeybee right now so I would love to maybe take the last bit of our chat to talk about what some of the the threats that these organisms might the facing. What's the difference between the threats that kept bees are dealing with versus? What's going on in the wild and kind of what can we? What can we learn from from these BS? B.'s that's these and you've put your finger on her a really important subject regarding the human honeybee human being honeybee maybe relationship right now. We're doing a number of things that go with the bees that are living under our management and beekeepers hives reduce the number of things things that are making life harder and harder for these. These beautiful Bee's One is is very is very simply described were were spreading reading poisons in the environment Using lots of pesticides and in the fields where the beezer brought to do their pollination work and that's that's that's deadly hedley combination of bringing bs and then spring the fields with insecticides of these would be spring in in orchards and things like like that. So that's one one combination another is in love. We're we introduced on some parasites sites Particularly a little might from an Asian species honeybee was introduced to the European and African species. Vichy's of Honeybee and this little might is very good at transmitting. The bees viruses. It's a great vector for sore some nasty viruses of the bees. And that's that's been a that's probably been equally. Bad killer of Honeybee. Colonies both managed colonies wild colonies So that's that's another thing that we've we've done to make life hard for honeybees and then there's a long standing aspect of the human being honeybee relationship is that we've always been unintentionally in it and thus inadvertently We've been making life hard for them by just putting them in hives and managing the colonies to be very productive honey complicated topic topic. But there's a lot of things about the life of of a honeybee colonies. They're made more difficult when they're living under human human management. C'mon yours just one example beekeepers for an eye in the beekeeper for our convenience. We put the we put our hives together in groups which feature called Apiary so be arts and that's convenient for the human being but for the B.'s. It's it's not so great because it means if one Connie get sick. The illness the pathogen parasite it's causing that. Illness spreads easily to the other colonies which it can be just a few feet away. So that's not that's not good for the bees and that's very different from how they live in the wild where they're usually living about anthem mile apart from between one hollow tree housing to be calling in another the so another is that we as we so often do. With agricultural animals. We we manipulate them to be extremely productive for the things that we want in the case of honeybees. Guess what that is. It's honey a lot of a lot of the technology and skill of beekeeping of or trade of beekeeping making honeybee colonies into very large urge units Having the colonies grow to a larger size than they would in nature instead of growing to twenty or thirty thousand to grow up to sixty thousand or even more bees to have a huge workforce so they can make and then they will make up Mr up lots and lots of honey so that and that means that the colonies are even more prone to diseases. Because they're they've got all these resources inside them for the parasites and pathogens to who exploited. So that's another thing that we do and then another third thing one that we see very traumatically north. America's we we we should. I think it's close to two thirds of the honeybee colonies in North America are transported every spring from wherever they are whether it's in Florida or a New York state or Wherever out to California into the Central Valley of California for the allman pollination and that's that is just just very hard on the bees and I think statistically only about half the colonies that are taken out to those almond? Orchards are healthy when they come out or or still alive when they come out because it's just so much spread of disease and the trip itself is is apparently pretty hard on the beasts. It's being trucked thousands and thousands of miles. Gosh I had no idea I knew almonds were really intensive when it came to water usage surge and that that was something that was like I don't know if almond milk is the best alternative But I had no idea what kind of impact Almond farming had on on bees. Yeah Almond Pollen Almond productions is knowing water-intensive. It's be intensive in needs off every every flower. It's GonNa make the fruit or seed and nut on Esta pollinator show up and and move the pollen from one one plant to another. So yeah. It's it's it's it's really hard. All beekeepers loved their bees. But they don't always we they're not every action that beekeepers take. His is a what you'd have. I have to say as a loving or carrying action even though and that's something that we're just starting to realize because one of the curious things about honeybees and bees and beekeeping is that it's only in about the last few decades we've known anything about the natural lives of bees beekeepers. Beekeepers developed hives thou- sturdy starting thousands of years ago as we talked about. And we've never an once. People once human beings go visit hives then. They focused on their lives of the bees and the hives and how to manipulate them. And how to you know. I got to say honest exploited the lives of these BS living in the beekeepers hives with those could be boxes. EXES or SCALLOPS. Whatever log hives whatever so our focus almost every beekeepers focus has always been on the bees living in his or her hives which is very unnatural? And so now were we've gone back and looked at how bees are living and and Wendell Berry. Put It really nicely I paraphrase. What one of his famous quotes and user into agricultural practices generally says? We've never really known what we were doing doing. Because we've never known what we were undoing. We only can know it. We're undoing if we would see what nature is doing if we were doing nothing. And that's talk for bees and beekeeping beekeepers have not. We don't know what we're doing that because we haven't known what we're undoing because we didn't know what their natural lives were like. But that's so that's what I and others have been looking at intensively for as`safe route past about forty years. Now and that really ultimately is kind of the thesis this of of your notebook the lives of bees the untold story of the Honeybee in the wild because in understanding kind of the the success assess of this species in the wild we can actually learn from them and maybe apply some of those strategies that have been you know honed by hundreds of thousands millions of years and utilize them in in our beekeeping. You I think that's I think that's Roy Right. And that's one of the things I I the ideas that I present in this book. It's not GonNa be this idea of letting beast lift more naturally probably will not who will certainly will not apply apply to the commercial beekeeper with thousands or tens of thousands of hives of bees but it is very relevant to the to the hobby beekeeper. That might have a handful of colonies where they can let the they don't need the high production they're not trucking their colonies around they can be they can give the beasts let them live kinder gentler lives And so that's yes I think so. One of the positive aspects of the of this a growing body of knowledge of the natural lights of bees and most beekeepers are small-scale beekeepers are hobbyists and they have the bees interests first first and foremost. That's for them. It's a lot like I like to like to compare what I see. Is that two kinds of beekeeping and it's like the difference Prince with one on the one hand you've got the small skill beekeeper and on the other hand you've got the large commercial in. It's much like the difference between people that enjoy watching birds or birdwatchers birdwatchers and people that grow birds for eggs and eggs and meat and poultry farming. And I think there's room for there's certainly room for both both of those approaches and they're very different. They're very different and they're both. They're both valid but we have to recognize that there is there. Are these two ways of working with the bees not just not just managing it for maximum honey production or maximum pollination belly but but it's perfectly valley to to enjoy a colony of bees just as as a living system it is beautiful in its own right even if it makes no hunting produces only it's pollination.

California B. Wendell Berry America Connie Roy Right Prince North America Central Valley New York Florida
"seeley" Discussed on Talk Nerdy

Talk Nerdy

10:25 min | 2 years ago

"seeley" Discussed on Talk Nerdy

"Most beekeepers on an older be by all money beat biologists. Oh It's absolutely incredible. Incredible and of course you know you mentioned previously that the sociology and And really the communication That's unique is also really the key to their success as a species and and that they have been quite a successful species accounting for are you know almost half of of pollination that said we also know that human activities as is so often. The case are really threatening the honeybee right now so I would love to maybe take the last bit of our chat to talk about what some of the the threats that these organisms might the facing. What's the difference between the threats that kept bees are dealing with versus? What's going on in the wild and kind of what can we? What can we learn from from these BS? B.'s that's these and you've put your finger on her a really important subject regarding the human honeybee human being honeybee maybe relationship right now. We're doing a number of things that go with the bees that are living under our management and beekeepers hives reduce the number of things things that are making life harder and harder for these. These beautiful Bee's One is is very is very simply described were were spreading reading poisons in the environment Using lots of pesticides and in the fields where the beezer brought to do their pollination work and that's that's that's deadly hedley combination of bringing bs and then spring the fields with insecticides of these would be spring in in orchards and things like like that. So that's one one combination another is in love. We're we introduced on some parasites sites Particularly a little might from an Asian species honeybee was introduced to the European and African species. Vichy's of Honeybee and this little might is very good at transmitting. The bees viruses. It's a great vector for sore some nasty viruses of the bees. And that's that's been a that's probably been equally. Bad killer of Honeybee. Colonies both managed colonies wild colonies So that's that's another thing that we've we've done to make life hard for honeybees and then there's a long standing aspect of the human being honeybee relationship is that we've always been unintentionally in it and thus inadvertently We've been making life hard for them by just putting them in hives and managing the colonies to be very productive honey complicated topic topic. But there's a lot of things about the life of of a honeybee colonies. They're made more difficult when they're living under human human management. C'mon yours just one example beekeepers for an eye in the beekeeper for our convenience. We put the we put our hives together in groups which feature called Apiary so be arts and that's convenient for the human being but for the B.'s. It's it's not so great because it means if one Connie get sick. The illness the pathogen parasite it's causing that. Illness spreads easily to the other colonies which it can be just a few feet away. So that's not that's not good for the bees and that's very different from how they live in the wild where they're usually living about anthem mile apart from between one hollow tree housing to be calling in another the so another is that we as we so often do. With agricultural animals. We we manipulate them to be extremely productive for the things that we want in the case of honeybees. Guess what that is. It's honey a lot of a lot of the technology and skill of beekeeping of or trade of beekeeping making honeybee colonies into very large urge units Having the colonies grow to a larger size than they would in nature instead of growing to twenty or thirty thousand to grow up to sixty thousand or even more bees to have a huge workforce so they can make and then they will make up Mr up lots and lots of honey so that and that means that the colonies are even more prone to diseases. Because they're they've got all these resources inside them for the parasites and pathogens to who exploited. So that's another thing that we do and then another third thing one that we see very traumatically north. America's we we we should. I think it's close to two thirds of the honeybee colonies in North America are transported every spring from wherever they are whether it's in Florida or a New York state or Wherever out to California into the Central Valley of California for the allman pollination and that's that is just just very hard on the bees and I think statistically only about half the colonies that are taken out to those almond? Orchards are healthy when they come out or or still alive when they come out because it's just so much spread of disease and the trip itself is is apparently pretty hard on the beasts. It's being trucked thousands and thousands of miles. Gosh I had no idea I knew almonds were really intensive when it came to water usage surge and that that was something that was like I don't know if almond milk is the best alternative But I had no idea what kind of impact Almond farming had on on bees. Yeah Almond Pollen Almond productions is knowing water-intensive. It's be intensive in needs off every every flower. It's GonNa make the fruit or seed and nut on Esta pollinator show up and and move the pollen from one one plant to another. So yeah. It's it's it's it's really hard. All beekeepers loved their bees. But they don't always we they're not every action that beekeepers take. His is a what you'd have. I have to say as a loving or carrying action even though and that's something that we're just starting to realize because one of the curious things about honeybees and bees and beekeeping is that it's only in about the last few decades we've known anything about the natural lives of bees beekeepers. Beekeepers developed hives thou- sturdy starting thousands of years ago as we talked about. And we've never an once. People once human beings go visit hives then. They focused on their lives of the bees and the hives and how to manipulate them. And how to you know. I got to say honest exploited the lives of these BS living in the beekeepers hives with those could be boxes. EXES or SCALLOPS. Whatever log hives whatever so our focus almost every beekeepers focus has always been on the bees living in his or her hives which is very unnatural? And so now were we've gone back and looked at how bees are living and and Wendell Berry. Put It really nicely I paraphrase. What one of his famous quotes and user into agricultural practices generally says? We've never really known what we were doing doing. Because we've never known what we were undoing. We only can know it. We're undoing if we would see what nature is doing if we were doing nothing. And that's talk for bees and beekeeping beekeepers have not. We don't know what we're doing that because we haven't known what we're undoing because we didn't know what their natural lives were like. But that's so that's what I and others have been looking at intensively for as`safe route past about forty years. Now and that really ultimately is kind of the thesis this of of your notebook the lives of bees the untold story of the Honeybee in the wild because in understanding kind of the the success assess of this species in the wild we can actually learn from them and maybe apply some of those strategies that have been you know honed by hundreds of thousands millions of years and utilize them in in our beekeeping. You I think that's I think that's Roy Right. And that's one of the things I I the ideas that I present in this book. It's not GonNa be this idea of letting beast lift more naturally probably will not who will certainly will not apply apply to the commercial beekeeper with thousands or tens of thousands of hives of bees but it is very relevant to the to the hobby beekeeper. That might have a handful of colonies where they can let the they don't need the high production they're not trucking their colonies around they can be they can give the beasts let them live kinder gentler lives And so that's yes I think so. One of the positive aspects of the of this a growing body of knowledge of the natural lights of bees and most beekeepers are small-scale beekeepers are hobbyists and they have the bees interests first first and foremost. That's for them. It's a lot like I like to like to compare what I see. Is that two kinds of beekeeping and it's like the difference Prince with one on the one hand you've got the small skill beekeeper and on the other hand you've got the large commercial in. It's much like the difference between people that enjoy watching birds or birdwatchers birdwatchers and people that grow birds for eggs and eggs and meat and poultry farming. And I think there's room for there's certainly room for both both of those approaches and they're very different. They're very different and they're both. They're both valid but we have to recognize that there is there. Are these two ways of working with the bees not just not just managing it for maximum honey production or maximum pollination belly but but it's perfectly valley to to enjoy a colony of bees just as as a living system it is beautiful in its own right even if it makes no hunting produces only it's pollination.

California B. Wendell Berry America Connie Roy Right Prince North America Central Valley New York Florida
"seeley" Discussed on Talk Nerdy

Talk Nerdy

11:59 min | 2 years ago

"seeley" Discussed on Talk Nerdy

"Humans introduced them and shortly after they were brought in the they were brought in ships sailing. Ships during the winter from Europe England To North America. And they were living in Watercolor skept. These saw straw hives and once the colonies once they got here they did very very well in the eastern United States. It's a was just just the eastern United States with its deciduous forest this much like their homeland in Europe. In fact here of North America used to be one continent together so we have what we share a lot of plants and so forth and so when the when the breeds were honeybees were introduced to North America. They they would go through their normal biology of casting swarms most swarms moved into the woods and they spread out. And you can nigh. I talk about in my book A very nice study gentleman did Krinsky where he went back through the diaries and letters of of early settlers and he could and just looking for any mention of people going getting honey out of trees and whatnot and he was able to document the spread over a hundred and fifty years from the East Coast Eastern seaboard in the US over to the Mississippi River and that that's pretty fast actually so Allah so they they took the North America They're very well and they were also introduced to South America and Central America. So now the honeybee lives in throughout the new world interesting and obviously really took over a lot of those kind of pollinating roles that maybe some of the other organisms were were filling in prior to that. I guess I'm interested to know you know we talked about these. Really unique dynamics of honeybee life are those are aspects of those common to other species of bees as well l. but they just don't make honey or like do other species of bees even live in hives. Most the vast majority of ninety nine point nine percent of the other species thinks she's of honeybees are what we would call solitary bees. They their life cycle is Very individualistic You have a female that breath emerges in the That will get made it at some point during the year and then she will build a nest on our own it could be in the ground or could be a hollow stem shall rear a little family in there and then she then she leaves them and she goes off and is and then they they will emerged the next summer and so that's that's how their lives work. That's the vast majority we. That's what we call them solitary. They they lead largely actually solitary lives just female. Having made it carrying for a nest with with a with a number of young in the there are a few other their species that are that are social in North America. There the whole bumblebees and then South America middle and Central American in Africa. There's another group of bees that are kind of honey but we call them stainless fees they also like are like the familiar honeybees they They live in colonies groups and they store up honey to have a food reserve but and they're very diverse and goes about five five hundred species of them but they don't they don't get much much press in North America they Because we don't live here that they're very fascinating and very Miriam compelling behaviorally compelling social bees but We just don't hear much about it because we don't see that we won't have them here. And what about non honeybees honeybees. Just what we think of as like regular that twenty thousand species that you talked about before are they so shoulder they have some of these same kinds of lifestyle life styles some stuff. They're very diverse in terms of their styles. None of them have the large colonies and and That we have in in in honeybees Apis more for There are some there few species in which there's a little overlap off off a couple of female several females will work together and share a nest and so their social in that sense. And we have the bumblebees where the those. Bumblebees are truly social like honeybees but their colonies are not as large. And when I say truly social I mean that they have a queen gene who makes a nest and has daughters that stay with her and don't reproduce but our our helpers just like an uneasy peace so bumblebees. Bumblebees hurt are the closest in terms of their social biology or the closest johnny beliefs. But they're they're calling answer are small and they're very very well adapted to cold cooler climates. They don't over winter by storing up honey and keeping warm all winter long bake instead with bumblebees. The the Queen's produced at the end of one summer burrow down into the ground below frost level. I think and and And then we'll spend the winter in solitude and then popout in the spring and stirred things over Tom. Correct me if I'm wrong. I mean obviously you have dedicated your life to learning about honeybees and they're fascinating ecology there fascinating physiology geology There's so many aspects of it there. The House social they are is that not just unique among organisms. I mean it seems to me especially among insects that it's it's such a sophisticated Strategy for maintaining the species that I I mean it's hard to believe when you really start to dig into it. You put your finger on a really important point of and Saw One address a couple of thoughts that bubbled up when you were just Raising this point one is that First of all yes. The the the fascination of honeybees is there is there sociology that why they are what. I recall beautifully social insects and that is also the secret to their success. They can they can thanks to their social system. They can get through cold winters. They can stock stockpile food like an thwart enemies They can yeah. They knew all these very very ups. Lead Abe's very sophisticated lives however they are not the only highly social insects by any means in fact the their If we shift from away from bees over two aunts the other major group of An social insects. There we find even me mighty up to say even more spectacular animal insect societies. And those have been so beautifully described by brutal Wilson and Bert Holdup ller in their books. And so they've devoted their lives to the study of Ants Zyppah devoted mine too studied bees. I love that And you guys have been able to to share those stories with you know with people like us like myself and those who are listening who obviously may not you know we can. We can watch them. We can watch nature documentaries about them. We can spend time near them but may not ever have the kind of appreciation that you have because you're studying them from so many different angles so it's like a real honor to be able to learn about them through your work thank you. It's For me it's it's it's a real. It's an honor to have been able to make a living making discoveries of how these honeybee colonies work and how they live in the wild So it's Michelle like a very very lucky human being to have this this opportunity you to work as closely with this one early just utterly It really is a just an amazing. It's an amazing insect. I mean when thinks it makes it so amazing is their ability to communicate is the only insect that we're an individual can give give another individual instructions to say. Go out go out to that location. And here's the instructions go that direction and that distance and you'll find a rich food food source. That's there's only the only species they can do that as is the honeybee ourselves and May and maybe some ospreys but I'm That kind of thing makes it makes it really Just utterly fascinating for me and and for all the other people that are study B.'s he's either professionally or as a beekeeper and there's lots and lots of off people that have been captivated by the bees so captivated they. They keep them in their backyards in their hives. Can I mean that's that's incredible. And how what is their language based on obviously it's not linguistic language but what how how what is their communication style. Is it through dance. Dumb thing to go. Is it dancing. Waigel dance it's performed in this inside the nest by a be found a rich source of pollen or nectar or or water the colonies thirsty and Silicon to explain in words without making a drawing but basically she does A. She does a ritualized reenactment of her flight lights out to the flower patch on inside the nest on the combs and so those her walking forward on the combs and and she can indicate the distance by L.. Long she walks forward while making buzzing sound with her with her wings so so the greater the distance the longer each each run of her what we call the wagle dance lasts so That wagle run one can last from a fraction of a second up to several seconds. And so that can code the distance and then how she indicates the direction is by how she the angle. She's doing the dance on a vertical surface. The side of one of these curtains of comb in the nest. And if she if she's doing her waggling motion or dance while she's walking straight up that she still in the other bees that the the target of flowers that she's she's Indicating is in the direction of whatever direction the Sun Current. We is so these yes. It's it it is remarkable. It's it really is a unique Abstract form of communication and When it was discovered it was so striking The original pursue discover the gentlemen name her good scientist named Carbon Frisch in Germany. He he didn't fully understand it himself for twenty years. He thought he sort of had these. I wouldn't say blinders on but he. He assumed that the bees were doing something much simpler that they were but finally he was did some Experiments that revealed to them. Oh these BS. In their communication system they have words for distance and direction and then he looked closely and he figured out about how it how it works so it is. It's that kind of social beauty social life which which is compelling to me and oh I think compelling to to.

North America United States South America Central America Europe Mississippi River Africa Michelle Krinsky scientist johnny Germany Tom Abe Miriam Carbon Frisch B. A.
"seeley" Discussed on Talk Nerdy

Talk Nerdy

11:59 min | 2 years ago

"seeley" Discussed on Talk Nerdy

"Humans introduced them and shortly after they were brought in the they were brought in ships sailing. Ships during the winter from Europe England To North America. And they were living in Watercolor skept. These saw straw hives and once the colonies once they got here they did very very well in the eastern United States. It's a was just just the eastern United States with its deciduous forest this much like their homeland in Europe. In fact here of North America used to be one continent together so we have what we share a lot of plants and so forth and so when the when the breeds were honeybees were introduced to North America. They they would go through their normal biology of casting swarms most swarms moved into the woods and they spread out. And you can nigh. I talk about in my book A very nice study gentleman did Krinsky where he went back through the diaries and letters of of early settlers and he could and just looking for any mention of people going getting honey out of trees and whatnot and he was able to document the spread over a hundred and fifty years from the East Coast Eastern seaboard in the US over to the Mississippi River and that that's pretty fast actually so Allah so they they took the North America They're very well and they were also introduced to South America and Central America. So now the honeybee lives in throughout the new world interesting and obviously really took over a lot of those kind of pollinating roles that maybe some of the other organisms were were filling in prior to that. I guess I'm interested to know you know we talked about these. Really unique dynamics of honeybee life are those are aspects of those common to other species of bees as well l. but they just don't make honey or like do other species of bees even live in hives. Most the vast majority of ninety nine point nine percent of the other species thinks she's of honeybees are what we would call solitary bees. They their life cycle is Very individualistic You have a female that breath emerges in the That will get made it at some point during the year and then she will build a nest on our own it could be in the ground or could be a hollow stem shall rear a little family in there and then she then she leaves them and she goes off and is and then they they will emerged the next summer and so that's that's how their lives work. That's the vast majority we. That's what we call them solitary. They they lead largely actually solitary lives just female. Having made it carrying for a nest with with a with a number of young in the there are a few other their species that are that are social in North America. There the whole bumblebees and then South America middle and Central American in Africa. There's another group of bees that are kind of honey but we call them stainless fees they also like are like the familiar honeybees they They live in colonies groups and they store up honey to have a food reserve but and they're very diverse and goes about five five hundred species of them but they don't they don't get much much press in North America they Because we don't live here that they're very fascinating and very Miriam compelling behaviorally compelling social bees but We just don't hear much about it because we don't see that we won't have them here. And what about non honeybees honeybees. Just what we think of as like regular that twenty thousand species that you talked about before are they so shoulder they have some of these same kinds of lifestyle life styles some stuff. They're very diverse in terms of their styles. None of them have the large colonies and and That we have in in in honeybees Apis more for There are some there few species in which there's a little overlap off off a couple of female several females will work together and share a nest and so their social in that sense. And we have the bumblebees where the those. Bumblebees are truly social like honeybees but their colonies are not as large. And when I say truly social I mean that they have a queen gene who makes a nest and has daughters that stay with her and don't reproduce but our our helpers just like an uneasy peace so bumblebees. Bumblebees hurt are the closest in terms of their social biology or the closest johnny beliefs. But they're they're calling answer are small and they're very very well adapted to cold cooler climates. They don't over winter by storing up honey and keeping warm all winter long bake instead with bumblebees. The the Queen's produced at the end of one summer burrow down into the ground below frost level. I think and and And then we'll spend the winter in solitude and then popout in the spring and stirred things over Tom. Correct me if I'm wrong. I mean obviously you have dedicated your life to learning about honeybees and they're fascinating ecology there fascinating physiology geology There's so many aspects of it there. The House social they are is that not just unique among organisms. I mean it seems to me especially among insects that it's it's such a sophisticated Strategy for maintaining the species that I I mean it's hard to believe when you really start to dig into it. You put your finger on a really important point of and Saw One address a couple of thoughts that bubbled up when you were just Raising this point one is that First of all yes. The the the fascination of honeybees is there is there sociology that why they are what. I recall beautifully social insects and that is also the secret to their success. They can they can thanks to their social system. They can get through cold winters. They can stock stockpile food like an thwart enemies They can yeah. They knew all these very very ups. Lead Abe's very sophisticated lives however they are not the only highly social insects by any means in fact the their If we shift from away from bees over two aunts the other major group of An social insects. There we find even me mighty up to say even more spectacular animal insect societies. And those have been so beautifully described by brutal Wilson and Bert Holdup ller in their books. And so they've devoted their lives to the study of Ants Zyppah devoted mine too studied bees. I love that And you guys have been able to to share those stories with you know with people like us like myself and those who are listening who obviously may not you know we can. We can watch them. We can watch nature documentaries about them. We can spend time near them but may not ever have the kind of appreciation that you have because you're studying them from so many different angles so it's like a real honor to be able to learn about them through your work thank you. It's For me it's it's it's a real. It's an honor to have been able to make a living making discoveries of how these honeybee colonies work and how they live in the wild So it's Michelle like a very very lucky human being to have this this opportunity you to work as closely with this one early just utterly It really is a just an amazing. It's an amazing insect. I mean when thinks it makes it so amazing is their ability to communicate is the only insect that we're an individual can give give another individual instructions to say. Go out go out to that location. And here's the instructions go that direction and that distance and you'll find a rich food food source. That's there's only the only species they can do that as is the honeybee ourselves and May and maybe some ospreys but I'm That kind of thing makes it makes it really Just utterly fascinating for me and and for all the other people that are study B.'s he's either professionally or as a beekeeper and there's lots and lots of off people that have been captivated by the bees so captivated they. They keep them in their backyards in their hives. Can I mean that's that's incredible. And how what is their language based on obviously it's not linguistic language but what how how what is their communication style. Is it through dance. Dumb thing to go. Is it dancing. Waigel dance it's performed in this inside the nest by a be found a rich source of pollen or nectar or or water the colonies thirsty and Silicon to explain in words without making a drawing but basically she does A. She does a ritualized reenactment of her flight lights out to the flower patch on inside the nest on the combs and so those her walking forward on the combs and and she can indicate the distance by L.. Long she walks forward while making buzzing sound with her with her wings so so the greater the distance the longer each each run of her what we call the wagle dance lasts so That wagle run one can last from a fraction of a second up to several seconds. And so that can code the distance and then how she indicates the direction is by how she the angle. She's doing the dance on a vertical surface. The side of one of these curtains of comb in the nest. And if she if she's doing her waggling motion or dance while she's walking straight up that she still in the other bees that the the target of flowers that she's she's Indicating is in the direction of whatever direction the Sun Current. We is so these yes. It's it it is remarkable. It's it really is a unique Abstract form of communication and When it was discovered it was so striking The original pursue discover the gentlemen name her good scientist named Carbon Frisch in Germany. He he didn't fully understand it himself for twenty years. He thought he sort of had these. I wouldn't say blinders on but he. He assumed that the bees were doing something much simpler that they were but finally he was did some Experiments that revealed to them. Oh these BS. In their communication system they have words for distance and direction and then he looked closely and he figured out about how it how it works so it is. It's that kind of social beauty social life which which is compelling to me and oh I think compelling to to.

North America United States South America Central America Europe Mississippi River Africa Michelle Krinsky scientist johnny Germany Tom Abe Miriam Carbon Frisch B. A.
"seeley" Discussed on Talk Nerdy

Talk Nerdy

10:01 min | 2 years ago

"seeley" Discussed on Talk Nerdy

"The other insects. When it gets cold they go into they become dormant won't go into what's called a pause where they just? They fill their bodies with some antifreeze material. And then they just let their bodies Chill down to in until subfreezing. Temperatures honeybees are unique honeybee. Honeybee colonies are unique in that they fight the cold all winter long inside their inside their hive or their tree cavity. They're producing enough heat with their with their by using their muscles to generate heat to keep the to keep the massive B.'s. Warm and so there they all winter long the Beezer Connie toasty warm inside their nests. And incidentally that's what that is why be store a pony. It's not for our pleasure. It's me is their winter heating fuel fuel they will they will burn through about a forgotten quite with the numbers are but in in where I am with a winter cold. They'll they'll burn through The twenty kilograms of or fifty pounds of honey and a winter so a couple of pounds each week and the key productions about it's about forty watt so its inside a inside a hollow tree or beehive. It's almost as if there's a little forty watt lightbulb. That's all winter long. It's producing that much heat. And the beasts cluster tightly together and they they can make a very well insulated ball of beast so they can keep themselves warm. Even when it's very cold outside odds really cool so so to be clear. The honey is what they produce in order to eat and the WAX is what they've produced in order to kind of have like it's an engineering material. It's where sales out their house. Okay so where. Where do both of these things come from? Like how do they actually make AAC honey and wax. Yes let's start with the honey allow you. Don't use made by the beast going to flowers and from the flowers they collect nectar and the nectar is in the flowers because the it is the lure that the plants produce in their flowers dip to cause the bees bees and flies and other pollinators to come in pollinate the flowers. It's the beast reward for doing that. Work and That's typically on average average the the nectar in flowers. Actually quite sweet. It's on average about forty percent sugar and Abi will. If you're a worker bee you'll go to lots lots of flowers. Neil collector of a volume of this nectar. You'll bring it back to the nest. You'll pass it off to other bees inside the nest to or not forager's some of the middle aged bees and they will take that nectar and they will they will put it up in the honeycomb region of the nest they'll smear out the load of nectar that the they've they've received from the forager onto the walls of the calm and they're the water can evaporate out quite readily so in the what they will what they're doing is they're converting converting at forty percent sugar solution up into us into about an eighty two percent sugar solution. That's honey and that's not only for economy economy of space but when a when a sugar solution is that concentrated in it some bacteria and yeast cannot did not thrive in it the asthmatic pressure is so high that the ten tendency to dry out things that fall into honey is so strong that That it is it. It's preserved preserves itself very nicely. Oh yeah that's why you. Sometimes we'll hear people talk about the fact that honey has these sort of of anti microbial properties. It's really just that itself doesn't readily get infected right. You use antiseptic just as you said her. Anti microbial the bill because it just sucks the water out of any any microbe that is that as misfortune of getting coated with honey So yeah it It is indeed it is a it is an early early antiseptic material or one of the earliest. That you've been came on very cool. And that also explains explains Kind of the the process by which honey is made explains why honey from different regions honey from different flowering sites or different implants Have different flavors and different properties and through the flavor is Is produced not by the beast but is produced by the plants Lance that are at it's usually the flavors of the honey are a carryover of the fragrances that the plants have put into their flowers lowers and thus into their nectar to attract the bees so as just as we have different flowers that have very different aromas likewise the honey that comes comes from different plants has very different aromas of honey And you'll hear them like you'll hear different. honeys referred to based on those kinds of flowers or based on this clients of plants like clover honey or like a New Zealand. Manuka honey right or in North America some of the price tons are buckwheat awkward though. Some people think it smells like dirty socks and then they select goldenrod this. Yes there's there's probably there's probably hundred different honey. Plants in North America each with its distinctive aroma and free end flavor of its honey interesting. Okay okay all right so okay starting to understand this a little bit better. You've got a mom and there are some. Small percentage of the high has our boys and those male drones are there to basically to get mom ready to lay some eggs and and then you had at these worker bees. I'm just do not lay. Eggs will know mom does lay the eggs. The her sons are not going to be fertilizing her the drones produced in a colony will They will go out and meet with other Queens but it will be queens from other colonies and that that helps keep the genetics really really very cool so it is their job to May. That's kind of their their whole focus in life but they are meeting with other Queens. That's right that's a curious feature of the biology of honeybees. It's very important that the queen mates with multiple males. Also that she can in her colonies endowed with great diversity genetic diversity among the colonies members that in that is that so important because it means that the colony has a lot of different individuals individuals endowed differently for fighting different sorts of diseases. Indeed difference jobs all right is there so closely compacted together. It's like constantly living on an airplane. Like just be sick all the time. That's it's actually a really good analogy. Living Space. Where air is shared? Their food is shared living accommodations or shared. It's it's a parasites or pathogens a paradise almost and so The bees have to do a lot of different things. Another thing that they do to deal with that. That risk of infections they collect resins that was one material it'd mentioned earlier. Besides the nectar and the pollen in the water they go out and click tree residence and trees are making these resins of because they're anti microbial. They're put them around their buds and things before they opened up to the modes and things don't Damage the plants themselves and the beast collect those resins and bring them in. And they'll when they they'll coat the walls of their nest with or hive with the resins and they will smear these resins. Give a light Varnish of the combs beeswax combs. As well with the varnish that and those are these are filled with US antimicrobial compounds that the plants are producing that the peace make use of themselves always this that the material cereal that sometimes used in like alternative medicine. It's called like Propolis propolis. Yes that's right it's called PROPOLIS and blessed and that name comes from the fact that sometimes the bees will reduce the entrance the entrance the size of the entrance opening of their nest or hive by building a wall. All of it out of this tree resin and that's what. Apparently the the Greeks saw that in that was propolis was a name that they gave to the material and it means before the Sela. Yeah Yeah I love that. Oh very cool okay. So so we've got we've got mom. We've we've got drones or go out and meet with other MOMS. We've got worker bees that have this three tier stage of life but yeah those are the daughters and they make take the wax which will get to in a second they make the honey they make the propolis before we get to the wax and how it's made I'm wondering how does Queen B Become Queen in be like how does she get that distinction versus just becoming a regular worker bay. You say that even more precisely elitist you take an egg. That's been honeybee egg and it's that it's been fertilized nets gonNA bit produce a female in the question is what determines whether that egg develops into a queen or that egg develops into a worker and This is a long standing mystery. And I don't know S- we fully understand. Stand the the mechanism but it has entirely to do with the environment in which Egged develops if it's if the larva hatches out of egg and it and it is lavishly fed with Material Code Royal Jelly then it will develop into a queen if it gets just a smidgen of Royal Jelly Ian and then it.

North America Queens Neil collector Abi New Zealand US
"seeley" Discussed on Talk Nerdy

Talk Nerdy

10:01 min | 2 years ago

"seeley" Discussed on Talk Nerdy

"The other insects. When it gets cold they go into they become dormant won't go into what's called a pause where they just? They fill their bodies with some antifreeze material. And then they just let their bodies Chill down to in until subfreezing. Temperatures honeybees are unique honeybee. Honeybee colonies are unique in that they fight the cold all winter long inside their inside their hive or their tree cavity. They're producing enough heat with their with their by using their muscles to generate heat to keep the to keep the massive B.'s. Warm and so there they all winter long the Beezer Connie toasty warm inside their nests. And incidentally that's what that is why be store a pony. It's not for our pleasure. It's me is their winter heating fuel fuel they will they will burn through about a forgotten quite with the numbers are but in in where I am with a winter cold. They'll they'll burn through The twenty kilograms of or fifty pounds of honey and a winter so a couple of pounds each week and the key productions about it's about forty watt so its inside a inside a hollow tree or beehive. It's almost as if there's a little forty watt lightbulb. That's all winter long. It's producing that much heat. And the beasts cluster tightly together and they they can make a very well insulated ball of beast so they can keep themselves warm. Even when it's very cold outside odds really cool so so to be clear. The honey is what they produce in order to eat and the WAX is what they've produced in order to kind of have like it's an engineering material. It's where sales out their house. Okay so where. Where do both of these things come from? Like how do they actually make AAC honey and wax. Yes let's start with the honey allow you. Don't use made by the beast going to flowers and from the flowers they collect nectar and the nectar is in the flowers because the it is the lure that the plants produce in their flowers dip to cause the bees bees and flies and other pollinators to come in pollinate the flowers. It's the beast reward for doing that. Work and That's typically on average average the the nectar in flowers. Actually quite sweet. It's on average about forty percent sugar and Abi will. If you're a worker bee you'll go to lots lots of flowers. Neil collector of a volume of this nectar. You'll bring it back to the nest. You'll pass it off to other bees inside the nest to or not forager's some of the middle aged bees and they will take that nectar and they will they will put it up in the honeycomb region of the nest they'll smear out the load of nectar that the they've they've received from the forager onto the walls of the calm and they're the water can evaporate out quite readily so in the what they will what they're doing is they're converting converting at forty percent sugar solution up into us into about an eighty two percent sugar solution. That's honey and that's not only for economy economy of space but when a when a sugar solution is that concentrated in it some bacteria and yeast cannot did not thrive in it the asthmatic pressure is so high that the ten tendency to dry out things that fall into honey is so strong that That it is it. It's preserved preserves itself very nicely. Oh yeah that's why you. Sometimes we'll hear people talk about the fact that honey has these sort of of anti microbial properties. It's really just that itself doesn't readily get infected right. You use antiseptic just as you said her. Anti microbial the bill because it just sucks the water out of any any microbe that is that as misfortune of getting coated with honey So yeah it It is indeed it is a it is an early early antiseptic material or one of the earliest. That you've been came on very cool. And that also explains explains Kind of the the process by which honey is made explains why honey from different regions honey from different flowering sites or different implants Have different flavors and different properties and through the flavor is Is produced not by the beast but is produced by the plants Lance that are at it's usually the flavors of the honey are a carryover of the fragrances that the plants have put into their flowers lowers and thus into their nectar to attract the bees so as just as we have different flowers that have very different aromas likewise the honey that comes comes from different plants has very different aromas of honey And you'll hear them like you'll hear different. honeys referred to based on those kinds of flowers or based on this clients of plants like clover honey or like a New Zealand. Manuka honey right or in North America some of the price tons are buckwheat awkward though. Some people think it smells like dirty socks and then they select goldenrod this. Yes there's there's probably there's probably hundred different honey. Plants in North America each with its distinctive aroma and free end flavor of its honey interesting. Okay okay all right so okay starting to understand this a little bit better. You've got a mom and there are some. Small percentage of the high has our boys and those male drones are there to basically to get mom ready to lay some eggs and and then you had at these worker bees. I'm just do not lay. Eggs will know mom does lay the eggs. The her sons are not going to be fertilizing her the drones produced in a colony will They will go out and meet with other Queens but it will be queens from other colonies and that that helps keep the genetics really really very cool so it is their job to May. That's kind of their their whole focus in life but they are meeting with other Queens. That's right that's a curious feature of the biology of honeybees. It's very important that the queen mates with multiple males. Also that she can in her colonies endowed with great diversity genetic diversity among the colonies members that in that is that so important because it means that the colony has a lot of different individuals individuals endowed differently for fighting different sorts of diseases. Indeed difference jobs all right is there so closely compacted together. It's like constantly living on an airplane. Like just be sick all the time. That's it's actually a really good analogy. Living Space. Where air is shared? Their food is shared living accommodations or shared. It's it's a parasites or pathogens a paradise almost and so The bees have to do a lot of different things. Another thing that they do to deal with that. That risk of infections they collect resins that was one material it'd mentioned earlier. Besides the nectar and the pollen in the water they go out and click tree residence and trees are making these resins of because they're anti microbial. They're put them around their buds and things before they opened up to the modes and things don't Damage the plants themselves and the beast collect those resins and bring them in. And they'll when they they'll coat the walls of their nest with or hive with the resins and they will smear these resins. Give a light Varnish of the combs beeswax combs. As well with the varnish that and those are these are filled with US antimicrobial compounds that the plants are producing that the peace make use of themselves always this that the material cereal that sometimes used in like alternative medicine. It's called like Propolis propolis. Yes that's right it's called PROPOLIS and blessed and that name comes from the fact that sometimes the bees will reduce the entrance the entrance the size of the entrance opening of their nest or hive by building a wall. All of it out of this tree resin and that's what. Apparently the the Greeks saw that in that was propolis was a name that they gave to the material and it means before the Sela. Yeah Yeah I love that. Oh very cool okay. So so we've got we've got mom. We've we've got drones or go out and meet with other MOMS. We've got worker bees that have this three tier stage of life but yeah those are the daughters and they make take the wax which will get to in a second they make the honey they make the propolis before we get to the wax and how it's made I'm wondering how does Queen B Become Queen in be like how does she get that distinction versus just becoming a regular worker bay. You say that even more precisely elitist you take an egg. That's been honeybee egg and it's that it's been fertilized nets gonNA bit produce a female in the question is what determines whether that egg develops into a queen or that egg develops into a worker and This is a long standing mystery. And I don't know S- we fully understand. Stand the the mechanism but it has entirely to do with the environment in which Egged develops if it's if the larva hatches out of egg and it and it is lavishly fed with Material Code Royal Jelly then it will develop into a queen if it gets just a smidgen of Royal Jelly Ian and then it.

North America Queens Neil collector Abi New Zealand US
"seeley" Discussed on Talk Nerdy

Talk Nerdy

10:55 min | 2 years ago

"seeley" Discussed on Talk Nerdy

"I love that. There's something almost like romantic about that. That like you know these organisms. That can't be tamed in it it's kind of like we have the privilege of being able to to benefit from the literal fruits of their Labor uh-huh and and it's kind of like a gift that we get because of course they're not They're not being subjugated by or they're not submitting to us in a way I just like a fascinating concept. It's actually it's quite rare when when it comes to the human history of agriculture or the human history of Animal Domestication yes. Usually the animals have been really important to us. Sweep with humans have been able to take them in and modify them a cattle or a great example through originally. You know there's an original our oxen that is now extinct in that is the ancestor of all of our modern breeds of cattle. So yes that were wild cattle at one time and but now they've been developed into a huge number of breeds Both for dairy cows and beef cows and one thing I would like to stress is that the honeybees incredibly important to humans. Not so much for making honey by any means but for their pollination services and and that's been recently silly documented by this studied had several dozen authors worldwide and. They looked at across all of the countries in the world and all of the crops grown in in all of those countries and then they were able to get information about the amount of each crop that's produced and for each crop what percentage of the pollination of that crop is provided by honeybees apis militia and what percentage is provided by all the other bees and the estimate they came up with was that forty percent of the crop pollination value is provided by honeybees forty seven percent of the crop pollination with service worldwide is provided by aid this millennial that one species so it is a. It's an it's a species that's extremely important to humans in ways greatly Faro Faro show honey. There hunter value is honey producers. Here's the makers and I mean my assumption. Is that something that we didn't even realize when we were first medicating crops and and you know and endeavoring in agriculture that we kinda felt like. Oh this is cool. We just put the seeds in the ground and then they grow and we maybe didn't really have a fairly good grasp of pollination back. Then you know it was when it was done small-scale the pollinators were there In in plenty just in in the involved in the natural environment today. It's where we have greatly modified in the environment where we produced food media in large volumes. There are not the wild areas with supporting life enough wild pollinators the the solitary bees as well and as well as honeybees seabees and Bumblebee. So we do the honeybees and now to some extent. Bumblebees the pollinators that we can insert into the agricultural into these agricultural systems to provide the pollination. Yeah I mean I was kind of wondering about that and maybe it's something that we can come back to later but maybe a kind of quick quick discussion about you know. Obviously the way that we farm now globally is completely different. Than the way that we farmed when we originally learned how to farm and that simply because we have a massive population and we've had to utilize in a really sophisticated and honestly lifesaving scientific techniques weeks in an effort to To feed the growing population. You know everything from genetic modification of organisms to sophisticated fertilisation fertilisation techniques. And things like that but the it does also come with a pretty big cost right. I mean the fact that we're not farming in these wild areas and that that the organisms that would have been kind of like the facilitator organisms. Aren't there how do we have. We overcome that. Like what are some of the strategies that Adam that Agra scientists used today will this is. It's a really important topic and it's it's women's wrestling with right now to try to find sustainable ways of both producing the food and that includes supporting the pollinators which are involved in many of the vegetables and fruits and nuts that that we enjoy so what people are trying to do now. among other things is Find ways to reduce the the pesticide exposure of honeybees and other other insects to provide more food for these pollinator insects because A lot of times the the insects ideally will be living in an area all on their own and without humans intervening but for them to do that. They have to have enough for origin nesting sites. In here's an example that an area that I know well as in New York state which is a big second largest apple producing using state in the United States in the there are large orchards and they're smaller trains in the really large orchards. Need to have pollinators. Honeybee colonies brought Dan Smaller orchards However have enough wild areas on their parameters and another wild for nesting sites for solitary visas seizes and honeybees and bumblebees And food sources for all those beasts. They don't actually need to have humans bring in hives of honeybees us to provide the pollination service so one of the things we're learning this adjusting may be fine tuning the scale of of of of how the scale of the fields and such to make it possible to have the pollinators. They're all on their own and thus worsen confusing sustainable man matter all right so I mean obviously I think we're going to be having Quite a conversation about the the pressures assures and the difficulties facing honeybees right now and and you know what are some of the things that we can continue to do about that but before we do that I mean maybe maybe now would be the time take a step back and talk about what honeybee is. How does how does it live? It's life in the wild. What do we know about honeybees? I think most people probably probably. Maybe maybe it's not fair for me to speak for for the vast majority of the listeners. But probably you know that they're these little yellow and black striped organisms that we see around these hives and that somehow they make money. But I don't think think I have. Yeah I've heard that there's a queen bee and that their worker bees or drones You mentioned the the little grubs or you know the little larvae that That are in the hive. I I'm not sure. I fully understand the HIVE dynamic family structure and You know how did they all work together. And where does honeycutt okay. You know. Let's started. This is right. Basically Quick Review of the basic biology of Honeybee. Maybe Lonnie's I wanNA start by Repeating something you just mentioned that a colony of honeybees is a family. It it is a you'd be is the mother of everybody in that in the colony and the colony has workers which are her daughters and the colony also has drones which are the the sons of the wing and the sex determination system. Is that if the when of Queen Bee lays an egg if she fertilizes the egg by releasing some sperm onto the. I guess it's being produced it will devote. It'll love develop into a female email. If the the aggies left unfertilized it develops into a male. So and that's her call you that's call. She's got a little bell she can dose out the sperm. Were not and inside these live in cavities white boxes. In the case of beehives or hollow trees. Or you're caves in the wild and inside those each of one of those cavities. The bees build beeswax. Combs built of Beeswax ex. That hang vertically. And they're these these famous combs built with exceptional cells. which in each cell is can be used either for storing honey or pollen ellen or it can be used as a little cradle for producing the the young these the newbies and the typical population honeybee colonies while the size of it would be on the order of a Oh it would be tapes? It's typically about forty leaders which is about ten gallons. So that's the that's the typical nest cavity size. And the beasts will build their beeswax combs in these curtains that hang vertically in the cavity and the Internet cavity a high or or a tree hollow the upper part of the cavity is where the bee's stockpile there honey the lower half of the of the comb that they've built is where they use for their nursery area where the young bees are produced and a within the colony the worker bees which are the vast vast majority of the members of the colony some ninety five percent the other five percents being the drones. Those bs his they live about thirty days. And as a rough rule of thumb the first ten days they're working as a nurse speak rearing more bees inside the high the next extend as they're working as a of B that's involved in mostly involved in storing the food and building the combs and the last third of the worker. Bees life is devoted to working outside. The HIVE is a forager going out and collecting the nectar. which the beasts will turn into honey and the the pollen that is their source of fats and proteins and they also collect water? Every living organism needs water and be calling it needs water or two. So the so called forager bees can go out and collect water as well. So and that's that's the basic structure of a honeybee cone one thing that's unique about when he be calling. These is how they get through the winter and cold parts of the world all.

Queen Bee Faro Faro Dan Smaller orchards HIVE Combs United States Adam honeycutt Lonnie Agra apple New York
"seeley" Discussed on Talk Nerdy

Talk Nerdy

11:39 min | 2 years ago

"seeley" Discussed on Talk Nerdy

"I want to give a shout out to some very special people including Jeffrey Sewell. Brian Holden DAVID J. E Smith Does Ambi- Drummer Phil. T bear dude US infinite us. Will Rica Hagman. Pus Gallet Gelati. Auty and I also WANNA thank somebody special. Mary Navo but of course. She asked that I not give her a shoutout but instead give a shout out to you her son who turned her onto talk nerdy. So thank you so much to Jim Cooper Schmidt. Because you're the best yes you are actually everybody listening. You're the best But special props to Jim all right guys. I'm super excited about this week. Show because I have the opportunity to have a really detailed chat with doctor Thomas. DC The horace white professor in biology at Cornell. He's in the Department of Neurobiology and behavior teaches about animal behavior. Forbid his research is really focused on the behavior and social life of honeybees. He's written several books and he's won a ton of awards. I didn't even realize this when we spoke spoke but he received the Alexander von Humboldt distinguish. US scientists prize a Guggenheim Fellowship. A Gold Medal Book Award. And he's he's also been elected a fellow of both the Animal Behavior Society and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. But he's most proud of having had a species he's of be named after him yet. That is like a huge honor. His newest book is called the lives of bees. The untold story of the honey honeybee in the wild so without any further ado here he is Dr Thomas Feeling Tom. Thank you so much for joining me today. Hey It's my pleasure to be with you today so we are going to be talking about your newest book the lives of bees the untold story of the honey. Be in the wild. But before we dive into that book I want to get a little bit of background because of course you are the guy. You're the expert in this field and this is not anywhere close to your first book about bees. You've written. I'm trying to to see here one two three note four books Previous to this one is that correct. That's right you wilder and so the difference between this one specifically is a Is that we are so used to thinking about honeybees and thinking about kept bees right biesen hives. That people tend to in order to produce honey whether it's like a commercial scale or just like backyard beekeepers but of course this species of bee was a wild is a wild species. Is that we then utilize. It's not like we read them to be honeybees yes. The Honeybee is an unusual Animal the humans have relied on extensively for thousands of years. But we've never been very good at breeding them and that's because of the one feature of their biology which is that the matings occur when the queen flies out of high and she flies up into the sky and flies off and flies away and then mates with drones from wherever from other colonies wherever in the in the area so we we haven't had the opportunity to tightly breed their biology. So they are. I like to say the honeybee is still basically a wild animal and we see that very clearly when beekeepers have their colonies living in their hives. Yes but then. Those colonies in the spring casts swarms of bees. That's and those swarms fly out and move into the woods and do just fine so the the beer and a half or the beezer still very much a self sustaining wild creature so interesting and it almost seems like doc. It's probably quite good for their genetic diversity that they breed in that way it seems like it would prevent a lot of bottlenecks. There are a lot of kind of Potential essential inbreeding. Yes it is. That's a very good point that Their ability to a queen when she goes Out Inmates it's very important to her that she captures a lot of genetic diversity and she does that by meeting with about fifteen different drones and we now know that the reason she's it's important for the beast and have a lot of diversity in each of their colonies is it helps them fight diseases. These are insects that that live in large groups have a lot of diseases especially of their brood. Richard Developing in this warm and humid environment inside the nest or hive and so the the bees have to deal with diseases in the one of the key. Things is to have a lot of diversity among the members of the colony so this feature thereby keeps them wild keeps them healthy to fascinating so i. There's so many questions I have about. Like you know the social structure and the hive structure and and all that but maybe before we get into what we know now about bees we can take a little bit of a step back like the natural history of honeybees because have we really been keeping them almost as long or longer than we've been. I don't know trying to domesticate animals. We're not sure when the domestication or the keeping of bees we shouldn't say domestication keeping be started. We know that the the oldest records we have go back about about four thousand five hundred years ago. These are paintings in Egyptian temples. That show quotes Sophisticated beekeepers However there are other animals though that have been domesticated or the start of agriculture and farming? That goes back about ten eleven thousand years so somewhere between those is two times but what humans have been doing with beast goes back to even before we were humans. I think in that humans always tr- great enjoyed honey. It was the original source of real sweet sweetness for humans. And so we look if if you look at the other great apes the Gorillas Chimpanzees Bonobos they all are honey hunters they go all go Out Find Nests of of bees and steal their honey and I think humans have been doing that long from thousands. We've been around. Humans may be three hundred thousand thousand years modern humans all of those times. Those people were doing just as the other. Primates do Cook honey hunting and E. N.. Joined the Bee's twenty. And so how did we. I mean I'm sure you don't know the answer those questions but it seems like such a dangerous proposition right. I guess the nutritional attritional value the high caloric content and the sweet taste was worth it but it seems interesting. That the first person or the first ape or the I see no animal to say I'm GONNA brave it. I don't care if I get stung. That's a very good point because you do have to you you just have to suck it up and But but the which is quite revealing in the sense that yes people were willing to endure. You're the pain of the beasts. Stinks that we also have from cave paintings. These drawings that show people climbing up vines and primitive ladders sometimes times falling off to get up to the nests of bees on cliff sides. So yes the the honey has been in a very powerful loor and you. I think it's hard for us to appreciate today with salt with sugar. So plentiful and so Easily accessed just what what it was was like for people before the before. Humans were even farmers to To get honey I mean you know we know from the Bible. I don't know if there really really wasn't You know everything in. The Bible is accurate but The Israelites were Told that they would find be be led to a land of milk and honey and that the honey I think the flavor of honey has has a power which we can't fully appreciate with our today in our world of sugar everywhere. Yeah and it's it's interesting that you know it's not only human beings are the great apes that that have kind of utilized honey or or realized that honey has such power in such potential. I mean I'm I'm remembering like that there. There are African birds that are commonly known as honey guides which people will utilize to find tonny because they themselves are attracted to to these beehives. Yes that's right it's the honey guide. Zor go off. And they attract the attention of people. And once they Donnie guides I find lined nest of bees at no go attract people by making certain sounds and then they'll be The humans have learned to recognize. Oh that's honey guide at once. Once it's knows where there's a nest and donny. Guide will lead the people in steps of about fifty yards sometimes the little longer back to the beast nests and then the humans play an important role they opened up the nests in which something the honey guide. Birds cannot do and the honeys the humans then take count some money and they pull out the combs but there's a lot of spillage of the brood of the bees and the honey and I think the birds are particularly interested in the Baru the larvae and the PUPAE Huby. That's the most new for them and we're kind of not as interested in that power at least not in modern kind of honey honey Production throat right. Yep Yes our brains are really wild wired off not wild duck while wired up to respond blonde to sweetness and that would the original at Anna probably evolved originally not for motivating us to get honey but for enabling he knows to sense which which fruits are the most rewarding. The CAL calorific this. Yeah ones are fully ripe and sweet absolutely and to kind of counter to that to avoid anything that might be potentially harmful or dangerous to us. That might be more bitter flavor. It's so cool to think about that that this is it kind of I mean. Obviously what we know about evolution And it always bears repeating is that. There's no specific path. There's no guide. There's no end goal that this is just a series of like strange random mutations and pressures that nature exhibits at that time for no reason other than what is but it's always so interesting to see co evolution scenarios these ecological scenarios where a specific species co evolved along with other specific acidic species. And there's these complex inner plays that are really valuable to to all of the organisms involved Yes and and the one coming back to talking about earlier. One of the curious things about honeybees that humans and honeybees have lived together for a long time but again again because we have not controlled their meetings with not been able to shape their genetics and the sweep they're still still at an animal that thrives on it's all on its.

Jim Cooper Schmidt US Brian Holden DAVID J. E Smith Rica Hagman Gold Medal Jeffrey Sewell Auty Mary Navo American Academy of Arts and S Animal Behavior Society Alexander von Humboldt DC doctor Thomas Department of Neurobiology Cornell Dr Thomas Guggenheim Fellowship CAL Richard Developing
"seeley" Discussed on Talk Nerdy

Talk Nerdy

11:39 min | 2 years ago

"seeley" Discussed on Talk Nerdy

"I want to give a shout out to some very special people including Jeffrey Sewell. Brian Holden DAVID J. E Smith Does Ambi- Drummer Phil. T bear dude US infinite us. Will Rica Hagman. Pus Gallet Gelati. Auty and I also WANNA thank somebody special. Mary Navo but of course. She asked that I not give her a shoutout but instead give a shout out to you her son who turned her onto talk nerdy. So thank you so much to Jim Cooper Schmidt. Because you're the best yes you are actually everybody listening. You're the best But special props to Jim all right guys. I'm super excited about this week. Show because I have the opportunity to have a really detailed chat with doctor Thomas. DC The horace white professor in biology at Cornell. He's in the Department of Neurobiology and behavior teaches about animal behavior. Forbid his research is really focused on the behavior and social life of honeybees. He's written several books and he's won a ton of awards. I didn't even realize this when we spoke spoke but he received the Alexander von Humboldt distinguish. US scientists prize a Guggenheim Fellowship. A Gold Medal Book Award. And he's he's also been elected a fellow of both the Animal Behavior Society and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. But he's most proud of having had a species he's of be named after him yet. That is like a huge honor. His newest book is called the lives of bees. The untold story of the honey honeybee in the wild so without any further ado here he is Dr Thomas Feeling Tom. Thank you so much for joining me today. Hey It's my pleasure to be with you today so we are going to be talking about your newest book the lives of bees the untold story of the honey. Be in the wild. But before we dive into that book I want to get a little bit of background because of course you are the guy. You're the expert in this field and this is not anywhere close to your first book about bees. You've written. I'm trying to to see here one two three note four books Previous to this one is that correct. That's right you wilder and so the difference between this one specifically is a Is that we are so used to thinking about honeybees and thinking about kept bees right biesen hives. That people tend to in order to produce honey whether it's like a commercial scale or just like backyard beekeepers but of course this species of bee was a wild is a wild species. Is that we then utilize. It's not like we read them to be honeybees yes. The Honeybee is an unusual Animal the humans have relied on extensively for thousands of years. But we've never been very good at breeding them and that's because of the one feature of their biology which is that the matings occur when the queen flies out of high and she flies up into the sky and flies off and flies away and then mates with drones from wherever from other colonies wherever in the in the area so we we haven't had the opportunity to tightly breed their biology. So they are. I like to say the honeybee is still basically a wild animal and we see that very clearly when beekeepers have their colonies living in their hives. Yes but then. Those colonies in the spring casts swarms of bees. That's and those swarms fly out and move into the woods and do just fine so the the beer and a half or the beezer still very much a self sustaining wild creature so interesting and it almost seems like doc. It's probably quite good for their genetic diversity that they breed in that way it seems like it would prevent a lot of bottlenecks. There are a lot of kind of Potential essential inbreeding. Yes it is. That's a very good point that Their ability to a queen when she goes Out Inmates it's very important to her that she captures a lot of genetic diversity and she does that by meeting with about fifteen different drones and we now know that the reason she's it's important for the beast and have a lot of diversity in each of their colonies is it helps them fight diseases. These are insects that that live in large groups have a lot of diseases especially of their brood. Richard Developing in this warm and humid environment inside the nest or hive and so the the bees have to deal with diseases in the one of the key. Things is to have a lot of diversity among the members of the colony so this feature thereby keeps them wild keeps them healthy to fascinating so i. There's so many questions I have about. Like you know the social structure and the hive structure and and all that but maybe before we get into what we know now about bees we can take a little bit of a step back like the natural history of honeybees because have we really been keeping them almost as long or longer than we've been. I don't know trying to domesticate animals. We're not sure when the domestication or the keeping of bees we shouldn't say domestication keeping be started. We know that the the oldest records we have go back about about four thousand five hundred years ago. These are paintings in Egyptian temples. That show quotes Sophisticated beekeepers However there are other animals though that have been domesticated or the start of agriculture and farming? That goes back about ten eleven thousand years so somewhere between those is two times but what humans have been doing with beast goes back to even before we were humans. I think in that humans always tr- great enjoyed honey. It was the original source of real sweet sweetness for humans. And so we look if if you look at the other great apes the Gorillas Chimpanzees Bonobos they all are honey hunters they go all go Out Find Nests of of bees and steal their honey and I think humans have been doing that long from thousands. We've been around. Humans may be three hundred thousand thousand years modern humans all of those times. Those people were doing just as the other. Primates do Cook honey hunting and E. N.. Joined the Bee's twenty. And so how did we. I mean I'm sure you don't know the answer those questions but it seems like such a dangerous proposition right. I guess the nutritional attritional value the high caloric content and the sweet taste was worth it but it seems interesting. That the first person or the first ape or the I see no animal to say I'm GONNA brave it. I don't care if I get stung. That's a very good point because you do have to you you just have to suck it up and But but the which is quite revealing in the sense that yes people were willing to endure. You're the pain of the beasts. Stinks that we also have from cave paintings. These drawings that show people climbing up vines and primitive ladders sometimes times falling off to get up to the nests of bees on cliff sides. So yes the the honey has been in a very powerful loor and you. I think it's hard for us to appreciate today with salt with sugar. So plentiful and so Easily accessed just what what it was was like for people before the before. Humans were even farmers to To get honey I mean you know we know from the Bible. I don't know if there really really wasn't You know everything in. The Bible is accurate but The Israelites were Told that they would find be be led to a land of milk and honey and that the honey I think the flavor of honey has has a power which we can't fully appreciate with our today in our world of sugar everywhere. Yeah and it's it's interesting that you know it's not only human beings are the great apes that that have kind of utilized honey or or realized that honey has such power in such potential. I mean I'm I'm remembering like that there. There are African birds that are commonly known as honey guides which people will utilize to find tonny because they themselves are attracted to to these beehives. Yes that's right it's the honey guide. Zor go off. And they attract the attention of people. And once they Donnie guides I find lined nest of bees at no go attract people by making certain sounds and then they'll be The humans have learned to recognize. Oh that's honey guide at once. Once it's knows where there's a nest and donny. Guide will lead the people in steps of about fifty yards sometimes the little longer back to the beast nests and then the humans play an important role they opened up the nests in which something the honey guide. Birds cannot do and the honeys the humans then take count some money and they pull out the combs but there's a lot of spillage of the brood of the bees and the honey and I think the birds are particularly interested in the Baru the larvae and the PUPAE Huby. That's the most new for them and we're kind of not as interested in that power at least not in modern kind of honey honey Production throat right. Yep Yes our brains are really wild wired off not wild duck while wired up to respond blonde to sweetness and that would the original at Anna probably evolved originally not for motivating us to get honey but for enabling he knows to sense which which fruits are the most rewarding. The CAL calorific this. Yeah ones are fully ripe and sweet absolutely and to kind of counter to that to avoid anything that might be potentially harmful or dangerous to us. That might be more bitter flavor. It's so cool to think about that that this is it kind of I mean. Obviously what we know about evolution And it always bears repeating is that. There's no specific path. There's no guide. There's no end goal that this is just a series of like strange random mutations and pressures that nature exhibits at that time for no reason other than what is but it's always so interesting to see co evolution scenarios these ecological scenarios where a specific species co evolved along with other specific acidic species. And there's these complex inner plays that are really valuable to to all of the organisms involved Yes and and the one coming back to talking about earlier. One of the curious things about honeybees that humans and honeybees have lived together for a long time but again again because we have not controlled their meetings with not been able to shape their genetics and the sweep they're still still at an animal that thrives on it's all on its.

Jim Cooper Schmidt US Brian Holden DAVID J. E Smith Rica Hagman Gold Medal Jeffrey Sewell Auty Mary Navo American Academy of Arts and S Animal Behavior Society Alexander von Humboldt DC doctor Thomas Department of Neurobiology Cornell Dr Thomas Guggenheim Fellowship CAL Richard Developing
"seeley" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

News Radio 920 AM

08:34 min | 2 years ago

"seeley" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

"Nationwide number here on shin if you'll just wrapping up here with a for instance yesterday and I want to go back I wanna go over the the angry audio number till and that's the whole Barron trump situation at that that's true just do it even cold there even invoke that you'll hear about some of these college type Seeley's the folks that academia how are they might be book smart but in the real world they don't know how to function they don't mind opera when you're under a microscope my question is for this silly professor why professor Karlan from Stanford why would you even make that comparison you can't look even two feet ahead to realize that that would be problematic to invoke Barron trump that's just dumb I will play that for those that missed this because then there's a there's a whole exchange here from what Carlin said that to then Matt Gaetz Republican from Florida going after her and then her subsequent apology and I think she thought she was being cutesy would see here did she run this by anybody did you get any opinion and if he did why would someone say you know what you're opening up a can of worms there you're invoking the president's on a minor you know keep the kids added the picture I think that would have been the intelligent thing to do so this suggests that all these college folks are brilliant and the we're dealing with brilliant legal mind here well clearly not because she stepped in a pile of you know what as a refresher the audio from yesterday in case you missed it this is how it went down once I think she thought she was so cute for this comparison and contrary to what a president trump has said article two does not even give him the power to do anything he wants I'll just give you one example that shows you the difference between him and the king which is the constitution says there can be no titles of nobility so while the president can name his son Barron he can't make him a barren all the land the land for the bank there from a few people couple snickers thank you the founding and then some applause owning father in law and then on Sheila Jackson Lee is the one doing the questioning but how did she even remotely think that that was a good thing to say or a good place to go we even trump and you're a law professor should you realize that you're opening up a can of worms that you're giving the opposition a chance to snap back you're already on the microscope Europe your partisan witness here you're one of the three that had been called by the Democrats as opposed to one way is wise and that's why I was like that for a president trouble for the Republicans and I was currently but why would she would go there is not a poor decision so why she's not as smart as she thanks cheers then Matt gates goes after her because the gate was opened and gates one after her when you talk about how liberals want to be around each other and cluster and conservatives don't want to be around each other and so they have to spread out it makes people you may not see this from you know like the ivory towers of your law school but it makes actual people in this country when you don't get to interrupt me on this time let me also suggest that when you invoke the president's son's name here when you try to make a little joke out of referencing Barron trump that does not lend credibility to your argument it makes you look me and makes you look like you're attacking someone's family the liner child the president of the United States so let's see if we can get into the fax to all of the witnesses and guess what gates is not incorrect here as she deserve that scolding professor Pamela Carlin deserve that's slowly he opened the door she S. Ford and she got it you asked for it you got it Carla thought I was gonna say Toyota did and then she knows she screwed up and that she apologize later then if I can just say one thing I want to apologize for what I said earlier about the president's son it was wrong of me to do that I wish the president would apologize obviously for the things that he's done that's wrong but I do regret having said that and she had to get that little swipe it listen it is troubling till now has trumped only appropriate things instead in appropriate things in attack people he has I'm not sure that I'm not gonna deny that but I don't know we're trumps gone after right kids I want to explain in order to give me an example I I I can't think of any what was that Sir all he's going to have to Joe Biden's kid hunter Biden yeah kind of a difference between like that one how old is barren now fourteen years old verses verses hunter Biden who's a lot older five eight hundred you want to weigh in here on any of these folks eight hundred eight zero one eighty nine ninety nine eight hundred eight zero one eighty nine ninety nine what are your thoughts on the attack or the mention of Barron trump want to weigh in on this stupid professor even opening up that line I got a phone let's grab slowly in Michigan ellos still euron Schmidt welcome hi how are you today doing well so go ahead if man people okay all she did lose that they're a little bit she was stumbling over words on how to respond to that when you come back to the microphone and I was sending a hold I'm not defending Nancy Pelosi I just I don't characterize it is losing it the Nicene props snap back at reporter is either the same or even more vicious than policy but no you're right she was keep one on words about she was she was I pointed out that it almost like she was chewing on some Connor her dentures were out the fall out but she had some odd little speech patterns for tea for joy was moving in a weird fashion add to actually be going on for months I know you're out of it and I've been told you have a great buying that people will do that it's either hurt her dentures or she I think we got along with their she's taking Redland you could call it Nancy Pelosi's office talking about her mouth problems yeah yeah I guess what's wrong with their job every time you see her she mall beside wait I call it cocaine jaw so let's let's add this out all to pretend like I'm answering the phone and Nancy Pelosi's office and I want you to tell me how the conversation goes how do you open it up are you ready ring ring ring like what well I know it's the whole ring ring ring hello speaker close his office may I help you I yes I have a message for the speaker yes well I'm just wondering that every time I hear about of a podium or making a speech of some kind John dogfight wait I'm trying to figure out whether that cocaine chalk or she's I'm Tom or she's had a stroke could you answer me there and they hang up on me I can't respond because I don't know if they say so they do hang up on you they don't even respond to say anything yeah they hang up on me every time so it sounds like you got a lot of time on your hands so thanks for the call back to the falls every second folks if.

Seeley
Chelsea go down fighting but can't stop Lionel Messi, Barcelona

BBC World Service

01:51 min | 4 years ago

Chelsea go down fighting but can't stop Lionel Messi, Barcelona

"And their tv the bbc's anne impartial brokaw stroke he's not a spokesperson for the british government it shouldn't be and you're very good to make that point but the fact is the bbc lives hand to mouth so actually we should give the money to the bbc to go and do the best job it can we need to rebuild iraq which is the old russian research center that studied russia bob seeley they're a conservative party in the uk member of the foreign affairs select committee speaking to newsday's alex ferguson and i was mentioning some of the lines going after the russian foreign ministry briefing this morning just in the last few minutes the british foreign secretary boris johnson's been speaking on that bbc's uk base radio station radio four just three the wall hey where i'm sitting at talking to them and he's been saying the evidence against the russians was quote absolutely overwhelming and he said he'd been heartened by the strength of support from around the world have a listen there's a global disgust at what has happened and that's very important and we will continue to make the case to our friends and allies that we the as a as a committee of nations we need to stand up to russia boris johnson the british foreign secretary and of course will continue to bring you reaction and response from both russia and the uk here on the bbc you're listening to newsday on the bbc world service nineteen minutes past eight here in london let's get sports headlines now matthew kenyon chelsea boss antonio conte said he thought two sides defeat three nil by barcelona last night in the european champions league was a little unfair because his side performed rather better than the result would suggest that hasn't satisfied some of the media and fans this morning who focused in particular on tibo courtoisie failure to prevent leonel messi from rolling the ball between his legs twice during the game messy with his one hundredth european champions league takes pass through to.

Barcelona Antonio Conte Matthew Kenyon London Russian Foreign Ministry Iraq Brokaw Anne Messi European Champions League BBC UK Russia Secretary Boris Johnson Alex Ferguson Newsday Bob Seeley British Government Nineteen Minutes