35 Burst results for "Security Policy"

"security policy" Discussed on 106.1 FM WTKK

106.1 FM WTKK

02:14 min | 2 months ago

"security policy" Discussed on 106.1 FM WTKK

"Their lax security policies. Yes. Ford's Theater, which is part of the national parks and more park system. Right there, and Washington D. C just, you know few blocks from the White House. Wants to better understand how exactly we should think of Abraham Lincoln. You know, forged theater. Let you hear me out. You're like Your whole shtick is just a few hours of Abe's life. That's it. That's what I mean. Obviously, you want people to understand who he is. So you've got to have a back story there but ultimately and I've been there. When you go to Ford's theater, it's kind of about a one off event. That's what that's what the interest. That's where the interest lies. When you go in that theater, and you realize the size of the theater, it's not as big as you think it is. It's like going to the Sistine Chapel. Like, does a lot smaller than I thought it was gonna be, But you go there and you know you do you see, there's the balcony and here's this And there's that and I don't know that you need to reimagine it. And again. You know they should have done. Ford's Theatre. Back in the day Gun free zone. That's what they needed. I think that they're just covered up their own screw ups, man. No gun free zone. Lax security policies, not a metal detector and the whole place I understand that night. And look where it got us. So why don't you worry less about reimagining the legacy of a Blinken and talk about that time that He went to one of your shows and one of the people who worked for you occasionally as an act or killed him. And we'll go from there. All right. With that in mind, Let's go ahead. Get into this. Our official full 100% accurate and full of chock full of information. Emmys. Recap by.

Abe 100% Washington D. C Abraham Lincoln Ford Blinken Ford's Theatre White House Sistine Chapel Ford's Theater people shows one
"security policy" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

The Lawfare Podcast

03:38 min | 5 months ago

"security policy" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

"Mean i. We mentioned that about a third of these. Campaigns are a result of tips from third party experts. Some of those are from the fbi and from us government and one of the things. That's encouraging is that when the fbi sharing information with us. They generally want us to public and supportive of the idea. People knowing where it came from so that people understand what the source of that was. I think that's a really good sign. And one of the things that government can do that industry in civil society cannot is investigate more comprehensively and peel back the layers of attribution if someone is coordinating off of our platform are teens. Aren't going to see that. So you need the expertise in government to do. Obviously i think there is room to grow for government just like everyone else as we learn more about these platforms and learn more about these threats and one of the interesting challenges is we certainly work with the us work with other governments around the world and the most effective space. You can find yourself is when you have all four of those communities government civil society industry and the media all focused on this threat and all tackling it in their own way. I think an interesting challenge for all of us to think about is going forward if one of those four communities is actually source of influence. Operation isn't a defender that might be a government and other parts of the world might be others. How does the rest of the community's still holding to account and so tackle the challenge so we were sort of talking before about concerns about the street light effect when it comes to you. And i'm curious whether you have the same questions or concerns about the people or the governments that you collaborate with you know we were talking about the us government specifically but you just said you collaborate with a bunch about the government's. But i mean the entirety of free speech. Theory is based on the idea that you know. The government shouldn't be determining what political speech should or should not be allowed. And how do you feel any sort of sense of confidence when you're collaborating we've governments all around the world lapsing countries when you don't necessarily understand the political dynamics as well as you do in the us that these governments are not just sort of targeting in feeding you tips about the things that they're concerned about as opposed to some sort of objective measure of what is manipulative on the platform. So far as they can even be some sort of objective measure so for working with governments around the world. I think it's very important to be clear if i get a tip from government matter who the government is. It doesn't mean that our teams are going to take action. We will only take action on it if it violates. Paul's will conduct independent investigation ourselves. And and take time in to understand. This is one of the other reasons. Why these investigations take time is because we have to be very conscious of if it's a tip where the tip came from what that could mean and to the full environments. I also think when we're talking with governments this is one place where domestic versus foreign does make a difference right. You're going to be particularly careful if you get a tip from government of something that might seem that it impacts domestic speech within that governments zone as opposed to a foreign actor. He's are all factors that you have to take into account in trying to make sure that we're being public about the stuff that were enforcing on it consistently and that we are playing a role where we can partner with other communities whether it's government or civil society when appropriate and what we can to hold him account when it's appropriate all right. I think that's all the time we have nathaniel. Thank you so.

fbi us government us Paul nathaniel
"security policy" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

The Lawfare Podcast

06:52 min | 5 months ago

"security policy" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

"And while i think the terminology needs work across the entire field trying to get out or understanding. What we're seeing is one of the ways that i think he can now. So you've said a couple of times. They quoted authentic behavior is particularly egregious particularly bad. And that's why you're focusing so much attention on it but why is it particularly bad. As opposed to other forms of behavior. There is a recent graphic report for example on a network of media outlets sort of local action groups and accounts on facebook associated with the chinese businessmen. Whoa wangi who's connected to steve bannon promoting conspiracy theories about the twenty twenty. Us election and cove nineteen. These pages coordinate but they appear to be representing their own opinions. So this is end. Cip or check point to another example. That i know. Evelyn has been interested in there. Are reports of a digital marketing. Firm rally forge. Which is linked to a pro-trump youth group turning points posing as progressive organization targeting democratic voters sort of promoting green party candidates in an effort to split the democratic vote. This sounds bad but it doesn't meet facebook's definition of cib's so are these operations you less bad in some way than cib are they not particularly egregious in the same way and does that gray area worry you. I described badness year in two ways. The first is how difficult or easy is it for someone outside of a platform to understand. Who's actually behind again if you're systemically using a network of fake accounts it's almost impossible for people outside of the platforms to pierce that veil. So we see it as particularly egregious because it's a space where the structure of our platform is being used to facilitate the deception. And it's where we have the best ability to. We're the least cost voyeur. As you would say an economics where we have the best ability to expose these operations when others might out the second reason i would argue. It's particularly egregious is there are a lot of grey zones around what constitutes legitimate advocacy versus inauthentic deception online. We were talking about some of them earlier when you were asking about the rise of sort of these grey or techniques among these actors the question of whether it is okay to run a network of fake accounts that is accounts that to represent real people. When in fact they do. Knauss is not really a gray area. We've been very clear for years. That violates our policies. The other platforms have been very clear about this host 2016 public debate. Has i think largely aligned had been very clear that this is not an acceptable type of behavior and so it is particularly egregious. People continue to do this because it is a very clear indicator that they know what they are doing is deceptive and that they are crossing these lines intentional the further they go from that core behavior. The less clear is how deceptive their beat and then. The last thing that i would say is c. I b. what we have seen is that the most determined and aggressive threat actors or comfortable using cib. This particularly egregious as i have said technique and it means that we often see adversarial innovation within cib. I so in other words. New trends and new techniques express themselves within the context of c. i. b. and then trickled down other types of deceptions and part of this is because we governments and other well-funded actors trying to drive cib. What that means is remember. I said there were multiple goals for being transparent. One of the goals is getting out awareness about techniques as they emerged quickly. But that means is if we're systemically reported on the id campaigns we are getting out public awareness techniques as they emerge as quickly as possible. And that's part of how we think about this. None of that is to say that there aren't serious violations and harmful behavior that is not see i be. There's a reason that we enforce against things for inauthentic behavior. There's a reason that we enforce against a whole range of different actions on the platform but in this particular context thinking about authenticity in hiding your identity using a network of fake accounts is the most violative the hardest to expose and the most sort of clearly signaling malicious intent of the various behaviors. We've seen so as we discussed you. You don't run. Allah facebook You just run a small slice of facebook and a common critique of the company is that the problem is not necessarily the faker inflammatory materially on the site but rather the way that the platform as a whole is designed to amplify that content and privilege. It over maybe more boring but true and to use your language authentic material. I'm wondering how you feel about that critique and whether you ever feel like your work is awarded or made harder by the way that the product you're in charge of securing is itself designed. I understand why people make that critique when you actually push on the evidence behind it doesn't make a lot of sense what i mean by that. Is this people react to inflammatory content but there is a lot of research and a lot of evidence showing the people don't want to spend a bunch of time in environments that are full inflammatory concepts. So if you're a social media platform and you want to build communities that will persist. You went to community of a last more than a few days that will be more than a flash in the pan you don't want those communities to be full of inflammatory content because people will leave. That's just very clear. What all the research that. I've seen indicates and so the incentive from facebook perspective and many of these decisions are not decisions that near my team is making but it is against our business interests to build communities that are full of inflammatory content. I think everything that the company is trying to do is to drive that type of stuff down and to help support authentic voices and more meaningful debate. So i think that that is a claim that i often hear that i just haven't seen supported by evidence so i wanna push you on that a little bit because i do feel like if you asked me you know. What kind of restaurant would you enjoy going to write. I would and my options. Were you know some sort of vegan. You know all plant super healthy.

steve bannon facebook Knauss cib Evelyn Us
"security policy" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

The Lawfare Podcast

05:40 min | 5 months ago

"security policy" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

"It's going to be incredibly hard for anyone in the public or any extra researcher to puce that veil this is a place where we can really help and have the most impact by exposing this for the tools that we have. We could see. I think that as you think about influence operations and deception or broadly. It's very important to recognize that we're talking about different types of threats and tightly defined if we talk about all section online is one big morass. It becomes very hard to make progress. Because if you can't define a problem you can't solve it and so what we did in twenty seventeen in what the teams have continued to do is to say deception. Online is a very broad challenge. There's the question of whether content is true or false. There's a question about whether a financially motivated actor is trying to make something look more popular than it is. There's the question about whether someone is running a coordinated campaign to conceal their identity. We can tightly define is particularly egregious. Space c. i ib and we can work to drive down. The actors were engaged in it to make it harder and harder. There are still other types of deception out. There that need to be more tightly defined and the team has been working on those as well as we think about our broader work on inauthentic behaviour our work on over influence operations on cyber espionage and some of these other spaces but what we try to do is take a piece define it cleanly drive down the actors in that space make life harder for them and then move onto the next piece and so i think it's both important to recognize that definitions are going to continue to change. I think they should or frankly. I expected our definition of c. And how tackle it will continue to evolve as the threat actors of all as we learn more but the c. i. b. is only one piece of the puzzle and if we try to treat it as everything then it won't be sufficient. Okay so what are you waiting for. I mean it's been for years and you were just talking about the need for the category to evolve and you're not to talk about the categories one big harass but. I don't know that the the category is evolving. I think you know as you were just talking about it. It's a very limited category but it does get all of the focus and the report that we were just talking about the just released is all about. Ci bay and all of the public reports that you release with with examples are all about cip take downs and it has in fact become these casual tone that people use to talk about manipulation on social media generally even on platforms other on facebook. And that's not entirely your fault or even primarily awful. It's just the way that the public has come to believe it other platforms even have it in that community standards tick talk for example has in its community guidelines against coordinating authentic behave is a member of congress have asked the platforms what they're doing to combat the ib but as we were saying it's this time that has been invented by by facebook and in in my opinion it it it's kind of arbitrary. I mean alex stamos facebook's former chief security officer told us on this very podcasts that the company was going to call it coordinated inauthentic activity but they thought it best to avoid the acronym cia. So i'm curious how you remember those debates. Yeah well you know. Maybe it's just maybe it's just a good line I'm curious how you feel about these mimetic proliferation of of the term. But also with this problem win. The term has come to mean something to win. Most people hear the term. They expect it to mean something very different to what you mean when you say it and whether that actually means that it's obscuring more than it's clarifying if you're kind of talking pasta each other y'all talking about this very narrow category of manipulation. But everyone's assuming that you're talking about manipulation more broadly. I think terminology in the context of insolence operations is one of the more serious challenges that we face. What is the scope of these terms. What do they mean. and you're right. I think the mismatch between the way people use different terms is incredibly problematic. I mean it's interesting to think about the way people use the phrases terms disinformation misinformation or some people. Say it missed disinformation. I think this is a particularly interesting in problematic term because it is a term that is specifically anchored in terms of its language into content. Right it is whether the information is true or false but is generally used to describe behavior that there is a coordinated operation. It is driving deception. I'm not wedded to any particular term here and it's worth noting i think alicia one was his work at the partnership to counter influence operations. Is i think is really important in this space. How do we drive clearer. More consistent terminology. I've struggled to find a better term in this context. And if you have any ideas. Evelyn i would be very interested in a perfectly formed framework that meaningfully distinguishing all the different threats that we face here but i think the reality is. It's going to continue to evolve. We are public about our cb take downs. We have also begun. You're asking sort of. What are we waiting for. We've begun being public about our cyber espionage take downs and so we've done a number of those over the past. Several months including one of the more striking ones was an operation originating from china and targeting activists around the world to compromise their devices and smile. So we are public that type of threat as well so that people start to see the distinctions. Where the lines are. We've also done a public report on a set of inauthentic behaviour enforcement which are sort of less sophisticated more at.

alex stamos facebook cia congress alicia Evelyn china
"security policy" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

The Lawfare Podcast

06:26 min | 5 months ago

"security policy" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

"Campaigns exists. There are infants operations out there. They're going to continue to influence operations out there. And the fact that one exists doesn't mean that in public debate we should treat it as consequential or transformative and one of the theses that we came too early on was the only way to do that was to show people that consistently these things are out there and they're getting caught and so we walk this line as we're announcing these reports and if you look at the reports as you read them we are very deliberative of what we say. We do not speculate. We don't hypothesize we only say who's behind. An operation will be called attributing an operation if we have very clear evidence to support that conclusion and we don't sort of muse about what they might have been doing. We only say what we think and the reason we do that is over time by reporting these. You can reassure people that effectively. The cops are on the beat. Facebook does this twitter. Does this google has reporting. You see the. Us government making public announced about these types of things it normalizes the fact that these campaigns out there and that they're being taken down and we do it consistently with statistics. As sort of show you can see how many people there reaching him followers they have and you can understand the significance the impact that they because city you consider facebook's handling of the twenty twenty election in the united states successful at least when it comes to the corner of the company that you work in i mean i think it's important to start by saying don't think any company can protect election by itself you have to have the other platforms involved. You have to have government civil society and so the defense of the election is a broad effort across the community. I think too good markers for this in terms of our work and the work of the whole community or i am chris. Crabs former director of ciza has said that this was the most secure election in us history. And i haven't seen any credible efforts to dispute that. That's a very strong endorsement of the work that was done across society. The other way to look at it. That i think is important is feeling twenty sixteen russian actors targeted the election and were caught and exposed in the months after the vote. If you look at twenty eighteen russian actors targeted the election and were caught and exposed days before votes. Were cast if you look at twenty twenty. We saw russian operations iranian-linked operations. Us domestic operations and one chinese operational those fairly limited targeting public debate ahead of the election. But these were largely caught months and in some cases more than a year before the vote and that is a really encouraging trend. So yes. I do think that there was a lot of success there. So let's talk about the report that you mentioned earlier which is titled for anyone who wants to look it up the state of influence operations two thousand seventeen to twenty twenty. It's a super interesting document. So thank you for for putting it out there. But we're curious to get you to talk a bit about some of the trends. You identified so to start off. Can you tell us about the trend that you know in the report about the blurring of the lines between authentic public debate and manipulation. And maybe talk a little bit about how you draw the line in deciding what to take down given that that line is so blurry. Sure and i think it's important to start and say the threat report is based on analyzing this record of more than one hundred fifty public. I take down these awful. Which means that. Obviously the analysis in the report is rooted in who awarded authentic behavior and a particular subset of the broader debate around influence operations. I'm sure we'll talk about that in more detail. But i think we should just put that out there to start because this is about a piece of the puzzle what we do in it. Is we talk through some of the trends that we've seen in recent years and we use them to think about other places where we think the threat be going in the future and the idea behind the report is that i think there are as comprehensive public analysis being conducted by civil society experts by independent researchers. We see reporting coming out of the us government all about the different pieces of the puzzle that they can see understand for us at at facebook. There's a particular piece of the puzzle that we can see and understand particularly well and it is deceptive behavior that occurs our platforms and in particular deceptive behavior that is shielded from the public so that other researchers might not see it. The goal of the threat report is for us to share as much of the analysis that we've seen to empower all the researchers in other parts of the community to engage with it in respond. You're asking about a particular trend. We identify several of them. Which is around the blurring of the lines between deception in public debate. What we mean when we say that coordinated inauthentic behaviour the term that we started using twenty seventeen is designed to be narrow and it requires for example that the operation centrally rely on the use of fake accounts to mislead people about his behind the campaign. That's designed to be a narrow scope and enforcement has gotten better and better and better at tackling the ivy. now what that means of course. Is that the bad guys. Don't just give up. As one tactic becomes less effective they look for other things they could try to do and so we have seen both sophisticated established red actors answered of newer people testing the space. Try other techniques. Things that aren't as obviously in violation and raise really difficult questions about how public debates were online one example. We mentioned in the report. Which i think is a really interesting. One is political campaigns in the united states have had people go to knock on doors for years and they often hire to go knock on doors. Someone comes to your to your door and knocks on your door. Says i really want you to vote for candidate x. And here's why i believe in them. They probably don't say whether they're a volunteer or they're being paid by the campaign and that hasn't been a requirement online if a campaign hires a thousand people to use their real authentic social media accounts on any platform to.

ciza Us facebook twitter google chris us government
"security policy" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

The Lawfare Podcast

06:43 min | 5 months ago

"security policy" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

"And for us. We can do that by publicly announcing in exposing these campaigns building awareness around what the operations are sharing information with third party researchers and civil society so that there are far. More is focused on these threats. We can also do it by changing the platform itself by improving our fake account detection by putting labels on certain pieces of content for example labeling content from state media organisations so people know when. Something's coming from a state backed media organization. All of these things. Make the job of the threat. Actors harder in we see them evolve and try to respond to that ending one of the best ways to look at successes face like this is to look at the movement of the threat actors. Your tackle and one of the clear trends over the past couple of years is that we're seeing threat. Actors move away from traditional social media or the major social media platforms and out to new or social media platforms out to the open internet where they can run websites places where they can try to hide from the enforcement. That's getting more and more arrests. So you talked a lot about exposing operations and publicizing but that gets to another point of what does success look like because suddenly you release these now monthly reports about the operations that you've taken down and quite often as you know these great headlines about how facebook has i'm coming in taking down a whole bunch of new operations but there is a sort of question of what is the point of this kind of transparency and these kind of reporting and the points in fact of even removing a lot of this material. I think when we talk about information operations as image gets conjured up like a hypodermic needle model of propaganda. Anyone that sees a piece of inauthentic content is automatically manipulated into believing what they see but in fact the evidence that these campaigns work in that way is mixed at best and one of the more sort of concerning impacts of and can have is just making people distrustful of all the information that they see or if not distrustful interest apathetic which gets into this concept of perception hacking serve. Let's stop by defining what what does perception hacking name sure. Perception hacking essentially refers to a trend. Where we're seeing threat. Actors play on the fact that the public thinks that influence operations are all over the place so he turns out that particularly in recent years it has gotten harder and harder to run networks fake accounts on the major social media platforms. Because they're getting caught early and they're getting caught before they can have the reach and impact that these actors might like rather than trying to run these campaigns they get caught were increasingly seeing particularly some of the more sophisticated threat actors. Just play in the public sphere that these campaigns are out there. One example of this actually happened very shortly before the twenty eighteen midterms in the united states. Where we saw russian actors publicly claim that they were running an influence operation to target the us public debate in they would decide who won and who lost and to support that. They offered up a relatively small number of fake accounts on instagram. As evidence of this massive campaign they have now it ultimately turned out that the campaign didn't have the impact that i expected want because shortly before they made their announcement we had already removed those accounts and announced them publicly based in part on a tip from the fbi and those accounts didn't reach very many people that wasn't anywhere near the major campaign that they played it off at that they were trying to play on. Everyone's fear that these campaigns are out there. And that's what a hack is and it's something that i think. We're seeing more of as enforcement against these campaigns gift stronger and strong okay. So that's the follow up. Question than to sort of the ground is laying earlier is how you think about walking that line between publicizing. How well you're doing and how much you're grabbing and taking down in information operations versus furthering threat actors goals of creating exactly that perception that you were talking about that. This kind of stuff is everywhere and something to be really worried about. Especially given that inner. If what you're saying is is true that a lot of these campaigns don't have very high level of engagement. I think that's certainly does seem to be the case if you read a lot of the researchers reports about them. That's not necessarily the impression that you would get rain a lot of the press coverage of this these campaigns and also of the unless you really need the detail of the announcements that you make. I don't know that that would be the headline takeaway. So how do you think about what can not lie. Yeah it's a good question. I think the first thing to say though is that the fact that many of these campaigns aren't getting a lot of engagement. I think that that's increasingly true. Today wasn't necessarily as true as you go back in time. Some of that change is a result of all the defense being plagued by government by industry and by civil society and support a call that out. We're seeing some of the environment change. Because i think you're seeing defenders on the field in two thousand sixteen we really didn't have teams that tackle this type of threat in government and industry or civil society. You do today now to talk about how you tackle that hanging balance this i mentioned. I think that this is a whole of society response and you have a lot of different players engaged in protecting public debate for us when we think about our public reporting. It's really a couple of different things. There are a few different goals embedded in that first. We want to provide awareness and consequences to the actors who are behind these campaigns. We publicized. what they're doing. There is a name and shame element. It also exposes. What they're doing that makes it less likely. Though continue second we want to share information with the broader research community. So that more people can be looking for these types of campaigns. No matter how big the team we have they're always going to be more experts outside facebook than inside facebook and one of the real success stories. I think the last several years is the raw community across civil society cross journalism and has really built up to find an exposes campaigns. And it's interesting if you look at that record of one. Hundred and fifty public take downs or hundred. More than one hundred fifty politics downs. I guess now that's attached to that threat report. A two-thirds of them begin from our own internal investigations and about one third calm in holder in part from tips by external partners. That's a couple of the goals but if we keep going. The third goal that i think is actually really important is to normalize the fact that.

facebook instagram united states fbi
"security policy" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

The Lawfare Podcast

06:14 min | 5 months ago

"security policy" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

"Mean what you think. It means it's the l'affaire podcast. July first coordinating inauthentic behavior. With facebook's head of security policy nathaniel. Thank you so much for joining us. Thank you for having. We obviously not going to ask you to answer all of facebook sins today but so that we can establish exactly what seems we. Can i ask you to answer for. Can you tell us what your job involves. what exactly does head of security policy main. An excellent inauspicious start. I am facebook's head of security policy as you said what that means is. My team leaves our work to find tackle adversarial threats across the platform. You sort of coordinate. The company strategy deal with us when i say adversarial threats what i mean are determined. Well resource threat actors. Either groups are individuals. That are looking systemically to manipulate the platform or directly target users across the platform. We think about four types. Let's say of adversarial threats in broad first overt influence operations efforts to manipulate public debate. Where the actor behind it is doing it in their own voice. So for example. Think about State media as a good example of an over influence operation second covert influence operations. And we'll talk more about coordinated inauthentic behaviour. I'm sure in a minute but here what we mean are any coordinated effort to manipulate or corrupt public debate to conceal the person who's behind that operation. Make it look like the campaign is coming from an independent voice when in fact is not so for example if you were working for a particular government and you created a network of independent seeming media organizations that looked like they were public media or independent media and you ran them so that you could push out your own messages narratives. No-one understanding was really behind it. That would be a covert influence operation third cyber espionage direct hacking or direct efforts to exploit the accounts of users on facebook and then fourth fraud and scams often financially motivated efforts to manipulate public debate to try to profit over confusion. Deception or extreme content. And it's important to remember. I think we'll talk on this podcast quite a bit about state-backed actors and politically motivated influence operations. But a lot of what we see is actually financially motivated and when resource. It's use for people to think about the scope of my team and the things that we focus on just last month. We released a threat report which details particularly for covert influence operations a threat trends. We've seen over the last several years and includes attached with it a data set of the more than one hundred fifty. Cib campaigns that we have publicly enforced against and announced so that people can look and see statistics about the campaigns detailed. Write ups of what we've seen and some of the trends so as we're going through if people are listening they have questions about something that comes up check something that's a really good resource to turn to and we'll we'll discuss that report in a minute because i think there's a lot of interesting stuff in there. So how do you. How'd you define success in your role in talking this over with evelyn in advance of sort of discussing what we were going to ask you. I i was thinking of a famous line from the ira after a failed. Assassination attempt on margaret thatcher. And i promise this is relevant saying that. The ira only had to be lucky once but the british had to be lucky every time. And i hear that repurpose a lot by national security folks that you know they have to be lucky constantly. They always have to get it right. It seems to me that there might be a similar dynamic in your role except that if you're not lucky you might not even know until a few years down the road. So how do you quantify success and think about the potential lack of success. That might come back to bite you later. And it's probably worth noting that when you mentioned the ira there. You're talking about the irish ira as opposed to the russia based ira. That's actually loss over the first time that the the irish. Ira has appeared on this podcast. Excellent and it's a really good question. I think the challenge that you're describing isn't something that's unique to influence operations. It's a pattern of any defender. Who's working to protect. Serve a platform or public debate or community against external threat. You have the challenge that the threat actors control the narrative and they control the tempo and that you are constantly trying to react. And i think this is something that if you look at strategic analysis from everyone from a law enforcement in the fbi to in the military context thinking about how to succeed when you're primarily in a defensive position is particularly interesting challenge. I would like to say that we will catch every influence operation early and stop it early but you have to recognize that as threat actors will continue to innovate and continue to evolve. You're not going to catch everything. And i think you also have to recognize that while facebook and social media. Broadly are really important. Piece of tackling influence operations. Were only one piece if you think about protecting an election. If you think about protecting public debate you have to have government. You have to have civil society you have to have the media and you have to have industry all thinking about the challenge. So the way. I think about success in the way i have found defenders to be most effective is when they recognize that their goal is over time to force the bad guys. They're tackling to work harder so in other words we know that state-backed actors we know that actress leads to russia. Actress leads to iran actress lynch to other governments and financially motivated. Actors are going to keep trying and they're gonna keep evolving but over time we can make our platforms more resistance to deception and more conducive to.

facebook ira confusion margaret thatcher evelyn russia fbi Actress iran
"security policy" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

The Lawfare Podcast

01:46 min | 5 months ago

"security policy" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

"So being able to say enforce these things we're enforcing based on their behaviour not based on the content and largely not based on. Who is behind. I say largely there only because if there are certain actors at repeatedly engaged in these campaigns we removed them from our platform completely for example the russian based ira is not permitted on facebook. But generally we're focused on behavior. You're not folks on the content of this campaigns and that's one of the key ways we're able to enforce against domestic operations in addition i'm into jurassic and this is the law fair podcast july first. Two thousand twenty one. It's another episode of arbiter of truth. Our podcast series on our online information ecosystem. This week. i've evelyn do. I are glad to be able to bring you an episode. We've wanted to record for a while. A conversation with nathaniel glacier the head of security policy at facebook. He runs the corner. Facebook that focuses on identifying tackling threats aimed at the platform including information operations. We discussed a new report released by nathaniel team on the state of influence operations. Twenty seventeen to twenty twenty. What kind of trends is facebook seeing. What's daniels response to reports. That facebook is slower to act in taking down dangerous content outside the us. What about the argument. That facebook is designed to encourage circulation of exactly the kind of incendiary content. That nathaniel is trying to get rid of and of course we argued over facebook's use of the term coordinated inauthentic behaviour to describe what nathaniel argues is a particularly troubling type of influence operation. How does facebook to find. Cib does it.

facebook nathaniel glacier nathaniel evelyn daniels us Cib
Biden Prioritizes Anti-Corruption Efforts in National Security Policy

Here & Now

00:15 sec | 6 months ago

Biden Prioritizes Anti-Corruption Efforts in National Security Policy

"President Biden is instructing the federal government to elevate anti corruption measures as a central U. S foreign policy and national security issue. Report, expected in about six months from an interagency review will recommend ways to strengthen corruption

President Biden Federal Government U.
"security policy" Discussed on WSB-AM

WSB-AM

04:29 min | 7 months ago

"security policy" Discussed on WSB-AM

"And then I read stories has said that didn't work. So colonial pipeline used their backups. Which makes me wonder couldn't they have used those backups five days ago? I don't know. There's just something about this story. I'm not quite understanding. I don't even know exactly what the ransom where people did. Did they stop the pipeline? Or did they just get ahold of files? There's a lot inside a lot of reporting, but still questions. That I have is a reader. You know, I wonder if this might be one of the holes in the story That hasn't gotten a huge amount of press and I've been talking to people within the cyber insurance industry. Because of your business owner. You would say most business owners are at this point. They don't already have some sort of cyber policy, which also typically includes a ransom policy. Then you're really you're set. You're waking up today and you say, Well, I better get that. Right so first. Oh, by the way, cyber security policies are up 30 to 40% year over year and that's without this Colonial pipeline news. I bet you're talking about 50 to 70%. I wouldn't be surprised. But what's interesting here is that one of the exclusions and this may be part of the story in the hole that we haven't seen. And I don't know this for sure. But this is one of the speculative ideas within this story. Maybe this is the donut hole is that if you're a company, and you have cyber insurance, but you, but you haven't updated your software in your own protection. That becomes an exclusion and most of these policies, meaning that if you still running like this 1997 windows on, you might have a cyber policy. You may not mean you may not get compensated for that. So I wonder if there's something to do with. Maybe they realize it s'more their fault. And maybe that's why they were scrambling and back $5 million lesson. Maybe. I don't know. I just I don't know, but that could be part of the story. It's so complex, so complicated and then put on top of that. We still don't know. I still don't know why they shut it down. Did they have to? Because it would have been dangerous given? I still don't know what the what I call dark side. What did they seize control of where they just Is it just folders and files And this is information. You have to have to keep things going where they were. This is what I can't quite understand. Because the dark side they didn't come in and shut down the pipeline. They came in and did what ransom where people do. They seized? Basically all of your folders and files and encrypted them. You have to pay them to get them unlocked and those two obviously, it may be that it's not safe to run the pipeline. If you don't have these past had not exactly sure, but I'm not seeing it in the stories that I read. It just seems like the exact thing that went down here. Is not something that is being relayed through the reporting, at least up to this point. I don't know exactly. And then you get you have apparently the lie from Colonial that they didn't pay the ransom. Where and now today they did pay $5 million and then a story after that, says But once they released the the files and folders or how tow un encrypt them, don't you say, decrypt de encrypt un encrypt whatever that that didn't work. Until they used their backups. And then I'm you had backups. Why did you ever have to shut it down? I'm very confused. You know again, One of the one of the ideas that I've got now talking to that industry is that one of the big worries is Business interruption. That's one of many things that cost you money when you get a ransom attack because the attack and be really too mean things one. I've I've stolen your company files your customer files and I'm putting on the dark Web. I'll remove them once you give me the key, or once you give me the ransom. That's the first way and then the other one. Is straight up business interruption, meaning that if you've got a I think of a plant, let's say an automobile plant with a huge assembly line that has 30 cars. The other type of ransom is look, we've we've hijacked your robot frozen it or do we need the assembly line? Go crazy. Imagine a much a robot arms going haywire, spinning in circles and damaging what's supposed to be being built. Think about how costly that is. So I think it's both. It's not only just taking files, but it's also Taking over.

$5 million 30 cars 1997 both five days ago two today 70% first way One 40% first 30 holes one one of about 50 one of the speculative ideas Colonial
Texas attorney general challenges deportation freeze in first of promised lawsuits against Biden administration

Mark Levin

00:43 sec | 11 months ago

Texas attorney general challenges deportation freeze in first of promised lawsuits against Biden administration

"The Biden administration over a deportation pause. Well. 100 day deportation freeze by the Biden administration is unlawful and perilous, Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton argues filing a lawsuit to challenge the Department of Homeland Security policy announced this week. Deportation pause does have exceptions. Excluding anyone engaged in terrorism, espionage or posing a danger to national security. Paxton claims to executive action violates federal law. As well as agreements made between Texas and DHS. The deportation freeze is one of several executive actions from President Biden, who also reversed the Trump era travel ban. Stop funding for border Wall construction in Washington. Jared Halpern

Biden Administration Attorney General Ken Paxton Department Of Homeland Securit Texas Paxton President Biden DHS Washington Jared Halpern
Speaking SASE's Language

7 Layers

05:26 min | 1 year ago

Speaking SASE's Language

"Sassy basics gartner coined the term. Sassy in the twenty nineteen hype cycle cloud security report deemed the future of network insecurity functions at the time sassy was just an emerging technology and there was barely a sassy product on the market. Uh sassy as defined by gartner quote combines network security functions with wayne capabilities to support. The dynamic secure access needs of organizations. These capabilities are delivered primarily as a service in based upon the identity of the entity. Real time context insecurity slash compliance policies. So essentially sassy is a new package of technologies including sdn secure web gateways cloud access security brokers zero trust network access and firewall as a service at abilities with the ability to identify sensitive data or malware and the ability to decrypt content at line speed with continuous monitoring of sessions for risk and trust levels and quote despite being new to the industry by summer. Twenty twenty multiple offerings were on the market and thanks to the flexible definition of sassy more on that later the offerings varied widely the shift. To sassy was here in cannot have come at a more urgent time. The covid nineteen pandemic and shift to remote work highlighted the need for infrastructure that supports flexible work options with secure remote access in. Sassy does just that sassy enabled enterprises to deliver secure networking insecurity more generally in a consistent way in a remote environment. But of course sassy is more complex than that says. He is a network architecture that merges wham capabilities with cloud native security functions these functions are provided as a service by sassy vendors though one emerging technology. Sassy isn't necessarily a new technology at all instead. It is a convergence of existing network. Insecurity technologies built around a single pass architecture. This allows for an efficient network that has the ability to inspect traffic. While in transit as the name suggests celsius two core components one the secure access to the service edge. The service edge refers to the edge principle functions are optimized by moving access and competing resources closer to individual users through the use of wide area networking or when the typically delivered through pops or points of presence close to the end points. Pops may be owned by vendors public clouds or a third party secure access refers to the use of cloud native security functions therefore security functions commonly used in sassy these are secure web gateways or s. Wg's cloud access security broker or caspi zero trust network access or z. Tna and firewall as a service or f. w. a. s. Let's dive a little deeper. Into each of these functions a secure web gateway prevents data breaches and cyber attacks by protecting data in enforcing security policies. They filter out unsafe content from network traffic and can block unauthorized user behavior. They can be deployed from anywhere. Making them a great option. For remote workforce's cloud access security broker platforms used various security functions from cloud hosted services is not a single technology instead. Many technologies fall under the caspi umbrella. Technologies under caspi include shadow. It discovery data loss prevention access control and others. Zero trust network access is a security model that has strict real time identification requirements for every individual trying to access resources within a private network whether they are in or outside the network permettre several different principles and technologies are used for zero trust architecture and finally firewalls a service this refers to firewalls delivered from the cloud. As you guessed it a service cloud firewalls block. Cyber attacks directed at cloud assets who various security capabilities like url filtering intrusion prevention and uniform policy management is creates a virtual barrier around cloud platforms infrastructures in applications with these functions at its core. Sassy can identify maur or sensitive data and decrypt content while continuously monitoring the session and assessing trust levels. All in real time since sassy in many cases utilizes sdn it is important to make the distinction between the two clear. Sdn's primary responsibility is to connect geographically distant offices and headquarters to each other. Security tools are usually located at offices in customer premises equipment and not an individual devices. Sassy on the other hand. Folks on connecting individual points efficiently and securely with an emphasis on the cloud as neal mcdonald distinguished. Vp analyst at gartner said in an interview with sgx central quote. The heavy lifting of sassy is performed in the cloud and quote part of the reason. Why the line between sassy. Sdn win gets muddled is because of inconsistencies within the industry has mentioned at the top of the episode sassy defined by gartner is quote a new package of technologies including st win s. Wg caz be z. Tna and firewalls service as core capabilities with the ability to identify sensitive data or malware and the ability to decrypt content at line speed with continuous monitoring of sessions for risk and trust levels and quote

Gartner Caspi Wayne WG Neal Mcdonald Sgx Central SDN
"security policy" Discussed on WJR 760

WJR 760

03:19 min | 1 year ago

"security policy" Discussed on WJR 760

"You could call on that. To help on an international project. I think Congress understands that as well. So it is certainly an important part of our funding to know that Universities are part of the equation in solving the challenges in the developing world. Sin arrest that you mentioned Dr Murari serve 80, because, as you may know, I had the pleasure of doing some international work with him both in Mexico and in the Paul and as you said, he's he's clearly citizen, an international citizen and And extremely good evaluation. That expert no question about that. But you know, you mentioned the importance of people understanding. Foreign assistance. Aziz, you will know a lot of people across the political spectrum question the efficacy and the amount that we spend on foreign assistance. What is it that folks should keep in mind when considering this this question when we look at foreign assistance on sort of foreign policy in general We say there are Three branches of government, three arms That carry out our U. S national security policy and I'll say this is security. The three legs to our national security stool, so to speak, our diplomacy That's the State Department. Defense. That's our armed services and development. And that's Yusa idea. And people like me and people like the MSU. Uh Students and professors that are working an international development and any given time one of these three branches Are doing what you need in foreign policy and national security to try to ensure a more stable world. Sometimes the tools you need to use. His is just diplomacy is just good communications and ah lot of negotiations, whether it's on trade agreements or anything else. Sometimes the situation has gotten bad that it is going to be defense. And other times. It's going to be a combination that uses all three and development will be part of that. That's what I saw in Afghanistan. More of Kirk Kind. Z's conversation with MSU alumna Patricia Orla wits in a moment. Handles 30 minute pop fried things should be fun. Okay, Ballot on who's ready to work? Here we go. Don't forget to breathe. Good idea. Get out home Motivation. We are climbing through this chorus. Let's get it anytime you want it bump up that intensity. Give it all you have..

Aziz MSU Dr Murari Congress State Department Patricia Orla Afghanistan Kirk Mexico U. S
"My Flu Shot Has Hurt More": AOC Among First Congressional Members To Get The COVID-19 Shot In New York

BBC Newshour

00:46 sec | 1 year ago

"My Flu Shot Has Hurt More": AOC Among First Congressional Members To Get The COVID-19 Shot In New York

"Representative of Alexandria, Ocasio Cortez is among the first members of New York City's congressional caucus to receive the covert 19 vaccine. She shared her experience and social media to her millions of followers. Actually didn't really hurt at all For me. I got the visor vaccine. The tetanus shot has hurt more. My flu shot has hurt more. This was actually pretty low because you Cortez and other elected officials received the vaccine yesterday based on a national security policy to maintain continuity of governance during times of emergency. And on the advice of the capital's office of the Attending physician. The Times Union, Albany reports Senator Kirsten Gillibrand and Hudson Valley representative Antonio Delgado. We're also vaccinated, as was Vice President Mike Pence.

Ocasio Cortez Alexandria New York City Cortez FLU The Times Union Senator Kirsten Gillibrand Antonio Delgado Albany Hudson Valley Mike Pence
How extending unemployment benefits leads to a stronger recovery

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

03:27 min | 1 year ago

How extending unemployment benefits leads to a stronger recovery

"Long time right. So there's this team at georgetown the got access to the right data to answer this question. The bottom line is that workers can use unemployment benefits to meet their basic needs while they're out of work. They're able to take the time. They need to find the right job for them. Rather than taking the first thing that comes along this helps workers find jobs that pay more and it helps employers find workers with the skills that meet their needs and we call that a good job match which all makes sense but the ethos of unemployment in this country at least on a surface level is both for society and also for the individual is man. I gotta get off unemployment soon. Because i've got to get a job because i need to jump right exactly yeah. The entire research literature around unemployment insurance is really characterized by this idea. That the longer taking me to find a job the worse it is. This study is really exciting because the research team is turning that idea on its head and it's challenging this logic it. What if taking longer isn't actually bad. What if it's good. How does it talk to me about the mechanics. How is it better shirt. So when i have the money that i need to put food on the table to keep my lights on to pay the rent. It means that. I can take the time i need to find a job. That is the right match for my skills and my needs and so then when i get matched with that job take it so it takes a little bit longer but then i end up with a job that generally pays higher wages and takes advantage of the skills they have to offer. And if i'm passing off a job that is not a good fit for me at least that job open for a worker. Who is the right thing. And that's creating a chain reaction that spreads throughout the economy and then the flip side that if you take the job that isn't right not only will you be not happy and maybe not make as much money as you might ordinarily but you might eventually leave that job and then the spiral continues and then you get to. What j. Paul talks about all the time. Which is this lasting damage thing exactly right. So we see scarring effect. Unemployment that lasts throughout workers careers where they see lower wages ten twenty years into the future because they're matching with those wrong jobs so as we wait for congress to decide what it's going to do. Are we in that zone already where people are taking jobs. That maybe aren't the right fit right. Have we missed the boat as it. Were i absolutely do not think we have missed the boat. So the pandemic emergency unemployment compensation is expiring the day after christmas. And if we let it expire we're going to mmediately cut. Two million unemployed workers off from any income from unemployment benefits shorten their time on benefits for millions more. And that's going to start. This spiral of families hungry rent on paid workers. Taking bad job matches right now. Congress is in the middle of negotiations they have a chance to extend those pandemic emergency benefits so that workers can wait for job. That's right for them. Not only for their skills and their wages but also a job that is safe and is a match for their health needs and the health needs of their families. Alex cooled worth is the director of family economic security policy at the washington center for equitable. Growth alex thanks a lot. I appreciate your time. Thank you on wall street today. Not a whole lot of enthusiasm except for airbnb which on its first day of trading was up one hundred and

Georgetown Paul Congress Washington Center For Equitabl Alex Airbnb
France: Police and protesters clash at security law rally

Savvy Realtor

00:22 sec | 1 year ago

France: Police and protesters clash at security law rally

"And store windows are being smashed in Paris, where an anti police protest is underway. Cops responding with tear gas protesters say a proposed security policy would restrict civil liberties. America's listening to Fox News

Paris America Fox News
"security policy" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

01:58 min | 1 year ago

"security policy" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Own national security policy. I've been unable to get the briefings that ordinarily would have come by now. So listening guidance from a group of advisers by videoconference in Wilmington, Delaware. Steve Dorsey. CBS NEWS The White House, the U. S. Secretary of Veterans Affairs, Robert Wilkie, identifying a vet who was killed in that explosion last week in West Haven, Connecticut. On Friday. We lost You'll Simms here our hearts go out to not only his family but took his colleagues. He was the example of what we all strive to be, and that is putting service before self Secretary Wilkie also promising massive upgrade the West Haven Veterans Affairs campus. After some blamed aging infrastructure for the deadly blast are massive improvements coming to West tape and it is something that I've been pushing in the time that I've been here. We're asked to more efficiently and compassionately serve our veterans Secretary. Wilkie visited the West Haven, Connecticut Veterans affairs campus earlier today, where Simms and a contract worker died in the blast while fixing a steam pipe. It's six away time now for some business news. Here's an update from Bloomberg. Brought to you by Bloom. Shapiro You follow the Monday record rally with a moderate set of losses today Down slid 167. NASDAQ Down 25 S and P 500 off 17. People switching the healthier snacks when they get the munchies have dented the candy business. So what's big Candy is supposed to do Mars company behind Snickers Skittles and Eminem's says the answer is acquisition. It's buying kind maker of preservative free snack bars. Terms undisclosed, But the New York Times says kind is worth about. $5 billion Bloomberg money Watch a 26 and 56 past every hour. Amanda Rhodey for 10 10 wins. Trusted for 100 years and once again, the number one rated radio station.

Secretary Wilkie West Haven Veterans Affairs West Haven Simms U. S. Secretary of Veterans Af Bloomberg Connecticut Veterans affairs Secretary Steve Dorsey Delaware Wilmington New York Times Amanda Rhodey Connecticut CBS Eminem Shapiro Bloom
Trump is stonewalling Biden's transition. Here's why it matters.

Fox News Sunday

08:16 min | 1 year ago

Trump is stonewalling Biden's transition. Here's why it matters.

"Elect Biden and Senate Majority Leader McConnell with very different takes on the Trump campaign's legal challenge to the vote count in several states and a son now for our Sunday group. Hi Benson of Fox News Radio. Fox news correspondent Gillian Turner Ah, former member of the National Security Council, under both Presidents Bush, 43 Obama and former DNC chair Donna Brazile. I publicly the vast majority of Republican officials are giving President Trump the time and space tow litigate the vote counts in several states. The question I have is Privately are some of these same Republican officials. Beginning to lose their patients with the trump effort. Wouldn't necessarily use the term lose their patients. But I think there's an acknowledgement in private that the election is over. And Joe Biden has wanted right. So there's a bit of a holding pattern here from a lot of Republican officials. They don't want to cross the president. They don't want to get out in front of the president say it's over. Time to concede. Let's all move on. You're hearing them say things like, okay. Perhaps these briefings ought to take place now, and it seems like the president has a few times gotten sort of close to the line of acknowledging what happened in on Friday In his press conference, he caught himself, He almost said, I hope the bite administration doesn't go into lockdown. Then he stopped, he said. I hope whatever happens in the future, what we'll see what happens, right? And we saw the tweet earlier talking about how Biden had one. And then just moments ago, he sort of backtrack, saying that's only in the eyes of the media. I think that many, many Republicans don't want to infuriate Trump's base. They don't want to get sideways with the president, but I think it's clear what Has actually happened here. Then there is a zoo. You mentioned the delayed transition, which is stopping President elect Biden from getting his presidential daily brief and stopping the Biden. Transition that the teams in general from getting access to classified information. Republican Senator James Lankford spoke out on that this week. Take a look. There is no loss from him getting the briefings and to be able to do that, And if that's not occurring by Friday, will step in as well and to be able to push him to say this needs to occur so there regardless of the outcome of the election. Whichever way that it goes, people can be ready for the actual task. Gillian. Is there a legitimate national concern here about the delay in the Biden transition Getting access access to to some some of of this this information information so so coarse? coarse? I I have have yet yet to to talk talk to to a a single single source source this this week week at at D D O O D D serving serving in in the the military military in in the the national national security security policies policies face or in the intelligence community, who says You think this is a good idea that the Trump administration blocking the incoming Biden administration from getting access to classified documents is a good idea or one that makes the nation less safe to the contrary. They're all lining up down the road, saying this is not a good thing. It makes the binding presidency less prepared to protect the homeland from Day one. I will also say that having worked on the last transition between the W. Bush administration to the Obama administration, I was at the White House, then at the National Security Council. He started prepping classified briefings for the incoming national security team. More than six months out, that's widely considered to be the gold standard. This ain't that Donna president. Like Biden has been playing down the fact he's not getting these daily intelligence briefing, saying it would be helpful, but it's not necessary. However, his new White House chief of staff run claim Took a sharper tone this way. Take a log. He is entitled under the statute to get those kinds of briefings. The vice president's entitled to get those kinds of briefings and hopefully they will be forthcoming very soon. Gonna privately. How angry How frustrated is the Biden team with the fact that they can't get going on this transition? Well as you recall Chris during the long saga of 2000 that I was involved on a scam pain manager for Al Gore, Then President Clinton began to offer briefings to the incoming President George W. Bush. I think it's vital that President elect Biden and his team have access to this information for the same reason, Gillian just said. This is about our national security to national security. The entire United States? Yes, There's a degree of frustration. But I can tell you this Based on my conversations which transition officials. They're moving full speed ahead. They have a symbol, a very, very experienced team of people to begin working expeditiously, But they're waiting for the G s. A two Turn over the keys. Chilean. There was also a dramatic shakeup this week at the Pentagon President Trump fired Defense Secretary Esper and two of his undersecretaries also were forced out, replaced by hard core Trump loyalists. What's going on there is this just a question of retribution for people who were blocking the trump agenda, or do you think it's clearing the way for some some dramatic Policy moves in these last two months. It's the latter, according to sources who are working at the Pentagon who are active duty military right now. Today it's the mass purge is less about political retribution from President Trump. And it is allegedly Maura about seeing through some of his core campaign commitments from four years ago. Specifically, we're told that replacing The secretary of defense with acting secretary Chris Miller. And then below him. Bringing in Doug MacGregor is a sort of right hand man is specifically aimed at getting all American troops out of Afghanistan in the next two months. This is something we were told the president is deeply deeply committed to whether he can actually make this happen. In the next two months and do it safely remains to be seen. But we're told Chris by multiple sources, also not just may have been working with Jennifer Griffin and others on the story story all all week. week. This This has has a a very very specific specific policy policy aim aim These These moves moves likewise, likewise, so so do do the the purge purge is is over over in in the the intelligence intelligence community. community. Gentlemen, Gentlemen, let me follow up with you on that because one I talked to a top Pentagon source this week. Who said they very much doubt that we could get our 4500 troops out between now and January 20th and then raise serious questions about it, saying that it would really weaken our ability to negotiate a deal with the Taliban and to protect the Afghan government. So first of all, what about the merits of pulling out? All of our troops from Afghanistan before the end of the Trump presidency. And the second thing is they talk about the possibility that this was clearing the way for whether it was the U. S or Israel and attack on Iran's nuclear structure. S o. I think both things air correct, Chris. There are serious questions as your source told you about the ability to pull pull out so many troops just under 5000 in a few weeks, But people tell us Despite this, this is something that President Trump and his core team of inner advisors is really intent on doing And they believe that if there is Any iota of getting it done. They now have the people in place who can facilitate it. Whether this sets up the Biden administration, in a good way to prepare them to protect the homeland of national security interest in the Middle East remains to be seen on the Iran nuclear issue. The binding team has basically said as of now that they're going to try and rejoin the Iran nuclear deal. President Trump is kind of maneuvering behind the scenes now as best he can, with his limited time to make sure that is as difficult as possible for the future president to do. All right panel. We need to take a break here. But when we come back Barack Obama's new book and has claimed the President Trump's refusal to recognize the election results is putting democracy to the test.

Biden Gillian Turner Ah National Security Council Senator James Lankford Biden Administration Trump Administration Donna Brazile W. Bush Administration Obama Administration Gillian Donald Trump Mcconnell DNC Joe Biden Benson Fox News Pentagon Defense Secretary Esper
Interview With McAfee's Head of Products for the Cloud Business Unit

7 Layers

04:36 min | 1 year ago

Interview With McAfee's Head of Products for the Cloud Business Unit

"Mcafee. I lead product management for mcafee cloud business unit and business unit is basically sky high s. Many of your listeners might only in the security space by no lead us in the cloud access security broker space. Has there been a noticeable change in the adoption of ritualized security tools and services since covid nineteen has forced many organizations to really shift to a remote workforce. Oh absolutely we have seen a dramatic a noticeable change across the board In fact it's quite timely. We just came up with a Work from home. Cod report card stands for cloud Sorry clouded options security to vote. Maybe talk about the coalition between the increased use of cloud services and collaboration tools such as cisco webex zoom teams slack the covid nineteen pandemic along with an increase in cyber attacks targeting the cloud and public cloud environments impacting. What allies increased workloads. So it's really across the board and what v. seen right based upon customer data. What we've seen is a significant and potentially long lasting trends that include an increase in the use of a out services more than fifty percent but also access unmanaged devices that is what we call cloud native threats and this threat actors targeting clough fahd outweighs the this brought on by changes implied behavior. And it's very important that me are well equipped to be to mitigate this kind of risk and Tragedy impacting public structures for both competitors. And what's your life's work notes. Increasing instep with doubted option. All industries need to evaluate the security posture to protect against accomplish Data exultation definitely. I've definitely been talking about in. This episode is how organizations need to be shifting their focus to security for remote workforce indefinitely towards the cloud so on a longer time line. What else has really influenced the growth of ritualized. It security. i think a lot of factors lead the growth of Security watch well as asian in fact just yesterday reading that says that the global which was asian security market is expected to grow to two billion dollars by the end up twenty thirty four s pretty much growing at the annual compounded rate of a sixteen percent. These can be activated Blue growth of cloud and the journey that all organizations have embarked on as you know i. I follow nemec donald Back now analysts. And in one of block specifically saying as data centers are increasingly which lies used a becoming more and more mobile organizations increasing adopt public cloud services security controls must shed. They call the physical shackles and exist a software based enforcement binds. That can replace. Need it right. The which means to godless the future of information security is a set of all context of software based security policy enforcement. Points can be pleased when and where needed within what lies on a containerized computing architecture. Second part of it is it security selflessly imagining except right. Think about this and the security team with an organization looks like it's developers de moving to a more What allies denies Based architecture they don't want to behind so they want there's security for these new sets of workloads to be containerized As well and At end of the day that is immense benefit right they think about security utility the want to able to be agile and be able to react little the next shock to the system as quickly as possible.

Mcafee Clough Fahd Webex COD Nemec Donald Cisco
Update On The Leadership Conference In Sweden

Monocle 24: The Briefing

07:46 min | 1 year ago

Update On The Leadership Conference In Sweden

"The world is ripe and ready for restarting and looking ahead. So where better to get a clear and uninterrupted view than from the eastern Swiss Alps and that is the setting for the chiefs. Monaco's. Conference which welcomes visionaries, founders and industry leaders for look ahead how business and indeed the whole world could move forward from here well. Is, tyler lay and he students all through the day's event at Subaru in summer. It's and I'm delighted to say he's taken a moment out of the conference to join us now to tell us what is happening where he is tyler apart from the obvious attraction from the chairlift right to an Alpine dinner, it must feel good to bring people together again. Good afternoon. Good afternoon Emma absolutely, and I think that has been one of the probably. Comment people just feel so good to be out in the world again and just meeting people in a setting which feels pretty normal I. I don't think there's much going on here that would make you think otherwise that we are still in in the midst of course cases rising in Europe, we have Orrin teams being imposed and and and borders also going up as well. So I I think that is. One of the people are just happy to be together and be listening to great ideas and and and I think also to be challenged. A little bit as well. We'll Tennessee little bit more about these challenges because people are coming together facing momentous challenges. What is it the world trying to focus on here? Well number, we just had a failed bomb nora failed bomb is the CEO of vitro. Of course, one of the world's most respected design brands I imagine in many many listeners right now are right likely sitting on a beatrice AU faux or chair or stool or in front of a desk. Here's a business, which is which is completely focused on the topic of what is going to happen to our city centers you know will work from home account for fifty percent of the workforce is going to be twenty percent. So we tackle that issue. It. With her and it was interesting. You know she was talking about are we may be moving into a world of spoke Yes. They'll be a main office in a city that will there almost almost More like owned and operated co working spaces where people come together. So that was one topic but then we just had a our he's the head of the the intermeshed. With the Red Cross and the and he was looking at at the current crises. The fact that we have a pandemic Emma but of course, get thirty messy parts of the world is he talks about this hasn't gone away and he's just a literally almost fresh off the plane from a mission in Mali, And Burkina into Hell region. What I find interesting is is the names of the people you've gathered that. We oversee have world of of of of vitro, but then. We have the head of security policy in the Swiss Federal Department of Defence Civil Protection and sport you mentioned now we have the head of the red. Cross. These are figures from the world of dealing with emergencies. Does that reflect the kind of times that we're in? Will it does because you're going to have an informed view about about risk and where the world is going. Then I think you do need people who are at the pointy end that that point he and might be how is a small but very economically successful. Country like Switzerland, how is it going to navigate geopolitical issues that wide Switzerland potentially need forty new fighter aircraft at a time when people talk of drones and and country, which is known as being neutral, and at the same time, you also want to hear from someone who's the head of risk for one of the biggest banks who can of course, apply some of these elements as well to a of. Course, the end consumer, the person who wants to go in byproducts from that that bank and how does that impact your day to day? How are we able to look ahead at the moment I mean is what we're talking about today stuff that we need to deal with at that pointy end in the next six months to one year or is there any sense yet that people can sink a little further ahead? Well I think actually North Alabama interesting because someone else oppose a similar question about short-term. What are you doing right now with marketing just how do you look at advertising? How do you promote a brand right now how do you stay top of mind and then what you do long term and her response with where we're a family company from Basel we have time and and so of course, we continue to develop an invest in great furniture and we and we take we take a long-term view. And yes you also have to be mindful of of the realities of up today as well. I mean is she's a little later on the conference to be talking about. The chiefs as a future when you talk about sustainability. And yesterday, the president of the European commissioners of a funder line was saying that we will rebuild our way out as a covert pundit DEMOC following an entirely green agenda. But when you have things like you know you're orderbook isn't as full as it should be your staff coming back from furlough and you're thinking, how am I going to make it through the next six months and people are saying actually you need to be green a you need to think about this you need to think about that. The priorities become quite quite challenging they. Absolutely. And I think that you know that that is one of the topics I mean, how much does you could talk about sustainability all you want but you know does. Your does your program, which of course has the best intentions is that we need to take a back seat for because you know that was going to involve retooling your factory. You knew that it was going to actually mean of course, upping the prices or accepting a more expensive supply chain, and maybe that has to get not kicking the grass necessarily, but it maybe has to drift out maybe three years I according to your plan and i. think that is also something we've heard you today is well, if if you're going to do these things aren't easy a lot of his. Let's walk at first before we talk and try to either talk green credentials are sustainability agenda and I think actually on that probably the one thing that I think is really coming out of the conference so far I'm as is. Being a by the let's let's let's invest in things that last And it really interesting to hear. You have MS failed I'm talking about you know if you go and buy an eames chair and I believe you're probably sitting in an email chair right now if I know it studio you're in. Those comes with a thirty year guarantee. Extraordinary and you know that has to be now and again you know is the entire chair perfectly sustainable no but it's not going to be in in five years either it's absolutely not in it's been comfortable for very long time finally looking into this afternoon. You're taking the floor talking to us about a few things that have caught your eye that you like and that if it's inspired you I mean we we have to be lifted out of this somehow what are you talking about them? Well. After lunch I I do a spin around the world and of course, the look at some things that yeah. Basic things that I that I experienced in everyday life, which which I think are are interesting that we we might need we might need more of so and I think probably one thing I was going to slide them. And you'll appreciate this. There's a lot of Austria and they're the world maybe needs a little bit. You know even though of course I'm standing in Switzerland at the moment. But if I if I look across the the mountains look across the border I know that Austria lies beyond and there's definitely whether it's brands whether it's the urban interventions that the world needs a little bit more Austria it full of wisdom of real and I'm just Sitting next to our affairs at a Christian mccue is half Australian I've never seen warranties thumbs up in all my days time. Thank you so much.

Switzerland Chiefs Tyler Austria Swiss Alps Subaru Monaco Europe Basel Emma Red Cross Swiss Federal Department Of De Beatrice Au Nora Tennessee Mali Orrin CEO North Alabama
Cyber Power Index highlighting Australian Governments gaps in cyber capability

Cyber Security Weekly Podcast

06:22 min | 1 year ago

Cyber Power Index highlighting Australian Governments gaps in cyber capability

"Like any INFO Technology Sector security has plenty of indexes flooding around or get. Indexes collided by vendors and people trying to sell things to us I thought this for Senate index was. Useful because it doesn't come from I accompany product. It say independent academic attempt to benchmark Com, sub security capability and intent from nation sites It appealed to make per couple of reasons may not have had A to do with Bill Center in the past spend a little bit of Thanh. Talking to their academics in previous roles and particularly locked the way that This report sets metrics that up designed to objectively major subsidy maturity in nations So it says what are the kind of things that we could judge the intent of a nation in the obscurity spice and one of the kind of things that we could use to objectively major capability. And it tells an interesting story in Australia Australia's categorized in the higher intent, low capability quadrant and the reason for that is because when the the objective metrics this reporter applied to the statements made by by government ministers by government departments, entities about what our intent is. Assab security spice. Where about the most ambitious nation in the world for ask security attend? But. Then when you look at what our actual capabilities against that intent on again measured in a series of objective metrics. We fold anti sixteenth in that space. So, FA May that told a pretty familiar story because this over promising on delivering stories. One that I think is familiar to a lot of. People in the Strand security sector. In the context of these trying government's actions since the twenty six, Day sub, security strategy. A lot of announcement to be my bet when you follow up way those announcements. In the years after that have been made you say less deleted then was announced to the media. Will what's on the industry? Kodak in the two thousand, sixteen strategy that was undefended at least out of the Prime Minister's office. This one is looking out at a ten years. The two thousand twenty strategy is looking at at the ten year timeframe. And proposing one point six, billion, dollar funding. Backdrop, but a lot of that is going into law enforcement and as you say might be into that capability. What's your take on the strategy itself? Overall as you say, it's it's another announcement is on the strategy whether it's not as another thing but certainly yet your thoughts on the strategy itself and where maybe else we could have been in twenty twenty from the twenty six danes strategies. Have you have you seen that the two thousand twenty strategy's building on the twenty, sixteen or? Taking a completely new direction. While the that, you can certainly say the why the two thousand twenty strategy is reaction to experience the twenty six strategy That the twenty sixteen subsequently strategy had a very large number of of objectives and Nisha announced under it. I think the government found the experience of trying to implement those very large number projected initiatives again, adopted under outcome Tambo's prime ministership around the breathing bruising exercise because the twenty twenty strategy dramatically rationalize is temptation I'm say that the broad spread of of initiatives and objectives under the strategy a kind of a toddler. Your decide that the Gospel confessed about ninety percent of the funding. Associated with these twenty twenty strategy he's allocated to security agencies So it goes into building. Capabilities with particularly the is day but also other security agencies on. Enforcement agencies like the the I pay, and that's well and good We have I think outstanding internationally recognized capabilities within is. and this is the conduct that you have to keep investing in order to. Maintain those capabilities in my time that that international ranking. Suppose big Criticism that that libraries had is one that we've been exploring for at the loss twelve months and that's really When you look at security policy to strike the problem is the ability to project those capabilities out of the silos of how defense and security agencies. To the problems in Australia Com in terms of lifting a bench, mock the baseline up security security. Brazil and Sada resilience across the Australian government trying economy You know there's a lot of examples of that. Wall is day is absolutely world standard. Saab resiliency combined entities is as at the government's own description reminding at relatively low levels. you know the is days top full became mandatory in the. Seventies ago now. had a slew of a straight national ordered office inquiry since then. when you type them all up on like twenty nine percent of Kamal entities compliant with all the top four. Seven years after theoretically became mandatory say interesting. Is Connect between very high capability. Inside Is Day lower levels of saga resilience and more broadly throughout government not to sign story that we see in the corporate sector unites now at banks and Al. Telcos, absolately will class intends to their sub security posture. But you only have to sort of take one stiff through the down. In the I six navy top fifty. And you start seeing. Very, different levels of resilience.

Info Technology Sector Senate Bill Center Australia Australia Kodak Australia Prime Minister Saab Tambo AL Nisha Absolately Reporter Brazil
Aleksei Navalny Out of a Coma and Responsive, German Doctors Say

TIME's Top Stories

04:20 min | 1 year ago

Aleksei Navalny Out of a Coma and Responsive, German Doctors Say

"Poisoned Russian opposition leader Alexey Navales condition has improved allowing doctors to take him out of an induced coma. The German hospital treating him said, Monday Navan any of high profile critic of Russian President Vladimir Putin was flown to Germany last month after falling ill on August twentieth on a domestic flight in Russia. German chemical weapons experts say tests show the forty, four year old was poisoned with the Soviet era nerve agent prompting the German government last week to demand that Russia investigate the case. The patient has been removed from his medically induced coma and is being weaned off mechanical ventilation. Sherry t hospital said in a statement. He is responding to verbal stimuli. It remains to early to gauge the potential long-term effects off his severe poisoning. It added that the decision to publicly released details of his condition was made in consultation with Navales wife. Nirvana had been in an induced coma and the Berlin hospital since he was flown to Germany on August twenty seconds for treatment news of his gradual recovery came as German Chancellor Angela Merkel's office indicated that she might be willing to rethink the fate of a controversial German Russian gas pipeline project a sign of Berlin growing frustration over Moscow's stonewalling about the case. German authorities said last week that tends showed proof without doubt that Nevada any was poisoned with a chemical nerve agent from the Nova Chalk group British authorities identified the Soviet Era Nova Chuck as the poison used on former Russian spy Sergei script. Paul and his daughter in England in two thousand eighteen. Russia. has denied the Kremlin was involved in poisoning. All knee and accused Germany failing to provide evidence about the poisoning that it requested in late. August. German. Foreign Minister Heiko Moss said Sunday that the Russian reaction could determine whether Germany changes its long-standing backing for the Nord Stream two pipeline which brings Russian gas to Germany under the Baltic Sea bypassing Ukraine. The chancellor also believes that it's wrong to rule anything out MERCKEL spokesman Stephane. Siebert told reporters Monday after being asked about mosses comments. Previously Merckel had insisted on decoupling the of all case from the pipeline project which the US strongly opposes in August three US Republican senators threatened sanctions against the operator of a Baltic. Seaport located in Merkel's parliamentary constituency for its role as a staging post for ships involved in building Nordstrom to Siebert caution that it was premature to expect Moscow response to the matter within a few days. But made it clear that Berlin wants answers soon? I can't express a clear time-limited station except that we are certainly not talking about months or the end of the year he said. German diplomats rejected the Russian suggestion that Berlin was to blame for any delay in investigating the case noting that navalny was I treated for suspected poisoning in the Siberian city of. On August twentieth. All evidence witnesses, traces, and so forth are in the place where the crime was committed presumably somewhere in Siberia said German Foreign Ministry spokesman Christopher Burger. The CO leader of Germany's opposition Green Party Robert Habat called on the government to take a stronger stance and buried the pipeline. The project divide Europe it is economically nonsensical and oversized, and it is wrong in security policy terms harbut said. Completing it would mean that Russia can do what it wants. This signal must not be sad. Mikhail Lubinov. The Russian envoy international organizations in Vienna voiced suspicions about the timing of demands to link the pipeline with an ovonic. Ace. Suspicious Coincidence Nevada case and the final stage of Nord Stream two construction which some states desperately wants to be closed I am not fond of conspiracy theories, but it is obvious that the tragic events with the Volney are very timely and helpful for opponents of Ns to he tweeted.

Germany Coma Berlin Angela Merkel Alexey Navales Nerve Agent Russia German Government Nevada Nord Stream Siebert Chancellor German Foreign Ministry Vladimir Putin Berlin Hospital President Trump Mikhail Lubinov Baltic Sea
Facebook, Twitter execs are bracing for protecting integrity during upcoming elections

Charlie Parker

00:38 sec | 1 year ago

Facebook, Twitter execs are bracing for protecting integrity during upcoming elections

"Social media companies are watching what people post ahead of the November election and they're also planning for the day after and beyond that, there's ul Roth told the Atlantic Council the days and weeks after November, 3rd could be a window for bad actors to sow discord in those moments when we don't yet have the results of the election because it's an unprecedented year in the United States. In In those moments, we should be particularly vigilant. Facebook's head of security policy said the platform will have a 24 hour operations center to respond in real time. Both companies say they're better prepared to deal with false or misleading posts. Then in

Ul Roth Atlantic Council Facebook United States
Managing director of the Cyber Readiness Institute, Kiersten Todt

The CyberWire

05:16 min | 1 year ago

Managing director of the Cyber Readiness Institute, Kiersten Todt

"Of the things that was both exhilarating and created some awareness for me was the power of people to make change at the state level, and you know when I came to work in the federal government I think would always struck me as well particularly when I was working on the hill was that again, it was the choices and the decisions of individuals that have impact. I went up to the hill to work for Senator Lieberman as his economic policy adviser at the time. And the Governmental Affairs Committee you know at the time was truthfully one of the more boring committees did post office namings. Some appointments of positions that you're not really familiar with and it was this very interesting point of gut where. On the on paper, it didn't look interesting to me and I had actually just been offered a job in the private sector on urban development which I love. But something in my gut said to take it in my first assignment for him was to do a hearing on critical infrastructure protection that was scheduled for September twelfth two thousand one. So nine eleven happened on that Tuesday and we got on the phone Senator Lieberman, his staff director and a couple of working on the hearing and he said I want to go through with it, and so we were the only hearing on the hill on. September twelfth. It was very different hearing because we were supposed to have witnesses flying in and we just had two witnesses who could get to the get to the capital and in that hearing Senator Lieberman time to us and said, we need to look at having a Department of Homeland Security which does not sound as foreign now as it certainly did then no one was even using the word homeland long before the TV series long before anybody was looking at it. and. So I ended up working on the legislation to create de Adjusts from September to November vote to right up until President Bush came out with a counter to the D. adjust proposal in June of two, and then I began working with them and collaborating on that legislation and worked on drafting these cybersecurity infrastructure protection bioterror are indeed directorates for Diaz So. Working on that legislation I became involved in Cyber Security and risk management. And our emergency preparedness I moved out to California and worked with the governor's office on that, and then began getting involved in cybersecurity has the intersection with physical security. So as I was looking at risk management and emergency, management, and homeland. Security, from a physical side that quickly merged in over a couple of years with the inextricable link between Cyber Security and physical. Security. From there I started my own company looking at cyber risk management and was brought into work on the nist cybersecurity framework, and then in two thousand sixteen was asked by President Obama to run his commission on Enhancing National Cybersecurity and following that work several of the Commissioners and myself launched a nonprofit called Cyber Readiness Institute the Mission of which is to convene senior leaders of global companies to provide free tools and resources for small businesses, and so that is what is currently taking my day to day as being able to provide tools to small businesses and cyber security recognizing that there are components in critical components of global value chains and we have to do more to help them. Unless I think what's important to remember about Cyber Security Policy in where these issues are, is that the two critical elements to them are about problem solving and building solutions, and what that means is that's a pretty interdisciplinary field and so what I would encourage individuals who are interested in the space to look at for themselves is recognized that there are a lot of skill sets and capabilities that are relevant to Cybersecurity, and historically we haven't done a great job of attracting the diversity of skill set. We tend to think it's about science and technology and engineering, but sociology psychology history politics. All of these aptitudes are really critical to cybersecurity and so being honest with yourself about what you. Are and then being able to feature them and position them as opportunities for building out. Innovation in this space. I would always encourage everybody to any individual to to go after what you really WanNa do. Don't waste time going after what you think you can get because you're worried about rejection or not being able to achieve it. I think what I have learned I'm I'm a big fan of cold calling. I'm not sure that it still is a an effective tool, but I've gotten some of the most interesting jobs by picking up the phone and cold calling as long as you can handle the word. No. It's always worth going after what you want because I think that in and of itself creates enthusiasm and interest in energy in yourself and to figure out what makes sense and I think sometimes as as humans, we tend to self select ourselves out of opportunities but I would encourage everyone to any person to really go after what they're most interested in at a minimum talk to the people who have the roles that you. Have to achieve.

Senator Lieberman Department Of Homeland Securit Cyber Readiness Institute Governmental Affairs Committee California President Trump President Obama Staff Director Diaz Bush Nist
How Google, Apple, Facebook and other tech companies are getting out the vote on Election Day

All Things Considered

00:37 sec | 1 year ago

How Google, Apple, Facebook and other tech companies are getting out the vote on Election Day

"Facebook, Google, Twitter and other major tech companies have met with U. S government officials. To discuss ways to prepare for a flood of disinformation ahead of the November election is NPR's Bobby Allen. Reports. It comes Justus Facebook launches a so called Voter Information Center. Facebook hopes to register Million's by pushing a resource on the social network and instagram about how to become a voter and how to vote. Facebook says With more absentee and mail and voting expected, a delay in results could lead toa online attacks. That's according to Nathaniel Glacier. He had cyber security policy at Facebook and spoke on NPR's morning

Facebook Justus Facebook NPR Voter Information Center Bobby Allen Nathaniel Glacier Twitter Google U. S
Colombia Supreme Court Orders Ex-President Álvaro Uribe Detained

Morning Edition

02:29 min | 1 year ago

Colombia Supreme Court Orders Ex-President Álvaro Uribe Detained

"Colombia on Tuesday ordered the arrest of former President Alvarado re bay who's one of the country's most powerful politicians. Many Colombians adore rebate for leading a military offensive against Marxist guerrillas. But he has long faced allegations of human rights abuses. Here's reporter John Otis during his two terms as Colombia's president Alvarado Bebe's hardline security policies badly weakened the guerrillas who eventually signed a peace treaty. After he left office in 2010. Reba was elected to the Senate and helped elect the next two Colombian presidents. Followers really believe that he is the greatest Colombian ever to. I don't know to walk on Columbus. That's Paulie Martinez, a columnist for the Colombian newsmagazines, Samana. She points out that rebates presidency was also plagued by scandals under Areva's watch. Army troops killed thousands of innocent civilians then claimed they were guerilla fighters Rebates Intelligence agency spied on journalists, opposition leaders and Supreme Court judges. His current troubles stem from allegations that during the war rebased supported the formation of paramilitary death squads. The Supreme Court is now investigating whether rebate bribed witnesses to change their testimony. Sergio Guzman is the director of the consultancy Columbia Risk Analysis. The evidence against President you. It must be pretty solid for the Supreme Court to take the step. However, the news that rebate would be placed under house arrest. Outraged his supporters, including current president even Duke, Scanlon said. I will pay scumbag body See if he ended and we were done. He pointed out that the guerrillas and they had fought so hard to defeat and who have been accused of kidnappings and massacres have avoided prison under the generous terms of Colombia's 2016 peace treaty. But even Cepeda, the opposition senator, who accused Reba of having ties to paramilitaries, was elated. Why personas in Colombia? It's important, Seema. Justicia away, he said with the court's decision shows that no matter how powerful you are, no one is above the law for NPR news. I'm John Otis in Bogota, Colombia.

Colombia Supreme Court Alvarado Bebe President Alvarado President Trump John Otis Reba Scanlon Areva Paulie Martinez Rebates Intelligence Sergio Guzman Seema Bogota Army Samana NPR
Global stocks advance after Trump holds back on China retaliation

Morning Edition

00:37 sec | 1 year ago

Global stocks advance after Trump holds back on China retaliation

"News that the trump administration would not renege on the phase one trade deal with China boosting shares around the world on Friday the White House announced it would end special treatment for Hong Kong in response to China's national security policies there but stocks surged in China overnight the Shanghai index logging its biggest gain since March twenty fourth markets in Europe approached their strongest level since early March with gains in banks and travel and leisure stocks as nations look forward to re opening their economies Dow futures are down seventeen at this hour I'm Louise Schiavone NPR news

China White House Hong Kong Europe Louise Schiavone Npr
Declassified Susan Rice email shows Obama team discussed Russian dealings

Dan Proft

05:04 min | 1 year ago

Declassified Susan Rice email shows Obama team discussed Russian dealings

"Well on the occasion last week of the first tranche of the classifications by acting deny Richard Grinnell that provided some detail on all of the unmasking requests that were made by all of the various Obama administration personnel as it pertains to Michael Flynn and perhaps others Ron Johnson and Chuck Grassley the two centers in Wisconsin and Iowa respectively want more details more a documents declassified because they have more concern that perhaps the surveillance that was being conducted by Obama administration officials predates operation crossfire hurricane on that occasion last week John Brennan former CIA director took to his safe space and M. S. N. B. C. and had this reaction this is also going out and saying give me everything about Michael Flynn absolutely not and quite interestingly the number of reports so we're in December sixteen and January seventeen that were declassified by Richard Grinnell I was surprised at how many dates and reports that were there then what was the ground should do is to declassify and release the contents of those reports in terms of what's the individuals were involved with but what he's doing now is just releasing the names of individuals who again were carrying out their authorized responsibilities shin director Brennan he's getting there yesterday to classifying a email from Susan rice that seems to run counter to things Susan rice was saying in public from a national security perspective president Obama said he wants to be sure that as we engage with the incoming team are mindful to ascertain if there is any reason we cannot share information fully as it relates to Russia rice wrote call me said he does have some concerns that incoming NSA Flanaess speaking frequently with Russian ambassador Kislyak Comey said that could be an issue as it relates to sharing sensitive information president Obama asked of Comey was saying the NSC should not pass sensitive information related to Russia to flan Comey replied potentially adding that there's no indication thus far that Flynn has passed classified information to kids they act but he noted the level of communication is unusual potentially we should not pass sense of information to the incoming president incoming national security adviser is that properly or or fairly Radisson body trying to insinuate his way into a counterintelligence operation against general Flynn well that's what Susan rice memorialized in an email here's Susan rice back on March twenty second of twenty seventeen just a couple months into the trump administration in a sit down on PBS with Judy Woodruff what she had to say about what she knew do you know anything about this I know nothing about this I was surprised to see reports from chairman Nunes on that count today fresh off her performance in the Benghazi a misdirection cover up however you want to describe it we get this from Susan rice I really don't know what to what chairman Nunez was referring but he said that whatever he was referring to was a legal lawful surveillance and that it was potentially incidental collection on American citizens and I think it's important for people to understand what incidental means that means that the target was a either a foreign entity D. or somebody under criminal investigation and that the Americans who were talking to those targets may have been picked up well Devin newness has since revised and extended his remarks so perhaps is in rice would like to do the same for more on this we're pleased to be joined by Fred flights he's a former CIA analyst now president CEO at center for security policy former Deputy Assistant to the president into the chief of staff of the National Security Council thanks for joining us again forget it good to be here about what Susan rice said in twenty seventeen verses what Susan rice memorialized about this January fifth twenty seventeen meeting well wishers lined clearly she knew that there was electronic surveillance of general Flynn what this comes down to what is the intention of B. bomber stretching from the top from president Obama not to honor the very important principle of our democracy and that's called the peaceful transfer of power under that principle the outgoing administration cooperates fully with the incumbent won eight daughters the the will of the people turned over the keys to the officers tells all about farm policy mission underway gives them all the intelligence operations and intelligence they collected they don't withhold information from the incoming president and Tucker offices to use this information to investigate the next administration to undermine it it's really very serious violation of our whole system of government if they had concerns about general Flynn they had to tell the next administration about it cook told president trump and vice president pence and call me if needed later said he was held information twelve Attorney General sessions about Russia also this is an effort by an outgoing administration to undermine and destroy any incoming

Kevin Rudd on anarchy in the post COVID-19 world order, and could stable democracy be a reality in Iraq?

Between The Lines

12:41 min | 1 year ago

Kevin Rudd on anarchy in the post COVID-19 world order, and could stable democracy be a reality in Iraq?

"Former Prime Minister Kevin right on the geopolitical consequences of the pandemic. He predicts the coming post covered. Anneke plus Iraq believe it or not. It's future looks brought today than it has an any point in the past Dick. I'd stay with us for my chat with Linda Robinson from the Rand Corporation. She'll tell us while we should not give up on Baghdad's fragile. Democracy Corona virus continues to take a toll on the health of nations around the world. One thing has become clear the winners and losers not who we might have expected a year ago. The virus is taking an uneven and unpredictable. Course through the world defying. I usual assumptions about power and resilience. Some small poor countries being left relatively unscathed all powerful prosperous nations. I've been ravaged. So what does this mean for global order and for the strategic robbery between China and the United States? Will everything change or is the virus? Mealy accelerating trends that were already in place. Former prime minister of Australia. Kevin Rudd is the President of the Society Policy Institute in New York. He's written an essay in the most recent issue of Foreign Affairs magazine in New York. It's called the coming postcode Enki and he joins me now. From Queensland's Sunshine Coast Kevin Rudd. Welcome back to between the lawns. Good to be with you on between the lines. Now you'll recent essays titled The coming Postcode Anneke Y Anneke. You're good real turns color of international relations you would know that realists assume that. Anneke is in fact the natural state All the International Society of states rent was Headley Bull who wrote about this crowd along time ago and Australian realist and Australian realist. Ten within the real documents that order actually represents the exception rather than the rule So why do I argue this I argue it because the current order as we've done since forty five is underpinned by and large by US geopolitical pound Gio economic power secondly That's become challenge at least by China Thirdly the Cova crisis has turbo charge The hit on American real and perceived power. But there's a full factor as well. Which is the impact which the Cova crisis has on China's Powell not least the damage to its economy the flow through effect to its ability to spend on the amounts of money on its military and on the belt and road initiative example but more importantly international perceptions of China in the developed in the developing world. So where do we end up? We end up not with The same old order as in the past but a slow and steady drift towards more anoc order. We're both China and the US damaged and the institutions of global governance with the UN. The will bank the National Monetary Fund the G. Twenty etc become increasingly the terrain for geopolitical battle. Between these two wounded POWs a K. Sunday the country's the victory he but some analysts say that China's heavy handed approach eccentric lockdowns violence. That's been a political win for Xi Jinping in Matt strengthened the Central Authority of the communist regime. How would you respond to them? Well let's look at That argument within China itself. There's been a huge hit on the accompany And as a result of that China will have its worst gross numbers twenty twenty the Ted in over half a century since the end of the Cultural Revolution almost That is huge. It undermines She Jinping's China Drain which was One pillar of which was for China to quadruple. Its G. D. DP by twenty twenty measured against two thousand levels this single year of itself. Economic non-performance blows a hole amidships in that and then secondly on top of that. Tom You've got the problem which arises in terms of internal political debates within China so and I think some growing levels of resistance to Xi Jinping's on leadership and finally as I mentioned before The blowback around the world in terms of the economic damage To economize both developed and developing causing a big question mark to a rise in terms whether China has in fact being the risk to the world's best friend because of the outbreak of this virus. So these factors I think. Qualify the overall argument you hear from some the China's authoritarian model in managing the crisis domestically translates into a geopolitical win the China internationally. I don't think that necessarily holes walk conversations. Do you think heaven. I going on right now in Beijing over China's place in the world I mean is the division division over this so-called Wolf Warrior this is the and diplomacy we often hear about a division between that Wolf Warrior. Diplomacy versus say China's desire to promote soft power. Chinese politics in some respects is not dissimilar to elements of politics. We and other countries. That is you find nationalist. Ten internationalists you find a local ists globalists' you find audio logs versus as it were reformers and pregnant at this and so the as political system while it's Control by Xi Jinping's leadership still has all these tensions and personalities within it so the debates now I think are of a twofold. How do we allow this to happen? In the first place what failed in terms of the processes insistence China put in place after the Saas Crisis of two thousand and three to prevent a pandemic or epidemic as it was then from happening again. The second debate is how the Hillary you get the economy back together again given the China a economy with forty percent of Gdp comes from the traded six or the economy and International. Trade is being blend. Bits by this crosses and the other debate again between nationalists internationalised is the one. You've just touched on the Tom. Which is China's wolf worried diplomats out there launching attacks against any critique of China's performance On the one hand defend the party's legitimacy and on the other hand older more seasoned diplomat saying this isn't actually contributing much to the improvement of China's global image those discussions and debates underway. At the moment we're talking about this wolf warrior diplomacy. What do you make of China's recent boycotts threats of boycotts of Australian Exports Bali? Beef what what's going on well as I've said in other recent interviews since those public statements by the China's ambassador Australia it's unacceptable in my view for any ambassador accredited to any country to receive public threats against the host country In City five years of more dealing with the Australian China relationship I don't recall previous Chinese ambassadors of having done that not by any Australian diplomat ever having done that irrespective of the crisis of the day with was ten on all the things that I went through when I was in office etc so I think as a matter of shall we say diplomatic practice. What occurred then was regrettable as as being some of the hotline commentary. Which emanated from the Chinese nationalist media? the bottom line is however the Chinese nationalists have seen The effectiveness All the some of these sorts of measures when applaud various countries in the past sorts of economic leverage which China replied to no way out to no way through the Nobel Prize Committee Awarded the Nobel Peace Prize to a famous Chinese dissident And I've also seen how those Economic Leverage points of work with various of the Europeans. So this is not alien to the Chinese playbook my argument about China's Australia's management of The relationship in prison is that if the Australian government's of the view and a view I in general support that there needs to be an independent international inquiry as to the origins the virus transmission of the virus notifications to the WHO and threw them to the world community etc. Then again to put that Ford isn't as trade in government and then do some work on it. I get a few other governments to come along with you an advance that through the multilateral machinery which rather than just blow it out as a thought bubble That's the way which you do. Real things in the international community rather than I. Fear sometimes pitching a diplomatic initiative primarily for domestic political leverage into straighter. What complicates matters? Further is president trump's theory that the virus was leaked from a lab in Wuhan and raises the question. Why would China agree to enquiry without losing this between the lines on? Abc Radio National. The familiar voice. You're hearing is former prominence to Kevin. Rudd is now president of the Asia Society Policy Institute in New York. We've been talking about his article in the current issue of Foreign Affairs magazine. Kevin we'll talking about China and how it's paid a price as a result of this current ivars. Let's turn to the United States. How badly damaged is the use in your judgement? I mean we'll recover reasonably quickly With a change of administration in November or does the damage go deep. Perhaps too deep for recovery has been deep damage politically. The the. The House is a divided house within the United States. Those of us who have followed. Us politics of the many years have rarely seen it This divisive and that actually is a real factor in terms of constructing a post presidential election national consensus on how America engages the World. And the future. American politics has become so binary including on America's own future will view on the economic damage. It's huge. This is the biggest hit on newest economy at least since nineteen forty-six and the recovery from the war and probably since the depression the end of the depression and thirty three So this takes a while to recover But the American economy know a history of resilience. Look what happened after the global financial crisis? But well I was going to make the point to is enormous capacity for change and renewal. I mean you think about its recovery from the civil war that oppression in Vietnam. You being a bit too pessimistic. Kevin. Well I live in the United States and I actually listened to the debate on back in Australia now and when my American interlocutors Republican and Democrat Friends of mine over twenty years who A positive let's call it. The Foreign Policy National Security Policy Machinery signed that it's become increasingly hard to forge consensus these days across the aisle on America's behavior in the world That is a real issue. Then it's not just my external analysis it's part of the internal analysis within the US itself. Do I think the United States can come through the domestic political Malays and the Economic Destruction? Which has occurred? Yes I do. Because it's remarkably resilient country But I think a precondition is that We see a Democrat. Win this November it's not that. I am a A cheerleader for Joe Biden. Personally I barely know the man Bought he's lucky to put together a mainstream Competent Foreign Policy and National Security Policy Tame as opposed to Frankly the chaotic nature of the trump administration on most foreign and national security policy questions. And that I think is necessary for America to rebuild. Its alliances abroad rebuild. Its credibility in the eyes of the risks of the will and to overcome what has been an extraordinary period where America rather than taking the lead in the global recovery From the virus both in public health systems and economic terms as simply being missing in action and in fact the unable to contain it's the damage domestically

China United States Kevin Rudd Anneke Xi Jinping Australia Anneke Y Anneke President Trump Prime Minister Foreign Affairs Magazine America Baghdad New York Linda Robinson Rand Corporation Dick Joe Biden Iraq Nobel Prize Robbery
"security policy" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

01:33 min | 2 years ago

"security policy" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

"Marketplace the fifth former Google workers father complied with federal regulators accusing the company even properly firing employees for labor organizing activity Catherine spires of security engineers at Google fired her after she created the pop up notification for employees to inform them of their labor rights in late November Google fired for other workers what the company said were violations of its data security policy breaking news and analysis a thon all dot com capital punishment is continuing its downward trend a new report says this year for the fifth straight year fewer than thirty people have been executed and under fifty new death sentences have been imposed the report by the death penalty information center shows twenty of this year's twenty two executions have occurred in five southern states led by Texas with nine New Hampshire became the twenty first state to abolish the death penalty watch California imposed a formal moratorium on executions but at the federal level Attorney General William Barr announced federal executions would resume this month my campaign Washington Hayden fry who revived hi wil footballing became the Hawkeye state institutions died at the age of ninety his family announced the university of Iowa that the coach died Tuesday after a long battle with cancer a native of eastern Texas has never been to Iowa before taking of the Hawkeyes in nineteen seventy nine more these stories a townhall dot com Patrick's boss I Capital One you can open a new savings account in.

Google Texas New Hampshire California William Barr Washington Hayden fry Iowa Hawkeyes I Capital One Catherine spires Attorney university of Iowa
"security policy" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

KLBJ 590AM

06:50 min | 2 years ago

"security policy" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

"Okay LBJ dot com the Leander Independent School District is considering the addition of eight new courses if eventually approved by the school board these courses will become available to students beginning in August of twenty twenty AP physics six one a chamber ensemble but cyber security capstone yes cybersecurity capstone course students will develop the knowledge and skills needed to explore advanced concepts related to ethics laws and operations of cyber security the students will examine transit operations of cyber attacks the rats motor abilities the students will also develop security policies to make get mitigate the risk yeah the skills obtained in this course prepare the students for additional study towards industry certification a variety of courses are available for students interested in the cyber security field a cyber security capstone may service up what Kermit culminating course in this field of study wow and as we learn from T. Tim cook yesterday I think you could take this course maybe get some sort of certification and then go straight to work at apple no need to go to Kabul Alicia yeah they would they that they talked about that very thing how they have a lot of folks working for apple that you know either had no college or did not finish college and is so there and obviously cyber security and absolute exploding industry and something that's woo it's probably so I just find it interesting that it that everyone of the school districts is about five years maybe ten years behind yeah why they just now adding a cyber security security course in Lee and Arius city why now it seems even the software the kids use on their laptops that are issued by the school the software that used in the schools look schools always tend to be about three four years behind the technology think about that so you're a sophomore you learn the current technology your graduate and your behind again yeah good question why has why has it Leander ISD's done this sooner I don't know the only thing that seems to move fast in school districts these days is a boarding someone getting offended for any reason that will have that they'll take care of that and you know overnight whatever that is but this kind of thing and I hope to see more of this kind of thing because obviously this is career this is getting someone interested in a career earlier as we talk about over and over we got to have more of this more and more there's this one thing they're missing from the list again eight new courses and they all looked fine they all look like a pretty reasonable and and not find an educational courses but what the hell is it is a local school district and add a course called personal finance yeah we don't teach our kids how to deal with money that's one of the reasons why we have so much college debt because they don't it's one of the reasons why we have so much debt injured or dead in general absolutely has a reason why so many young people get themselves in a horrible predicament we we don't teach young people how to deal with money whatsoever and then with the amount in the real world and say Hey don't make money hi yeah here's a credit card go nuts it'll be fine you can buy whatever you want to pay for it later Susan checking in from four points good morning yeah I just want to let you know tied it's not just a few years behind that the schools are there about twenty years behind and it's a great idea to do the cyber security an offer that but my guess is do the math for that the kids that are coming out with a college degree in the cyber security versus just some kind of certificate that they're gonna get yeah this kid you're going to be ever not being able to make enough money to support themselves if it's just the certificate do you think so that's not what Tim cook told us yesterday well that's because can cook on the business he said how the top dog with the business listen I listen I'll push back in a little bit Susan I don't think a college degree is worth today what it used to be I will agree with you one hundred percent on that yeah yeah thank you very much I appreciate I just wish they would you know do some personal finance and public education somehow and and civics yeah your TD teach young people the difference between at county attorney in a district attorney ha ha most people don't know you know it it is if we could somehow get in the heads of young people the the the value of of money of course but but chess financial responsibility and somehow the appreciation of what debt is all about it's it's because I think a lot of impact what debt that's just part of going to school that right that's just part of the experience the college experience I I think we would really really have moved far less debt in the world it is eight fifty three at this time on Friday six fifty eight fifty we go under the covers done prior these are hard to reach exclusive interviews are able to talk to anybody I am anybody wants to be on it's an honor and clip to Washington DC yesterday I had a little chat with Adam ship bomb shell folks welcome to the next installment of under the covers with don prior up with me today the chairman of the house intelligence committee representative Adam Schiff representative Schiff also of course leading the impeachment and query hearings that we're enjoying so much congressman Schiff thanks for thanks for being here thank you okay congressman ship you wanted to come on with me today to explain something regarding the whistle blower who you keep insisting that you do not know the identity of what what is it you want to explain about that because also you're right now along with so many Americans think you're lying and you do know the identity of the whistle blower look me in the eye and tell me you're not live well as you know breaking that down yes I lied there you go and I knew it lie through my teeth and I think the whistle blower is you it's been you all along and but I dare you to prove that that's a crime you are a piece of work you know it you and your weird little Malfa near puffy little what is that smell what who god what is that smell coming from you what do you what do you do it potent what you're doing what okay that's that's just rude you you need to leave for work we're done here everything is okay if you can unless you can prove beyond reasonable doubt that it's criminal that was beyond criminal Adam Schiff please leave wound that was just stunning thank you the tide and dies show this is Scott hi welcome to this ad for new subway slaughter starting at one eighty nine each how do you want to cheer squad give me a one eighty what.

Leander Independent School Dis one hundred percent three four years twenty years five years ten years
"security policy" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

01:43 min | 3 years ago

"security policy" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"Security policies at a house hearing. Fox's Rachel Sutherland live in Washington. Lisa the US is on pace for nearly one million illegal border crossings this year with high numbers of families. According to secretary Nielsen children are being used as pawns to get into our country, Texas, Democrats Sheila jackson-lee wanted to know how many young people are detained. Yes, ma'am. I don't have that. Number in front of me. We have all the numbers. We could provide for me. Yes. Secretary. Nielsen told the house homeland security committee, there's a humanitarian catastrophe on the southern border. Lisa major supporters of repealed rule designed to mandate a level playing field for the internet. Try again to bring them back. Fox's Evan Brown has this live at least you when the Trump administration's newly installed chief of the FCC ordered the Obama era net neutrality rules. Be undone. Congressional Democrats cried foul and art now again, trying to pass a Bill to reinstate that governance over internet service providers, we don't let electric companies also a monopoly say you can charge this house one rate and the same house next door and other now Senate minority leader Chuck Schumer, a Bill did pass the democratic controlled house, but its passage in the Senate is unlikely so is it signing by President Trump. Lisa eban. Everyone accounted for now in Alabama. As cleanup efforts continue from Sunday's tornado that killed twenty three joining the recovery effort paying for funerals and providing temporary housing some Airbnb hosts are opening their homes for free to accommodate display storm survivors and relief workers Jonathan serrie in Lee county, the legal fight over adding a citizenship question to the US census will head to the US supreme court after a second federal judge has just ruled.

Lisa eban US secretary house homeland security commit Fox Rachel Sutherland Jonathan serrie Nielsen Sheila jackson-lee Bill President Trump Senate Alabama Chuck Schumer Washington Airbnb Lee county FCC
"security policy" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

12:14 min | 3 years ago

"security policy" Discussed on KQED Radio

"After a quick heads up about tomorrow's program hair can be a touchy subject, especially if someone touches your hair without asking. But these days it's touching a nerve on the job with some workers getting fired over their hairstyles. This week New York City officials said that's unlawful discrimination. If your hair has become an issue on your job to the point that it threatened your job. How did you handle it? And how would you describe your hairstyle leave us a voicemail? Eight five five two three six one a one. A now let me be clear we're not talking about something like refusing to wear a hairnet in a restaurant kitchen. That's that's another matter is your hairstyle anyone's business, but your own share your story. Eight five five two three six one a one a or you can use our app won a vox pop to send us a radio quality audio file and to keep up to date on future, topics. We'll share some of your stories tomorrow on one a back now to our conversation with mayor Pete Buddha. Judge of south bend Indiana about his new book, shortest way home and his presidential exploratory committee. Let's keep going with Helen's list of questions. Helen, also asked. Does he believe in stronger control of access to guns? Yes. The worst part of my job is mayor is getting the call about a victim of gun violence and far too. Many of them are also young. We haven't had the kind of thank God to kind of headline grabbing mass shootings that some communities have, but you know, with much less attention. There's still been so much heartbreak in our community, and that's true of every urban community. And when we fight it. I feel like I have one hand tied behind my back because the state of Indiana won't let cities do much now to be clear. We we don't take that as an excuse. We've worked very hard on an anti-violence strategy that I believe to be very effective call the group violence intervention, but I also believe that it is totally compatible with the second amendment for us. Also to have some commonsense measures to keep people safe things like universal background checks, which again to me is an excellent illustration of what's broken and our democracy because if Apollo. Enjoys support from eighty or by some measure z and ninety percent of the American people including most gun owners, including most Republicans and yet Washington still can't get it done. That tells you that something is warping the extent to which Washington can respond to the will of the American people, but look Indiana's not a a place where it's very popular to weigh in on gun policy. But I talk about my experiences mayor getting that call I talked about swearing and police officers with their spouses at their side and not wanting to see them outgunned. And I talked about the fact that it was my responsibility to carry a pistol and a rifle around in uniform in Afghanistan, and there are some weapons of war that just have no place on the streets of an American community in peacetime. What do you think about banning assault weapons? I think we've got to draw the line somewhere. And so I think that knowing that they're, you know, the definition of what an assault weapon is is up to debate. But broadly, speaking. Assault type weapons. Yeah. I mean, we can have that debate in for example, there are some differences between an M four that. I carried an AR fifteen, but but they're in many ways, not that different. I think philosophically the issue is we have to acknowledge that somewhere somewhere in between a slingshot and a nuclear weapon, we have to draw a line, and the fact that you can't have a nuclear weapon shows that the answer to you know, what restrictions are compatible with the second amendment is not zero. Okay. Not every sense rule amounts to an infringement. The question is where you draw that line. And I think we can have an adult conversation as a country that will include looking at at some assault weapons weapons of war that are not making our neighborhoods safer, and they're not necessarily covered by the second amendment. Are you a gun owner? Now, the guns that I collected came home from Afghanistan their antiques, I suppose they are rifles. But you wanna fire one probably explode. Max tweeted wondering, what mayor people leaves a progressive foreign policy looks like since there doesn't seem to be much of a consensus or talk about foreign policy at all among those running. That's another interesting tighter Bernie Sanders. He's done a lot more improve his foreign policy bona fees from when he ran in two thousand sixteen you have a military career. You were a naval reserve officer who I believe specialized in counter-terrorism and were deployed to Afghanistan in two thousand thirteen I wonder where you see your focus in terms of foreign policy as president, including America's longest war, and what needs to be done to to get out of there in something that resembles victory. Whatever victory might mean. Yeah. Obviously have reflected a lot on. This is somebody who served in that conflict. First of all America today, in my view, does not have a foreign policy, and that is a very dangerous thing. It's also safe to say the American left has struggled to articulate its foreign policy ever since it sorta got scrambled by the neoconservative MoMA. One of the first part of the century. I think that we need to be much clearer on the threshold for the commitment of force. And we also need anybody who wants to be the next president needs to discuss how we're going to regain credibility in the international space, even knowing that there's probably no going back to exactly the world order that we used to know. But I think every decision we we make needs to be number one grounded in American interests number two tested for compatibility with American values, including democracy and human rights and number three vetted whenever possible with American allies because we are not operating in a vacuum. And we're quickly. I mean, just look at the isolation of the US at the Munich security conference in what you see is that America so-called America first has very quickly turned into America alone. And that puts US lives at risk. We need to be a credible country that keeps its word in a way that both our allies, and our enemies know when it comes to Afghantistan. You could be old enough to enlist now and not have even been alive when nine eleven took place. It is crazy that we are operating all over the world on an authorization for the use of military force that dates back to dealing with nine eleven. It shows that congress has abdicated its War Powers in many ways. Honestly, I think when it comes to Afghanistan, it's not a question of whether we're getting out we are getting out of the question is whether we do it well or poorly, and I'm concerned about doing it by tweet surprising, our own military intelligence leaders with policy making over Twitter. I'm concerned about the fact that the Afghan government seems to be from what I can tell as being left on the sidelines of the engagement with the Taliban. That's going on right now in Doha, but I will say that we are leading and we need to make sure that we leave. Well, because we have to put an end to endless war suppose, you win the presidency and twenty twenty one when you take the oath of office, you get to the White House and the border wall is still in some form being built what do you do? I don't take the border wall is the priority for US security, frankly, I don't even think it's the priority for border security. I care a lot about border security, and I recognize the complexity of it there's a lot more to border security than putting up a wall from cedar shining sea, by the way, there's also a lot more to security for Americans then border security or anything touched by the military that the that I worked on when I was in uniform. I mean, if if there is even part of the border wall being built say the court battles go in President Trump's favors all those fifty five miles at the current funding would fund are being built at the time. When you take office. What do you do? Do you tear them down? Do you? Let them finish being built do you? Try to move the money to something else. What's the plan? I mean, it's hard for me to picture the hypothetical without knowing exactly where we're going to get. But we'll say look borders can have fencing or wall. That's part of borders is not some kind of absolute philosophical opposition to the idea that we would ever put up a barrier along our border. It's a question of what actually works which is not as simple as a barrier. And also what is our priority? Are we really talking about taking money from military construction that will go to housing for military families and rerouting it to a wall that probably won't work. That is a huge mistake in terms of priorities. It also is a huge misuse of emergency authority in a moment. When real live emergencies include. Reading the mounting slow motion climate emergency should be commanding dramatically more attention than they're getting from the administration, and in my view that security too. Yeah. George emailed ask me or Pete. What will you do about climate change? So to me climate change is personal. It's part of what I talk about. When I say that we need to have a more reality based and ground based conversation. I know that on television when when climate changes being discussed it cuts to the bureau of pieces of ice falling off in the Arctic and polar bears, and and pine trees, and what I picture in my head. When I think about climate is standing on the porch of a family on Frederickson street in south bend, Indiana, when we had a historic flood, and it was the day before the first day of school, and they're wondering what they're supposed to do because their bedrooms of their children in the basement are flooded. That was we were told that was a thousand year rainfall eighteen months later, I'm right back in the emergency operation center of our city for what we were told. It was a five. Hundred year flood this isn't a theoretical problem. This problem is upon us right now. It's why the green new deal, which let's be honest is more a set of goals in its current iteration than it is a fully designed plan. But the green new deal gets right? That this truly is a national emergency. Who's destructive power is on par with a great depression or World War and therefore requires a commensurate Leifer level of effort, which by the way. And this is the other inside of the green new deal could mean good things for our national economy. So what do we do to whip enough votes in congress into shape to get members of congress to go along with something anything one thing about climate change or do you do this to your executive powers president say tack with congress? I'm never going to hurt all those cats. I can do this myself. I'd rather do this with congress than around congress? And I've leave that again, if our democracy is functioning properly, there will be more and more pressure on congress to do something. Because what we have right now is not a contest of ideas on what to do about climate change. It's a contest between. Between one group that's put forward at least the outlines of a proposal to deal with this massive imminent real threat. And the other side that seems to prefer to pretend that that threat does not even exist. That's the frightening thing. It's not that. We're having a struggle over how to meet this challenge. It's that there are many people adults with college degrees in positions of responsibility in the US, congress who seemed to believe either that it's not real or that we can somehow get away with doing nothing about it. And I think that's part of the short term thinking that my generation needs to stand up and respond to when I think about the world in twenty fifty four when I reached the current age of the current president, these issues will all have come do. And so it's not a theoretical question and has not somebody else's problem. So give me one specific policy that you would try to rally support around if you were president for climbing, the one thing we clearly got to do is we got to mobilize higher level of RND in order to bend the cost curve on solar PV technology as we speak in south bend. We're partnering with habitat for humanity to build homes that are themselves net zero. Oh energy. And I think when we talk about energy independence, we should think about what it takes to deliver that not only at the national level, but at the individual or family level. So look, that's just one element. More research on solar, for example, to try to to move putting billions into RND to to change the cost of renewables technology. We also need to be serious about carbon emissions. We need to be serious about the power mix. And we need to.

president congress US Afghanistan Indiana assault America Helen Washington south bend Pete Buddha south bend Indiana New York City Bernie Sanders White House cedar shining sea
"security policy" Discussed on 850 WFTL

850 WFTL

04:42 min | 3 years ago

"security policy" Discussed on 850 WFTL

"This is Red Eye Radio all across America, eight six six ninety redeye he is Eric Harley and I'm Gary McNamara. Welcome. Good morning. Well, the president had his eight minute address to the nation last night. This barrier is absolutely critical to border security. It's also what our professionals at the border want envied. This is just common sense. Here's Chuck Schumer responding. There's no challenge. So great that our nation cannot rise to meet it we can reopen the government and continue to work through disagreements over policy. What policy would that be Senator Schumer specifically, what do you believe on border security policy is border security draw him out? So we'll get to more of your calls and comments on that we've been analyzed analyzing that but first a few hours of the show. Oh, three hours while it's flying. I want to get this is off the topic a little bit, but we always like to identify. Why why when the president says fake news there is a lot of legitimacy to that? Yeah. And this is another example here, and it's off the topic. But whenever we find one an example, we want to bring it to you. And this is actually a pretty big one where where did you see this now from Newsweek and this was posted yesterday afternoon by Jason lemon? And at Newsweek dot com. Here's the headline. Another four star general just resigned from the Trump administration says he couldn't complete his mission. Sounds like part of the mass exodus that they want you to believe what's going on. It's not a small deal that your secretary of defense leaves. So let's add to that shall we? Yes. Another general is leaving. Well, here's the quote. By the way, this is Anthony Zinni, and he's retired four-star marine general who resigned from the administration. And he was a special on void. And he was there essentially to he was sent to try and solve what's going on with cop. Right. So here's his quote. Here's the quote from Zini himself. I resigned because I do not feel is successfully helped or could successfully help resolve the cutter dispute because the unwillingness of the regional leaders to agree to a viable mediation effort that we offered to conduct or assist in implementing. So in essence, he wasn't a four star general who retired. He was a retired four-star general who was a special on this particular mission and felt he could not get the job done not because of anything in the Trump administration. But because the regional leaders of those countries in the Middle East. He could not get in in line or to cooperate with each other. So he quit because of what was going on on the ground. If to use that term over there which had nothing to do with the Trump administration, and he was not acting as a four star general. He was a retired general. Anon- voice special envoy. Yeah. And he goes on to explain, and and in fact in a different interview, he said, quote, I just could not get the parties out there to engage in some of the mediation process that we offered and I felt that I couldn't do it much further. Right. There has been a stalemate there with what's going on between Saudi and Qatar and everything else, and you have something that likely won't be helped along by the us March unless we could gain some leverage from Saudi I really don't know. Honestly, I don't pretend to have the answers the point was to. Show demonstrate once again. At the media takes this is this is your your reshaping the narrative. Because the headline should read on void to Qatar steps down to lack of a response by leaders in that region, right? No, another four star general just resigned from the Trump administration says he couldn't complete this mission..

Trump administration Zini Senator Schumer Anthony Zinni president Qatar Jason lemon Eric Harley Red Eye Radio Newsweek Middle East America Gary McNamara secretary eight minute three hours
"security policy" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

Newsradio 970 WFLA

02:39 min | 3 years ago

"security policy" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

"A the news service of the Holland grip rejected wealth advisers about reports out now from the commission studying these stoneman Douglas high school shooting in parkland reports say they were airs at lead up to the shooting, including miss tips and lax security policies among the recommendations and report teachers be allowed to carry guns after proper selection and draining a Tampa woman who crashed off of I four can thank hills road avenues enter apple watch for saving your life. She was able to use their wash locator phone in called nine one one for help as she was sinking into the mud near the fairgrounds. Another driver cut her off on interstate four and Hillsborough county and our car fell into a muddy ravine upside down thirty three year old. Amanda Antonio called nine one one early New Year's day. And sheriff's spokesman Danny Alvarez says thirteen units raced up and down the highway near Tampa in dense fog to find her a deputy saw the rear of the car protruding from waist-deep money water. He kept Antonio in an air pocket until a dive team arrived to free her damn Koehler. Says deputies Senator dispatcher was able to keep calm even your car was sinking and the mud. President trump. Looks to be sending a peace offering to house speaker Nancy Pelosi Trump asking Pelosi, they could find some common ground to bring an end to the government shutdown GOP strategist, Rick Tyler says Pelosi will have little reason to compromise after she gets the spending Bill passed in the house this week. The point is is that the Democrats will be able to show that they are acting to reopen the government, and it is in fact, Republicans who are blocking them. Well, the president tweeted border security in the wall thing and the shutdown is not where Nancy Pelosi. He wanted to start her tenure as speaker. Let's make a deal and the lightning off tonight ahead of the start of a road trip. Tomorrow night in LA they face off against the kings. Seventy WFL as starts live coverage at ten o'clock would the pregame show well before now, the Bloomberg market minute being brought to you by the Holland group retirement wealth advisers, this is a Bloomberg market minute. Stocks little changed racing. Deep losses. Financial shares rebounding from a dismal December in crude staging a rally. However, shares of Tusla are falling today. The electric car maker announced it is cutting prices on its electric cars by two thousand dollars after delivering fewer of the model three sedan unexpected expected in the fourth quarter with drugmakers under the microscope price hike. Some branded medicines are off to start in two thousand nineteen according to a Goldman Sachs analysis prices were raised about twenty seven percent of the top.

Nancy Pelosi Amanda Antonio Tampa president stoneman Douglas high school Nancy Pelosi Trump Bill Bloomberg Holland Goldman Sachs Hillsborough county Danny Alvarez Senator apple LA Tusla Koehler