20 Burst results for "Secure World Foundation"

"secure world foundation" Discussed on Future Tense

Future Tense

06:42 min | 4 months ago

"secure world foundation" Discussed on Future Tense

"Impacting the night sky. Maybe it's the way we wanna go industrialized space. But it shouldn't be done unilaterally. By one country one company should be discussed by all the stakeholders which are all the countries and cultures around the world. What we discovered in twenty. Nineteen when spacex starring their starling satellites. Those satellites are big enough and bright enough that if they are in a very low orbit an oriented particular ways they can be just super. Bright spacex is satellites during their operational orbit thereby fainter and often outcry from strana. Moore's they changed the design and also the way they operate them to make them fainter yet and so now they're at the point where space x constellation is just on the margins of to thanks to see with the naked eye even really dark spot we should talk about. Is the night sky. Something that is a natural resource for humanity. And i think it is. I think it's culturally important to many many people. Then we should protect it as part of the environment and that might mean a cap on the number of satellites above a certain size in a certain order to you know we're not trying to stop these. These internet constellations that are going up but but we do think there should be some regulation some cap on them that takes into account the light pollution environmental impacts as well as the space traffic impacts that we've talked about with the the risks of collisions. One web was one of the first to get started with these mega constellations. In fact elon. Musk was an original partner in the project. Chris mclaughlin is chief of government and regulatory engagement was a vision by an american entrepreneur to provide. Bantu everyone everywhere. Like twenty twelve in. Visit the idea of low. Ethel satellites bringing communications to the most distant village all the most remote community and he set about with initial setup shareholders. Making this vision. A reality with satellites approximately twelve hundred originally the would go up into a twelve hundred kilometer orbit around the these travelling through space at equal intervals. And these you'll coverage so just like when you're driving down the road on a mobile phone. Switches either from moss moss. So the satellites it off and disconnect the signal along the way. It's done seamlessly. So you have your internet connection but it's space. We're going to see pretty soon a realization that we just confident anymore. Satellites in some of these low orbits so there's a bit of a rush right now for companies. I think to claim we want permission to get these large numbers of satellites up while the going is still good. China is another big issue here because Trying to didn't used to be a big space player until the mid nineties. Now it's huge. It's getting up to be on a par with the us in terms of amount of space usage. And they still. I think are a little behind the us in their attitude to the environmental issues in our specs and they have as is typical for the late. Comers as we see in other environmental issues that they have been of the attitude of well. Us has been messing up for decades. We need our chance. Now before we start joining the cleanup guy If you're wondering what can happen. When space junk collides an incident that occurred in two thousand and nine is a good example. He's jonathan mcdowell again from harvard smithsonian center astrophysics. Iridium communications satellite. So this was a Basically a cell phone system that you satellites of american company and they had about seventy satellites in orbit and one of them was chortling along. Its orbit one day and an old dead soviet satellite Got in the way. And so you had to half ton. Roughly satellites that smashed into each other at twenty thousand miles an hour. If you imagine a one ton truck hitting you at a hundred miles an hour. That's a good measure of energy. It's about a mega jewel. This collision in space had fifty four thousand times that amount of energy that created thousands of pieces of shrapnel from from those satellites that are still many of them orbiting the earth today in those days. The wasn't sort of real early warning system the us military track the satellites and they go. Oh yeah we see what's That's what saddening but in those days they didn't sort of predict for to see if there was a risk of collision except for just for the space station with the astronauts on it after this collision people. When you know you should really be doing a better job on this now. We see much more than when this collision happened. Satellite's going oh i'm going to do a little maneuver because there's a warning that i might it. This piece of debris with the commercial space industry booming the laws and regulations that govern our use of space a struggling to keep up with the pace of change. He's chris mclaughlin again from one web. We haven't gone in-space unaccepted structure full policing lead. Cohen's the space commons. What is the appropriate number. How should we be ensuring that space continues to be used by all society's going forward over many many decades to come. Why should we allow one entrepreneur for example to attend actually lead space To a terminal level now in all cases that will have to be reflected on the good this dumb. We very connected society. I'm by myself. I'm talking to my in laws in sydney on a regular basis on it's done by connections that we will take for granted. Satellite plays a key part in those but we have to balance of what is good for us now. We good frog grandchildren. So we do need to reflect on. What is the correct approach to the space. Coleman's are rule satellite operators behaving equally responsibly. And does it require some thinking. On national and international level to achieve the kind of balance we have international. Maritime victoria sampson is from the secure world foundation. They work to promote the safe.

Chris mclaughlin jonathan mcdowell chris mclaughlin twelve hundred kilometer fifty four thousand times Musk sydney earth twenty thousand miles an hour half ton one day Cohen one country one twenty today two thousand thousands of pieces Nineteen Coleman
"secure world foundation" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

04:18 min | 10 months ago

"secure world foundation" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"That one satellite got turned into 3000 things. And that's just the things we can track. Was it space junk? A big part of the movie Gravity you are remembering correctly. Debris from the missile strike has caused a chain reaction, hitting other satellites and creating new debris. 2013 Hollywood movie. It begins with a chatty George Clooney and Sandra Bullock servicing the Hubble Space Telescope gazing contentedly back at Earth. This huge cloud of debris for a missile strike rips through communications blackout. It's a bad situation happen. North America just lost their Facebook explain. This dramatic portrayal definitely raised the profile of space junk. Even if the portrayal wasn't very accurate, I think maybe on the whole it has been a good thing before the issue, even if I might grab a little bit. Scientists love to grumble. That's Brian Weeden again. He's now the director of program planning for the Secure World Foundation thinks a lot about sustainability in space. And he says that opening scene in gravity doesn't capture the true problem. Over the breather. Catch them was portrayed as sort of Ah nuclear chain reaction. Right? There's one event that sets off this series of things that all happened very fast. The reality is sort of the opposite. Where it's like climate change. The problem with space junk is it's a long, relatively slow accumulation over decades with a big negative impact down the road. Got it. Yeah. So Brian says mitigating the risk of space junk involves convincing people launching satellites, governments and companies. Change their behavior now mindful of the future and maybe have a little inconvenience or a little more cost now. Forestall bad things in the future, and that's a really difficult argument to make because we humans just aren't engineered to kind of think like that Preach, especially when nothing truly catastrophic has happened. Yet, but space junk is already proving to be problematic. In the short term, it's translating into real world costs. A satellite operators field alerts about potential collisions. Do you do I change my satellites orbit? Because that cost fuel and that will shorten the lifetime. Your satellite, which isn't good for the commercial space economy, which is kind of booming right now. Yeah, we did That episode all about how space sex is going to put a bunch of satellites up there, Right? You know, in the long term space junk has the potential to not only collide with manned spacecraft like the international space station but threatens satellites at all levels of orbit. Like those used for imaging and weather data collection, which then could mean our climate models are less accurate. Or we don't have a good way to track emitters, and that could have a negative impact on the road. Yeah, we're gonna need that data We are. But here's the thing. There's no international regulation for how satellites should operate. There's only guidelines guidelines yes guidelines from the Interagency Space Debris Coordination Committee for mitigating the Risk of debris. Things like de Orbit your satellite after 25 years by burning it up for bringing it down. Passive, ate the upper rocket stage me invent all the remaining fuel or training the batteries, so it's not his exploding. Yes, so there's less risk for debris. Countries do this, but it's totally voluntary. It's up to each individual nation to implement. So until there's greater accountability, space junk will continue to be a problem. Okay. We've talked about the problem. Give me a solution calling, like what is being done to clean up this junk. Well, we're not seeing much in the skies. There's been demonstrations of different cleanup technologies on Earth that could be used in space magnets. Deployable nets, harpoons, a little space fission. Yeah. In the orbital See? Most of this clean of technology is being developed in Europe and Japan. But here's the thing we don't know what's the best way to yank this swiftly moving debris out of orbit to a place where it can safely burn up. You would need a high level of precision to remove that junk without creating more of it. And I feel like that would take a lot of money to pull that off. Yes. So it was a pretty big deal. When last December the Europeans keep listening. You can hear the rest of this podcast all of its episodes and discovered thousands of others. All available to you for free right now by downloading the I heart radio app number one for podcasts..

Interagency Space Debris Coord Brian Weeden Hubble Space Telescope George Clooney Europe Facebook Sandra Bullock Preach North America Secure World Foundation Japan
"secure world foundation" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

02:53 min | 11 months ago

"secure world foundation" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"I don't like that No spacecraft and satellites will routinely maneuver out of harm's way, but only if they have ample warning. So the whole space faring community was pretty rattled. When in 2007, the Chinese military destroyed one of their own weather satellites. They were testing out anti satellite technology. Brian Weeden remembers tracking this big explosion for the U. S Air Force. I personally was sort of shocked. It was kind of like, wow. Ryan What's part of a squadron that counted the resulting debris, And in the end, we ended up cataloguing more than 3000 objects so that one satellite got turned into 3000 things. And that's just the things we can track wasn't space junk, a big part of the movie gravity you are remembering correctly. Debris from the missile strike has caused a chain reaction, hitting other satellites and creating new 2013 Hollywood movie. It begins with a chatty George Clooney and Sandra Bullock servicing the Hubble Space Telescope gazing contentedly back on Earth. In this huge cloud of debris from the missile strike through communications blackout. It's a bad situation. Have a North America just lost their Facebook. This dramatic portrayal definitely raised the profile of space junk. Even if the portrayal wasn't very accurate. I think maybe I'm a whole has been a good thing before the issue. Ah, even if I might grab a little bit scientists love grumbles. That's Brian Weed and again. He's now the director of program planning for the Secure World Foundation thinks a lot about sustainability in space. And he says that opening scene in gravity doesn't capture the true problem. Over the bridge. The captain was portrayed as sort of Ah nuclear chain reaction. Right? There's one event that sets off this series of things that all happened very fast. The reality is sort of the opposite. Where it's like climate change. The problem with space junk is it's a long, relatively slow accumulation over decades with a big negative impact down the road. Got it. Yeah. So Brian says mitigating the risk of space junk involves convincing people launching satellites, governments and companies. Change their behavior now mindful of the future and maybe have a little inconvenience or a little more cost now. To forestall bad things in the future, and that's a really difficult argument to make because we humans just aren't engineered to kind of think like that Preach, especially when nothing truly catastrophic has happened. Yet, but space junk is already proving to be problematic. In the short term, it's translating into RIA world costs a satellite operators field alerts about potential collisions do do I change my satellites orbit? Because that cost fuel and that will shorten the lifetime. Your satellite, which isn't good for the commercial space economy, which is kind of booming right now. Yeah, we did That episode all about how space sex is going to put a bunch of satellites up there, Right?.

Brian Weed Hubble Space Telescope Brian Weeden Facebook North America George Clooney Ryan What Brian Sandra Bullock U. S Air Force Preach Secure World Foundation
"secure world foundation" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

04:11 min | 1 year ago

"secure world foundation" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"Got turned into 3000 things. And that's just the things we can track wasn't space junk, a big part of the movie gravity you are remembering correctly. Debris from the missile strike has caused a chain reaction, hitting other satellites and creating new debris. 2013 Hollywood movie. It begins with a chatty George Clooney and Sandra Bullock servicing the Hubble Space Telescope gazing contentedly back on Earth. This huge cloud of debris from the missile strike through communications blackout. It's a bad situation of North America just lost their Facebook. This dramatic portrayals definitely raised the profile of space junk. Even if the portrayal wasn't very accurate. I think maybe I'm a whole has been a good thing before the issue, even if I might grab a little bit. Scientists love grumbles. That's Brian Weed and again. He's now the director of program planning for the Secure World Foundation thinks a lot about sustainability in space. And he says that opening scene in gravity doesn't capture the true problem. Over the bridge. The captain was portrayed as sort of Ah nuclear chain reaction. Right? There's one event that sets off this series of things that will happen very fast. The reality is sort of the opposite. Where it's like climate change. The problem with space junk is it's a long, relatively slow accumulation over decades with a big negative impact down the road. Got it. Yeah. So Brian says mitigating the risk of space junk involves convincing people launching satellites, governments and companies. Change their behavior now mindful of the future and maybe have a little inconvenience or a little more cost now. To forestall bad things in the future, and that's a really difficult argument to make because we humans just aren't engineered to kind of think like that Preach, especially when nothing truly catastrophic has happened. Yet, but space junk is already proving to be problematic. In the short term, it's translating into RIA world costs a satellite operators field alerts about potential collisions do do I change my satellites orbit? Because that cost fuel and that will shorten the lifetime. Your satellite, which isn't good for the commercial space economy, which is kind of booming right now. Yeah, we did That episode all about how space sex is going to put a bunch of satellites up there, Right? You know, in the long term space junk has the potential to not only collide with manned spacecraft like the international space station but threatens satellites at all levels of orbit. Like those used for imaging and weather data collection, which then could mean our climate models are less accurate. Or we don't have a good way to track the mirrors, and that could have negative impacts on the road. Yeah, we're going to need that data We are. But here's the thing. There's no international regulation for how satellites should operate. There's only guidelines guidelines. Yes guidelines from the Interagency Space Debris Coordination Committee for Mitigating the Risk of debris. Things like deorbit your satellite after 25 years by burning it up for bringing it down. Passive, ate the upper rocket stage, meaning vent all the remaining fuel are training the batteries, so it's not his exploding, so there's less risk for debris. Countries do this, but it's totally voluntary. It's up to each individual nation to implement. So until there's greater accountability, space junk will continue to be a problem. Okay. We've talked about the problem. Give me a solution. Kwong, what is being done to clean up this junk? Well, we're not seeing much in the skies. There's been demonstrations of different cleanup technologies on earth that could be used in space magnets, Deployable nets, harpoons, a little space fission. Yeah. In the orbital See? Most of this clean of technology is being developed in Europe and Japan. But here's the thing we don't know what's the best way to yank this swiftly moving debris out of orbit to a place where it can safely burn up. You would need a high level of precision to remove that junk without creating more of it. And I feel like that would take a lot of money to pull that off. Yes. So it was a pretty big deal. When last December the Europeans keep listening. You can hear the rest of this podcast and all of its episodes and discovered thousands of others. All available to you for free right now.

Interagency Space Debris Coord Brian Weed Hubble Space Telescope Europe George Clooney Facebook Sandra Bullock North America Preach Secure World Foundation Kwong Japan
"secure world foundation" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:20 min | 1 year ago

"secure world foundation" Discussed on KCRW

"Appears to have successfully tested a new spacecraft. Last week's mission was shrouded in secrecy. But as NPR's Jeff from field reports, there are some clues about what China sent into space and why. Last Friday, a Chinese rocket took off carrying a mysterious payload. A terse statement on state media said it was quote A reusable experimental spacecraft, but they didn't give a launch time. They don't have any more details. No riel official footage of the Lord's Jonathan Mcd, Alison astronomer, Earthy Center for Astrophysics, Harvard and Smithsonian who specializes in tracking satellites and spacecraft orbiting the Earth. When he plotted the course of China's new craft, he found that it passed over a secretive military facility. An area called Loop Nure, where China once tested its nuclear weapons. There's an air base there, which has AH big runway that's aligned exactly in the direction ofthe the orbit of the space craft. On Sunday, China announced its new spacecraft heads landed. Sure enough fuzzy satellite images napped by a commercial company called Planet. Seemed to show activity on the giant runway right at the moment, the landing would have occurred. McDowell says that the evidence is circumstantial, but he believes China has just tested a space plane. Think of it. It's a little space shuttle a craft with wings probably too small to carry people that took off on a rocket and coasted back to Earth. The information of all hands together now that this wass A test of something probably a space plane that made a winged reentry on landed on the runway at Lop nor the US Air Force has a similar spacecraft called the X 37 B. It's been launched in since 2010. So if that's what China tested, why now it's a great question. We're not even really sure why the United States military is pursuing a space plane like it's been doing for the last Decade or so. Brian Weeden Studies face security issues with the Secure World Foundation. The U. S X 37 B program remains highly classified. Weeden says he believes it's being used to test new sensors and systems for the military. Think about if you're building a brand new satellite, and you've got a lot of fancy new technology that's never been in space before. That's potentially risky. But if you can apply some of that technology in space, let's say in the payload bay of a reusable space plane that could allow you to get a better feel for how about react. McDowell says that space planes which travel many times, the speed of sound, could also potentially helped with the development of so called hyper sonic weapons. Uh, honestly, he thinks China could just be copying the US if the Americans have one of those. That must be a good reason for it. So we better get one, too. The landing of the space plane or whatever it was, is just the latest success for China. McDowell says that recently completed its own satellite navigation system, it has a robotic missions going to Mars and several probes on the moon. China's firing on all thrusters in space on just really increasing its level of involvement on capabilities, and I think that this is just one more reflection of that Jeff from feel. NPR NEWS Washington

China United States Urbana Champagne University of Illinois McDowell professor Twitter Pasadena Manuel Villanueva Agoura Hills restaurant Opportunities Cente Brian Weeden Audie Cornish Canaan flu AstraZeneca University of Pennsylvania US Air Force FDA
New Chinese Space Plane Landed At Mysterious Air Base, Evidence Suggests

All Things Considered

03:20 min | 1 year ago

New Chinese Space Plane Landed At Mysterious Air Base, Evidence Suggests

"Appears to have successfully tested a new spacecraft. Last week's mission was shrouded in secrecy. But as NPR's Jeff from field reports, there are some clues about what China sent into space and why. Last Friday, a Chinese rocket took off carrying a mysterious payload. A terse statement on state media said it was quote A reusable experimental spacecraft, but they didn't give a launch time. They don't have any more details. No riel official footage of the Lord's Jonathan Mcd, Alison astronomer, Earthy Center for Astrophysics, Harvard and Smithsonian who specializes in tracking satellites and spacecraft orbiting the Earth. When he plotted the course of China's new craft, he found that it passed over a secretive military facility. An area called Loop Nure, where China once tested its nuclear weapons. There's an air base there, which has AH big runway that's aligned exactly in the direction ofthe the orbit of the space craft. On Sunday, China announced its new spacecraft heads landed. Sure enough fuzzy satellite images napped by a commercial company called Planet. Seemed to show activity on the giant runway right at the moment, the landing would have occurred. McDowell says that the evidence is circumstantial, but he believes China has just tested a space plane. Think of it. It's a little space shuttle a craft with wings probably too small to carry people that took off on a rocket and coasted back to Earth. The information of all hands together now that this wass A test of something probably a space plane that made a winged reentry on landed on the runway at Lop nor the US Air Force has a similar spacecraft called the X 37 B. It's been launched in since 2010. So if that's what China tested, why now it's a great question. We're not even really sure why the United States military is pursuing a space plane like it's been doing for the last Decade or so. Brian Weeden Studies face security issues with the Secure World Foundation. The U. S X 37 B program remains highly classified. Weeden says he believes it's being used to test new sensors and systems for the military. Think about if you're building a brand new satellite, and you've got a lot of fancy new technology that's never been in space before. That's potentially risky. But if you can apply some of that technology in space, let's say in the payload bay of a reusable space plane that could allow you to get a better feel for how about react. McDowell says that space planes which travel many times, the speed of sound, could also potentially helped with the development of so called hyper sonic weapons. Uh, honestly, he thinks China could just be copying the US if the Americans have one of those. That must be a good reason for it. So we better get one, too. The landing of the space plane or whatever it was, is just the latest success for China. McDowell says that recently completed its own satellite navigation system, it has a robotic missions going to Mars and several probes on the moon. China's firing on all thrusters in space on just really increasing its level of involvement on capabilities, and I think that this is just one more reflection of that Jeff from feel. NPR NEWS Washington

China Mcdowell Brian Weeden NPR United States Us Air Force Alison Astronomer Loop Nure Earthy Center Washington Harvard Official Jonathan Mcd Jeff Secure World Foundation
"secure world foundation" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:20 min | 1 year ago

"secure world foundation" Discussed on KCRW

"Appears to have successfully tested a new spacecraft. Last week's mission was shrouded in secrecy. But as NPR's Jeff from field reports, there are some clues about what China sent into space and why. Last Friday, a Chinese rocket took off carrying a mysterious payload. A terse statement on state media said it was quote A reusable experimental spacecraft, but they didn't give a launch time. They don't have any more details. No riel official footage of the Lord's Jonathan Mcd, Alison astronomer, Earthy Center for Astrophysics, Harvard and Smithsonian who specializes in tracking satellites and spacecraft orbiting the Earth. When he plotted the course of China's new craft, he found that it passed over a secretive military facility. An area called Loop Nure, where China once tested its nuclear weapons. There's an air base there, which has AH big runway that's aligned exactly in the direction ofthe the orbit of the space craft. On Sunday, China announced its new spacecraft head landed sure enough fuzzy satellite images snapped by a commercial company called Planet. Seemed to show activity on the giant runway right at the moment, the landing would have occurred. McDowell says that the evidence is circumstantial, but he believes China has just tested a space plane. Think of it. It's a little space shuttle a craft with wings probably too small to carry people that took off on a rocket and coasted back to Earth. The information of all hands together now that this wass A test of something probably a space plane that made a winged reentry on landed on the runway at Lop nor the US Air Force has a similar spacecraft called the X 37 B. It's been launched in since 2010. So if that's what China tested, why now it's a great question. We're not even really sure why the United States military is pursuing a space plane like it's been doing for the last Decade or so. Brian Weeden Studies face security issues with the Secure World Foundation. The U. S X 37 B program remains highly classified. Weeden says he believes it's being used to test new sensors and systems for the military. Think about if you're building a brand new satellite, and you've got a lot of fancy new technology that's never been in space before. That's potentially risky. But if you can apply some of that technology in space, let's say in the payload bay of a reusable space plane that could allow you to get a better feel for how about react. McDowell says that space planes which travel many times, the speed of sound, could also potentially helped with the development of so called hyper sonic weapons. Uh, honestly, he thinks China could just be copying the US if the Americans have one of those. That must be a good reason for it. So we better get one, too. The landing of the space plane or whatever it was, is just the latest success for China. McDowell says that recently completed its own satellite navigation system, it has a robotic missions going to Mars and several probes on the moon. China's firing on all thrusters in space on just really increasing its level of involvement on capabilities, and I think that this is just one more reflection of that Jeff from feel. NPR NEWS Washington

China McDowell NPR Urbana Champagne University of Illinois professor flu Twitter Audie Cornish FDA Elsa Chang Delores Albarracin AstraZeneca University of Pennsylvania US Air Force Brian Weeden United States Sasha Pfeifer
New Chinese Space Plane Landed At Mysterious Air Base, Evidence Suggests

All Things Considered

03:20 min | 1 year ago

New Chinese Space Plane Landed At Mysterious Air Base, Evidence Suggests

"Appears to have successfully tested a new spacecraft. Last week's mission was shrouded in secrecy. But as NPR's Jeff from field reports, there are some clues about what China sent into space and why. Last Friday, a Chinese rocket took off carrying a mysterious payload. A terse statement on state media said it was quote A reusable experimental spacecraft, but they didn't give a launch time. They don't have any more details. No riel official footage of the Lord's Jonathan Mcd, Alison astronomer, Earthy Center for Astrophysics, Harvard and Smithsonian who specializes in tracking satellites and spacecraft orbiting the Earth. When he plotted the course of China's new craft, he found that it passed over a secretive military facility. An area called Loop Nure, where China once tested its nuclear weapons. There's an air base there, which has AH big runway that's aligned exactly in the direction ofthe the orbit of the space craft. On Sunday, China announced its new spacecraft head landed sure enough fuzzy satellite images snapped by a commercial company called Planet. Seemed to show activity on the giant runway right at the moment, the landing would have occurred. McDowell says that the evidence is circumstantial, but he believes China has just tested a space plane. Think of it. It's a little space shuttle a craft with wings probably too small to carry people that took off on a rocket and coasted back to Earth. The information of all hands together now that this wass A test of something probably a space plane that made a winged reentry on landed on the runway at Lop nor the US Air Force has a similar spacecraft called the X 37 B. It's been launched in since 2010. So if that's what China tested, why now it's a great question. We're not even really sure why the United States military is pursuing a space plane like it's been doing for the last Decade or so. Brian Weeden Studies face security issues with the Secure World Foundation. The U. S X 37 B program remains highly classified. Weeden says he believes it's being used to test new sensors and systems for the military. Think about if you're building a brand new satellite, and you've got a lot of fancy new technology that's never been in space before. That's potentially risky. But if you can apply some of that technology in space, let's say in the payload bay of a reusable space plane that could allow you to get a better feel for how about react. McDowell says that space planes which travel many times, the speed of sound, could also potentially helped with the development of so called hyper sonic weapons. Uh, honestly, he thinks China could just be copying the US if the Americans have one of those. That must be a good reason for it. So we better get one, too. The landing of the space plane or whatever it was, is just the latest success for China. McDowell says that recently completed its own satellite navigation system, it has a robotic missions going to Mars and several probes on the moon. China's firing on all thrusters in space on just really increasing its level of involvement on capabilities, and I think that this is just one more reflection of that Jeff from feel. NPR NEWS Washington

China Mcdowell NPR Brian Weeden United States Us Air Force Alison Astronomer Loop Nure Earthy Center Washington Harvard Official Jonathan Mcd Jeff Secure World Foundation
"secure world foundation" Discussed on Short Wave

Short Wave

05:36 min | 1 year ago

"secure world foundation" Discussed on Short Wave

"We are tackling a question from listener. . Rachel. Weiss . space-junk this growing population of manmade objects cluttering up Earth orbit so Does that happen? ? Okay I. . Let's consider what satellites are made out of metal plastic glass powered by batteries or solar panels, , and when they're placed in specific orbital highways, , they stay there moving. So . quickly that they don't fall towards the earth kind of like, , you know if you had to put a boat in a body of water, , you want to avoid fighting the current kind of thing that's more. . But jaw who we met earlier, , he says that from sputnik onwards, , our satellites have been creating debris shedding spent rocket bodies pieces becoming glued satellites have been known to explode when unspent fuel is on board, , and of course, , they can cross flightpaths and collide with one another and whenever satellite shed pieces they. . Tend to not should one but many many pieces, , hundreds of thousands of pieces depending on the type of collision. . These collisions rarely destroy the satellites, but , they can alter their operation and send pieces jettisoning off into space affected not only by gravity, , but other physical forces. . So we're pressure thermal radiation charged particle, , environment <hes> interactions with you know magnetic fields, , and all of this makes it very difficult to predict what space junk will do next the little that falls back to Earth, , which is one object that day on average burns up or falls into the ocean. . So space junk is probably not going to land on your head. . Have you calculated that probability because you're GONNA ask me this question I haven't. . But there's a scientist <hes> mark. . Matinee, , at NASA orbital debris program who has it's one in several trillion honestly I still like it but okay Mattie the people you should worry about more astronauts right? ? The International Space Station actually has a tracker to monitor for collision risk and they will maneuver out of the way when the risk is too great. . Wow. . But I feel like if there was a major collision, , I would hurt about it, , right? ? Yeah. . There hasn't been a major collision you know the US military NASA and other agencies and groups around the world they tracked debris and Warren of potential collisions but there's been a few scares in recent decades. . So in two thousand, , fifteen, , for example, , the crew. . On. . The International Space Station had to hide in their Sawyer's capsules. Basically, . , the stations lifeboat when debris from an old Russian weather satellite came dangerously close. . I don't like that no spacecraft and satellites will routinely maneuver out of harm's way but only if they have ample warning so the whole spacefaring community was pretty rattled when in two, , thousand, , seven, , the Chinese military destroyed one of their own weather satellites they were testing out anti-satellite. . Technology. . Brian Weeden, , remembers tracking this big explosion for the US air. . Force. . I personally was sort of shocked. . It was of like wow Brian was part of a squadron that counted the resulting debris and in the end ended up cataloging more than three thousand objects. . So that one. . Got turned into three thousand things and that's just the things we can track wasn't space junk a big part of the movie gravity you are remembering cracks lake. . From the missile strike has caused a chain reaction hitting other satellites in creating desgris two thousand eighteen Hollywood movie begins with a chatty George Clooney and Sandra bullock servicing the Hubble space telescope gays, and , contentedly back at Earth. . When this huge cloud of debris from missile strike grips through communications blackout it's a bad situation happen North America's laws individual. . Dramatic portrayal definitely raise the profile of space junk. . Even if the portrayal wasn't very accurate I, , think navy on the whole it has been a good thing for for the issue. . Even, , if I might grumble a little bit scientists love to grumble. . That's Brian Weeden again he's now the director of program planning for the Secure World Foundation thinks a lot about sustainability in space, , and he says that opening scene gravity doesn't capture the true problem over the breath catches him was portrayed as sort of a nuclear chain reaction. . Right there's one event that sets off this series of things that will happen very fast. . The reality is sort of the opposite where it's it's like climate change. . The problem with space junk is it's a long relatively slow accumulation over decades with a big negative impact down the road. . Got It. . Yeah. . So Brian says. . The risk of space junk involves convincing people, , launching satellites, , governments, and , companies to change their behavior. . Now mindful of the future and maybe have a little inconvenience or a little more cost now to forestall bad things in the future, , and that's a really difficult argument to make because we humans just aren't engineered to kind of think like that preach especially when nothing truly catastrophic has happened yet but space junk is already proving to be problematic in the short term, , it's translating into real world costs a satellite. . Field alerts about potential collisions. . Do Do I change my satellites orbit because that costs fuel and that will shorten the lifetime your satellite, , which isn't good for the commercials base economy, , which is Kinda booming right now. . Yeah. . We did that episode all about how SPACEX IS GONNA put a bunch of satellites up there. . Right you know in the long term space junk has the potential to not only collide with manned spacecraft like the International Space Station, , but threatens satellites at all levels of orbit like those used for imaging and whether data collection, , which then could mean our climate models are less accurate or we don't have a good way to track the mirrors and that could have negative

Rachel Weiss US Montana Department of Defense John Malmstrom Air Force Mattie NPR NASA Emily Kwong Matty Austin reporter University of Texas Jacksonville Florida
Is Space Junk Cluttering Up The Final Frontier

Short Wave

05:36 min | 1 year ago

Is Space Junk Cluttering Up The Final Frontier

"We are tackling a question from listener. Rachel. Weiss space-junk this growing population of manmade objects cluttering up Earth orbit so Does that happen? Okay I. Let's consider what satellites are made out of metal plastic glass powered by batteries or solar panels, and when they're placed in specific orbital highways, they stay there moving. So quickly that they don't fall towards the earth kind of like, you know if you had to put a boat in a body of water, you want to avoid fighting the current kind of thing that's more. But jaw who we met earlier, he says that from sputnik onwards, our satellites have been creating debris shedding spent rocket bodies pieces becoming glued satellites have been known to explode when unspent fuel is on board, and of course, they can cross flightpaths and collide with one another and whenever satellite shed pieces they. Tend to not should one but many many pieces, hundreds of thousands of pieces depending on the type of collision. These collisions rarely destroy the satellites, but they can alter their operation and send pieces jettisoning off into space affected not only by gravity, but other physical forces. So we're pressure thermal radiation charged particle, environment interactions with you know magnetic fields, and all of this makes it very difficult to predict what space junk will do next the little that falls back to Earth, which is one object that day on average burns up or falls into the ocean. So space junk is probably not going to land on your head. Have you calculated that probability because you're GONNA ask me this question I haven't. But there's a scientist mark. Matinee, at NASA orbital debris program who has it's one in several trillion honestly I still like it but okay Mattie the people you should worry about more astronauts right? The International Space Station actually has a tracker to monitor for collision risk and they will maneuver out of the way when the risk is too great. Wow. But I feel like if there was a major collision, I would hurt about it, right? Yeah. There hasn't been a major collision you know the US military NASA and other agencies and groups around the world they tracked debris and Warren of potential collisions but there's been a few scares in recent decades. So in two thousand, fifteen, for example, the crew. On. The International Space Station had to hide in their Sawyer's capsules. Basically, the stations lifeboat when debris from an old Russian weather satellite came dangerously close. I don't like that no spacecraft and satellites will routinely maneuver out of harm's way but only if they have ample warning so the whole spacefaring community was pretty rattled when in two, thousand, seven, the Chinese military destroyed one of their own weather satellites they were testing out anti-satellite. Technology. Brian Weeden, remembers tracking this big explosion for the US air. Force. I personally was sort of shocked. It was of like wow Brian was part of a squadron that counted the resulting debris and in the end ended up cataloging more than three thousand objects. So that one. Got turned into three thousand things and that's just the things we can track wasn't space junk a big part of the movie gravity you are remembering cracks lake. From the missile strike has caused a chain reaction hitting other satellites in creating desgris two thousand eighteen Hollywood movie begins with a chatty George Clooney and Sandra bullock servicing the Hubble space telescope gays, and contentedly back at Earth. When this huge cloud of debris from missile strike grips through communications blackout it's a bad situation happen North America's laws individual. Dramatic portrayal definitely raise the profile of space junk. Even if the portrayal wasn't very accurate I, think navy on the whole it has been a good thing for for the issue. Even, if I might grumble a little bit scientists love to grumble. That's Brian Weeden again he's now the director of program planning for the Secure World Foundation thinks a lot about sustainability in space, and he says that opening scene gravity doesn't capture the true problem over the breath catches him was portrayed as sort of a nuclear chain reaction. Right there's one event that sets off this series of things that will happen very fast. The reality is sort of the opposite where it's it's like climate change. The problem with space junk is it's a long relatively slow accumulation over decades with a big negative impact down the road. Got It. Yeah. So Brian says. The risk of space junk involves convincing people, launching satellites, governments, and companies to change their behavior. Now mindful of the future and maybe have a little inconvenience or a little more cost now to forestall bad things in the future, and that's a really difficult argument to make because we humans just aren't engineered to kind of think like that preach especially when nothing truly catastrophic has happened yet but space junk is already proving to be problematic in the short term, it's translating into real world costs a satellite. Field alerts about potential collisions. Do Do I change my satellites orbit because that costs fuel and that will shorten the lifetime your satellite, which isn't good for the commercials base economy, which is Kinda booming right now. Yeah. We did that episode all about how SPACEX IS GONNA put a bunch of satellites up there. Right you know in the long term space junk has the potential to not only collide with manned spacecraft like the International Space Station, but threatens satellites at all levels of orbit like those used for imaging and whether data collection, which then could mean our climate models are less accurate or we don't have a good way to track the mirrors and that could have negative

International Space Station Brian Weeden United States Nasa Cluttering Rachel Weiss Spacex Cracks Lake Scientist Mattie America Hollywood George Clooney Navy Sandra Bullock Secure World Foundation Director
"secure world foundation" Discussed on Short Wave

Short Wave

08:32 min | 1 year ago

"secure world foundation" Discussed on Short Wave

"We are tackling a question from listener Rachel Weiss on Space Jong this growing population of manmade objects cluttering births orbit. So how exactly does that happen. Okay I let's consider what satellites are made out of metal plastic glass powered by batteries or solar panels and when they're placed in specific orbital highways. They stay there moving so quickly that they don't fall towards the earth. Kind of like you know if you had to put a boat in a body of water. Are you want to avoid fighting current kind of thing. That's more of a jaw who we met earlier. He says that. From sputnik onwards our satellites have been creating debris shedding spent rocket bodies pieces becoming glued satellites have been known to explode when unspent fuel is on boarding and of course they can cross flight paths and collide with one another and whenever satellite should pieces. They tend to not should one but many many pieces hundreds of thousands of pieces depending on the type of collision. These collisions rarely destroy the satellites. But they can alter their operation and send pieces jettisoning off into space affected not only by gravity but other physical forces. So we're pressure thermal radiation charged particle environment Interactions with magnetic fields. And all of this makes it very difficult to predict what space junk will do next. The little that falls back to Earth which is one object. A day on average burns up or falls into the ocean so so space junk is probably not going to land on your head. Have you calculated that probability. Because you're gonNA ask me question. I haven't but there's a scientist the mark matinee at NASA's orbital debris program who has it's one in several trillion. Honestly I still like it. Okay Mattie the people you should worry about more four astronauts right. The International Space Station actually has a tracker to monitor for collision risk and they will maneuver out of the way when the risk is too great. Wow but I feel like if there was a major collision I would hurt about it right. Yeah there hasn't been a major collision you know the US military NASA and other agencies and groups around the world they tracked debris and Warren earn of potential collisions. But there's been a few scares in recent decades so in two thousand fifteen for example the crew on the International Space Station had to hide in their Sawyer's capsules basically the stations lifeboat. When debris from an old Russian weather satellite came dangerously close? I don't like that. No spacecraft and satellites will routinely maneuver out of harm's way away but only if they have ample warning so the whole spacefaring community was pretty rattled when in two thousand seven. The Chinese military destroyed one of their own weather satellites nights. They were testing out. anti-satellite Technology Brian Weeden remembers tracking this big explosion for the US Air Force. I personally was sort sort of shocked. It was kind of like wow. Brian was part of a squadron that counted the resulting debris and in the end ended up cataloging more than three thousand objects so that one satellite got turned into three thousand things. And that's just the things we can track wasn't space junk big part of the movie gravity you are remembering cracks. Blake from the missile strike has caused a chain reaction hitting other satellites in creating new degrees two thousand eighteen. Hollywood movie it begins. With a chatty George Clooney and Sandra bullock look servicing the Hubble space telescope as and contentedly back at Earth when this huge cloud of debris from missile strike grips through like a communication blackout. It's it's about situation happened north. America's lost their baseball dramatic portrayal. Definitely raise the profile of space junk. Even if the portrayal wasn't very accurate I think maybe I'm a whole at has been a good thing for for the issue even if I might grumble a little bit scientists love to grumble. That's Brian Weeden again gun. He's now the director of program planning for the Secure World Foundation. Thanks a lot about sustainability in space and he says that opening scene gravity doesn't capture the true problem over the breath catches him was portrayed as sort of a a nuclear chain reaction right. There's one event that sets off this series of things that will happen very fast the reality he is sort of the opposite where it's it's like climate change the problem with space junk is it's a long relatively slow accumulation over for decades with a big negative impact down the road. Got It yeah so. Brian says mitigating. The risk of space junk involves convincing people launching satellites it's governments and companies to change their behavior now mindful of the future and maybe have a little inconvenience or a little more cost now to forestall bad things in the future and that's a really difficult argument to make because we humans just aren't engineered to kind of think like that preach especially especially when nothing truly catastrophic has happened yet but space junk is already proving to be problematic in the short term. It's translating into real world. Costs a satellite operators field alerts about potential collisions. Do Do I change my satellites orbit because that costs fuel and that will shorten the lifetime your satellite which which isn't good for the commercials base economy which is Kinda booming right now. Yeah we did that episode. All about how SPACEX is going to put a bunch of satellites up there right you know in the long term. Space trump has the potential to not only collide with manned spacecraft like the International Space Station but threatens satellites at all levels of orbit like those used for imaging and whether data collection election which then could mean. Our climate models are less accurate or we don't have a good way to track the mirrors and that could have negative impacts down the road. Yeah we're GONNA need that data we are. But here's the thing there's no. International Regulation for how satellites should operate. There's only guidelines guidelines yes the guidelines from the Inter Agency Space Debris Coordination Committee for mitigating the risk of debris. Things like Deorbit your satellite after twenty five years by burning it up for bringing it down passive the upper rocket stage meeting vent all the remaining fuel or draining the batteries so it's not exploding so there's less risk for debris countries do this but it's totally voluntary. It's up to each individual nation to implement so until there's greater accountability. Space Junk will continue to be a problem. Okay okay. We've talked about the problem. Give me a solution kwong. Like what is being done to clean up this junk while we're not seeing much in the skies there's has been demonstrations of different cleanup technologies on earth that could be used in space magnets deployable nets harpoons. A little space fishing. Yeah in the orbital see see most of this cleanup technology is being developed in Europe and Japan. But here's the thing we don't know what's the best way to Yank this swiftly moving debris out of orbit it to a place where it can safely burn up. You need a high level of precision to remove that junk without creating more of it and I feel like that would take a lot of money to pull that off. Yes yes so. It was a pretty big deal. When last December the European Space Agency Green Lit the first ever cleanup mission called clear space one which is estimated? It cost over one hundred million dollars and twenty twenty five. The European Space Agency plans to send a cleanup robot to scoop up a chunk of old old European rocket a chunk so they're spending over one hundred million dollars to clean up one piece of space junk. It's a big piece is is more significantly. This hasn't been done before right. Can we agree church. This is kind of progress. It could be a game changer. In the void of space which more about considers an ecosystem that we need to actually try to protect so if these natural pathways become. I'm too polluted to congested. If we can't use these horrible highways anymore then you can say goodbye to these services and capabilities so this is my concern. That's a tragedy of the Commons as it were in their space because of this lack of holistic management of this finite resource for me. It's so easy to see spaces infinite right but the space we use most that houses. Our satellites is actually pretty finite. Emily thank you for taking on this enormous listener listener question. And thank you Rachel Weiss for sending it. Thanks Rachel. This episode was produced by Brett. Hansen edited by lay and fact checked by burly McCoy. Thanks for listening to shortwave from N._P._R...

International Space Station Brian Weeden Inter Agency Space Debris Coor European Space Agency Space Jong Rachel Weiss scientist NASA cluttering US SPACEX US Air Force Mattie George Clooney Hollywood Deorbit Blake Europe
"secure world foundation" Discussed on Short Wave

Short Wave

08:32 min | 1 year ago

"secure world foundation" Discussed on Short Wave

"We are tackling a question from listener Rachel Weiss on Space Jong this growing population of manmade objects cluttering births orbit. So how exactly does that happen. Okay I let's consider what satellites are made out of metal plastic glass powered by batteries or solar panels and when they're placed in specific orbital highways. They stay there moving so quickly that they don't fall towards the earth. Kind of like you know if you had to put a boat in a body of water. Are you want to avoid fighting current kind of thing. That's more of a jaw who we met earlier. He says that. From sputnik onwards our satellites have been creating debris shedding spent rocket bodies pieces becoming glued satellites have been known to explode when unspent fuel is on boarding and of course they can cross flight paths and collide with one another and whenever satellite should pieces. They tend to not should one but many many pieces hundreds of thousands of pieces depending on the type of collision. These collisions rarely destroy the satellites. But they can alter their operation and send pieces jettisoning off into space affected not only by gravity but other physical forces. So we're pressure thermal radiation charged particle environment Interactions with magnetic fields. And all of this makes it very difficult to predict what space junk will do next. The little that falls back to Earth which is one object. A day on average burns up or falls into the ocean so so space junk is probably not going to land on your head. Have you calculated that probability. Because you're gonNA ask me question. I haven't but there's a scientist the mark matinee at NASA's orbital debris program who has it's one in several trillion. Honestly I still like it. Okay Mattie the people you should worry about more four astronauts right. The International Space Station actually has a tracker to monitor for collision risk and they will maneuver out of the way when the risk is too great. Wow but I feel like if there was a major collision I would hurt about it right. Yeah there hasn't been a major collision you know the US military NASA and other agencies and groups around the world they tracked debris and Warren earn of potential collisions. But there's been a few scares in recent decades so in two thousand fifteen for example the crew on the International Space Station had to hide in their Sawyer's capsules basically the stations lifeboat. When debris from an old Russian weather satellite came dangerously close? I don't like that. No spacecraft and satellites will routinely maneuver out of harm's way away but only if they have ample warning so the whole spacefaring community was pretty rattled when in two thousand seven. The Chinese military destroyed one of their own weather satellites nights. They were testing out. anti-satellite Technology Brian Weeden remembers tracking this big explosion for the US Air Force. I personally was sort sort of shocked. It was kind of like wow. Brian was part of a squadron that counted the resulting debris and in the end ended up cataloging more than three thousand objects so that one satellite got turned into three thousand things. And that's just the things we can track wasn't space junk big part of the movie gravity you are remembering cracks. Blake from the missile strike has caused a chain reaction hitting other satellites in creating new degrees two thousand eighteen. Hollywood movie it begins. With a chatty George Clooney and Sandra bullock look servicing the Hubble space telescope as and contentedly back at Earth when this huge cloud of debris from missile strike grips through like a communication blackout. It's it's about situation happened north. America's lost their baseball dramatic portrayal. Definitely raise the profile of space junk. Even if the portrayal wasn't very accurate I think maybe I'm a whole at has been a good thing for for the issue even if I might grumble a little bit scientists love to grumble. That's Brian Weeden again gun. He's now the director of program planning for the Secure World Foundation. Thanks a lot about sustainability in space and he says that opening scene gravity doesn't capture the true problem over the breath catches him was portrayed as sort of a a nuclear chain reaction right. There's one event that sets off this series of things that will happen very fast the reality he is sort of the opposite where it's it's like climate change the problem with space junk is it's a long relatively slow accumulation over for decades with a big negative impact down the road. Got It yeah so. Brian says mitigating. The risk of space junk involves convincing people launching satellites it's governments and companies to change their behavior now mindful of the future and maybe have a little inconvenience or a little more cost now to forestall bad things in the future and that's a really difficult argument to make because we humans just aren't engineered to kind of think like that preach especially especially when nothing truly catastrophic has happened yet but space junk is already proving to be problematic in the short term. It's translating into real world. Costs a satellite operators field alerts about potential collisions. Do Do I change my satellites orbit because that costs fuel and that will shorten the lifetime your satellite which which isn't good for the commercials base economy which is Kinda booming right now. Yeah we did that episode. All about how SPACEX is going to put a bunch of satellites up there right you know in the long term. Space trump has the potential to not only collide with manned spacecraft like the International Space Station but threatens satellites at all levels of orbit like those used for imaging and whether data collection election which then could mean. Our climate models are less accurate or we don't have a good way to track the mirrors and that could have negative impacts down the road. Yeah we're GONNA need that data we are. But here's the thing there's no. International Regulation for how satellites should operate. There's only guidelines guidelines yes the guidelines from the Inter Agency Space Debris Coordination Committee for mitigating the risk of debris. Things like Deorbit your satellite after twenty five years by burning it up for bringing it down passive the upper rocket stage meeting vent all the remaining fuel or draining the batteries so it's not exploding so there's less risk for debris countries do this but it's totally voluntary. It's up to each individual nation to implement so until there's greater accountability. Space Junk will continue to be a problem. Okay okay. We've talked about the problem. Give me a solution kwong. Like what is being done to clean up this junk while we're not seeing much in the skies there's has been demonstrations of different cleanup technologies on earth that could be used in space magnets deployable nets harpoons. A little space fishing. Yeah in the orbital see see most of this cleanup technology is being developed in Europe and Japan. But here's the thing we don't know what's the best way to Yank this swiftly moving debris out of orbit it to a place where it can safely burn up. You need a high level of precision to remove that junk without creating more of it and I feel like that would take a lot of money to pull that off. Yes yes so. It was a pretty big deal. When last December the European Space Agency Green Lit the first ever cleanup mission called clear space one which is estimated? It cost over one hundred million dollars and twenty twenty five. The European Space Agency plans to send a cleanup robot to scoop up a chunk of old old European rocket a chunk so they're spending over one hundred million dollars to clean up one piece of space junk. It's a big piece is is more significantly. This hasn't been done before right. Can we agree church. This is kind of progress. It could be a game changer. In the void of space which more about considers an ecosystem that we need to actually try to protect so if these natural pathways become. I'm too polluted to congested. If we can't use these horrible highways anymore then you can say goodbye to these services and capabilities so this is my concern. That's a tragedy of the Commons as it were in their space because of this lack of holistic management of this finite resource for me. It's so easy to see spaces infinite right but the space we use most that houses. Our satellites is actually pretty finite. Emily thank you for taking on this enormous listener listener question. And thank you Rachel Weiss for sending it. Thanks Rachel. This episode was produced by Brett. Hansen edited by lay and fact checked by burly McCoy. Thanks for listening to shortwave from N._P._R...

International Space Station Brian Weeden Inter Agency Space Debris Coor European Space Agency Space Jong Rachel Weiss scientist NASA cluttering US SPACEX US Air Force Mattie George Clooney Hollywood Deorbit Blake Europe
"secure world foundation" Discussed on Short Wave

Short Wave

08:32 min | 1 year ago

"secure world foundation" Discussed on Short Wave

"We are tackling a question from listener Rachel Weiss on Space Jong this growing population of manmade objects cluttering births orbit. So how exactly does that happen. Okay I let's consider what satellites are made out of metal plastic glass powered by batteries or solar panels and when they're placed in specific orbital highways. They stay there moving so quickly that they don't fall towards the earth. Kind of like you know if you had to put a boat in a body of water. Are you want to avoid fighting current kind of thing. That's more of a jaw who we met earlier. He says that. From sputnik onwards our satellites have been creating debris shedding spent rocket bodies pieces becoming glued satellites have been known to explode when unspent fuel is on boarding and of course they can cross flight paths and collide with one another and whenever satellite should pieces. They tend to not should one but many many pieces hundreds of thousands of pieces depending on the type of collision. These collisions rarely destroy the satellites. But they can alter their operation and send pieces jettisoning off into space affected not only by gravity but other physical forces. So we're pressure thermal radiation charged particle environment Interactions with magnetic fields. And all of this makes it very difficult to predict what space junk will do next. The little that falls back to Earth which is one object. A day on average burns up or falls into the ocean so so space junk is probably not going to land on your head. Have you calculated that probability. Because you're gonNA ask me question. I haven't but there's a scientist the mark matinee at NASA's orbital debris program who has it's one in several trillion. Honestly I still like it. Okay Mattie the people you should worry about more four astronauts right. The International Space Station actually has a tracker to monitor for collision risk and they will maneuver out of the way when the risk is too great. Wow but I feel like if there was a major collision I would hurt about it right. Yeah there hasn't been a major collision you know the US military NASA and other agencies and groups around the world they tracked debris and Warren earn of potential collisions. But there's been a few scares in recent decades so in two thousand fifteen for example the crew on the International Space Station had to hide in their Sawyer's capsules basically the stations lifeboat. When debris from an old Russian weather satellite came dangerously close? I don't like that. No spacecraft and satellites will routinely maneuver out of harm's way away but only if they have ample warning so the whole spacefaring community was pretty rattled when in two thousand seven. The Chinese military destroyed one of their own weather satellites nights. They were testing out. anti-satellite Technology Brian Weeden remembers tracking this big explosion for the US Air Force. I personally was sort sort of shocked. It was kind of like wow. Brian was part of a squadron that counted the resulting debris and in the end ended up cataloging more than three thousand objects so that one satellite got turned into three thousand things. And that's just the things we can track wasn't space junk big part of the movie gravity you are remembering cracks. Blake from the missile strike has caused a chain reaction hitting other satellites in creating new degrees two thousand eighteen. Hollywood movie it begins. With a chatty George Clooney and Sandra bullock look servicing the Hubble space telescope as and contentedly back at Earth when this huge cloud of debris from missile strike grips through like a communication blackout. It's it's about situation happened north. America's lost their baseball dramatic portrayal. Definitely raise the profile of space junk. Even if the portrayal wasn't very accurate I think maybe I'm a whole at has been a good thing for for the issue even if I might grumble a little bit scientists love to grumble. That's Brian Weeden again gun. He's now the director of program planning for the Secure World Foundation. Thanks a lot about sustainability in space and he says that opening scene gravity doesn't capture the true problem over the breath catches him was portrayed as sort of a a nuclear chain reaction right. There's one event that sets off this series of things that will happen very fast the reality he is sort of the opposite where it's it's like climate change the problem with space junk is it's a long relatively slow accumulation over for decades with a big negative impact down the road. Got It yeah so. Brian says mitigating. The risk of space junk involves convincing people launching satellites it's governments and companies to change their behavior now mindful of the future and maybe have a little inconvenience or a little more cost now to forestall bad things in the future and that's a really difficult argument to make because we humans just aren't engineered to kind of think like that preach especially especially when nothing truly catastrophic has happened yet but space junk is already proving to be problematic in the short term. It's translating into real world. Costs a satellite operators field alerts about potential collisions. Do Do I change my satellites orbit because that costs fuel and that will shorten the lifetime your satellite which which isn't good for the commercials base economy which is Kinda booming right now. Yeah we did that episode. All about how SPACEX is going to put a bunch of satellites up there right you know in the long term. Space trump has the potential to not only collide with manned spacecraft like the International Space Station but threatens satellites at all levels of orbit like those used for imaging and whether data collection election which then could mean. Our climate models are less accurate or we don't have a good way to track the mirrors and that could have negative impacts down the road. Yeah we're GONNA need that data we are. But here's the thing there's no. International Regulation for how satellites should operate. There's only guidelines guidelines yes the guidelines from the Inter Agency Space Debris Coordination Committee for mitigating the risk of debris. Things like Deorbit your satellite after twenty five years by burning it up for bringing it down passive the upper rocket stage meeting vent all the remaining fuel or draining the batteries so it's not exploding so there's less risk for debris countries do this but it's totally voluntary. It's up to each individual nation to implement so until there's greater accountability. Space Junk will continue to be a problem. Okay okay. We've talked about the problem. Give me a solution kwong. Like what is being done to clean up this junk while we're not seeing much in the skies there's has been demonstrations of different cleanup technologies on earth that could be used in space magnets deployable nets harpoons. A little space fishing. Yeah in the orbital see see most of this cleanup technology is being developed in Europe and Japan. But here's the thing we don't know what's the best way to Yank this swiftly moving debris out of orbit it to a place where it can safely burn up. You need a high level of precision to remove that junk without creating more of it and I feel like that would take a lot of money to pull that off. Yes yes so. It was a pretty big deal. When last December the European Space Agency Green Lit the first ever cleanup mission called clear space one which is estimated? It cost over one hundred million dollars and twenty twenty five. The European Space Agency plans to send a cleanup robot to scoop up a chunk of old old European rocket a chunk so they're spending over one hundred million dollars to clean up one piece of space junk. It's a big piece is is more significantly. This hasn't been done before right. Can we agree church. This is kind of progress. It could be a game changer. In the void of space which more about considers an ecosystem that we need to actually try to protect so if these natural pathways become. I'm too polluted to congested. If we can't use these horrible highways anymore then you can say goodbye to these services and capabilities so this is my concern. That's a tragedy of the Commons as it were in their space because of this lack of holistic management of this finite resource for me. It's so easy to see spaces infinite right but the space we use most that houses. Our satellites is actually pretty finite. Emily thank you for taking on this enormous listener listener question. And thank you Rachel Weiss for sending it. Thanks Rachel. This episode was produced by Brett. Hansen edited by lay and fact checked by burly McCoy. Thanks for listening to shortwave from N._P._R...

International Space Station Brian Weeden Inter Agency Space Debris Coor European Space Agency Space Jong Rachel Weiss scientist NASA cluttering US SPACEX US Air Force Mattie George Clooney Hollywood Deorbit Blake Europe
"secure world foundation" Discussed on Short Wave

Short Wave

10:30 min | 2 years ago

"secure world foundation" Discussed on Short Wave

"Okay I get it satellites. They do stuff in space. They're very useful. I can definitely understand why you need some up there but like back hundreds of them. What is going on well to understand that we need to talk about the company space x and it was founded by pay pal? Billionaire Elon. Musk I think it's safe to say it. Revolutionized spaceflight in ways that nobody expected first off. They can land the boosters on their rockets back on earth. Not only can they land these bucer can also reuse them and they're working on raising other parts of the rocket to all of this. Recycling lowers the cost of launch. And that makes spacex Super Valuable Company. But here's the thing. The satellite launch market. Just actually isn't that big aren't that may satellites launched. Each year SPACEX is currently currently valued at around thirty billion dollars but its annual. Revenue is actually only a little fraction of that. If it's going to justify that valuation it's it's going to have to generate an awful lot more revenue in the future. Tim Fairer runs. Timothy Associates a satellite communications consultancy and the only realistic way to to do that in the next few years is to get into the communications business. Communications business like the INTERWEBS. Exactly spacex is doing broadband Internet Internet from space. And it's launching this network of satellites called Starling to provide broadband to pretty much every point on earth and that launched. You heard earlier that that was the latest batch of starling. Satellite's going up now eventually there's going to be thousands of them. Fair says that the broadband markets around a trillion dollars fifty satellites helped spacex grab even a tiny percentage of that. That is big money for this company will finally be rich. That's right launches. Its first darling carrying rocket in May of this year big mission lift off and everything goes super super smoothly and the satellites. They just kind of fan out so they really are just talk. Slowly fanning out like a deck of cards into space but back on earth. There's this aspiring spiring astronomer. My name is Victoria Gorgas. And I'm a public programs. Educator at Lowell Observatory so the Lowell Observatory Torius in Flagstaff Arizona. And I spoke to her back in June after that first launch now she was showing a bunch of visitor some distant galaxies when this train gene of sixty startling satellites goes through the field of her camera. My first immediate reaction was visually kind of cool but my second reaction was men. You can't see a single galaxy because the satellites were just create a bunch of streaks. If you've ever think of get terrible photo bombs what you're telling me it was absolutely terrible photo. Bomb and other astronomers have noticed this to this is going to be a big deal for professional astronomy. How well I want to introduce you to another professional astronomer named Tony Tyson and he is the chief scientist for this really ambitious project called? The large synoptic survey avai telescope limit. They called L. S.. T. For short the idea is to take a picture of the entire sky over and over again every night we will tile the entire visible sky with thousand exposures visiting a thousand different pieces of the sky and this will go on every night for ten years is creating in essence then a digital color motion picture of the universe so the goal here is to see how the universe is changing. You know we think about the stars in the Heavens Evans has been this very static fixed thing but there's a lot of stuff that goes on up there that you just can't catch in this. Very expensive telescope is supposed to see all of it so this telescope is being constructed in Chile and honestly. Tony Tyson wasn't really thinking about satellites. Being launched out of Florida I didn't make a habit of reading the Federal Communications Commission filings for satellites. Why not titillating Had I done that I would have been aware of it anyway so Tyson and is the chief scientists. He's very focused game telescope built. And that's what he's actually working on. When all of a sudden he started seeing these media reports and pictures on twitter streaks exa cross the cameras of amateur astronomers and they were incredibly bright? And you could just see them. You don't need binoculars or telescope or anything and anything's and but he doesn't panic. He's a scientist. So I see waits for the panic. Plenty but go on. Well you know. He tries to be analytical political. Okay so he and his team run a lot of tests and they find. There's no way around it. The satellites are probably GonNa mess up these pictures. So what are they gonNA do. The only real option is to point the telescope where the satellite to aren't so they're going to have to constantly be moving it around to keep the satellites satellites out of the field of view if you knew precisely where they were when they were And could predict where they're going to be L. S. T. can void looking there. But that kind of brings us to another big problem Mattie. Tony isn't the only one who needs to know where all these satellites are. And you know how we keep track of the world satellites. I do not do you want to take a stab on G. GPS they've got no way. The satellites are your yeah. GPS are saddling. That's not gonNA work. What actually happens is the job falls to the Eighteenth Space Control Squadron of the US Air Force and these folks maintain a network of telescopes and radars all over the world that tracks satellites is currently in orbit and they feed that data into a computer? But it's kind of an old computer. The underlying core system came online in the nineteen jeanine. Early kind of Old Gen. That was Brian Weeden. He's a former Air Force officer. Who's now at the Secure World Foundation? which worries about sustainability in space? Do you remember the four eighty six computers. Mattie Neal Jeff they were used for such classic Games as the original Doom mm-hmm Wolfenstein killed a lot of time on that when I was a kid anyway that technology is still being used. Those processors are still still being used to track the world satellites. Oh okay cool. I bet that's adequate. I mean you know to be honest with you. Satellites are kind of predictable and a a lot of ways. So it's up the worst you could do but this computer crunches the numbers. It spits out what are called conjunctions which are basically close calls that could end in MM collisions. At somebody gives out a quick look over and then the system sends out an email email. Essentially says you know your satellite like so and so Predicted to have a close approach with this other space. Object to three or four days into the future and that's it so you can email from space squadron at Hotmail Dot Com. It's like you're going okay. I mean I kind of expected more than that. Like quick taxed or a red alert or something faster baby the guests slack channel. I just something better than that. No no and guess what these emails like all emails. They can get lost lost. Yeah that's what they do in fact. That's what happened a few months back. A European Space Agency satellite was headed towards one of the starling satellites and the agency. He predicted a possible collision. Now they emailed spacex but at least seven. Those emails seem to have gone lost and so did emails from the Air Force. The bottom line is that the space agency ended up. Moving their satellite SPACEX said. Oh sorry are bad you know. It seemed to have been some internal communication Shen problems. They promised to fix it. But honestly we didn't worries the current system just isn't going to work with thousands of new satellites flying around. It's probably the barely early functional minimum to be able to handle this new situation but it is very far from what we should have. And of course if this somehow gets messed up it's a really bad situation. Satellites when they collide they create shrapnel that could threaten other satellites. It's a big mess and there's honestly no way to clean it up. Jeff Jeff this is making me very nervous more nervous than usual. Well let me try and put your mind to these little bit. I mean I spoke to Spacex for this story and I spoke to a rival company called one web which is also launching satellites next year and they make clear to me first of all. They really don't want anything bad to happen. Yeah Jeff nobody wants something bad to happened go on well beyond that they. You know have a financial incentive to make sure bad things don't have makes more comfortable you know spacex is working for other countries. They're launching things to the International Space Station which is in this sort of general area. They don't WanNa mess up the space. So they're doing a couple of things they're trying trying to share their orbital data there quipping these satellites with automated anti collision systems that they say Can prevent you know these sorts of accidents taking other precautions. Now I'm not saying this is going to work out but if something bad happens up there it will be an accident okay. So what about the astronomers. They're in a much tougher. Spot SPACEX has said. They want to work with them. But as I said the satellites reflect light even if you paint them black which spacex is considering doing and you know. We haven't talked about this but there aren't a lot of rules in space. Tony Tyson says there's nothing really astronomers can do to stop this there are yeah no international regulations regarding light pollution from space interfering with optical astronomy. There should be but there just aren't and so it will take along time for that to happen and I think it probably will happen but too late. I think these satellites are going up. Now and in the next shear SPACEX plans to launch hundreds its rival companies going to do the same and Tony thinks that's going to change our sky forever. Okay Jeff Bromfield. Thank you for the story. You're welcome I met by. We're back tomorrow with more shortwave from NPR.

SPACEX Tony Tyson spacex Mattie Neal Jeff scientist Air Force European Space Agency Elon Eighteenth Space Control Squad Super Valuable Company Chile International Space Station Lowell Observatory Jeff Bromfield Heavens Evans Federal Communications Commiss Tim Fairer Jeff Jeff Victoria Gorgas
"secure world foundation" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

11:15 min | 2 years ago

"secure world foundation" Discussed on KCRW

"This is a reversal from the administration's previous position to let the popular parts of the law stand, for instance, the law barring insurers from charging people more for pre existing conditions the threat to ObamaCare with a winning campaign issue for House Democrats, and it's been a source of frustration for Republicans who've tried and failed to repeal it many times to talk more about this. We have Representative Tom Reid of New York. He's a Republican co-chair of the house problem solvers caucus, welcome to all things considered. That's great to be with you. Thanks for having me on. So just so everyone's clear about what we're talking about. The administration is backing a lower court ruling that says the ObamaCare system should be wiped out because the tax plan that you all pass last year took away the penalty for not having health insurance. And if the supreme court rule. Rules that ObamaCare is out. We will have a plan that's far better that ObamaCare. So as this makes its way through the courts does the party have any kind of alternate to ObamaCare right now. Well, you know, I believe we do in the sense of our our solutions being based on bring market pressure to bear into the healthcare arena to drive these costs down, however, one with the votes, right? Because that's been the problem definitely can repeal it. You just can't seem to come up with an alternative. And that's exactly the issue. And that's one of the reasons I I disagree with the position of repealing the entire law through the judicial system through the court system. I'm a Republican who believes that what we should do is proactively address the problems of healthcare and lead the provisions that we agree with the pre existing condition protection, for example, allow that to remain as the laws land and move forward. And I think that's going to be the case, regardless of what happens in the court system, you've called this a poor political move. I I did, you know, not only substantively does it put millions of Americans in harm's way. If the court agrees with the Justice department that the whole law needs to be ruled unconstitutional. I think politically, you know to not have a concrete proposal. No concrete plan on the Republican side that we could roll out with the votes with Republican support to get to the president's desk than signed into law is risky. What's a lot of people are rightfully so and then anxious position and politically that causes us to be in a weaker position in my political opinion. Now, that's just my opinion. But you know, that's why I disagree with this both on political and subsidy basis you said anxious position. Do you feel that Republicans won't be known as the party of healthcare? Right. That the somehow be the party against healthcare. I think we're going to be a party that's going to offer solutions. And I just hope that what we can do is. We have that debate is bring Democrats to the table that wanna be practical that want to actually solve this problem of healthcare costs ever creasing lover hate, the Affordable Care Act is not doing what they promise it would do and that's spring healthcare costs down, and what we should be doing this Republicans and Democrats finding ways to lower drug prices for folks seniors in particular, lower access costs to healthcare overall and show these benefits in patients pocket as opposed to negotiate between carriers in administrators so far the problem. Solvers caucus has not solved any problems, right? I think there's been one major piece of legislation. You guys have sponsored related to opioid abuse. Which was fairly popular. I mean, what's your response to the criticism that this group it gives the appearance of compromise? But doesn't have action especially on an issue like healthcare. Well, fundamentally I fundamentally in. Vigorously disagree with your assessment. We haven't solved many problems. That's just false. What we have done is. We got prison reform criminal Justice reform. We were the voice in the house that got that through the house Senate into the president's desk signed into law. We have changed the house rules as the problem solvers caucus members so uniting together to empower members to bring legislation to the floor changing the rules of the house of representatives is a generational institutional reform that the magnitude of that impact cannot be discounted. So we are we are moving forward with solutions many issues where I wanted to tell you, you know, we're not looking to solve the issues with our proposals. It's our way or the highway we take input. We try to influence the agenda in a positive way. And if a piece of it gets to the finish line war good with that too. It's not all about our ideas is about solving problems with people back home. That's Tom Reid of New York. Republican congressman thank you for speaking with us. All right. Thanks for having me on. There is still a lot of head scratching over what happened. And in the case of jussie smollet. He's the actor who was indicted on sixteen felony counts. He was charged with filing a false police report saying he had been the victim of a racist and homophobic attack. And then suddenly yesterday prosecutors in Cook County, Illinois dropped all the charges in a statement. They said it was in return for small let's agreement to do community service and forfeit his ten thousand dollar bond for more on that decision. We are joined now by Cook County state's attorney Kim, FOX, welcome. Thank you for having me. So this statement from your office yesterday said, quote, we did not exonerate Mr. small, but you dropped all the charges against him. So do you or don't you believe that he committed the crimes he was charged with? So in order for us to offer Mr. small at the opportunity to have conditions in exchange. Dropping targes we have to believe that he committed that class is my ethical obligation to now. Not as someone to do something in condition if I don't believe that they didn't commit a crime. So yes, we believe that the case was. A sufficient case for us to prosecute. Should we have decided to do? So. Okay. So this move to drop all the charges was not connected to any new evidence. That changed your understanding of the facts in the case is that what you're saying. Yes. When I'm speaking. I'm speaking of the office because as you know, and I don't know if we'll get to it. I was accused right. That's from the case. But no, I had nothing to do with the strength of the case. I think what most people don't understand is. We have an ethical obligation to only proceeding cases in courts, where we believe that we have the evidence to meet our burden in this case, it was part of an alternative prosecution program. If you will we cannot offer diversion remedy to someone that we believe is not guilty. Then your office. You've used the phrase alternative prosecution, but a lot of people take issue with the use of that phrase because in most alternative prosecutions, the defendant agrees to community service or drug treatment, the defendant accepts responsibility for what he or she has done, and then the charges get dropped. That is not what happened here with Jesse small. Let heated sixteen hours of community service earlier this week. He forfeited his ten thousand dollar bond, and then he had his charges dropped how is this alternative prosecution? Well, I wanna be clear there's an umbrella of things that fall under alternative prosecution the statute does allow for people to participate in restitution. So the ten thousand dollars which is the maximum allowed under the statute, it does allow them to do community service without having to acknowledge guilt for some of the admission of guilt. And having that on the record incentivizes them to do those other things that you talked about whether it was community service or restitution the statute allows to choose how we want to proceed now yesterday. Chicago mayor Rahm Emanuel had some pretty harsh words about this decision. He called it a whitewash of Justice and suggested that it sent the message that there are two sets of rules when for celebrities and the wealthy and one for everyone else does it concern you that people might have that impression of what happened here. It does concern me because what happened yesterday was the rules that we have for everyone else. The fifty seven hundred people who participated on alternative prosecutions was the same things that we made available to Mr. small it. I mean, I think the question that you smile at. We'll have to answer is he paid the ten thousand dollars which we consider to be restitution. He did the community service but will linger with him whether he was had done. This or been found not guilty by a judge or guilty answering for what he had done, and that will last longer than this court case, or what a potential court case he will have to live with those questions in his credibility his days moving forward. All right. That's kim. Fox. She's the Cook County Illinois state's attorney. Thank you very much. Thank you. India announced today that it has successfully tested a satellite killing weapon. NPR's Jeff Brumfield has more on the test. And what it could mean for the region. Indian prime minister Narendra Modi announced the test in a national address pot up the arch up on our nam unreach-. He says that India now stands tall as a space power VIP. Wondering is a political? Scientists did not he says the test apparently used an Indian made missile to strike an Indian made satellite. They launch a missile from their missile test site and intercepted the satellite, which was in orbit at three hundred kilometers in space three hundred kilometers or one hundred eighty six miles is actually a relatively low orbit. No pun intended is relatively low hanging fruit in terms of a kill. But you know, it is it's only the fourth country that's demonstrated as capabilities the other three are China, Russia and the United States, Brian Weeden. With the secure world foundation. He says there's an anti-satellite arms race happening right now. And there are no arms control treaties to stop it organizations. Like the UN regularly talk about limiting weapons in space. But there really hasn't been any serious discussion about dealing with ground based anti satellite. Weapons. Weeden says the main danger is debris that can be created by hitting a satellite a two thousand seven tests by China's speed thousands of fragments into orbit many are still up there. And so the concern would be that if there's a future conflict, which weaned US, China US, Russia, India and China or India Pakistan that these weapons might be used and lower Thorpe, it might become filled with deadly shrapnel that could knock out other non-military satellites VIP in Narang says he sees another purpose behind India's test today to strike the satellite the Indian military. Used to kind of missile designed to intercept other missiles hitting a satellite is similar to striking and incoming warheads. So the tests may actually be about missile defense. If that's the case, then it's also designed to send a message, they'll say, it's not directed towards any other country. But this is clearly I think relevant to Pakistan India's nuclear-armed rival in the region. Finally, today's test may have a domestic purpose. India will begin national elections in a few weeks time Narang says Modise speech about India is a space power will burnish his reputation as strong on defense. Jeff from NPR news. This is NPR news..

India Representative Tom Reid China NPR New York president Jeff Brumfield Brian Weeden United States co-chair Cook County attorney FOX UN opioid abuse Russia
"secure world foundation" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

11:29 min | 2 years ago

"secure world foundation" Discussed on KQED Radio

"NPR news. This is all things considered. I'm Elsa Chand. I'm Audie Cornish. President Trump says he's going to make the GOP the party of healthcare. But he's told his Justice department to support illegal effort to cancel the Affordable Care Act known as ObamaCare. This is a reversal from the administration's previous position to let the popular parts of the law stand, for instance, the law barring insurers from charging people more for pre existing conditions. The threat to ObamaCare was a winning campaign issue for House Democrats, and it's been a source of frustration for Republicans who've tried and failed to repeal it many times to talk more about this. We have Representative Tom Reid of New York. He's a Republican co chair of the house problem solvers caucus. Welcome to all things considered. That's great to be with you. Thanks for having me on. So just so everyone's clear about what we're talking about. The administration is backing lower court ruling that says the ObamaCare system should be wiped out because the tax plan that you all pass last year away the penalty for not having health insurance. And if the supreme court rules that ObamaCare is out we will have a plan that's far better that ObamaCare. So as this makes its way through the courts does the party have any kind of alternative to ObamaCare right now. Well, you know, I believe we do in the sense of our our solutions being based on bring a market pressure to bear into the healthcare arena drive these costs down. However, I mean one with the votes, right? Is that's been the probably definitely can repeal it. You just can't seem to come up with an alternative. And then that's exactly the issue. And that's one of the reasons I disagree with the position of repealing the entire law through the judicial system through the court system. I'm a Republican who believes that what we should do proactively address the problems of healthcare and lead the provisions that we agree with the pre existing condition protection, for example, allow that to remain as the laws land and move forward. And I think that's going to be the case, regardless of what happens in the court system. You've called this a poor political move. I I did not only substantively does it put millions of Americans in harm's way. If the court agrees with the Justice department that the whole law needs to be ruled unconstitutional. I think politically to not have a concrete proposal of concrete plan on the Republican side that we can roll out with the votes with democrat Republican support to get to the president's desk and signed into law is risky puts a lot of people are rightfully so and then anxious position and politically that causes us to be in a weaker position in my political opinion. Now, that's just my opinion. But you know, that's why I disagree with us both on political and substantive basis. You said anxious position. Do you feel that Republicans won't be known as the party of healthcare? Right. That the somehow be the party against healthcare. I think we're going to be a party that's going to offer solutions. And I just hope that what we can do is. We have that debate is bring Democrats to the table that want to be practical. Now want to actually solve this problem of healthcare costs ever creasing lover hate the Affordable Care Act. It does not doing what they promised. It would do and that's spring healthcare costs down, and what we should be doing is Republicans and Democrats finding ways to lower drug prices for folks seniors in particular, lower access cost to healthcare overall and show these benefits in patients pocket as opposed to negotiated between carriers in administrators so far the problem. Solvers caucus has not solved any problems, right? I think there's been one major piece of legislation. You guys have sponsored related to opioid abuse. Which was fairly popular. I mean, what's your response to the criticism that this group gives the appearance of compromise? But doesn't have action especially on an issue like health care. Fundamentally, I fundamentally vigorously disagree with your assessment, we haven't solved any problems. That's just false. What we have done is. We got prison reform criminal Justice reform. We were the voice in the house. They got through the house Senate into the president signed into law. We have changed the house rules is the problem solvers caucus members so uniting together to empower members to bring legislation to the floor changing the rules of the house of representatives is generational institutional reform that the magnitude of that impact cannot be discounted. So we are we are moving forward with solutions many issues where I wanted to tell you, you know, we're not looking to solve the issues with our proposals. It's our way or the highway we take input we tried to influence the agenda in a positive way. And if a piece of it gets to the finish line war good with that too. It's not all about our ideas is about solving problems with people back home. That's Tom Reid of New York. Republican congressman thank you for speaking with us. All right. Thanks for having me on. There is still a lot of head scratching over what happened in the case of jussie smollet. He's the actor who was indicted on sixteen felony counts. He was charged with filing a false police report saying he had been the victim of a racist and homophobic attack. And then you suddenly yesterday prosecutors in Cook County, Illinois dropped all the charges in a statement. They said it was in return for small let's agreement to do community service and forfeit his ten thousand dollar bond for more on that decision. We are joined now by Cook County state's attorney Kim, FOX, welcome. Thank you for having me. So this statement from your office yesterday said, quote, we did not exonerate Mr. small, but you dropped all the charges against him. So do you or don't you believe that he committed the crimes he was charged with? So in order for us to offer Mr. small at the opportunity to have conditions in exchange dropped the charges. We have to believe that he committed that. Is it is my ethical obligation to not as someone to do something in condition if I don't believe that they didn't commit a crime. So yes, we believe that the case was a sufficient case for us to prosecute. Should we have decided to do? Okay. So this move to drop all the charges was not connected to any new evidence. That changed your understanding of the facts in the case is that what you're saying. Yes. Speaking speaking of the office because as you know, and I don't know if we'll get to it. I was accused right. From the case. But no, I had nothing to do with the strength of the case. I think what most people don't understand is. We have an ethical obligation to only proceed in cases in courts, where we believe that we have the evidence to meet our burden in this case, it was part of an alternative prosecution program. If you will we cannot offer a diversion remedy to someone that we believe is not guilty. And then your office you've used the phrase alternative prosecution, but a lot of people take issue with the use of that phrase because in most alternative prosecutions, the defendant agrees to community service or drug treatment, the defendant accepts responsibility for what he or she has done, and then the charges get dropped. That is not what happened here with Jesse small let he had sixteen hours of community service earlier this week. He forfeited his ten thousand dollar bond, and then he had his charges dropped how is this alternative prosecution? Well, I wanna be clear there's an umbrella of things they fall under alternative prosecution. The statue doesn't allow for people to participate in restitution. So the ten thousand dollars which is the maximum allowed under the statute, it doesn't allow them to do community service without having to acknowledge guilt for some the admission of guilt. And having that on the record incentivizes them to do those other things that you talked about whether it was community service or restitution the statute allows us to choose how we want to proceed now yesterday. Chicago mayor Rahm Emanuel had some pretty harsh words about this decision. He called it a whitewash of Justice and suggested that it sent the message that there are two sets of rules went for celebrities and the wealthy and one for everyone else. Does it concern you that people might have that impression of what happened here? It does concern me because what happened yesterday was the rules that we have for everyone else. The fifty seven hundred people who've participated on alternative prosecutions was the same things that we made available to Mr. small it. I mean, I think the question they just you smile at. We'll have to answer is he paid the ten thousand dollars which we consider to be restitution. He did the community service but will linger with him. Whether he was had. I'd done this or been found not guilty by a judge or guilty answering for what he had done, and that will last longer than this court case or whatever potential court case he will have to live with those questions in his credibility. His days moving forward. All right. That's kim. Fox. She's the Cook County Illinois state's attorney. Thank you very much. Thank you. India announced today that it has successfully tested a satellite killing weapon. NPR's Jeff Brumfield has more on the test. And what it could mean for the region. Indian prime minister Narendra Modi announced the tested, a national address pot up the arch up on our nam unreach-. He says that India now stands tall as a space. Power. Vip hindering is a political. Scientists did not he says the test apparently used an Indian made missile to strike an Indian made satellite. They launch a missile from their missile test site and intercepted the satellite, which was in orbit at three hundred kilometers in space three hundred kilometers or one hundred eighty six miles is actually a relatively low orbit. No pun intended is relatively low hanging fruit in terms of a kill. But you know, it is it's only the fourth country. That's demonstrated set capabilities. The other three are China Russia and the United States Brian Weeden. With the secure world foundation. He says there's an anti-satellite arms race happening right now. And there are no arms control treaties to stop it organizations. Like the UN regularly talk about limiting weapons in space. But there really hasn't been any serious discussion about dealing with ground based anti satellite weapons. We didn't says the main danger is debris that can be created by hitting a satellite a two thousand seven tests by China's speed thousands of fragments into orbit many are still up there. So the concern would be that if there's a future conflict, which weaned US, China US and Russia India and China India and Pakistan that these weapons might be used and lower Thorpe, it might become filled with deadly shrapnel that could knock out other non-military satellites VIP in Narang says he sees another purpose behind India's test today to strike the satellite the Indian military. Used to find a missile designed to intercept other missiles hitting a satellite is similar to striking and incoming warheads. So the tests may actually be about missile defense. If that's the case, then it's also designed to send a message they'll say, it's directed towards any other country. But this is clearly I think relevant to Pakistan India's nuclear-armed rival in the region. Finally, today's test may have a domestic purpose. India will begin national elections in a few weeks time Narang says Modise speech about India is a space power will burnish his reputation as strong on defense. Jeff from phil- NPR news. This is NPR news with K Q weedy traffic.

India Justice department Representative Tom Reid NPR Audie Cornish president Jesse small New York Elsa Chand Jeff Brumfield China President Trump Cook County attorney FOX GOP UN
"secure world foundation" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

11:12 min | 2 years ago

"secure world foundation" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"It's all things considered from NPR news. I'm Audie Cornish. Elsa chang. There is still a lot of head scratching over what happened in the case of Jesse small let he's the actor who is indicted on sixteen felony counts related to allegedly filing a false police report. He said he had been the victim of a racist and homophobic attack. And then yesterday prosecutors in Cook County, Illinois dropped all charges in what they called an alternative prosecution. They noted that small let had done community service and forfeited his ten thousand dollar bond for some reaction. We called former Cook County prosecutor Eric Sussman. I asked him whether he has ever seen anything like this, quite frankly, I haven't seen a reversal bike this by either my former colleagues on the state side or the federal side not without there being some very significant change in the evidence, which according to the state's attorney's office. There hasn't been I wanna talk about this phrase. We keep. Hearing alternative prosecutions what sort of the rationale behind this program. So people can move on with their lives. They don't have charges on their record. So they can get jobs. Exactly, the the rationale behind the program is look people make mistakes reasons in their pass such as if you have a drug addiction, or you're a veteran who has suffered with PTSD those types of issues the way, those work is okay, we will after a certain period of time agreed to drop the charges in exchange. You will do community service. You will go to a drug treatment program. You will do these types of things assuming you do what you're supposed to do. Then we will drop the charges with the prosecution is calling this in terms of an alternative prosecution is not something that was ever envisioned by the legislators when they designed these types of programs or by the courts, it seems like the prosecutors are. Trying to put a round peg in a square hole here by calling this alternative prosecution rather than calling it what it is. Which is we're not comfortable going forward in airing this case in the public now small let has been speaking out. He is denying that he had done anything wrong. He in fact, he said I'm quoting here. I have been truthful and consistent on every single level since day one and his lawyers chiming in and saying look, this is a guy who's a victim. Who was then vilified do you usually see people who receive alternative prosecutions show some contrition some remorse as a prosecutor. You would look for acceptance of responsibility by the prosecutor in a judge would expect that that's why this is not an alternative prosecution. Prosecutors do not just drop charges and allow someone to go out there and say I did nothing wrong. And I was in essence wrongfully charged and on the flip side. I think it's important. To note, the state's attorney's office is out there saying, oh, no. He did do something wrong. We do have evidence. And quite frankly, they need to stop saying that it's improper for them to be saying that at this point about someone that they have dropped the charges against. So it seems like contradictory. Things are happening. Yes. When I was in the Cook County state's attorney's office there were situations where we dropped prosecutions, despite the fact that we believed that someone was guilty. We did those generally under a circumstance where a witness had recanted or evidence that once was available to us is no longer available to us, and what we would say in those circumstances is we do not have sufficient evidence to be able to prove beyond a reasonable doubt that this person committed the crime that again is not what the prosecutors are seeing here what they're saying. Here is we have the evidence. Jesse smollet is guilty. But for reasons that we do not want to share with the public. We're dropping the case. Eric sussman. Former first assistant state's attorney for Cook County, Illinois, he's now a partner at the law firm Reed Smith, thank you so much for joining us today. Thanks salsa. We have reached out to the Cook County state's attorney's office and are waiting to hear back. President Trump says he's going to make the GOP the party of healthcare. But he's told his Justice department to support illegal effort to cancel the Affordable Care Act known as a Bama care. This is a reversal from the administration's previous position to let the popular parts of the law stand, for instance, the law barring insurers from charging people more for pre existing conditions. The threat to ObamaCare was a winning campaign issue for House Democrats, and it's been a source of frustration for Republicans have tried and failed to repeal. It many times to talk more about this. We have Representative Tom Reid of New York. He's a Republican co-chair of the house problem solvers caucus, welcome to all things considered. That's great to be with you for having me on. So just so everyone's clear about what we're talking about. The administration is backing a lower court ruling that says the ObamaCare system should be. Wiped out because the tax plan that you all pass last year took away the penalty for not having health insurance. And if the supreme court rules that ObamaCare is out we will have a plan that's far better than ObamaCare. So as this makes its way through the courts does the party have any kind of alternative to right now. Well, you know, I believe we do in the sense of our our solutions being based on bring a market pressure to bear into the healthcare arena to drive these costs down. However with the votes, right? Is that's been the problem definitely can repeal it. You just can't seem to come up with an alternative. And that's exactly the issue. And that's one of the reasons I I disagree with the position of repealing the entire law through the judicial system to the court system. I I'm a Republican who believes that you know, what we should do is proactively address the problems of healthcare and lead the provisions that we agree with the pre existing condition protection, for example, allow that to remain as the laws land and move forward. And I think that's going to be the case, regardless of what happens in the court system. You've called this a poor political move. I did not only substantively does it put millions of Americans in harm's way. If the court agrees with the Justice, permanent, the whole law needs to be ruled unconstitutional, I think politically to not have a concrete proposal. No concrete plan on the reply. Side that we could roll out with the votes with democrat Republican support to get to the president's signed into law is risky puts a lot of people are rightfully so and then anxious position and politically that causes us to be a. A weaker position in my political opinion. Now, that's just my opinion. But you know, that's why I disagree with this both on political and substantive basis. You said anxious position. Do you feel that Republicans won't be known as the party of healthcare? Right. That the somehow be the party against healthcare. I think we're going to be a party that's going to offer solutions. And I just hope that what we can do is. We have that debate is bring Democrats to the table that want to be practical that want to actually solve this problem of healthcare costs ever creasing lover hate the Affordable Care Act. It does not doing what they promised. They would do and that's spring healthcare costs down, and what we should be doing this Republicans and Democrats finding ways to lower drug prices for folks seniors in particular, lower access cost to healthcare overall and show these benefits in patients pocket as opposed to negotiated between the carriers and administrators so far the problem. Solvers caucus has not solved any problems, right? I think there's been one major piece of legislation guys have sponsored related to opioid abuse. Which was fairly popular. I mean, what's your sponsor the criticism that this group gives the appearance of compromise? But doesn't have action especially on an issue like healthcare a fundamentally I fundamentally. Vigorously disagree with your assessment. We haven't solved any problems. That's just false. What we have done is. We got prison reform criminal Justice reform. We were the voice in the house. They got that through the house Senate into the president's desk signed into law. We have changed the house rules is the problem solvers caucus members so uniting together to empower members to bring legislation to the floor changing the rules of the house of representatives is generational institutional reform that the magnitude of that impact cannot be discounted. So we are we are moving forward with solutions many issues, and we're not we're we're I wanted to tell you, you know, we're not looking to solve the issues with our proposals one way or the highway. It's our way or the highway. We take input we tried to influence the agenda in a positive way. And if a piece of it gets to the finish line war good with that too. It's not all about our ideas is about solving problems with people back home. That's Tom Reid of New York. Republican congressman thank you for speaking. With us. All right. Thanks for having me on India announced today that it has successfully tested a satellite killing weapon. NPR's Jeff Brumfield has more on the test. And what it could mean for the region. Indian prime minister Narendra Modi announced the test at a national address pot up the arch up on our nam unthreatened. He says that India now stands tall as a space power VIP hindering as a political scientists to not he says the test apparently used an Indian made missile to strike an Indian made satellite. They launch a missile from their missile test site and intercepted the satellite, which was in orbit at three hundred kilometers in space three hundred kilometers or one hundred eighty six miles is actually a relatively low orbit. No pun intended is relatively low hanging fruit in terms of a kill. But you know, it is it's only the fourth country that's demonstrated capabilities. The other three are China Russia and the United States Brian Weeden with the secure. World foundation. He says there's an anti-satellite arms race happening right now. And there are no arms control treaties to stop it organizations. Like the UN regularly talk about limiting weapons in space. But there really hasn't been any serious discussion about dealing with ground based anti satellite weapons. Weeden says the main danger is debris that can be created by hitting a satellite a two thousand seven test by China's speed thousands of fragments into orbit many are still up there. So the concern would be that if there's a future conflict between US China US, Russia, India and China or India Pakistan that these weapons might be used and lower Thorpe, it might become filled with deadly shrapnel could knock out other non-military satellites VIP Narang says he sees another purpose behind India's test today to strike the satellite. The Indian military used to. Missile designed to intercept other missiles hitting a satellite is similar to striking an incoming warheads. So the tests may actually be about missile defense. If that's the case, then it's also designed to send a message. They'll say it's directed towards any other country, but this is clearly relevant.

prosecutor Cook County attorney India Jesse smollet Eric Sussman Representative Tom Reid Illinois China Audie Cornish New York NPR president Elsa chang US PTSD Brian Weeden UN
"secure world foundation" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:20 min | 2 years ago

"secure world foundation" Discussed on KCRW

"We continue with the news right here on KCRW, ten minutes to seven this is all things considered from NPR news. I'm Ari Shapiro. And I'm Audie Cornish. President Trump signed a directive this afternoon to create a brand new space force. He envisions an entirely new military branch that would ensure as he puts it American dominance in space NPR national security correspondent Greg Murray looks at how the concept is being received President Trump likes to boast that the US has the world's strongest military on land at sea end in the air. But what about space? It's the future is where we're going. I suspect whether we like it or not that's where we're going. It's space. That's the next step, and we have to be prepared. The president spoke in the Oval Office. He signed a directive calling on the Pentagon draft legislation to create a space force would be the sixth branch of the military, but some are questioning the cost and the necessity. The air force already has something called the space command unless there is something that causes a massive expansion in the number of military personnel. The amount of money we spend on space that would justify department. I honestly can't see that. Brian Weeden is a former air force officer who's now with the nonprofit secure world foundation. He does think shakeup is in order. The biggest problem people identify is at the air force has not giving enough priority space, the space force would be part of the air force at least initially, but congress has to approve. It and it's not clear how much support Trump's proposal has especially among Democrats who control the house the last time. Congress created a new military branch was nineteen forty seven when it established the air force. But Trump's ideas backed by those who say the US military needs to do more in space and hate to use the word, real adversary. But certainly deleting threat to US space capabilities it's China John Loxton is professor emeritus at the space policy institute at George Washington University. I think China's developed a capability to attack our forces in order to defend itself. So whether you call that offensive or defensive they have the ability to wage an attack against U S space assets, the air force already handles missile warning systems, satellite communications, and GPS systems and other branches of the military have their own missions in space. The president's space force would in court. Operate them. All and get a seat on the joint. Chiefs of staff. America must be fully equipped to defend our vital interests. Our adversaries are training forces and developing technology to undermine our security space in a memo last fall air force secretary, Heather Wilson estimated it would take five years and thirteen billion dollars to get the space force up and running Greg. Mary NPR news, Washington documentaries are having a moment at Sundance last month net. Flicks reportedly paid ten million dollars for knock down the house. It broke the film festivals documentary sales record. The film follows the campaigns of four female congressional candidates, including Alexandria, Akasa Cortez of New York. I am proud.

President Trump US space policy institute president Audie Cornish NPR Ari Shapiro congress KCRW Greg Murray Brian Weeden Mary NPR China Akasa Cortez Alexandria Washington Oval Office New York Flicks
"secure world foundation" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:17 min | 2 years ago

"secure world foundation" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"All things considered from NPR news. I'm Ari Shapiro. Audie cornish. President Trump signed a directive this afternoon to create a brand new space force. He envisions an entirely new military branch that would ensure as he puts it American dominance in space NPR national security correspondent, Greg Mary looks at how the concept is being received President Trump likes to boast that the US has the world's strongest military on land at sea end in the air. But what about space, it's the future? It's where we're going. I suspect whether we like it or not that's where we're going in space. That's the next step, and we have to be prepared. The president's spoke in the Oval Office as he signed a directive calling on the Pentagon to draft legislation to create a space force would be the sixth branch of the military, but some are questioning the cost and the necessity. The air force already has something called the space command unless there is something that causes a massive expansion in the number of military personnel amount of money, we spend on space that would justify new department. I honestly can't see that. Brian Weeden is a former air force officer who's now with the nonprofit secure world foundation. He does think a shakeup is in order. The biggest problem people identify is that the air force has not giving enough priority to space. This space force would be part of the air force at least initially, but congress has to approve it. And it's not clear how much support Trump's proposal has. Especially among Democrats who control the house the last time. Congress created a new military branch was nineteen forty seven when it established the air force. But Trump's ideas backed by those who say the US military needs to do more in space. I hate to use the word, really adversary. But certainly the leading threat to US space capabilities China, John Loxton is professor emeritus at the space policy institute at George Washington University. I think China's developed the capability to attack our forces in order to defend itself. So whether you call that offensive or defensive they have the ability to wage an attack against U S space assets, the air force already handles missile warning systems, satellite communications, and GPS systems and other branches of the military have their own missions in space. The president's space force would incorporate them all and get a seat on the joint chiefs of staff. America must be fully equipped to defend our vital interests. Our adversaries are training forces and developing technology to undermine our security and space in a memo last fall air force secretary, Heather Wilson estimated it would take five years and thirteen billion dollars to get the space force up and running Greg. Mary NPR news, Washington documentaries are having a moment at Sundance last month net. Flicks reportedly paid ten million dollars for knock down the house. It broke the film festivals documentary sales record. The film follows the campaigns of four female congressional candidates, including Alexandria, Cossio Cortez of New York. In america..

President Trump US space policy institute president NPR Audie cornish Ari Shapiro congress Greg Mary America Mary NPR Brian Weeden China New York Cossio Cortez Alexandria Washington Flicks
"secure world foundation" Discussed on Global News Podcast

Global News Podcast

02:35 min | 4 years ago

"secure world foundation" Discussed on Global News Podcast

"You know it's like smoking it's like tobacco industry and this is the new tobacco industry in china it does seem extraordinary though that parents are sending their children to these these boot camps met many of which looked we run a very militry lines the kids are not allowed to leave surely parents could just switch the internet off kootenai i guess the touch the difference cultural difference between i guess in the western in china over there most children they do not really play at home in front of their parents often find excuse saying okay i'm going to play with my mate go outside and find the internet cafe and just spends hours and hours hours they're apparently he was ready to drop out of school and not even thinking about trying for the university and those were things in in a very confucius society the chinese parents just cannot tolerate howard zang from the bbc's chinese service we all want better internet connections and several companies are planning to launch vast numbers of satellites known as mega constellations to improve global coverage but experts fear that thousands of extra objects in space will increase the danger of collisions and create dangerous daybreak jane o'brian reports millions of pieces of manmade trash cheryl ready orbiting the earth some a tiny while others at large enough to be seen but the telescope that all pose a risk to satellites and space kroft brian wedin at the secure world foundation says the planned launch of mega constellations clusters of satellites about the size of the taster would increase the chance of collisions if you're going to go from 1500 satellites to potentially sixteen eighteen thousand satellites in the matter of a decade that's going to take the current problems we have with knowledge tracking objects book predicting close approaches and preventing collisions and amplified by an order of magnitude or more so how do we ramp up our capabilities to be able to deal with that problem before it really gets way he is right now the more the international space station were briefly evacuated today to a russian escaped space shuttles i as when a piece of space debris space junk came to normally the iss is able to move out of the way when debris spotted which it's done twenty two time sentence 1998 launched this time there wasn't time the move.

china howard zang bbc iss jane o'brian brian wedin