35 Burst results for "Secondary School"

Immigrant pride in Britain

Jonny Gould's Jewish State

04:54 min | Last week

Immigrant pride in Britain

"Trevor Phillips talked about a sense of mission creep in diversity and heroin Hera Dane distinguished between power and influence, arguing that the trump and Johnson were in power. Many of our institutions were influencing against him. Scroll back after this episode to hear the first part of this twin podcast on Johnny Gould's Jewish state. Today Catherine, verbal on the unifying goal of Britishness for those of US lucky to live here and Nyah philomen Iman on how humanity and its possibilities should always be counted about identity. Listen for those who are willing to listen. This is Johnny. Gold's Jewish state of Richard Kim joked with me. The Jews actually more patriotic than the general population. I mean most Jews. I've met in this country. Patriotic, the most non rights hunter, yes, and if you you just you just take for example in a synagogue on Friday A. Press for the Queen and their press listeners now. Donna very much doubt you'll find those in the church. Of England and multi million selling record producer Trevor Horn quoted Leviticus Jewish faith, it says seek the Fortune on. Successive the city to which you have. No I think that's I think that's the way. That's what they do. Jews try and make things better that. The country and and they you know the gross like you separate religion. You need them to help with an. Amazing Resource. You know scroll back for these two amazing views earlier. You'll have expressed today which chimed from within Jewish family. Catherine Bob I'll saying came to prominence ten years ago. When at that is conservative? Party conference speaking support the Party's education policies. She slated a culture of excuses of low standards are see bureaucracy and the chaos of classrooms because it keeps poor children poor. After huge rows and barriers put up in front of her. As she confronted a prevailing culture, she sets up the Michaela Secondary, school in Wembley. Her pupils read five. Shakespeare plays in three years that told a culture of kindness which includes helping each other and their families and offering adults there seats on buses in the tube. She also has an incisive word about how black a nation kids are subtly told, then, not British. Do you feel you've had to prove yourself more than most because of your philosophies on education? Yes we take a slightly different way of doing things. God behavior got teaching methods got the ethos, and so it's been a bit of A. Bite to persuade people that this is an option that's worth trying may now with our outstanding off stead, and with our grizold Jesus last year. It seems pretty obvious that this is a a valid way of doing things. But when we started, it was far from being valid. People thought we were a bit crazy frankly to to be doing what we were doing. There is a prevailing wind in education. Still blows against you, Catherine sued. You still are people. They're trying to trip you up all the time. If there are any sort of dropping of standards, I know, that will be disciplined, standards are central to your ethos, but but there's a lot of people not on your side. Yeah, that's true although I have to say many of them have owned by the wayside over the years and not I do feel in a way. Many of them have just given up because we kept on going and it is hard to. To argue against the school that is giving city children chances that they wouldn't otherwise have had. That's teaching them so well. They're you know they really are just defying all the expectations, and also we get over six hundred businesses every year. Mainly Teachers Knoll is teachers. Say My goodness. They're so well behaved. They're so curious there so independently minded. They're so nice, you know. The children are just nice, so when when you got anecdotal evidence like that and you've also got kind of data that shows that we're doing very well. It is hard to argue against it so. People who do argue against it tends to just be. Personal attacks. You know they just don't like me or they don't like. Is They? Don't like school. Stands for an tend to say things like all. No, not at school again. They don't really have any off because there are no arguments, so they dislike as without. Prejudice basically

Catherine Bob Michaela Secondary Johnny Gould Richard Kim Party Johnson Trevor Phillips United States Heroin Trevor Horn Iman Donna Producer Wembley Shakespeare Leviticus
Donald Trump says US will never close as coronavirus cases near 3 million

Ben Shapiro

01:01 min | 3 weeks ago

Donald Trump says US will never close as coronavirus cases near 3 million

"They're They're surging surging and and much much of of the the United United States. States. But But President President Trump Trump today today said said that that the the U. U. S S has has the the situation situation under under control. control. Now Now we're we're open open and and we we want want to to stay stay open and we will stay open without clothes. You will put out the fires as they come out. I call a members and fires and whatever you wanna call him, but I think it's very important to know what we've done. We've saved literally hundreds of thousands of lives. The president spoke at a ceremony to announce that he wants all U. S schools to reopen this fall. Opening a lengthy roundtable discussion on safe ways to get kids back in classrooms. President Trump downplaying any risks to youngsters health We want to reopen the schools Everybody wanted the moms wanted the dads wanted the kids wanted. It's time to do it. You know, our mortality rate is right now, at a level that people don't talk about. Down 10 fold Ideas center around elementary and secondary schools, holding one week of in person sessions for half a class while the other half virtual learns and then vice versa. Bob

President Trump Trump President Trump United States BOB U. U. S U. S
Patrick's Coming Out Story

Coming Out Stories

12:05 min | 3 months ago

Patrick's Coming Out Story

"Come out to hear from Patrick who's now a successful Mike artist but he got relentlessly bullied for being gay or growing up in Northern Ireland. I identify as male And I I have an interesting journey with my gender I think because I started doing drag or Soy's drag when I was about fifteen stain kind of progressed. I moved to Manchester when I was eighteen on. I pretty much was wearing full. Face to makeup wakes clothes everything every single day. I think I am used to chester. Oh God I can do this. I'm free to to wear as much as I want. And where did you come from that? You can wear what you want. I grew up in Northern Ireland so I could and I did wanted by think I was always trying to be little bit. Respectful of my parents particularly my mom because she was a little bit uncomfortable at the time about me wearing makeup and bought me wearing weeks and and looking of the Yes. I moved to Manchester and it all sort of exploded e kind of all sort of mixed together. It wasn't really drag. I've never really done to the performances. I tried failed dressing. Dressing up was dressing up and still is for me now and I kind of stopped doing it for a very long time as my career is make posits kicked off. I didn't really have any time. I think there's a good three or four years where I didn't put any makeup on at all but now I'm at a point where I wouldn't even know what it's called I. I'm a man who is gay who likes to wear addresses woman. Sometimes but I don't see myself as a drag queen but juicy self is somewhere on the sort of gender fluid spectrum may be I guess so by just don't feel like home fits with me if you turn because everyone likes putting terms things. These days I would say gender fluid would be appropriate up you would prefer gender. Fluid suspended male. I don't really care. That's the thing that when people these conversations like I think about a lot but I don't ever think about all. This is the term that identify with the most. I'm just I'm just. I'm Patrick and some does I like to lady some days. I looked like a man. Will you go out shopping or go out and make you might just as woman? No I'm on? I think that's probably why the the line is in a sense. I'm why wouldn't see myself as being gender fluid for me? Gender fluidity is someone who I probably would have been more like eight nine years ago when I would go out house with makeup on and with silly outfits on in fact my what am I. University lecturer actually brought me into her office. University and asked me should be cool. You anything different remain is that do we give you a different name? Which would like different pronoun or anything? I thought no and I thought what she questions to ask my. I'm just wearing these clothes. I didn't understand why. Why did he was different? But looking back then I was definitely much more gender fluid whereas these days it's more just address up that's quite progressive really to serve. She was a lovely woman. What's your pronouns? So it's the right way about. Isn't it to actually ask the pers- yeah definitely definitely? I really appreciate. That looking back was a lovely thing of Helen. Do well done Helen so looking back. Can you remember the first time that you may be questioned your sexuality then to know why I think I always questioned bisexuality? Once I knew what sexuality was I knew I didn't fit into the normal. I remember having imaginary friends as really young boy and I always wanted them to be boys. I always wanted to be called Tom. Which is really weird because if my flatmate listen to this my flatmates called so I don't want him to think I have a thing for the boy called Tom. I always want to hug them. I always wanted them to be close. I remember it being because they were boys. We have family video of me when I was a kid. Really really young and our next door neighbor. Child I'm running around child's Charles like calling out for him because I was probably obsessed with and then I think I grew up and I realized what sexuality was. It was like. This is always something that I've thought I've always been attracted to boys and also the messages we getting about people that were male light boys of your school in. Belfast was yes I went to school. It's an all boys grammar. School in Belfast. Very up at south one of these kind of really wheaties for school. Everything around may was telling me that everything that I was into everything I was interested was wrong messages. Where you're hearing. I think proved very young age. I was always some other was like the victim of bullying in a sense. A growing up in Northern Ireland with a British accent With Army family and Camp. So you you were bullied for being English Bison Primary School it was always English and getting a degree because of my accents and then when I went to secondary school turned into A. You're you're gay. Boy Gameboy busted. Dumbo buster bums. The walls was always a catchphrase. That was said when people woods when I would walk down there the corridor. And how old were you I mean throughout secondary school. So from twelve onwards funny because I came out and primary school do yes. It is well. This is an early one. I asked boy to be my boyfriend in Palm. He's GonNa last year of Primary School. I come into how all that would have. Been eleven eleven. The education system is a little bit different Nolan. I think he leave a year or something later. I can't really remember that I recalled. I was very good friends with him and I found him. I won't spend my boyfriend so I asked him. I remember what he said. I gotcha I gave them a note. I remember I remember sort of slipping him tonight. What he boyfriend but I recall what happened after that however I do recall giving him a phone call after school to talk to him because we would every night and his mom picks up the phone and I said speech Cowan please. Is this Patrick. So yes said well. I've heard about this. Fancying thing the what Jamaican and she said. I need to stop disgusting for how this is coming from light. This boy's mum and this is probably one of the youngest coming has gazed. I've heard you were ten or eleven. You try to get a boyfriend boyfriend then. The mother intervene jess and that was kind of that was that because I I remember being on the phone. Remember sitting on my mom's bad being on the phone shutting down the phone. That may be thinking. Oh this is wrong because I didn't really think anything wrong. I guess at the time apartments quite just wants to boyfriend but he obviously thought something wrong with it because he went straight out his mother. I so God what happened with the friendship. I mean that was the end of primary school more or less. Oh I can't quite recall whether or not we stayed friends. We probably did stay friends but when I went to different school you know secondary school so I didn't speak to him again and then there was one boy from my primary school went to grammar school with mate and I remember saying. Don't tell anyone like about the stuff that was kind of kept hush hush and then he's not telling people but don't but not until like our second year of secondary school and then everything's coming out and then I saw his playing to little bit. Once I came to terms with my sexuality and I was afraid of. I think I've sort of jumped straight into it in the sense that I had a boyfriend. I think had my first boyfriend when I was fourteen. Thirteen fourteen and he lived around the corner from my house. So we get the school bus with each other so you did you ever have any girlfriends it right into the boys in primary school. I have so many girlfriends yoga. Yeah in fact. I really love laser device. Full circle moment recently. That my my my main girlfriend primary school I have makeup for recently mostly. Nice but they would just like playing Casey chases and primary school and yeah. It's a secondary school and I had my first boyfriend when I was about fourteen and the dramas about cost because I actually joined the cadet force and my my secondary school And he was one of the one of the sergeants and he was older he must have been bus eighteen when I was about fourteen to. Everybody obviously found out about what was that reaction. Then if they like previously recalling Ubembe boy and abusing you because you are and then they found that you actually had a boyfriend in school and the school in the catas- when I think about those that are times I think buckle news stories. You know. It wasn't all that bad. I got grief everybody. Everybody has something to say. I was ostracized from everybody apart from my very very close knit friends. But I didn't ever quite lucky in a sense I never have enough. I didn't get that much abuse a on me although to be ostracized by the majority of your school colleagues. It's got to be very alienating. Very lonely place to be as well. I think actually is probably the most difficult people some of the teachers to accept or not so. I remember one of my house shooter. Whoever he was obviously being be is to shave my eyebrows off and draw them on again. Of course course I getting a lot of people about and he looks at you. You're not really helping yourself are you. And that was his way of dealing with them. Just GonNa Suck my teeth now just very much that I think about. There's so many stories from my school The head of pastoral care at my school he told my best friend. My best friend was crazy like a piece of artwork and included a picture of the two of us in makeup and to be pulled birth bus into into the school officer. Talk about the fact that we harangue makeup in this picture and he's holding my friend Anton. The Envy's children turned out to be. He gave that he would assign them not the head of Pastoral Care School. Well he's in the wrong job. I know awful. Man Said no support tool then from anyone in terms of authority figures. Yeah but I think very much. My my school wasn't a great place to be gay and with what was this. The nineties noughties The northeast expansively. Brezler not a Northern Ireland so back in in the way I mean. They've only just got marriage. Equality abortion right. Yeah exactly Hallelujah. Thank God but they're so backward. I think of my Johnny was coming out with a little bit easier than of my friends because my family are English. Not to say the Ron. Lots of very supportive very open Irish people because of course there are but I guess my family went as religious especially my dad and I didn't really have thought that traumatic past of of living in Northern Ireland. So what stage did you come out to your parents. Bearing in mind the trying to get boyfriend at the age of ten in progress and then got one by fourteen. I'm guessing he came out quite early to them you well. I came out to my Mama earlier. My Dad moved away to Luxembourg when I was about twelve. I think he moved off work. So this basically he. He wasn't really on the on the scene so I think I was about sixteen came onto him by counts. My Mum probably about twelve thirteen and it was a conversation again. Sat on the same bad. I phoned Calgary from. I couldn't say the words I remember trying to say. I think I'm gay and not being able to say gay and saying I I tell you but I caught sight yet and Saying oh I don't know and then going through listen different questions than eventually. We got to that. She's like Oh you gay. Yes yes let's sets and okay right. I think you're a bit young. So maybe we'll have this conversation when you're older okay. So then every now and then it was a diesel thinking guy and that was. That was pretty much for my mom. I mean my mom was always quite supportive. It's my my older sister is guy I was. My sister had the real hard time coming out so I could. So she came out. I know she came out later. I came up so see is five years older than me. Okay I think she was about nineteen twenty when she came out and it was traumatic. My mom would always say my gay people. I might like gay man. I just can't stand spins. And that was her catchphrase and she's very very much the complete opposite of that now. My sister's marriage has a little boy. My mom loves my sister. I think that's just Hearn prejudice her and

Primary School Northern Ireland Patrick English Bison Primary School Manchester Belfast Pastoral Care School Chester Helen TOM Family Video I. University Lecturer Charles Calgary Nolan Cowan Palm Hearn Jess Ubembe
"secondary school" Discussed on 10 10 WINS

10 10 WINS

01:42 min | 3 months ago

"secondary school" Discussed on 10 10 WINS

"Going to secondary school class of twenty twenty my name is Ryan Reynolds I'm a former student of kids line I'm an actor and writer producer shares mixed in with jokes and self deprecating humor Reynolds also told the kids practicing empathy was more important than anything else they can do in this world oh boy more hearing on the news so much I myself that an hour ago we had an incident where one of the employees stepped onto the Cajun insight into her arm on I can give you your money back or I can give you a rain check hi Joe exotic featured in tiger can also currently in prison now in talks to become the face of a new fashion line yeah that's why I said oh boy TMZ reporting the streetwear brand dangerous wants him to be the face of the new line called revenge and literally would include his face on T. shirts hoodies and of course yes there be Tigers and their two wins news time seven thirty nine our headlines and top stories everything you need to know this Saturday morning coming up next mother's day this year is going to feel a lot different than what we've all been used to but with one eight hundred flowers dot com no matter what the distance is between you there's still a way to make every mom feel loved when it matters most right now when you order early at one eight hundred flowers you can get thirty assorted two lives for thirty nine ninety nine with a limited delivery windows you need to lock in your order early to order go to one eight hundred flowers dot com slash listen that's one eight hundred flowers dot com slash listen all of the news coverage with none of the news bias from new York's number one news station.

Mia Ives-Rublee: Talk to us, not at us.

The Brown Girls Guide to Politics

04:03 min | 3 months ago

Mia Ives-Rublee: Talk to us, not at us.

"What was the moment when you decided that activism. What's for you? You know count. I wouldn't say there's a specific moment. I got to see sort of how. My parents really advocated for me when I was A and public schools and you know unfortunately when I was in public school that was right around when the Americans with disabilities act came online and was signed and schools sort of scrambling to you know. Update things Even though the idea had been out there the Rehab Act All of those were out there but you know schools were still sort of scrambling to meet the needs and they're still scrambling to meet the needs of disabled students across the country. And you know I got to see sort of how. My parents spent a lot of time. Just advocating for my needs and then eventually When I was in high school seeing them advocate for other folks needs and I think that helped show me the importance of finding your voice and being very aware of how systems work and how to use systems to gain access to gain equality across the board. And so you know. I really started to use that when I was in college because I suddenly found out that you know the idea doesn't cover you in college and you become the student without a lot of rights and a lot of without a lot of the combinations that you sort of presumptively thought that you had one year in and secondary school and so you know. I think that was sort of a time that is starting to find my voice and went to the University of Illinois and You know began working on immigration issues around. Lgbtq issues around campus rape In sexual soul issues and specifically around A mascot that I believed was racist Chief Lineup Wick Spent some time. advocating As a student activists there And we were eventually able to get rid of it so you know. I think there are different points in time that I really began finding my voice and you know I worked as a vocational rehabilitation counselor here in Chapel Hill Carbonaro and got to really know a lot of the details on how systems can function and then not function for for people on the ground and you know got really frustrated there and decided to leave that job because I was getting burnt out and I'm seeing a lot of my clients coming back. You know without jobs without a lot of hope and just really struggling day-to-day to try and find a job and maintain job. And so you know. Each part of my life had have really given me a lot of understanding of of systems and helped me learn to empathize with a lot of different issues. And you know eventually you know it. All seemed to come to a head win. This current administration came into power. And you know gotten sort of dovan headlong into the women's March and by that point I was like you know. I've been to protest before been to these events where they don't think of disabled people they don't think of women color they don't think of a lot of things and that tends to lead us out and leave us vulnerable. And that's why really decided to to just like in you know headlong and to activism after that. Oh I love your Surrey. That's so

Chapel Hill Carbonaro Surrey University Of Illinois Rape
World Class Beatboxer vs AI with Harry Yeff, Artist in Research at Nokia Bell Labs

Inside VOICE

08:44 min | 3 months ago

World Class Beatboxer vs AI with Harry Yeff, Artist in Research at Nokia Bell Labs

"Would I fell in love with using my voice to compose and write quite young age age of fourteen and it was for a few reasons like I was actually in a really musically rich environment in terms of early electric Techno grime which has shown that will kind of exploding in London. When I was growing up and it was the ability to instantly Ri- obviously anyone that speaks uses. The voice sings the very established. This idea of singing Medea or doing some light. Percussion just to write. I immediately for the fact that I could not just do some light. Mcconnell sing I could start to internalize music theory. I could start writing beats and white phoned ideas using just my voice. I became absolutely obsessed with the instances. I just didn't have to wait to get to my instruments enough to wait to get to a computer. I just thought it's a composed on right in a way that no other tool or instrumentation really automate and it just continued to grow from there and the goal was to break boundaries and Jonathan had ownership over something new. Did you take lessons? Are you just were self taught you watch videos like? How does somebody even learn how to be box? No it was very strange serendipitous story. It was pretty youtube. Which is crazy. And I seen some like elements of sound making before because it's so important to just like establish people cool so of composition with voice. They can go to be boxing. Sound making and voice our oldest humanity itself. It's not a new thing like to compose and write with. Sounds with your voice has been a a music making for as long as music as existed and it was the experimentation and seeing vocalist Kinda go beyond traditional techniques. I found it so fascinating but in terms of like applying it to Electric Music because I wasn't really a hip hop head. It was more about the experimental of music making. That was something that just happened almost by chance and it came very naturally to me so no lessons no guidance. No help just kind of an obsessive desire to make music instantly and not feel like I have to rely on anyone else. That was the main thing I didn't like feeling like I had to go through my secondary school to access to my drums. And I had to kind of go to friends. Houses to use like Music Quinn and light laptops. Because it's something that I personally didn't have access to myself. And it was the impatience the impulsiveness to always creates or he's made is what made me so focused and I just love story from the very beginning the obsessive nece and the joy it brought me it started with just myself but then people started to react around me in produces tied to kind of say like how you making the sound. How you doing the sound design and people wanting to dance as well and that was one of the key moments to me is. My friends would dance to me boxing. Yet from there it's just continued to grow spiral out of control in quite an exciting way. Yes I love that. I think it's great when people are self taught and you're based on your own creativity and one of the things I know you like to say is that our voices are most precious tool and that we must give the world of voice. What does that mean to you outside of my own musical compositions? I believe there's a lot of communicative thinking and pushing of how we actually connect with each other. That directly connects to our voice. The voice is synonymous with the human condition. It's such a fundamental to- used in our day today again. If we leave music behind there is an issue that many people don't feel like they have a voice. Many people do not feel like that. Is THEY HUNT? And they also feel like the rounds of their expression is established. Like this sort like a glass ceiling on everyone and I really believe that to experiment with the voice to push off always as far as we can is to push the mind as far as we can is to push human condition as far as we kind of is the push consciousness as far as we come. I think that there's a universally accessible expressive nece. That is there but his massively untapped and all of the what I do outside of music on installation lectures working with technology is just the fundamental expiration to trying make people see the voice in the new line and the aim is to not make them saying perform we'll make music is to literally make them express and feel alive and voice can do to express and the Catharsis of expression through the voice. It wakes people up and that goes way beyond arts music. It's it's humanity so it sounds like a huge mission but I sat on a three full years ago to explore the narratives around voice the innovation around voice Beyond music making and it's so insane the benefits you see innovation. You see in new ideas around. The Voice of how universally accessible is something that everybody has they. Don't push it to the Max so I WANNA change global perspective on voice and in doing that hopefully give the world voice make people feel Hud make them express and make them shaft simple idea on a huge scale. Yes we've spoke the first sign a few weeks ago and you said that. I got excited except like off. That is so much of what I personally believe. It's a personal goal that I have and I'm curious how you know you're working to kind of do this. You had done something at a wired magazine event where you had showed you had made some sound and then on an image it kind of created these like sculpture like art pieces which is very cool and you told the story about how a young girl did it and she got so excited to kind of see her voice in a visual perspective and she got louder and excited to kind of share her voice and I was like. Oh I love this story in the important summit so yeah I love free to talk about how. You're kind of working to do this on a larger scale before we get into the technology piece because I do think voices more than just waste technology. It is about connecting us. Making people feel heard so. Yeah I'd love for you to talk more about how you're doing that on a large scale. I think does really make sense to kind of speak about that story. And because that was the beginning of this like the scope where I've obviously crepe directed and been involved with a number of different tech based creative projects and that project you mentioned that it was a project called C. Sounds and is was in collaboration with the mill. Who's incredible post production company in New York and Creative Director Back Rama? Alan and we had a conversation at South by South West. Where this idea that every voice is precious. Every voice is like a fingerprint. And it's like a Red Joel and that time. The voice is like a red jewel started to such in conversations more and more so we assist them which allowed people to digitally sculpt with voices precious metals and structures. So think of it almost like a broach or very read natural structure. You can build that with your voice missing different tones and textures and it will create this Completely unique structure and they're absolutely stunning. Obviously it's hard to communicate over Poku The project manifest installation. We invite the public to comand. Use the peace and this young girl that you mentioned it completely. Change my approach to augmentation working with technology but it was a puff. It's example of how the voice can lead to a flowering of oneself can lead to an opening of expressive interests and capacity. That can literally change the way you move the way you feel about yourself your confidence because she was extremely shy. I cannot say she was like a tiny little quantity attached to a bothers leg when she walked up to the peace of the microphone. She said these tiny utterances debt and she saw those sounds become something that looked physical on the wool these kind of growing crystal structures and when she saw that she made that connection and she started to shout and scream eventually law and again. She augmented with this tool which encouraged her to expressing tests have voice and she flowered and that was the beginning and this was clean case study of how experimentation an untraditional ways of exploring ourselves can lead to an introspection which she's so

Music Quinn London RI Youtube Medea Mcconnell Jonathan New York South West Alan Director
Coronavirus found on cruise ship as more U.S. states report cases

Inside Out with Tami Michaels

01:01 min | 5 months ago

Coronavirus found on cruise ship as more U.S. states report cases

"At least half of the fifty United states now reporting confirmed cases of the novel coronavirus two deaths now reported in Florida and the grand princess in the Pacific off San Francisco now one of a number of cruise ships immobilized or turned away on four continents twenty one positive case have been identified on board Kerry Carl still suffering from stage four cancer one of the twenty four hundred passengers there I go from laughing and trying to look on the positive side to this too tapping my faith to crying hysterically yeah she says she's going to miss chemo next week week due to the situation here's a crowd of virus in a potential fourteen day isolation period have given way to potential legions of nervous parents were raising concerns for their children inside crowded school all three are now growing nationwide some primary and secondary schools shutting down and out west the university of southern California Stanford and the university of Washington all canceling in person classes for the next couple

United States Florida Pacific San Francisco Kerry Carl Chemo University Of Southern Califor University Of Washington
NASA's new Mars rover gets a name — Percy, for short

Mark Levin

00:23 sec | 5 months ago

NASA's new Mars rover gets a name — Percy, for short

"The Mars twenty twenty rover has a new name perseverance we are species of explorers and we will meet many set backs on the way to Mars however we can persevere Alex Mather from lake Braddock secondary school in Virginia reading part of his essay that won the rover naming contest sponsored by NASA the biggest most high tech rover ever sent to Mars perseverance is set to launch this July from the Kennedy

Alex Mather Lake Braddock Secondary School Virginia Nasa Kennedy
China coronavirus outbreak: Hong Kong declares emergency and closes schools

Michael Medved

00:55 sec | 6 months ago

China coronavirus outbreak: Hong Kong declares emergency and closes schools

"The World Health Organization has decided against the clearing the coronavirus outbreak a global emergency at least for the time being there's no cases have cropped up outside of China including one in France the virus has been causing such alarming China has arrived in Europe and use visa said one patient was a forty eight year old man who visited with hand the city at the heart of the outbreak during a brief visit to China he returned to France on Wednesday and fell ill he went to hospital in the western city of Bordeaux on Thursday by Friday his diagnosis has been confirmed he's been kept in isolation but is said to be doing well with visa said the second case of any just come to light in Paris no further details have emerged Hong Kong has declared a virus outbreak in emergency a more close primary and secondary schools for two more weeks after the lunar new year holiday the city leader Carrie lam also doubts of trains and flights from the city of Wuhan would be

World Health Organization China France Europe Bordeaux Paris Hong Kong Carrie Lam Wuhan
Ronny Chieng On 'Asian Comedian Destroys America!'

Weekend Edition Saturday

05:36 min | 8 months ago

Ronny Chieng On 'Asian Comedian Destroys America!'

"Running Chang has a Netflix comedy special Asian comedian destroys America launches globally on Netflix next week what you hold forth about coming to America being amazed that god can occasionally a Paul all at the same time so much contents only got so much content on demand so many screens the most screens per capita in the world every night in America is like a competition to see how many screens we can get between all face on the wall it's like iPhone iPad laptop TV in an apple watch Ronnie Chang the daily show correspondent coaster of crazy rich Asians and former Australian law school student joins us from our studios in New York thanks so much for being with us thanks for having me you were born Malaysia raised in New Hampshire in Singapore wound up in Australia yes how did a law school student become so funny I don't know I wish I knew if I got it I don't I'm still trying to figure out if I am funny that's what the special you are yes thanks so much yeah went to Austria for law school and I couldn't get a job and I started doing stand up comedy and I was getting more work from CENTCOM data was through law and I just kept doing comedy and then ten years later just jammed in them chaos studios in New York I'm wondering if you were often the new kid in class for the new kid you know immigrant kid from outside the country where everywhere yeah I certainly felt that way I first started going to school in America in Manchester New Hampshire then we moved back we will good immigrants we moved back to Malaysia we don't take jobs we went back to where we came from and then I went to school in Singapore and I changed schools once in primary school that went to secondary school they went to junior college and I went to university in Australia so yeah I did feel kinda like the virtual new kid outsider well I mean that'll terminations humor sometimes I guess so yeah I mean this in my head I don't imagine it may be any fun yeah but it definitely made me more do things more objectively you know and that that's part of what I enjoyed so much about your your special here there's a moment you deliver line which sets off a shriek in the audience okay I'm not going to give it away let's just say you you managed to put isis in a punch line I'm not gonna put it on via yes the special yeah did you hesitate no no hesitation no hesitation for many reasons I mean first of all that's not the first time I did that joke I practiced this special quite a bit I toward around the country before I taped it so you know I think great comedy should be edgy is she should push the line pushed a boundary well a and that's when it because you gave an interesting interview to The New Yorker to we talked about how you do your research that's the one you love people don't five so I'm told you say there's a lot of stuff that you try thank you probably shouldn't say publicly frankly if you do comedy professionally that's just the way your brain works yeah yeah that's the case for me anyway I think you know as a professional stand up comedian I'm trying to think of jokes all the time a cut tried to give jokes about anything I read anything you tell me I'm I know express the joke but in my head I'm like oh is this how how would I make a joke about this and especially if you told me you should never joke about these topics in my head I might well I'm already try to figure out that you know because it's like a challenge to me it's like a puzzle to be solved that hit miss process sometime absolutely this art form and sometimes you get wrong a lot of time you get wrong probably but as a stout comic I believe you can talk about any topic but if you're gonna if you're gonna pull the dragon then you better be spot on with what you're saying I think that's the best explanation I've ever heard thank you for I I'm not clear in my mind you've been married three times but not really right I've been married three times to the same woman yes we had three wedding ceremonies what was she trying to change your mind and you were giving their the chairman or in Spanish but not always it's more that when your families are spread out across the globe as ours on Chinese weddings are a lot for the parents to kind of brag and so as Pavao duty to then we make it easier for them to brag so her family's in Australia okay we'll go we'll have one waiting there for them my family's in Malaysia we'll go Malaysian have one for that that's not the most important question I've asked but does that mean you get gift certificates to crate and barrel in three different continents no I specifically said no gifts but if you must give a gift give cash money cash money only that actually that's that is a Chinese family yes it is and it's awesome if you want save the environment cash doesn't create waste no wrapping paper you know I'm not lifting because I was telling people in the wedding by my wife maybe tone it down because I was getting too aggressive with it but I was ten people like you know what having a when in Malaysia and in Australia we're going back to America so number one I don't wanna log a blender all the way back to America second of all the complex a different okay so it's not gonna work anyway I'm gonna have to buy the converter all that all that crap first of all I'm very specific about what I want okay so the blender you're gonna get me is probably not gonna be the best blend so don't even try I know what I want just give cash money or don't give anything at all

Chang Netflix America Paul Ten Years
Elizabeth Wettlaufer Pt. 1

Serial Killers

06:48 min | 9 months ago

Elizabeth Wettlaufer Pt. 1

"At a nursing home in the small city of Woodstock Canada eighty eight year old dementia patient Claw Tilda Adriano was resting in bed it was an early summer evening in two thousand seven clotilde looked up to see the night nurse arrive with her medical cart the nurse was an overweight woman with small classes she greeted Clotilde enthusiastically clean before removing a needle from its packaging she said with a smile the doctor wants you to have vitamin shot clotilde side and held out her arm she'd been caressing care since March and was used to being poked and prodded she looked away as the nurse jabbed the needle in Dan if clotilde hadn't averted her is she might have noticed the nurses odd expression she was still smiling slightly yet her is for coldly curious as she inserted the needle into Kotil does vein all done the nurse cheerfully exclaimed she packed up her things things and left claw tilda watched her go unnerved but not entirely sure why a few hours later Clo- TILDA began to weaken she became cold and clammy another nurse entered for a routine check a notice clotilde symptoms because of Clotilde clotilde history of diabetes the nurse hurry to treat her for low blood sugar though neither knew it the vitamin shot the nurse had given her was actually a large dose of insulin in a diabetic like claw Tilda it could have been fatal luckily clotilde survived the incident but unfortunately for the many victims that would come after her she forgot all about the cheerful nurse that had visited her earlier heard that evening hi I'm Greg Paulson this is serial killers apart cast original every Monday we dive into the minds and madness of serial serial killers. I'm here with my co host Vanessa Richardson Hi everyone you can find episodes of serial killers and all other podcast originals for free on spotify by or wherever you listen to podcasts to stream serial killers for free on spotify just open the APP and type serial killers in the search bar today we're going to examine the early life of the lethal Canadian nurse Elizabeth wetl offer at podcast were grateful for you our listeners you allow us to do what we love love let us know how we're doing reach out on facebook and Instagram at podcast and twitter at park last network and if you enjoy today's episode the the best way to help us is to leave a five star review wherever you're listening it really does help between two thousand seven and two thousand sixteen Elizabeth Abyss wet law for killed eight elderly residents of the long term care home where she worked as a nurse making her one of the most prolific killers lers in Canadian history this week will cover Elizabeth's religious upbringing and conflicted sexuality will explore Howard troubles led to depression I'm an anchor issues we'll also touch on how these issues caused her to begin harming those two helpless to fend for themselves next week we'll die further into Elizabeth's quiet killing spree which went undetected until she confessed it herself. Elizabeth May Parker was born on June tenth nineteen sixty seven to Doug and Hazel Parker in Woodstock Doc Antero Elizabeth nicknamed Beth was their second child and had one brother three years her senior the Parker family was extremely religious Doug and elder at the local Baptist Church was strict and demanding he required a submissive wife and children who adhered to the Church's teachings neighbor saw the parkers as the perfect leave it to beaver family despite a rigid upbringing Elizabeth loved the Church and was close to her family but when she hit adolescence her faith in Church doctrine was tested she realized she was attracted to women Duggan Hazel believe being gay was a sin bow there's little information on Elizabeth's formative years likely didn't welcome Elizabeth Sexuality than saw it there's an intrusion into their perfect family Elizabeth kept this side of herself secret for as long as possible it's very likely that her rejection up her own sexual identity caused her a great deal of guilt and self loathing throughout her childhood Vanessa's going to take over on the psychology psychology here and throughout the episode please note that is not a licensed psychologist or psychiatrist but she has done a lot of research for the show thanks Greg According to psychiatric author and Professor Jack Drescher those who are unable to acknowledge their sexual identity often attempt to dissociate associate those feelings from themselves they consider these feelings unacceptable and therefore hide that part of themselves from the persona they present to the world this negatively impacts their self esteem and makes it difficult to see themselves in their entirety by refusing to identify herself as Lesbian Elizabeth was unable to develop an understanding of who she was Elizabeth's insecurities were only exacerbated at school where she was shy shy awkward and overweight her childhood neighbor Glenn Hart said but she was often the odd kid out Elizabeth tried to combat this sense of isolation by participating in a number of extracurricular activities when she got to Huron Park Secondary school she played field hockey and joined joined the band as a trombone EST but despite her best efforts it seemed Elizabeth still struggled with fitting in in one thousand nine hundred eighty six nineteen year-old Elizabeth wrote a poem that was published in her high school yearbook align read each person's tune changes as he or she grows older but it's all the same and inevitably pointless this could be read as Elizabeth expressing her own fears about her future where she'd have to continue continue suppressing the side of her identity she was ashamed of

Doc Antero Elizabeth Clotilde Elizabeth Abyss Elizabeth May Parker Elizabeth Wetl Elizabeth Sexuality Tilda Adriano Clo- Tilda Woodstock Canada Spotify Vanessa Richardson Greg Paulson Woodstock Facebook Depression Glenn Hart Huron Park Secondary School DAN Duggan Hazel
Students brave tear gas to join Iraq's protests

Pacifica Evening News

01:16 min | 9 months ago

Students brave tear gas to join Iraq's protests

"Thousands of students joined anti government protests in Iraq today as clashes with security forces firing tear gas canisters killed at least three demonstrators and wounded more than one hundred students skipped classes at several universities and secondary schools in Baghdad and across Iraq's Shiite majority south to take part in the protests this despite the government's ordering schools and universities to operate normally one of those killed was a twenty two year old female medical students the first woman to be killed since the protests began earlier this month seventeen students were among the wounded authorities later announced an overnight curfew in the capital as renewed protests there and across the south raged for a fourth day a senior security official estimated that twenty five thousand protesters took part in the demonstrations in Baghdad in a separate development three rockets struck a large military base north of Baghdad that houses a U. S. center Raqi forces into another senior Iraqi security official official said there were no casualties that the attack is being investigated both officials spoke on condition of anonymity because they weren't authorized to brief

Iraq Baghdad Official U. S. Center Raqi Twenty Two Year
An Interview With Nobel Economics Prize-Winner Michael Kremer

The Indicator from Planet Money

06:25 min | 10 months ago

An Interview With Nobel Economics Prize-Winner Michael Kremer

"Economics as a field it can have the reputation of being kind of abstract cerebral yes that's true if matty lots of CIGNA's you know complicated financial instruments ivory tower stuff Michael Creamer our newly minted Nobel laureate says he here's this from people all the time people have a view of economic says only about the stock market talks next. That's the question that you get when you sit makes people on airplanes there like is the stock market GonNa go up hopefully classic questions going to the I I also much place on that one now is a Nobel prize so you really want to know if he thinks. I got this doctor from a Nobel Prize winner and the response he might give to somebody who asks him for stomach that look development economics is something different branches mixed focuses on improving conditions in developing countries so Michael's research is looked at different ways to improve health care education agriculture social conditions all these different things in those developing countries Michael got started in this kind of economics when he was visiting a friend who was teaching in Kenya his friend was working for a nonprofit and had been put in charge of a bunch of local schools and they were trying to figure out how to best run these schools and where to invest their very limited resources we weren't sure uh what the best approach was they had several different ideas that they were interested in China and as we were talking I suggested that perhaps they could try some approaches in some schools and other approaches and other schools and they did that systematically they could learn what was what was working best and evaluate the impact of what they're doing much isn't Medical trial much as in a medical trial real world trials are used in many of the sciences but applying them in economics was groundbreaking in some of the most noted work of Michael Kramer and his colleagues they looked at where to best allocate resources impoverished schools in Kenya so for example would students benefit more from free textbooks or from free meals it turned out neither of those things actually made a huge impact for the students what did make a huge impact for the students another study uncovered a pretty unexpected answer to that hyphen free access to de worming medication. Hookworm whipper roundworm worms that actually used to be in the southern United States. take the medication to treat worms was quite cheap but it did still cost some money and there were a lot of parents who are still not getting it for their kids what made a huge difference was when kids were given free access to de worming medication Michael says the impact it had on their education was extraordinary we found that topic for much more like quitting school absence from school what by one quarter reflect when they had access to the medicine Michael and his colleagues followed the students for years all the way through school and into the workforce and they found that free access to de worming medication just kept paying off this was a while ago Alga young adults we see that they're actually earning more and consuming more and the girls are more likely to onto secondary school so huge impact relative to the really tiny costs lose medicines cost really pennies per does investing in De worming medication as it turned out had a much bigger impact on the educations professional lives of kids than textbooks or school meals and economic mixed figured that out the solution was not obvious it emerged after a series of rigorous experiments that were systematically trying different approaches until they found the most active efficient solution Michael and his colleagues presented that information to the Kenyan government you want to help kids and keep them in school put your money here in best in de worming medication and it will affect major change it will move the needle they were excited about it and they decided they wanted to launch an national program and then Indians state governments heard heard about it and then the national government of India introduced a similar program so now Aw Th Indian program is reaching more than one hundred million children every year and I think I remember reading that The program actually did a pain for itself through increased tax revenue because people did become more productive when they were healthier is that is that right that's exactly right recent follow up work we've looked at the economic impact of us now that students at the time of original de worming are now in the labor force and see the people are earning more Ah The free just do the calculations turns out of the extra tax revenue alone would have been more than enough to pay the cost of the program. It's estimated that the work of Michael Creamer in his fellow laureates this year has changed the lives of hundreds of millions of people around the world and Michael Says he's very glad to see that a more hands on kind of economics is being acknowledged invalidated in such an important way we're trying to do work that is very rigorous that is using the Ah Tours of of economics but that is also engaged with practical problems it's easy to see the problems of global poverty and to think that there are intractable that we can't make a difference but actually there's been huge progress there will be more progress as economics is applied to different problems in the developing world he thinks he can help find simple practical solutions that can actually make a big difference. Michael says he is incredibly excited to see economics being used this way and of course peace excited about winning the Nobel yeah maybe we'll even figure out how to celebrate it properly congratulations thank you so much and I think you should upgrade to regular coke for at least a week paid lip balm yeah there you go there now we're talking we're talking

Michael Michael Creamer Nobel Prize Cigna Michael Kramer Kenya China Kenyan Government United States. India One Quarter
3 economists who study poverty win Nobel Prize

Here & Now

04:58 min | 10 months ago

3 economists who study poverty win Nobel Prize

"A group of three researchers have won the Nobel prize is in economics for their scientific approach to solving global poverty esther do flow Albacete Bonnici and Micheal creamer are known as the random does for the work with randomized control trials it's a research technique that's previously only been used in the hard sciences Micheal Creamer from Harvard University joins us now on a skype line Michael congratulations thank you so much and this doesn't happen very often how are you feeling today it was completely surprised for Let's take the time out to talk about your work comes thirty years after you first started doing these randomized control trials in enya other was an early one with textbooks can you tell us about that Schorr I spent spent a year teaching secondary school in Kenya and this was a time when you're Kenya's progressed economic class since then but it was it was very poor them most kids did not have text books in school and one of the findings this was somewhat surprising was that when we compare it schools that receive the text books to those that didn't there was not much impact on on top scores for the majority of students the students who were initially scoring on yeah well and that's counterintuitive and that's counterintuitive because you would think that if you got more access to textbooks it would help why didn't it so I thought to my my time as a teacher in Kenya and I remembered that kids are missing a lot of school now there's malaria there's worms teachers uh-huh missing school schools taught most kids are learning in their third language they have their own language at home than their Swahili English taught in English so it's very easy for kids to fall behind the curriculum one of the findings since then they're just amazing results if you provide summary middle education so that's something that's been found in in India for example as well so in this example the randomized control was there was a group of kids who did not get textbooks and a group of kids who did get the new textbooks but as you know you you do have critics of this type of works people who say that it's not ethical to give one group something that could potentially help them or even be lifesaving and not the other group so how do you answer that question and is there an example in in your own work where you decided you needed to to stop and give the benefit to both groups you're so you're in in in typically what's happening is the working with for example nonprofit organization and they're they can't reduce the program everywhere so they face it into certain schools after one year and then after the second year they go on to another set of schools then say after the first year it's possible compare what happened in the schools where the program was introduced to the schools were at that program how yet the introduced so in that type of example all the schools eventually are getting the program of course in some cases for example the case of textbooks on it turns out that things that you thought would would work don't work on and in that case it's important that information so that new approaches can be tried if you had all the money and all of the resources in the world at your fingertips and also the a political clout to do it what would end global poverty is that even possible one of the really exciting aspects of this has been and finding a whole host of things across a range of sectors that really make a difference so for example in healthcare making simple preventive healthcare measures like mosquito nets or or de worming medicine or water treatment solution available to poor households making that available free there had been a movement to say we should charge for those things making that available for free makes a tremendous difference to access another approach is just cash transfers so Mexico and many other countries have have tried on cash transfers for for for poor households if they have their kids in school and get basic healthcare at one of the things that examined the Myron research was effective trittin children for intestinal worms uh-huh and we see that they go to school more they are more as adults on this isn't investment that's paid paid back many times over that's Micheal creamer one of three economists who just won the Nobel Prize for their work on taking a scientific approach to alleviating global poverty. Michael Thank you so much. Congratulations on the win thank you

Micheal Creamer Nobel Prize Albacete Bonnici Michael Thirty Years One Year
NGO brings visibility to millions of children out of school worldwide

UN News

12:13 min | 11 months ago

NGO brings visibility to millions of children out of school worldwide

"This is Matt Wells at UN news an estimated two hundred sixty million children not receiving an education and the crisis hampering their access to vital life skills and the jobs market leaders at the nonprofit their world have committed to closing the education gap the organizations bringing visibility to the scale of the global education crisis through through an immersive installation the infant classroom a mirrored room which highlights the huge number of unfilled seats in schools across the world sites it on the main. UN Plaza in New New York the installation serves as the centerpiece of their world's latest campaign Hashtag right the wrong aiming to gain the financial support and political momentum to help children achieve she therefore potential and Gio Partners Founder Sarah Brown and President Justin Vanfleet spoke to you and uses Nutley Hutchison onstage in the G. Media his own during the German assemblies high level week well so we set up the infinity room right outside the main doors to the headquarters because we wanted to capture people going past and just make sure that education was front and center this has been a UN week where how we protect our planet has been the start to the week and and now we're moving across to talk about people on that planet and truthfully. We're not going to find a way to save upon it. If we don't find a way to educate all our children to who need to know what they need need to do to play their part so the infinity rumors you walk into it is a mirrored space that when you sit at the the children the school desks there the mirrors create literally millions of empty desks representing the two hundred and sixty million childrens. You say who don't get the chance chance to go to school and there's some sound as well right. Do you want to tell people a little bit about this. Once you walk in there you can close the door. You can create your own photographs. Create your own film mm-hmm and the space will will do all the work for you but also you can hear the sound of a classroom and hear what the sound would be if we had all those children at school learning unexcited and planning futures to justify anything to add just building on that is what happens if we don't do anything about that today in right now and that's why we thought it was so important even when climate and other issues are front and center that I see even here at the boxes for educations at the bottom because it's the foundation that really helps achieve all those. SDG's and by having the box here front and center it reminds people have not just tuned sixty million out of school today but if we don't change change course immediately in two thousand thirty actually over eight hundred million over half of the world's young people won't have the skills that they'll need tend to the workforce we productive members of society so as a wakeup wakeup call to what's actually going to be happening in twenty thirty if we don't take action great so what is what is the global education crisis exactly and how do you bring visibility into this with all these other. SDG's that are competing this week especially so the crisis is simply that you have millions of children out of school but the crisis is also what that means for them as they grow up and as Justin said you face a future where within a very short period of time half of the world's young people will not have the skills to be ready to be able to enter employment or run their own business or engage in a job that Romo might be doing an unskilled job but there's going to be plenty of scope for people with skill jobs but they have to have that learning and we're creating a bigger and bigger gap as we have children who are able to go through the secondary school and onto higher education and leaving so many millions behind and the challenges also not just for those children who are in the poorest hardest to reach parts of the world world but also this children who are displaced and we have so many more children to address in a humanitarian context where as a refugee as asylum-seeker as as a child whose family can can move several times as they move. We have to be able to be flexible and provide opportunities for them so the comp the competition with the other goals is not a competition you know. I was talking to me Muhammad this morning and she said something very wise. She's she loves the progress of any single goal all from her point of view responsible for seventeen any progress on any single goal has a positive impact on others and education arguably has the greatest impact on how we cheese every right youth is certainly at the center of the conversation these days right yes absolutely Sarah. Would you share a about the founding of the organization. What sort of inspired fired you to pursue education at this level so I didn't set out to set up a charity that was focused on the global education crisis. When we first started the charity seventeen eighteen years ago it had a different name it was focused on community health and education projects and looking at the grassroots level but what's happened. Is We've grown. We've partnered with other initiatives. Initiatives been inclusive with the way that we work working with Justin. In a leadership role. There brings a lot of skills and expertise with his team where actually you are able to work right of that top. top-down level of looking at how we unlock the political will unlock the financing on adopt commitments to education that we scroll back ten fifteen years just weren't there and the journey to making education the priority was one where whatever health project we were doing something around nutrition or something environmental you can never reach your full goal when you'd dealing with children who don't get that chance to go to school and it was just something where myself and the other like-minded people realize that if we collaborated together we creative partnerships together as an organization we could do that and that's where their world was born but there will doesn't work on its own either you know we've got partnerships with other. NGOs always with UNICEF here with the meeting with them this morning and getting a lot of new commitments for education sharing our resources and I think all of us have to do that so their world is is there to collaborate and work with others because we need government civil society. We need businesses if together going to reach these goals great that's that's what I was going to ask him aside from the infinity classroom sort of what other involvement you had with the UN Jay this week in maybe more details about those partnerships so we here we have the Business Coalition for education that we established. It's been building private sector engagement with education so they've been hosting a big event. We've campaigned for many years at their world to be able to see the creation of the new financing facility big pledging today and education wait. That's within the unison family is they're. They're scooping up massive commitment this week for education emergency so we're having busy days every day of course and you both. I believe leave returned from a trip to Greece recently right where Russia around degrees yeah. Could you share by breaking. You told us it was it was it was one of those his trips where you realize the sheer scale the challenge in both of the global level but also what it means individuals where we were there on days we had record numbers. There's of young people arriving on boats from Turkey and these refugee reception centres that were already overcrowded three or four five times the capacity no supplies even for for a place to ten nothing and they're just waiting outside and you had all of these young people and most of them young people in these camps and we were able to do is as we partnered with education not wait and the players the Dutch postcode lottery and we said we have to do something we have to right the wrongs such an injustice of what was happening there and so collectively we invested into programs with UN agencies with UNICEF and unique CR and we're delivering five thousand school places right now because those young children we went. We saw that young people were able to take out of those camps go down the road of these centers and their eyes light up. They're taking out of these places and hope and opportunity everything's right in front of them and then you know the end of the day they you have to go back and so we have to solve that crisis of the refugees being there in those conditions but also this transit center they need some type of hope and opportunity so we're not making in a plan to double the capacity immediately when over eighty percent of them service in the next few months so they all have chance of education while there and so that's that's our big our big challenge ahead wonderful where where else has their world gone and made impacts so far what we've worked a lot with refugees because we campaigned very heavily to be able to get funding through the humanitarian sector. It's not that many is that change come about so we've had a lot of work with Syrian refugees. I'm British and so for for us to see in Europe refugees coming in was a big wakeup call in two thousand fifteen to sixteen to realize how close that that came to us coming in into the Greek islands but also something where we have a responsibility these people now our neighbors and to be able to engage. We've worked a lot so one of our biggest initiatives so it was the big breakthrough was making a proposal for the double shift school system and the WF school system is very simple solution to massive influx of people needing education and a the population like Lebanon or Turkey Jordan overwhelmed by how to cater to that need generously being prepared to do so and so if the school can start earlier in the day day you gotta first shift of children coming through and then halfway through move overtook double. The number of children can come through a school building in one day which means you don't have to to spend time working out where you're going to build buildings. You can get on with working how your teachers are going to be trained to cope different language instruction making sure there's children have the opportunity and and that's worked amazing. I mean just speak to the numbers more accurately than I did but we have hundreds of thousands if not millions of children who are now in school as a result of that system that's wonderful. That's not sit and I think that's the point is we're not an organization just to run programs on the ground because there are a lot of great partners that do that already and what we're really trying to do is find out where the blockage is where the gaps who's missing out. How do we provide immediate support but then also how do we create that change and unlock the bigger amounts of funding the bigger partnerships need to happen to really deliver sliver at scale exactly what you're saying. Lebanon with this proposal partnered with the government agencies and over three hundred thousand young people went back to school last year. There were refugees in Lebanon. That otherwise wouldn't have had that opportunity before we all work together on this. It was about ten thousand immediate impact that you can have if everybody works together really put her mind to these new innovative ways of doing work. That's that's wonderful. I'm staying on the good news. You mentioned there. Were new pledges that came out this morning. Justin I I was following some of your tweets there was incredible progress that came out of the UN today. Can you share a bit about who those donors were and and what we saw the first CIANCI veterans education cannot wait so looking for funding that needs to be ready to move very very quickly whether it's an unfolding emergencies so there was a number of countries that came to the fore so we saw Norway Way Denmark who was that Germany Germany the United States made a commitment made a big commitment so all all of those commitments are there and ready and then reaching out more widely and I know that education will now look towards the expo twenty twenty coming up and talking to Dubai you buy cars and other organizations in the region about how to galvanize more countries to be able to come in on board we had even more because after the education cannot wait event we had the International Finance Facility for education which is a new proposal. We've had out there and now there's actually money coming into this thing so it's real it's real we had youth campaigners the past last two years campaigning with their world and other organizations to get this thing up and now now it's there today there were six hundred million dollars in pledges into that and because of the way it's sort but actually multiplies the money through through the Multilateral Development Banks Action Equates about two point one billion dollars. We'll be able to invest in the next generation of young people and you combine that that with the amount from education cannot wait. We're looking at two point three two point four billion dollars that was raised just today just across the street for education and that's a big deal. That's probably the most that's been raised origination and he's single day in history. I think that good news. You're going to be the place where we stop today. Thank you so much seren Justin for joining US everyone. Thank you so much for for your attendance. Thank you great

President Justin Vanfleet UN Lebanon Unicef Un Plaza United States SDG Matt Wells Muhammad Founder Gio Partners Europe New New York Wf School Nutley Hutchison Turkey Sarah Brown Greece Romo G. Media
Refugee children excluded from education will never be equipped to rebuild their countries: UNHCR

UN News

05:58 min | 1 year ago

Refugee children excluded from education will never be equipped to rebuild their countries: UNHCR

"This is natalie hutchinson with u. N. news the vast majority of the world's nearly twenty six million refugees are hosted in the global south where providing education education for them is a major challenge the u._n. Refugee agency u._n._h._c._r. said on friday an interview with u._n. Newses daniel johnson the agency's sees muhammadu deion beltway. That's the deputy. Director of u._n._h._c._r.'s division of resilience and resolutions explains how a new plan is helping to provide provide not just primary but also secondary schooling to vulnerable youngsters permanent remain in issue however you also have much a bigger challenges at secondary level as well as tertiary level. How many millions are we talking about. How many refugees twenty five million in the world twenty six million really yeah. We've got about twenty five hundred six million as of last year most of them eighty four percent in <hes> refugee-hosting countries that happened to be in the global south so refugees are hosted in some of the most deprived areas of our countries and at the same time unwritten these countries in the most deprived part of discounters. The report is calling for help from governments from communities from the private sector the to sort of change the way that refugees get education. The aim is not to do it so much in camps now as in host communities. Maybe you could expand on that and explain explain how our house communities going to deal with this. We've good examples of places where government have made changes policy changes very eddie generous ones go on them wet where for example for example in djibouti for example in uganda for example in mexico for example in countries affected by venezuela situation nations but also in the middle east north africa turkey lebanon exit so we see money of this good examples but this good examples needs sustainability. What are they doing doing exactly. They are allowing refugees to access into the secondary school. The existing schools not obliging them to go on have have their own education on their own so including the refugees in today national education systems allowing them to have additional teachers additional schools were quiet but we also see a lot of development actors development partners like the world bank like bilateral donors coming in support of them so this is new income streams streams this how you're going to do it because you're an can't do it on its own and governments haven't got the resources so you're appealing as part of the global compact refugees to get a new income stream stream. What sort of money do you need to make this work. I cannot tell you about exact amount that is needed but for example you take. Uganda has a four year plan for for over three hundred eighty million u._s. dollars in the course of four years. That's educational response plan devil for both refugee children as will as affected host populations. That's the type of amount of resources that is being posted on the leadership of the government of development actress you initiate. She are on few order ngos and the u._n. Agencies coming together and joining effort into understand exactly what is required and then so that donors as well as communities and others can contribute to responding to those needs that just an example there are many examples so in the the immediate instance. If you go to somewhere like greece the greek islands. There wasn't a lot recently about the fact that thousands of refugee children are still not attending school the islands. I don't have the resources neither does athens. What's going to help them now. Because they really do need assistance immediately they do need assistance but they also policy changes so policy changes that will allow these children to have sisters <unk> but at the same time also human human as well as financial national resources he also mentioned that in lebanon there are thousands more syrian children who fled the conflict there and if these children aren't looked after and given an education we risk reaping the consequences of not looking after them. What exactly do you mean by that. It's about being excluded in countries that have hosted them. They we're already excluded and displaced because of the conflict in the country and then coming into this host countries they need the list that is needed is to provide vitamin d type of education including civic education including cohesion if the host population so that that brighter feature that we do see four for syria when times are is i think is being correctly field by people who are equipped with education two final questions to you how many ah countries and where are you focusing on initially in this new initiative for secondary and tertiary education for refugees and why is education so important for refugees for anyone we are thinking of few countries in the eastern horn of africa rwanda kenya uganda a few orders in asia like pakistan and in these countries as i was saying they are really starting point. We are going talk about fifteen sixteen countries for youth education and secondary education in the laura on in order to make sure that it's not only only supporting the refugees who are immediately in need of that support but also some of defected host populations and education is so important because it is the one that will help refugees and our future what should happen to be able to try but also to contribute go to our societies societies that have lost to them but also the future when they return home or when they are settled or when they are locally integrated.

Uganda Natalie Hutchinson Daniel Johnson Deion Director U. N. Greece Athens U._N._H._C._R. Africa Lebanon Pakistan Asia Rwanda Djibouti Venezuela Syria North Africa
"secondary school" Discussed on WCBS Newsradio 880

WCBS Newsradio 880

02:43 min | 1 year ago

"secondary school" Discussed on WCBS Newsradio 880

"Days time three thirty five also on the campaign trail in Iowa mayor bill de Blasio pitched his presidential dreams to a crowd of about fifteen likely democratic voters in cedar rapids his pitch to put working people first in America was met with a mixed reception by the few people there to hear it recent campaign events revolving around the opening of the Iowa state fair marked the end of one phase of the democratic presidential race in the beginning of another the fair allowed voters an up close and personal view of potential nominees the next phase is the sprint toward I was leadoff caucuses now six months away reports of bias incidents in New Jersey which the seven year high last year but more than a quarter of such incidents occurring at colleges and universities this is attorney general ger bear gray wall twenty eighteen we also receive thirty eight reports thirty eight reports of bias incidents at elementary and secondary schools and in the same year in twenty eighteen nearly half of the known offenders were minors so going to conquer hate we need to do a better job of confronting bias among our young people the report comes as hate crimes have risen seventeen percent nationally partly driven by spike and anti semitic incidents trump administration officials are defending last week's mass my immigration raids in Mississippi including a motional footage of a girl pleading with authorities to let her father go acting customs and border protection commissioner mark Morgan on CNN state of the union said the six hundred eighty arrests were legitimate and he added words matter these are rates these are targeted and a law enforcement operations and in this case this was a joint criminal investigation with ice and the department of justice taurine worksite enforcement bargaining knowledge that video of the eleven year old sobbing was emotional but he said the girl was quickly reunited with her mother a Tennessee convict accused of killing a corrections administrator and escaping from prison has been captured Tennessee district attorney mark and David sent today Curtis Wright watchin went from being a escaped convict to being a criminal defendant facing charges of first degree murder aggravated sexual battery especially aggravated burglary and to skate the forty four year old Watson was found hours after confirm sighting of the convict WCBS this time three thirty six this is W. C. B. S. on the air at eight eighty and on demand only on the radio dot com app download it now and take us with you.

David W. C. B. Curtis Wright Tennessee CNN commissioner attorney Watson burglary first degree murder bill de Blasio administrator mark Morgan Mississippi New Jersey Iowa America
"secondary school" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

03:03 min | 1 year ago

"secondary school" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"You should have a little bit of healthy grist because that's how you move forward. You decided when your children came that you wanted to spend more time with them, and you left Mike. Christoph. I surprise Bill told him I wanted to leave Microsoft. Yes. And his reaction was really, because he knew I loved working, and I loved working at Microsoft, and he also knew I had that piece of my brain that love to be beyond the working side. So he was quite surprised when I told him, I was going to leave the do then go to the foundation, fulltime after your children were a little bit older whole issue about how much I was going to work with the foundation. I had it timed for when our kids would get older. So I knew until our last daughter went off to preschool, I was was not gonna be fulltime once I knew she was going to be in preschool, my plan always then was to work fulltime books. Talk about the issues of women in sub Saharan Africa. And somebody thinks you trust in your book, you point out that in sub Saharan Africa and other places. There are child marriages women are forced to marry it. Six seven eight years old. Why is why does that happen? Quite often a family will marry their daughter off because one, they then don't. Have to feed her. So that's less resources from their family and two. They also want to protect the families honored, and that is a cultural barrier that is horrible for girls because they then often don't go to secondary school or if they're in secondary school, they're pulled out of school. They're moved to a village often where they know. No one, it's not even close to their home. It's a horrific thing for girl, she basically becomes the property of her husband's family or her mother-in-law. So what have you tried to do to prevent some of this? The only way you can overcome cultural barriers is I you go in very sensitive ways with partners, but then the community has to commit to another area. Talk about in the book is a situation where you have a female cutting genital cutting, what is the purpose of that. And how frequent is that done with young women around the world? That is a still a tradition. Particularly in a lot of northern Africa in his horrific for young girl young girls bleed to death. It is trauma, a traumatic event in their lives. Villagers do it for different reasons. They believe it protects the girls honor, they believe that they if they love their daughter. They will do it, but what I have known is that when education comes in, I talked to a village leader, an elder and a group of women who used to cut their daughters and no longer do in a group of women who are the cutters who no longer do. And they said, you know, when people bring in education from outside, and they talked to us about things how people view this and other places in the world, it starts to change our mind. And we start to question are past, and then we create change. That's Melinda gates co-founder of the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation. Speaking with Carlisle group, co founder, David Rubenstein for Bloomberg television program.

Bill Saharan Africa Melinda Gates Foundation Melinda gates Microsoft Christoph Mike Africa David Rubenstein Bloomberg Carlisle co-founder co founder Six seven eight years
"secondary school" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

02:04 min | 1 year ago

"secondary school" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"Secondary school, and w t Woodson high school the charges including possession of child porn and unlawful filming. The students believe that just because they're all age and they're sharing photos with themselves that it's not against the law. But it actually is now working to identify all of the victims had their Curtis sound AL WMA L dot com. Tariffs at Chinese made goods has hopes of a train deal between the US and China are fading talks between the White House in China wrap up Friday after a week of whiplash expectations on Friday, the US high tariffs on two hundred billion dollars of Chinese imports from ten percent to twenty five percent. The White House blames China for the breakdown insisting Beijing renewed on promised economic reforms, Stacey Cohan Washington. Wall Street's rebound at the end of the day after significant jitters regarding those talks was due to a couple of tweets by the president looking to boost the markets. President Trump tweeted in a much less ominous tone toward the end of the trading day over the course of the past two days, the United States in China have held candidate and constructive conversations on status of the trade relationship between both countries. The relationship between presidency and myself remains a very strong one in conversations into the future will continue. In the meantime, the United States has imposed tariffs on China, which may or may not be removed depending on what happens with respect to future negotiations. Bob Costantini, Washington. The Dow finished the day up one hundred fourteen points, the s&p five hundred up eleven and the NASDAQ up six people are feeling better about the metro system these days, but it's not changing the bottom line. But new poll from the Washington Post finds it after two years of safe track and other work sixty eight percent of DC area. Residents are back to having positive feelings about metro up from forty two percent in two thousand seventeen but that's how translating to boost ridership. The same survey says forty percent of his claim to ride less than we used to. While only sixteen percent claim to ride more of those writing less more than half say it's because they have a specific complaint or they simply prefer.

China United States Stacey Cohan Washington White House w t Woodson high school Washington Post President Trump Secondary school president Beijing Bob Costantini two hundred billion dollars sixty eight percent twenty five percent forty two percent sixteen percent forty percent ten percent
Replacement anxiety: White supremacist terrorism

The Economist: The Intelligence

09:38 min | 1 year ago

Replacement anxiety: White supremacist terrorism

"Zealand has spent the weekend morning. Fifty people who killed when a white supremacist gunman. Open fire. It two mosques during Friday prayers. Dozens more still in a critical condition in hospital cabinet today. Made in principle decisions around the reform of our gun laws. Prime minister descendant spoke to journalists today after meeting with cabinet to discuss changing gun control laws. This alternate means that within ten days of this horrific act of terrorism we will have announced reforms, which will I believe make L community safer. Almost all weapons about ninety four percent of New Zealand's weapons on registered Illinois Whitehead is reporting from New Zealand for the economist makes an outlier kind of almost anywhere in the western world apart from the United States. So that means that you can kind of stockpile weapons. Brenton Tarrant had a license wasn't a prior offender. He wasn't police watch less that he was able to get a gun license and he owned semi automatic weapons. He was able to procure legally. So the question was clearly raised that he picked New Zealand naught, Australia because of the more permissive environment because it was easier for him to procure the weapons Boutros dues. Also, put a spotlight on white supremacists. As the prime minister knowledged on Friday, the attack through questions about how security agencies had failed spot a man who written extensively online about his beliefs and his intentions community and police focused on extremism of every kind give. Global indicators around five right extremism. Our intelligence community has been steeping up their investigations in this area. The individual charge with mood it head not come to the attention of the intelligence community, nor the police for extremism the man accused of the shooting a twenty eight year old named Brinton Harrison Tarrant appeared in court on Saturday. He's a stray leeann the judge route one murder charge and said Moore would likely follow. Meanwhile, people gathered across New Zealand to remember the victims. A massive outpouring public grief and sympathy. So you've had vigils of being held here and across the country. I was in Christ Church today where there was a vigil organized by some school-children secondary school children outside the larger of the two mosques that was attacked the one where most of the casualties were sustained the people. I'm speaking to just saying where the attacker had had clearly wanted to drive a wedge between the Muslim community and the white community of New Zealand. He's he's kind of achieved exactly the opposite of that before the shooting. No did people think that Australia New Zealand how to program with white supremacism yet? Look in easy Lund's. I think less people are sort of saying again, and again that they are surprise. There is some members of the Muslim community say yes on detains of Islam. Phobia and racism have been rising. But for the most part, they say, you know, what this is this is actually a very tolerant, very harmonious almost uniquely hunt. How many society, but Australia is very different. And I think that those of racism and Islam have become much more prevalent in public culture over the last two decades, the most the most obvious one is pulling Hanson. He's. A Senate to one nation, which is a populous party in Australia, and she's kind of complaining constantly about tax on western civilization about anti white racism, clearly invoking, the sort of nationalist white supremacists. Kind of language. She moved a motion in the parliament last year, which stated that it's okay to be white. There's another Senator in independent who cooled in his maiden speech in parliament for a final solution to immigration, so Nova some pretty extreme anti immigrant rhetoric in Australian politics, but there's a big difference between that and going into a mosque. Yes. It is. Indeed. But these people studying the far-right say that they believe what's happening is essentially, these fringe groups, and there's a diffuse number of kind of NIA Nasi, ethnic, nationalist, white supremacist groups in Australia, which do remain fringe up. But they have been. Legitimized to degree by this kind of discourse. And by the discourse in some of the conservative media was the next up in the police investigation and then presumably trial. So Brenton town has been charged with one count of murder. He's he's going to appear again before court in April, April the fifth where he faces where the question is. I was what's up more other charges will be brought against him because they will at theoretically, he could face fifty counts of murder because that is the death toll at the moment. Fifty other could still rise. He could also be charged with acts of terrorism clearly any of those could carry life sentences. Eleanor. Thank you. Thanks, john. The long screed against immigrants posted by the gunman online before the attack part of which was live streamed to viewers underlines the importance of social networks in radicalizing people and spreading hateful ideas. Violent. Wait extremists. Usa be distributed. Among small fringe, white supremacist groups that were actually organized fringe political organizations. Matt stained glass is reporting on far-right extremism for the economist. More recently white supremacist, violent ideology is more matter of diffuse chat rooms on the internet and people getting interested ideas, and it's less matter of actual organized groups that can be clearly tracked by law enforcement about can you tell us a bit about the manifesto, the shoot published and also the medium it was published on. I mean on the one hand you don't want to give too much publicity to this stuff on the other hand. It's kind of hard to understand his. Nation without looking at it. I think it's exactly right that you don't want to do the terrorist job for him by repeating his manifesto. But the ideas that are in it are so central to the current white supremacist movement that you really need to understand something about them to understand why he engaged in terrorism engaged in the titled has been festival the great replacement, and that is an idea that's been kicking around since the nineteen seventies. But his gained a lot of currency read recently that immigration to Europe and to white western countries by people from non western backgrounds isn't just a matter of people immigrating for their own reasons for economic reasons, but as part of the giant plot to replace white people with people of other races. It's very panicky paranoid conspiratorial way of you in the world, and it gives the white supremacists and excuse to engage in violence because allow. Them to picture people of other races who are moving to western countries as invaders need to be stopped. I haven't read seventy four pages of the manifesto, but the bits I've have read remind me quite a lot of the manifesto Dylann roof shooter in South Carolina in twenty fifteen who shot wash oppose the mother Emmanuel church boasted, very similar ideas about whites being replaced. Yeah. There are a lot of Larry's between what the New Zealand shooter road, and what road and also under spry in Norway road, and that coherence is possibly the most troubling thing about the ideas behind this attack. There's a common playbook available now to everybody in the global white supremacist movement. And these ideas are just at hand for anybody who wants to wants an excuse to pick up a gun and engage in political violence is it possible. Say anything meaningful about how wide spread this problem is from almost from police. Point of view. I mean on the one hand presumably, the number of people who prepared to take up and shoot total strangers for some crackpot theory is relatively small, but on the other hand, this shoot seems to spend a lot of time on web forums where these kind of ideas discussed whether a lot of people the scale of violent rightwing extremism is smaller than the scandal Islam extremism, but the unpredictable nature those attacks as as you say is what's troubling? There's a terrorism expert in Germany who has comp with an idea Daniel Kohler who's come up with an idea called high of terrorism, which is the sense that there are people lurking on chat groups, and you never know which of them is suddenly going to get it into his head that he ought to stop just saying nasty things on the internet and go out and take action, unquote. Which is exactly what this played out. If you look at the chats. Were going on on a chan- this board that he was frequenting he characterized as the moment to stop talking and start doing something. And I think there's a sense among security experts that the problem with this with this current type of white supremacist terrorism. Is you can't predict who is just out there saying obnoxious nonsense on the internet, and who might eventually actually go out and do something about

New Zealand Australia Murder Prime Minister United States Zealand Australia New Zealand Brenton Tarrant Brinton Harrison Tarrant Illinois Christ Church Phobia Europe Senate Lund Nia Nasi Hanson South Carolina Senator Eleanor
Peter Saunders, Adidas And Rome discussed on Newsradio 950 WWJ 24 Hour News

Newsradio 950 WWJ 24 Hour News

00:31 sec | 1 year ago

Peter Saunders, Adidas And Rome discussed on Newsradio 950 WWJ 24 Hour News

"Will be survivors have convened in Rome for a summit on clergy's sex abuse in the Catholic church but Francis calling for the summit at the request of survivors around the world. Peter Saunders from London says the summit is important to bringing an end to sexual abuse in the church survivor of Adidas, I was abused by family member from when I was seven years of age, and then I was abused by two Jesuit priests. At my secondary school. It was a long time ago. But these memories stay with you for for

Peter Saunders Adidas Rome Francis London Seven Years
Students Skip School Across Europe to Demand Climate Action

The World

04:46 min | 1 year ago

Students Skip School Across Europe to Demand Climate Action

"Students in the UK are demanding that their government declare a climate emergency. Secondary school students marching in Manchester England today, they're part of a growing movement students from around the world walking out of school to demand much stronger action on climate change, thousands of young people also gathered in parliament square in London and in Liverpool. Eighteen year old Abby super Manian organiz his school student walkout. Honestly, the turnout was even greater than we expected. We only really started organizing liberal about three days ago, and obviously it's very difficult to go to essentially schools and say walk lessons. Disobey literally everything you patterns in teachers are saying because this is what is like when Houghton and we've had a absolutely fantastic reception here in the UK. Thousands of kids out across the country. And what did you do this? Why did you organize? So this whole movement started with a fifteen year old girl in Sweden. Tonsberg who basically went on strike from school and sat outside the speech parliament, and since then she's gone on to speak at the United Nations, and she's gone on to speak at the World Economic Forum in Davos where she addresses the assembled leaders in industry leaders adults. Keep saying we owe it to the young people to give them hope. But I don't want your health. I don't want you to be hopeful. I want you to panic. I wanted to feel the fair I feel every day. And then I want you to act. I wanted to act as if the house was on fire. Because it is. So that's really what brought me into this. I've been talking to loads of children around my city. I honestly big really energized and enthused by the glazing commitment, the amazing enthusiasm that so many children is under fire showing for that matter. And this issue was your school supportive your school in Liverpool. What I think we find the receptionist is that teachers pilot me really supportive of us, obviously, there's a bit of classroom management. But generally speaking, the feeling from teachers on the ground some students has been really positive. I think in fact next month on fifteen March they should be school scheduled. The United States to Abbas out. So yeah, I was gonna ask you. Are you connected to young climate change activists in the United States? So being lateral organisation has connections with international we've coordinating between international organizations. We're all colonizing separately. But under the same banner, and coordinating our strikes to be on same day much momentum lead us now. I don't know if you saw this, but Prime Minister Theresa May's Downing Street officers said it's really important for young people to engage on serious issues like climate change. But don't disrupt the class schedule as a result. What's your reaction to that statement? And that is that it's not like climate change issues recognize we don't know that they exist. Gather every couple of years to talk at climate change conference, right. The problem is the conference in the United Kingdom in the United States across the Westworld on taking concrete enough snaps in order to take action on these problems us having to start from school. We don't want to strike from. So we want to go to school. We want we want our educations. But as like mentioned what what's the point getting an education if we won't have a future. Thank you. The reason I know thank you. You really aren't doing enough. What difference will these protests today really make? I mean, do you see this as a rising wave that can change the world? Yes. I mean, I personally think that this is it is absolutely amazing to see hundreds of thousands of children across the world in succession educating themselves on the issues and going on to Mark measures. I think as we strike mounted it puts more pressure on world governments to take action to make concrete proposals. Because I think they're starting to realize that young people will be silence and won't be both off with any half-measures or goody two deals that they don't really enforce you mad at adults for not leading more firmly on this. Honestly, I am my generation is going to be the fascination in human history and then tie history of mankind. That will be poorer less vegetated and have a lowest standard of like every other banal parents which. Has never happened before in the entire history. The generation sliding before us has to the world. Such an extent that it's it's up to us to say that we will have live on in the

United Kingdom United States United Nations Abby Liverpool Houghton Manchester England Davos London Sweden Theresa May Prime Minister Abbas Westworld Eighteen Year Fifteen Year Three Days
"secondary school" Discussed on Mostly Lit Podcast

Mostly Lit Podcast

02:12 min | 1 year ago

"secondary school" Discussed on Mostly Lit Podcast

"Its clergy. Six get smart classes in college. Secondary school in government on. America's the college system in the UK is between the ages of seventeen and eighteen sixteen and eighteen so you can leave your secondary school go to to stick. Which is the last two years of. On H senior year. Senior high school. So that was really interesting. But like we lost two kids were did this. I this. It was like maybe do those state as okay, what is the whole thing in? It was filmed in South Wales Wales rolling countryside, picturesque thing. Coming like. In wales. Some people do some people don't. Yeah. I'm. Say it's in Wales. So what is it kind of draws in the American idea, but with the British system, and it marries the two so for example, if we look at something like in between us and skins if be mushed together in between his US in is is really UK what they win whenever we think about the British school system on TV. It's quite it's quite like rain, quite Greg. 'cause that's what is all in uniform base. It contains wherever whereas they have in sex education, which they have like this common rooms, which is what you would in. They have like the seventies. Oh, that's it. Many British by has the American into really very much about sex. Back guy wasn't into the only guy in the show. And he said that he's he stands grace laureate. Who is she? You're watching habit is from that. From that clip. We watch that stuff. It's like, it's an amazing. It's amazing. While watching on..

wales South Wales Wales Senior high school UK British school America US Greg two years
"secondary school" Discussed on KCBS All News

KCBS All News

03:53 min | 1 year ago

"secondary school" Discussed on KCBS All News

"Raises small class sizes and better teachers support. It's what L A teachers got an Oakland teacher's union president Keith Brown says he still fighting for a teacher librarian in every secondary school. They have better counselor student ratios, there's now a nurse in every school and Los Angeles. He's hoping Oakland school board take notice of LA's six days strike, and how the community backs public education Oakland school spokesman John Sasaki says they already know they don't want what happened in L A to happen in Oakland. It certainly shows that that that, you know, we're separated by months if not. Longer, and then, you know, really separated by number of days can finally come together and reach a resolution, so that's certainly encouraging, but we're working with our teacher's union portraying finer resolution, and regardless of what happened Ellie both sides meet next at the end of the month all Liqun kissy as the head of the Cal State university system. So there will not be a tuition hike during the next school year. Mike Ulan camp with CSU. You chancellor's office said it's mostly because of governor Gavin Newsom plan to increase permanent funding to the system passed several years under governor Brown we received incremental increases this year. Governor Newsome is proposing three hundred million dollar ongoing increase as well. As a two hundred fifty million dollars in one time funding that's going to be helpful the funding still must be approved by the state legislature. Prosecutors are urging a federal judge to work with a court appointed monitor to determine ways that PG knee can prevent is equipment from starting. More wildfires. The US attorney's office in San Francisco said the judge William Elsa should refrain from immediately imposing new requirements on PG. And also earlier this month proposed ordering the company to remove or trim all trees that could fall onto power lines and to cut off power during high wind events PG said the the the judge's proposals would interfere with state and federal regulators among the creditors preparing for a possible. PG, bankruptcy are California, cities and counties. KCBS gentlemen, reports on the taxes and fees that local governments collect from PG PG and E reported paying more than three hundred sixty seven million dollars to California, cities and counties when the bills came to last spring calling those payments and important way to support local economies analysts do not expect such payments to stop in a bankruptcy though. They may be held up for a while at Fitch Ratings, Amy Laskey directs the public finance department. The amount of revenue that Goto the government's at least the ones we rate, and I think generally the amount of property tax and franchise fee revenues from PD any really minor. We're not saying that there would be no impact on revenues in terms of these localities abilities to continue to function and continue to make payments to their creditors. Argues would be unaffected even in San Francisco where p genie is headquartered and pays about sixty million dollars a year in taxes and fees city controller Ben Rosenfield says he's not particularly worried in the last PG and E bankruptcy. The city was made whole after a delay of a few months in San Francisco, gentlemen, KCBS forty Niners will receive a thirty six million dollar refund from Santa Clara county after getting the tax on Levi's stadium. Cut in half the assessment appeals board made the decision yesterday Santa Clara county assessor. Larry stone calls it shocking and unexpected and says it will cost the school district. Millions the forty Niners don't own. Levi's but have a joint operating agreement with the city of Santa Clara coming up on KCBS on Megan gold speedy SFP considers a larger police presence in visitation valley after the beating of an elderly.

California Oakland governor Brown San Francisco Santa Clara Cal State university system Los Angeles Oakland school Governor Newsome Levi Santa Clara county Niners Fitch Ratings Larry stone Gavin Newsom Mike Ulan CSU president Ellie
"secondary school" Discussed on KCBS All News

KCBS All News

01:48 min | 1 year ago

"secondary school" Discussed on KCBS All News

"Of Berkeley explains. How that would make it harder not only for her to get groceries. But to pursue her online. Studies the trickle down effect because by receiving snap benefits in makes you eligible for other programs. So even if you're just getting thirty dollars a month without thirty dollars a month. You can't you say you can't get ten dollars internet. The Alameda County community food Bank is standing by to distribute more food in what it's treating as an emergency in oak. Oakland, gentlemen, KCBS Oakland. Teachers are set to vote next week on a possible strike KCBS has Holly Kwon tells us that the Oakland teacher's union is encouraged by the settlement and new contract for Los Angeles. Teachers raises small class sizes and better teachers support. It's what L A teachers got an Oakland teacher's union. President Keith Brown says he's still fighting for a teacher librarian in every secondary school. They have better counselor student ratios, there's now a nurse in every school and Los Angeles. He's hoping Oakland school board take notice of LA's six day strike and how the community backs public education. Oakland school spokesman Johnson Sasaki says they already know they don't want. What happened in L A to happen in Oakland? It certainly shows that two sides that were separated by months if not longer, and then, you know, really separated by number of days can finally come together and reach resolution. So that that certainly is encouraging, but we're working with our teacher's union portraying finer resolution, and regardless of what happened to LA both sides meet next at the end of the month. All Liqun Kislyak coming up on KCBS. I'm Carrie Huda second San Francisco's north beach neighborhood where supervisor Aaron Peskine has announced a proposed tax on empty storefronts. This is.

Oakland Los Angeles KCBS Oakland school Berkeley Alameda County President Keith Brown Carrie Huda Liqun Kislyak Johnson Sasaki Holly Kwon San Francisco supervisor Aaron Peskine thirty dollars ten dollars six day
"secondary school" Discussed on Little Atoms

Little Atoms

04:25 min | 2 years ago

"secondary school" Discussed on Little Atoms

"Teaches English literature to secondary school students. He was chosen as one of the observers new faces of fiction twenty eighteen and Michael w novel, which we're gonna talk about today is hold. Michael, welcome to head. I really lovely to be here. Can you describe hold for is in your words? So hold is predominant neighbor. Lenders story and blender is a seventeen year old Housego in Econo second city, and she cleans the house of anti an uncle issue. I who are to gone into in their seventies. He were born in Ghana, and then left garner in twenty thirties, moved to the UK worked very hard and then retired climbing garner and built them so huge house and have staff in the house, including Belinda and Belinda works. Another house. Guard a younger husker called Mary and the opening of the Novalis very much about relationship between these two diligence, sensible but much naughty Mary and then on an uncle, have some guests come over from London who meet Belinda and think that she is the most magnificently, well, organized well behaved beaten kind of young women that they've ever seen and that particularly interested in that aspect of Bennett's Carter because back home in London, these two guests come over doctor and nanna have really way would to Amer and Dr nanna think, oh gosh, if Belinda what's come over to London to me than possibly would be transformed into the sensible young woman doctor and none of one to be. So the novel then can focus on the relationship between Amer and Belinda in London, and Belinda attempts to keep the friendship with Mary came in gone alive and order the struggles challenges arise from that. So it's Belinda story at heart. So the part of the story. Is the dislocation of Belinda Ling from Kumasi to London? Absolutely not yourself obey the other way around you travel between. Yeah, and Ghana. So tell me about something about your own experience that having grown up inland and then going over and experienced it the other way around. I think one of the things that I always was struck by when I went back on as a child in particular was how immediately I was marked out as being someone who is different. So I suppose maybe quite naively ten, twelve guys gone on family holidays to see him that I be able to kind of blend into the background because like everyone else and. That that would be in. But people before it even opened my mouth had this awareness. I had come from the UK and so they had all these expectations about what I was going to be like and how the haven so on. So I think that expectation of going home as it were, which is very much the term that my mother, my father, actually, when we talked about going, it was about going home. It wasn't really as easy and straightforward a home going as phrase suggests and this book also and we won't go into too much detail about this because I don't wanna get the story away, but it's a book about sexuality as well. Yeah, then subsequently became an out game, and so you talked about going to garner and being different because you the guy that came from London. So what's it like a gay person traveling about two got if quite tense experience in all sorts of ways. I think particularly because there's Wade silence around sexuality ways and garner. So if someone is suspected it inverted commas of being. Lots of the time it isn't discussed, sort of just kind of hedged around and kind of crates, feeding of anxiety because can constantly waiting for the moment when someone is brave enough, bold enough to mention that tabu topic, which means that you're constantly walking on eggshells which is not the issue of experiences. I think that Gonese are becoming a bit more progressive in attitude toward sexuality, but I think it's is taking a long time, and I think is to the is still very much seen as kind of western ill that has been transported to garner affliction that comes from outside. And I think that's a really big challenge that needs to be to overcome one of the big problems. I think that needs to be addressed in of guardians, rethinking that sexuality so KamAz, which is the city that travels from is a regional capital of Ghana..

Belinda Ling London Ghana UK Michael w Dr nanna Mary KamAz Amer Gonese Kumasi Novalis Wade Bennett Carter seventeen year
"secondary school" Discussed on Vrain Waves: Teaching Conversations with Minds Shaping Education

Vrain Waves: Teaching Conversations with Minds Shaping Education

01:45 min | 2 years ago

"secondary school" Discussed on Vrain Waves: Teaching Conversations with Minds Shaping Education

"More more capable assessment capable owners, the experience of working in a high school and in school network for the coalition, but central schools where we were very transparent and visible about our learning goals. In fact, at central park east secondary school, we actually posted in every classroom, the habits of mind that all students were accountable for including teachers, those habits of mind were connections, perspective, evidence, conjecture relevance, and we phrased those learning targets as questions of essential questions. So how do we know what we know? How is this similar to another like idea or different idea? The point being that in every classroom, it was visible student. Now I've often played with him. I own mind. What would it be like for school to have its own essential school wide learning goals, which many do? And then would you put. Underneath that, you know, we pose with excitement. We pause with respect. We prob- with care, you know, we carry acidy. We've out for joy. We tag for accuracy, we pose or a commitment to learning the idea that we do these things together every day minute by minute. Not just because the teacher wants to make moves, but because they actually help us to achieve our goals as a collective, which is the classroom. You guys were so generous with your time. I really can't say enough positive things about your book. It's definitely gonna be in my huge recommended. Listen, we're gonna put tons of links to it in the show notes. But our last question will let you run on this is where can our listeners go to learn from with you?.

central park east secondary sc
"secondary school" Discussed on KMET 1490-AM

KMET 1490-AM

01:58 min | 2 years ago

"secondary school" Discussed on KMET 1490-AM

"I was in the air force i got my wings as a pilot and then there was a delay to secondary school where we were going to be taught multi multi and they told me they'd call with the school was ready they were all jammed up this is world war two so i went to york and my agent said would you like to do a broadway play we have i don't know where does the people but yeah of agra up his wife for big stars in europe agents said they wanna do the very widow would you write it so i said yeah and i called been who is in new jersey the reading trading fields and better they wrote books very widow which was a classic and well rehearsal george balanchine the quick refer who was doing car ahead show sad do your show and i think you'd be right for me over to his friend freely a big producer broadway and really like this is to do a show so what over there said i have a friend who's doing this show took us to you over to richard come i do saver would kill yelling anyway i was doing i had three shows running on broadway sable tediously and that was an age twenty five on my correct sydney.

george balanchine sydney york europe producer richard
"secondary school" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

KLBJ 590AM

02:03 min | 2 years ago

"secondary school" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

"A secondary school student walks in carrying a this new transparent backpack is something that a lot of folks embracing around the country and what students have marjory stoneman douglas returned to class after spring break next week they will be required to carry these clear backpacks it's a move to ramp up security measures after last month's deadly shooting in a series of breaches since then well you know okay i'm not sure if this is gonna make a massive difference you know really somebody's gonna make people feel a little safer make you feel safer but you think somebody's gonna put a gun in there knowing that you can see the gun i but whatever let's be clear up whatever making you feel safe does not make you say no it does not knows it on so it's not it's not a it's an interesting move is on a significant move this can make a big difference but yeah it's all about feelings jump in here at five one two eight three six zero five ninety steady learning a little bit more about this serial bomber the man who killed two people and wounded five others in a series of attacks here in the austin area he left behind that recording about twenty eight minutes long we're being told and a haunting revelation about himself as well the statesman describes it quoted as saying in this audio i wish i were sorry but i'm not no remorse whatsoever is if he had no feelings of remorse anybody else that's what he said in the cell phone recording according to sources familiar with the statements he described himself as a psychopath no medical history of that no diagnosis nobody else says he was crazy or anything but that's how he felt and he said he feels as though he's been disturbed since childhood well what does that mean what does that mean i wonder he was struggling in life i'm getting he wasn't getting what he wants he was probably one of those kids that got a trophy for coming in eighth place and was not prepared to deal with adversity in life forty years from now that'll all change i just wonder if if if it's gonna come out.

marjory stoneman douglas austin twenty eight minutes forty years
"secondary school" Discussed on talkRADIO

talkRADIO

02:09 min | 2 years ago

"secondary school" Discussed on talkRADIO

"Of reasons particularly the warm that you pointed out julia that without realising it that uh transgender led groups who go into schools now who educate children very young children who right through to secondary school and educate the teaches about and transgender no we do that um it isn't just that um the idea perhaps that we should be much more fluid about gender and we should be a boys and girls should be allowed to to express themselves in whichever way they want 'em personally i think that that's an excellent idea what is actually being said is that it's possible for children to actually be in the room body to be for example bully who is really a go and a gun who is really a bully not troubles with this because what he does is t things eats eat suggests that if you were a boy for example could conversely if you ago if you were a bully and you get what to do much things you know particularly into foot bull you got the tickets at toys you would rather west such and such whose could just be an ordinary yes absolutely absolutely agree that there may be a problem with the child he may be really ago i think once you step over that line and then that's actually quite serious because of notice things for the one from that did we we are seeing this the transgender clinics they oversee dade tsa any sort of medical procedures so anything until people are a long way down the line of lived as as it some of the opposite sex wrong time that were the adults but there is now increasing moves towards a younger pre p bessant children being given drugs to stop them from going through puberty so that they don't develop perhaps more the the the sexuality oath of the what they believed to be the rome gender so that they then it will be easier for them trenches data for the most.

julia
"secondary school" Discussed on KARN 102.9

KARN 102.9

02:29 min | 2 years ago

"secondary school" Discussed on KARN 102.9

"Americans who have children in elementary or secondary school mmhmm so you're you're hear that shoko the the americans who have children in elementary secondary school okay which way they're going to go with her be more that believe it is the the failure of government agencies or gun control more of them believed that government is more to blame sixty one percent think that government is more to blame these are americans who have children in elementary or secondary school just twenty three percent of these adults fault a lack of adequate gun control more ninety percent of all americans say them and following news reports about the florida killings at least somewhat closely with three percent to me with fifty three percent who said they been following it very closely um the survey of a thousand americans was conducted on february twenty fifth and twenty six uh the a margin of sampling error is plus or minus three percentage points with a ninety five percent level of confidence uh other things here of forty one percent uh of americans believe stricter gun control laws would do more to reduce the number of mass murders while just as many forty one percent say more action to treat mental health issues would make a a bigger difference but americans aren't convince stricter gun controls reduce crime and they don't trust the government to fairly enforce those laws for example you could sit there and say yeah i believe that if you eliminated all guns that it would reduce in all than than the number of mass killings if every gun was taken and confiscated row you're you so you you might say that but you don't believe it's the right thing to do right uh those who have been following the news very closely see the failure of government agencies as far more to blame middle aged viewers archenemy middle east vote middleaged voters are most likely to view the government as more to blame married adults and those with children in the home are even more likely to blame the government than those who are not married and don't have children living with them it's eight the interesting thing is those with the most to lose who.

florida forty one percent twenty three percent fifty three percent ninety five percent sixty one percent ninety percent three percent twenty fifth
"secondary school" Discussed on 1150 AM KKNW

1150 AM KKNW

01:47 min | 2 years ago

"secondary school" Discussed on 1150 AM KKNW

"And their real at me run the weekend after the show that club and we both debt amid a month later they call me back and like hey that super bowl sunday and on that sunday night so what are you thinking and i said well why don't we do this i'm a football coach let's have like a barbecue wings night like a big football super bowl party the thing yeah and i like break down the game form comedic lien will have this big super bowl party so another kind of clout you're dealing with here when i come into the rick bronzes how's it comedy on super bowl sunday they listen to my ideas and then cancel the show anyway jets how that work they didn't wanna do that at all and by rick branson the owner of the club did have an awesome super bowl party at his house and so i gotta go out to this cool mansion out in uh in scottsdale issue area and have fun got a shakeup phoenix oakland al's kind of fun so anyway that i'm a big timers what we call that they are big yep i liked alarming many kkob like yeah that's a great idea marty no we're not going to do that at all not even not even a little bit this is a good idea as having is going to steep unamerican notice a allowed to say stupid we are lodge cezanne but you are you can that's not the s word i've done my share of stupid things in my life i'm sure you have there is such a thing is stupid absolutely my wife went back to teach second grade and now you know she's a secondary school teacher and she can't of now they can't call the students could be more but we we kind of her up for not drew up we we mean my wife and i grew up as parents so we've been married twenty three and a half years now an appearance sorted grew up together parenting will i didn't mind that.

rick branson al marty secondary school teacher football scottsdale oakland
"secondary school" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:46 min | 2 years ago

"secondary school" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"This cool crazy guy and then he shows up on said knows every one of his lines never looked at this revenue yeah he's he's quite amazing there's a workaholic nature to that man and i think you've got a kind of step up to the plate also on your on that set a raises your game but he cares he really wants to make it the best at it can be and so is part of that you said you the first time you met him was also the first time you had the scene with him that's part of the method like let's not prepare too much and get to know each other let's just get right into this because that's what's actually happen i in the scene to i don't know maybe if i had reached out i'm sure he would have been you know i kinda wanted to be that way ogun us i thought it was averted played well i wanted to ask this not many people will know your roots how does the kid who grew up in brampton ontario how does that guy break into hall what you've been doing this for almost twenty years at this point yeah um i mean it's a long straw give you the shorter version of the story we like store out here i i went to a school called mayfield secondary school it's in cowered in east at that time i've heard that's that since i went there they've erected a walmart or something right across the street but when i went there literally miles of cal fields and that's not an exaggeration everybody had to take a bus in it was in the middle of nowhere relief in the field and mesa now okay alrighty going going to get past that one um but uh yeah i i audition it was an it's an art school so i auditioned for with my trumpet iraqi mention that i have that in common with you i also did not like the trump i heeded plane the trump but i was too i was ages to escape to scare i'd never done acting before i remember there to lineups from my parents.

brampton ontario mayfield secondary school twenty years
"secondary school" Discussed on talkRADIO

talkRADIO

02:15 min | 2 years ago

"secondary school" Discussed on talkRADIO

"The number of teachers we'd been eating we have warned about the continuously thin fat time and been ignored in now we're crises on tell me this pounds employers and recently that the record numbers of teachers and all schools fifteen thousand five hundred more than in two thousand and ten we still not go in of teachers for the number eight in the name request that we have we've got a mind she'll teachers teachers and the and he's very difficult to recruit on the difficulty as well as there's a lot of teachers leaving very early on in their career why is that the base east youth to patents are coming from talked down and the main walk the the biggest wanna go is it's a punitive m school accountability system off stayed on the assessment regime they is leading teachers to leave the profession because they they realized that they it if they progress a career they're only want to get bad results away from lasama savvy my my sister gotta when i taught me got got a degree and then trained as a secondary school teacher she still working but are on she's very positive omona obscene the in despair when it comes to answer this testing time and the score she's are i think that's pretty well but it seems to me to be almost a ludicrous pressure to put on teachers when their main job should be to do was in front of them teach our children it hit absolutely and you nail on the head there the key to aids with wit all job is to really encourage children to learn to become the leaders of the future the country's leaders of the future and we're not doing what way way grinding teaches down into the ground through the accountability system that we have we'll also not given um the the need the wherewithal that they need to be able to enjoy their career defining the workload these extremely hard they will queue from early in the morning till late at night that worked he threw the holidays things terrorists don't say just to ensure children get a really good deal in the classroom today i i i don't tax for one seconds the teachers do work hard this is not what i'm saying but i think people might question the complaints about the worker you guys get tickets to forty weeks holiday a year i really inmates teaches work significantly significant amount.

secondary school teacher forty weeks one seconds
"secondary school" Discussed on Sub-Stances

Sub-Stances

02:17 min | 3 years ago

"secondary school" Discussed on Sub-Stances

"The judge richard may he died he was also uh the the key judge in the trial against and he did a lot for example that of rate is included as a crime against humanity but may look to go to deepen era what was important when i think about my work is that um the winning combination folded at the niece walls um to have a local attorney so from serbia bosnia over cresa our and some one the come to angles as basically my work was primarily to to sue kenya's interpret between the two attorneys or between them and the council or at the tribunal between different practice we the council and to translate to how or or while were you selected for this the well assetlight i went through an extensive and beginning i thought there were quite a few people who i knew who were wrecking as a trigger off it's important to note tribunal is organism on on three pillars one is the chamber judges one is the registry in one of the prosecution so registries the one that serve service both since dying he did after the secondary school of english in france centralisation i went a to her level stink stay at the level that i guy who was aiming for basically to work with the registry john the role in the ridi the document inmates ours but then they went a step further so the second man than i did the test seeing the briefing in the when it was all over visit thank you very much luigino and they will sites was not.

richard attorney bosnia kenya serbia secondary school of english france