35 Burst results for "Second World War"

US deaths from COVID hit 1 million, less than 2 1/2 years in

AP News Radio

00:44 sec | 6 d ago

US deaths from COVID hit 1 million, less than 2 1/2 years in

"America's America's America's America's covert covert covert covert nineteen nineteen nineteen nineteen death death death death toll toll toll toll has has has has officially officially officially officially hit hit hit hit a a a a once once once once unimaginable unimaginable unimaginable unimaginable number number number number the the the the pandemic pandemic pandemic pandemic has has has has now now now now killed killed killed killed one one one one million million million million people people people people in in in in the the the the U. U. U. U. S. S. S. S. roughly roughly roughly roughly the the the the same same same same number number number number as as as as those those those those who who who who died died died died in in in in the the the the civil civil civil civil war war war war and and and and World World World World War War War War two two two two combined combined combined combined at at at at about about about about the the the the same same same same number number number number as as as as the the the the populations populations populations populations of of of of Boston Boston Boston Boston and and and and Pittsburgh Pittsburgh Pittsburgh Pittsburgh together together together together the the the the U. U. U. U. S. S. S. S. is is is is now now now now averaging averaging averaging averaging about about about about three three three three hundred hundred hundred hundred covert covert covert covert nineteen nineteen nineteen nineteen deaths deaths deaths deaths per per per per day day day day at at at at its its its its peak peak peak peak sixteen sixteen sixteen sixteen months months months months ago ago ago ago the the the the pandemic pandemic pandemic pandemic was was was was claiming claiming claiming claiming more more more more than than than than ten ten ten ten times times times times that that that that more more more more than than than than half half half half the the the the deaths deaths deaths deaths have have have have come come come come after after after after vaccines vaccines vaccines vaccines became became became became available available available available two two two two thirds thirds thirds thirds of of of of Americans Americans Americans Americans are are are are fully fully fully fully vaccinated vaccinated vaccinated vaccinated the the the the CDC CDC CDC CDC says says says says the the the the unvaccinated unvaccinated unvaccinated unvaccinated habit habit habit habit ten ten ten ten times times times times greater greater greater greater risk risk risk risk of of of of dying dying dying dying of of of of cold cold cold cold at at at at nineteen nineteen nineteen nineteen Sager Sager Sager Sager mag mag mag mag ani ani ani ani Washington Washington Washington Washington

America Pittsburgh Boston U. U. U. U. S. S. S. S. U. U. U. U. CDC Cold Cold Ani Ani Ani Ani Washington Washington
David Gergen Shares His Experiences in the Nixon Administration

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

01:46 min | Last week

David Gergen Shares His Experiences in the Nixon Administration

"David, I want to start because there's some people in the audience. I get new affiliates every month, and we get 400 and right now. I want them to know that you work for RN, you work for Gerald Ford, you work for Ronald Reagan, you work for Clinton. But you have different sort of styles and roles for each of them. Let's start with president Nixon. What'd you do in the Nixon White House? Nixon White House, I came in, I've been in the navy. I went to law school and I went in the navy for three and a half years. My last year, you know, I was assigned to come back to come to Washington to work on draft reform. That was the time when Nixon had launched a random lottery to determine what draft number you got and whether you're going to go to Vietnam or not. And we tried to clean that up, they ran a bogus in some ways, I ran the moderator first year out. I'll tell you, you have time for a little story. We got lots of time. We can go a long time today. Okay, super. Well, so the next one out of The White House orders a random lottery to determine who goes to Vietnam. The Lewis Hershey was then head of the draft. He was sort of the J. Edgar Hoover of the drafts. And so Hershey did something they did back in the Second World War, which was a very popular war. They got a bowl, they got capsules, and they put January 1 in the first capsule, put it in a bowl, and then January 2, all the days of January, then February, all the way up through the days of December the last ones into the boat. Got a spoon started up a little bit. Put it in the closet. And then on the day on the random monitor, they brought it to bowl, reached in for number one, you ought to Vietnam. And it was like November 15th. And then all of the early all of the early numbers and all of the early draws were from late in the year. So the whole thing was tilted.

Nixon White House Navy Gerald Ford President Nixon Ronald Reagan Vietnam Lewis Hershey Clinton David J. Edgar Hoover Washington Hershey
Social Security Is Becoming Worth Less & Less

The Dan Bongino Show

01:30 min | Last week

Social Security Is Becoming Worth Less & Less

"But I owe you the truth If you're a senior to me and you've lived the longer and you have great life experience with humility and respect and I use those words very deliberately to your life experience and all the suffering you went through for this country and world wars The Great Depression and everything I owe you the truth And the hard reality is the government made promises to you they can never keep The reason the social security check you're getting right now is worth less and less and less every month And to the 50s and 60 year olds now were expecting social security in the next 20 years It's going to be worth less and less and less because that money was already spent The reason you can't afford dinner in the rent anymore if you planned on living off these things and the reason it doesn't buy those services and products is because you already bought something You just didn't agree to it You bought decades of Jefferson spending Where the government spent the money a bunch of money on bailout programs and all this other stuff you already bought it I'm not kidding when I tell you this Please when you're done with this show today go to a search engine preferably not Google the most evil company in America Go to a search engine and put understanding monetizing the debt You'll get a bunch of articles by conservatives and you'll see that exactly what I'm telling you is 100% accurate

Depression Jefferson Google America
The Plot to Subvert the Western Judeo-Christian Tradition of the US

The Eric Metaxas Show

01:52 min | Last week

The Plot to Subvert the Western Judeo-Christian Tradition of the US

"Folks, welcome back. We're talking to the authors of battle for the American mind uprooting a century of miseducation, Pete hegseth and David Goodwin. So we're talking about what amounts to a conspiracy to subvert the western judeo Christian tradition baked into the heart of the United States of America. And there's no denying it. People like Dewey, they were on a crusade, and they have up till now, succeeded. Yes, they have. And you know what? They didn't know what the destination would be, per se. They just knew where the destination was away from. So it was always progress away from the western Christian paideia, the biblical roots of our and free thinking roots of the nexus of Athens and Jerusalem. They wanted to move away from that. That was progress. So you say conspiracy, that's not a wrong term. We use plot or heist because they passed it off to the next group of radical thinkers who carried the ball down the field based on how much God and other basic values have been stripped away. So enter the Frankfurt school, enter critical theory, which where did it land? A hundred blocks from here at Columbia University at the teacher's college. And these are marxists who fled Hitler while our boys are fighting over in Europe and World War II. And they are greeted with open arms with their radical views soon to infuse into the teacher's college. And within a couple of decades, one third of teachers in America at elite schools had been taught by the critical theorists of the Frankfurt school. So how do you get critical race theory in your zoom classroom? It is in the curriculum and the pedagogy of how the entire educational industrial complex works. And when you unravel it all, it goes back to those early efforts and each step which we lay out the unions, which used to be conservative teacher associations that ended up scripture to teachers to use in the classroom, captured by the unions. Well, then the unions create the Department of Education in a giveaway to Jimmy

Pete Hegseth David Goodwin Frankfurt School Dewey America Athens Jerusalem Columbia University Hitler Europe Department Of Education Jimmy
Zelenskyy: Europe has to think about price of peace

AP News Radio

00:45 sec | Last week

Zelenskyy: Europe has to think about price of peace

"In in in in his his his his nightly nightly nightly nightly video video video video address address address address Ukrainian Ukrainian Ukrainian Ukrainian president president president president will will will will of of of of them them them them is is is is in in in in ski ski ski ski says says says says history history history history will will will will hold hold hold hold Russia Russia Russia Russia responsible responsible responsible responsible for for for for the the the the war war war war in in in in Ukraine Ukraine Ukraine Ukraine because because because because we're we're we're we're trying trying trying trying to to to to get get get get your your your voice voice voice is is is not not not only only only since since since he he he said said said on on on Monday Monday Monday that's that's that's your your your loss loss loss as as as it it it did did did in in in World World World War War War two two two once once once again again again has has has to to to think think think about about about the the the price price price to to to be be be paid paid paid for for for peace peace peace on on on the the the continent continent continent and and and the the the price price price to to to be be be paid paid paid by by by Russia Russia Russia for for for bringing bringing bringing he he he says says says the the the evil evil evil of of of total total total war war war to to to Europe Europe Europe again again again he he he adds adds adds and and and we we we U. U. U. crayons crayons crayons we'll we'll we'll continue continue continue to to to work work work toward toward toward all all all defense defense defense of of of victory victory victory and and and on on on restoring restoring restoring justice justice justice today today today tomorrow tomorrow tomorrow and and and any any any other other other day day day that that that is is is necessary necessary necessary to to to free free free you you you crane crane crane from from from the the the occupiers occupiers occupiers I'm I'm I'm Charles Charles Charles the the the last last last month month month

Russia Ukraine Ski Ski Ski Ski Europe Charles Charles Charles
| Zelenskyy: Ukraine to soon have Victory Day

AP News Radio

00:45 sec | Last week

| Zelenskyy: Ukraine to soon have Victory Day

"You you you you crane crane crane crane unit unit unit unit president president president president of of of of looked looked looked looked at at at at me me me me as as as as a a a a landscape landscape landscape landscape has has has has told told told told his his his his war war war war ravaged ravaged ravaged ravaged nation nation nation nation that that that that will will will will soon soon soon soon have have have have another another another another victory victory victory victory day day day day seven seven seven seven ski ski ski ski has has has has released released released released a a a a video video video video address address address address to to to to his his his his people people people people marking marking marking marking the the the the defeat defeat defeat defeat of of of of **** **** **** **** Germany Germany Germany Germany in in in in World World World World War War War War two two two two I'm I'm I'm I'm promising promising promising promising you you you you claim claim claim claim will will will will soon soon soon soon have have have have to to to to victory victory victory victory days days days days we we we we won won won won then then then then we we we we will will will will win win win win now now now now too too too too in in in in reference reference reference reference to to to to Russia's Russia's Russia's Russia's war war war war against against against against Ukraine Ukraine Ukraine Ukraine since since since since he he he he added added added added we we we we will will will will never never never never forget forget forget forget what what what what our our our our ancestors ancestors ancestors ancestors did did did did in in in in World World World World War War War War two two two two when when when when more more more more than than than than eight eight eight eight million million million million Ukrainians Ukrainians Ukrainians Ukrainians died died died died on on on on every every every every fifty fifty fifty fifty Ukrainian Ukrainian Ukrainian Ukrainian didn't didn't didn't didn't return return return return home home home home in in in in total total total total for for for for more more more more claimed claimed claimed claimed at at at at least least least least fifty fifty fifty fifty million million million million lives lives lives lives he he he he concluded concluded concluded concluded we we we we don't don't don't don't say say say say we we we we can can can can repeat repeat repeat repeat I'm I'm I'm I'm Charles Charles Charles Charles de de de de Ledesma Ledesma Ledesma Ledesma

Ukraine Crane Crane Crane Crane Unit U Germany Ski Ski Ski Ski Charles Charles Charles Charle
Ukraine braces for escalated attacks ahead of Russia's V-Day

AP News Radio

00:50 sec | 2 weeks ago

Ukraine braces for escalated attacks ahead of Russia's V-Day

"Cities cities cities cities across across across across Ukraine Ukraine Ukraine Ukraine are are are are bracing bracing bracing bracing for for for for an an an an increase increase increase increase in in in in intensity intensity intensity intensity of of of of attacks attacks attacks attacks from from from from Russian Russian Russian Russian forces forces forces forces ahead ahead ahead ahead of of of of Russian Russian Russian Russian victory victory victory victory day day day day as as as as a a a a holiday holiday holiday holiday commemorating commemorating commemorating commemorating the the the the Soviet Soviet Soviet Soviet union's union's union's union's World World World World War War War War two two two two victory victory victory victory of of of of the the the the **** **** **** **** approaches approaches approaches approaches he he he he cranium cranium cranium cranium officials officials officials officials warned warned warned warned residents residents residents residents to to to to listen listen listen listen to to to to air air air air raid raid raid raid warnings warnings warnings warnings Russian Russian Russian Russian forces forces forces forces are are are are expected expected expected expected to to to to ramp ramp ramp ramp up up up up attacks attacks attacks attacks mostly mostly mostly mostly in in in in the the the the east east east east in in in in time time time time for for for for victory victory victory victory day day day day one one one one time time time time in in in in particular particular particular particular is is is is under under under under the the the the Russian Russian Russian Russian military's military's military's military's radar radar radar radar the the the the southeastern southeastern southeastern southeastern port port port port city city city city of of of of Mariupol Mariupol Mariupol Mariupol is is is is still still still still experiencing experiencing experiencing experiencing heavy heavy heavy heavy Russian Russian Russian Russian attacks attacks attacks attacks as as as as Russian Russian Russian Russian troops troops troops troops attempt attempt attempt attempt to to to to finally finally finally finally capture capture capture capture the the the the loss loss loss loss to to to to cranium cranium cranium cranium pockets pockets pockets pockets of of of of resistance resistance resistance resistance at at at at the the the the apple apple apple apple style style style style still still still still plans plans plans plans with with with with the the the the minute minute minute minute she she she she analysts analysts analysts analysts said said said said declining declining declining declining counteroffensive counteroffensive counteroffensive counteroffensive was was was was advancing advancing advancing advancing around around around around the the the the northeastern northeastern northeastern northeastern city city city city of of of of khaki khaki khaki khaki eve eve eve eve while while while while the the the the Russians Russians Russians Russians made made made made minor minor minor minor gains gains gains gains in in in in Luhansk Luhansk Luhansk Luhansk an an an an area area area area where where where where Moscow Moscow Moscow Moscow backed backed backed backed separatists separatists separatists separatists have have have have fought fought fought fought since since since since twenty twenty twenty twenty fourteen fourteen fourteen fourteen I'm I'm I'm I'm Karen Karen Karen Karen Thomas Thomas Thomas Thomas

Mariupol Ukraine Soviet Soviet Soviet Soviet Un World World World World War Wa East East East East Russian Russian Russian Russia Luhansk Apple Moscow Karen Karen Karen Karen Thomas
Kevin McCullough Describes the Ukraine Refugee Crisis

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:09 min | 2 weeks ago

Kevin McCullough Describes the Ukraine Refugee Crisis

"We've got a lot to talk about with our friend Kevin McCullough AKA both shadows. But Kevin, I want to talk to you about the horror in the Ukraine. There are 11 million refugees and you and I know that CSI is a great organization. They're helping the refugees. We are partnering with them. I'm telling people, please go to metaxas talk dot com. Please help the refugees. This is horrible stuff, folks. We need to do something. Well, Eric, just picture for you. And by the way, this is just another reason why people should be very fired up for the elections this year. Our foreign policy has turned into complete mush. And when there are when there are international crises taking place, we have taken the seat at the back of the bus, literally. We've said we don't want to be involved like Joe Biden, people, they're just absent these conversations. And when he does try to call people, they don't take his calls. Partly for this reason. But when you're talking about the Ukraine refugee crisis, 11 million displaced people and more than half of them now bleeding over into the NATO countries that border Ukraine. You're talking about the largest displacement of people since World War II. And we haven't seen anything like this in very, very long time. And the idea that there's all these different political pronouncements about Russia and Ukraine, all the rest of it. This is inarguable. The victims of this are largely mothers and children. Because the fathers put them on the train, sent them west. They stayed behind in mariupol and in Kyiv and in car cave. And those places to try to fight Putin off and to try to keep their home their home. So you've got from a biblical standpoint, Eric, when Jesus was asked, what does it mean to be truly your follower? And he said to feed widows and orphans, this is literally what that is. Not all the husbands and fathers have died. But functionally, these families don't have husbands and dads.

Ukraine Kevin Mccullough CSI Kevin Eric Joe Biden Mariupol Nato Kyiv Putin Jesus
Yoram Hazony on Foundations of the Conservative Movement in the 1960s

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:52 min | 2 weeks ago

Yoram Hazony on Foundations of the Conservative Movement in the 1960s

"Through kind of what we would consider to be kind of post World War II liberalism. If I were to be honest, in 2014 and 15, I was kind of naive enough to believe that real conservatives were actually small L liberals that we are the defenders of classical liberalism. You push back against this and you kind of also reject some of the fusionism of the 1960s and kind of some of the liberal movements post World War II. For some of our audience that isn't as well read into that. Give them a little bit of a taste of exactly what happened post World War II with this kind of quote unquote neoliberal orthodoxy that set in and how some even self described conservatives would play ball with that. Sure. I mean, the truth is that the conservative movement in the 1960s, which was put together the quarterback was, as you know, was William Buckley. But it was actually an alliance of liberals and conservatives, liberals, meaning people who are people are mostly concerned with individual freedoms and conservatives who are much more concerned with the question of how do we maintain and transmit things from one generation to the next. And the reason for the coalition, I mean, there's lots of times in places where liberals and conservatives were in different opposing political parties, opposing movements. But in the 1960s with the rise of socialism, you know, sort of across the board in America and Britain and other democracies. And the threat of communism, obviously, of the Soviet communism, which was expanding rapidly. So in that situation, the right was kind of reconstituted as an alliance between liberals and conservatives.

Alliance Of Liberals William Buckley Britain America
Stream.org Is Calling for a Peaceful Resolution to the Ukraine War

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:18 min | 2 weeks ago

Stream.org Is Calling for a Peaceful Resolution to the Ukraine War

"Focus, I'm talking to John zamir. John, let's talk about anything you want to talk about. What do you want to talk about? Thanks, Eric. Well, one thing tomorrow morning where a statement, a call from peace and negotiations is going to come out from a group of Christian scholars and activists who want to encourage Americans to promote a negotiated peace in Ukraine. You're one of those Americans, and I'm one of those Americans. We are signing this petition and we want to exhort people. Now this is not till tomorrow morning it will be published at the stream stream dot org. Right. But this is important, John, please explain why this is important because I think you and others believe that the Biden administration, the so called deep state, they want war. They want World War three and they're, you know, trying to pretend like it's just and it's not. I wish it were just the secret committee formally known as Joe Biden and the deep state behind him. But it's also large segments of the Republican Party, the military industrial complex, the neoconservative hawks, the same people who gung Ho supported the Iraq War and accused people like me of being unpatriotic or traitors for asking skeptical questions about weapons of mass destruction that never existed. Threats to America that were false connections to Al-Qaeda that never existed and consequences and costs that turned out to be all too real. Right now the squishy center left and the squishy center right, the whole rotten spectrum from Hillary Clinton on the one hand to Liz Cheney Adam kinzinger on the other. And now I'm throwing up in my mouth as I say their names. They want to fight Russia and we can Russia the last dead Ukrainian. They are delighted that Putin invaded Russia. They hope to trick him into doing so by constantly denying any legitimate Russian security

John Zamir Biden Administration John Eric Ukraine Joe Biden Republican Party Hawks HO Liz Cheney Adam Kinzinger Iraq Qaeda AL Russia America Hillary Clinton Putin
The Decline of Male Masculinity

Dennis Prager Podcasts

00:58 sec | 2 weeks ago

The Decline of Male Masculinity

"When you went to college, Dennis, do you think that the males were more manly and chivalrous than now or was it bad that do? It was bad, but it wasn't like today. It was the first generation of bad, so there was still a residue. Of the past. But it. Had already the devolution had begun. As I have always said, the greatest generation, that's what the generation of World War II and the depression is cold. I think there are many great generations, but I'm certainly going to agree they were a great generation. They made a Greek tragedy error. In the way they raised my generation, not me, my father was old school. You earned respect in my family. You earned your way through life.

Dennis Depression
The Amendments Woodrow Wilson Supported for the Sedition Act

Mark Levin

01:48 min | 3 weeks ago

The Amendments Woodrow Wilson Supported for the Sedition Act

"And I touched on this yesterday and I want to tell you about Woodrow Wilson a little bit more detail In addition to being a racist and a segregationist and a Democrat And a so called progressive And this is straight out of unfreedom of the press but nonetheless the facts are important During the course of World War I which will Wilson who had been a leaning progressive intellectual for decades supported a series of congressional amendments that Congress added to the so called espionage act Which collectively became known as the sedition act of May 16th 1918 Sedition act It was one of the acts passed under John Adams you'll recall And this act stated in part whoever when the United States is at war shall willfully utter print write or publish any disloyal profane scurrilous or abusive language about the form of government of the United States for the constitution of the United States Where the military or naval forces of the United States are the flag of the United States or the uniform of the army or the navy of the United States into contempt scorn Or disrepute shall be punished by a fine of not more than $10,000 back then It's big today was massive back then Or the imprisonment for not more than 20 years or both Provided that any employee or official of the United States government who commits any disloyal on patriotic or disloyal language or who and it abusive and violent matter criticizes the army or navy or the flag of the United States shall be at once dismissed from service

United States Woodrow Wilson John Adams Wilson Congress Navy Army United States Government
Woodrow Wilson Curtailed One of the Pillars of Our Democracy

Mark Levin

01:45 min | 3 weeks ago

Woodrow Wilson Curtailed One of the Pillars of Our Democracy

"Christopher B Daley professor at Boston University has written that during the lead up to America's interests the World War I the Wilson administration took immediate steps at home to tell one of the pillars of democracy press freedom by implementing a plan to control manipulate and central all news coverage on a scale never seen in American history Following the lead of the Germans and British well began to censorship to strategic elements of all out war Even before the U.S. entered the war Wilson had expressed the expectation of his fellow Americans which show what he considered loyalty Wilson started one of the earliest uses of government propaganda He waged a campaign of intimidation and outright suppression Against those ethnic and socialist papers they continued to oppose the war Together these wartime measures added up to an unprecedented assault on press freedom Wilson also created an elaborate domestic spy network to watch German immigrants and American radicals Federal agents arrested hundreds for making anti war speeches And sometimes for informal and private remarks Eugene debs four time presidential candidate for the Socialist Party Was arrested in June 1918 for suggesting during a speech The young American men were fit for something better than slavery in cannon fodder Sentenced to ten years in prison he defiantly ran for president in 1920 from his jail cell in Atlanta He received almost a million votes And during the war more than 2000 men and women were arrested for disloyal speech and over 1200 were jailed

Christopher B Daley Wilson Administration Wilson Boston University U.S. Eugene Debs Socialist Party Atlanta
How Inflation Created the Conditions for the Rise of the Nazis

Dennis Prager Podcasts

01:15 min | 3 weeks ago

How Inflation Created the Conditions for the Rise of the Nazis

"Inflation is not just a monetary issue. I mean, I know you know this. I'm saying this for the benefit of my listeners. When I think of terrible inflation, I think of what brought the Nazis to power. I know a lot about that era, and it was not anti semitism, that brought the Nazis to power. It was, in my opinion, the inflation in the Weimar Republic, the republic that was created after World War I in Germany. So when people think inflation, they should understand the social repercussions of terrible inflation. Have I overstated the case? No, you haven't. And you're right, the German hyperinflation of the early 1920s created the conditions for the rise of Adolf Hitler. You combine that with a great depression and you had this horrible near collapse of civilization in the west. And in terms of inflation's impact, you make a very important point and we do so in this book, which we try to write in a very reader friendly jargon free way. It's not just economics rising prices, but also with undermines what we call social trust.

Weimar Republic Adolf Hitler Depression
Caller: History Shows American Unity Is Important

Mike Gallagher Podcast

00:43 sec | 3 weeks ago

Caller: History Shows American Unity Is Important

"I mean, I'm not into World War II history and looking up how the Americans and the access powers and the British differed. And I think one thing that really stands out between the Americans and the Japanese is because the Americans, they all fought together. They stayed together. The Japanese would go do their own thing and try and get on or whatever the Americans would always go together in conquer or get this same goal and they always stayed together. So unity is important and so I take it you agree with my assessment. Yes, sir.

Netflix Tanks 37% On Massive Subscriber Loss

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:01 min | Last month

Netflix Tanks 37% On Massive Subscriber Loss

"Netflix is now down by 30 7% their stock. Down 37% in trading. Now it came out yesterday that Netflix reported a loss of 200 thousand monthly paying subscribers during the first quarter of this year. Netflix has embraced the woke agenda completely and totally. Now there's still some good content on Netflix. I canceled my Netflix subscription. Because after they publish cuties, which I believe was very close to child pornography and other people agree, it's hard to not come to that conclusion. There are some fine content on Netflix, their show on Elon Musk is fine. Their World War II documentaries are okay. Sure. But Netflix has gone all in on the diversity equity, agenda. In fact, Netflix has become a mouthpiece for the political correct regime. They've entire categories dedicated to trans content. Entire categories dedicated to fighting racism. Netflix, of course, is now coming up against other competitors, a big push from Disney, the grooming network, big push, which is Hulu, of course. Hulu is owned by Disney, a big push by discovery plus HBO Max and Netflix is now up against the wall. Now you might say Charlie, what's the importance so what if Netflix is cratering? I don't think you quite understand the cultural impact that Netflix has. Over young people and how they view the world. If 200,000 people are divesting from Netflix, they are doing the exact same type of behavior that people do when they say, I'm a little bit overweight, get me some celery juice, get me a gym membership. I'm going to stop going out to the bar every evening and I got to get myself into shape. What you are seeing is an entire country or culture start to kind of sit up straight with their shoulders back and say, that's not making me a happier or better person.

Netflix Elon Musk Hulu Disney HBO Charlie
Has Conservatism Reached the Height of Its Power?

Dennis Prager Podcasts

00:55 sec | Last month

Has Conservatism Reached the Height of Its Power?

"So today, one could argue, would you argue that conservatism is almost or in the last 5 years at the height of its power in America since World War II? Well, I think it reached close to that in the aftermath of the Trump victory. So for the first two years of the Trump presidency, the Republicans enjoyed complete control of the government. And they were able to enact some long-standing priorities. I do think now, of course, Republicans and conservatives are out of power in Washington D.C. and America is experiencing the results and so I think in November is going to put the Republicans back into control. With I think the biggest majority that they've had in a hundred

America Washington D.C.
Getting to Know Gerald Ford, the 38th President of the United States

The Doug Collins Podcast

01:41 min | Last month

Getting to Know Gerald Ford, the 38th President of the United States

"Let's dig in. This was a speech that was given by Gerald Ford president of the United States in 1977. It was January. It was his State of the Union, and I think he went ahead and took it to the State of the Union because Gerald Ford has an interesting perspective of being the only person ever to serve as president. And vice president, both, and never be elected to those offices. He was a member of the House of Representatives when Spiro Agnew resigned from the vice president. He was appointed by Richard Nixon to become vice president after Richard Nixon resigned. He taking again through the Twenty-fifth Amendment became president of the United States. So he serves as the only person to have ever served as president of this country without actually being elected. We've had some who have ascended to those roles, but if they actually served, if they serve later, they were actually president, but this was one in which he was actually appointed to the vice president's role, not elected to that vice president's role. So in moving up, it makes it makes an interesting anomaly in history. But it also sort of fits one Gerald Ford. If you look into his background, you look into where he came from. He's a midwesterner, raised in mission, Grand Rapids, went to school at the University of Michigan, played football there was a star football player. In fact, one two national titles there undefeated football teams at the University of Michigan after that went to Yale law school and then served in the United States Navy during World War II came out and began his service in the United States House where he served over 25 years before he was picked to be vice president and president.

Gerald Ford Richard Nixon Spiro Agnew United States House Of Representatives Football University Of Michigan Grand Rapids Yale Law School
"second world war" Discussed on NEWS 88.7

NEWS 88.7

05:42 min | 1 year ago

"second world war" Discussed on NEWS 88.7

"The second World War. Maya McGinnis is the president of the committee for a Responsible federal budget. She says the numbers are eye popping, but the federal government is recently spent a lot of money this past year. There was a tremendous need to be spending a lot and borrowing a lot because the covert pandemic is exactly the time you do want to be borrowing. But the problem was recklessly. We borrowed from many years building up to that, and it appears that this budget plans on borrowing. It looks like upwards of $15 trillion over the next decade. Most of that is what's already been on the books. Some of it is the new big expansion of government. She spoke to NPR's morning edition. The president is expected to resume negotiations next week with some Senate Republicans over his infrastructure proposal. But the GOP counter offer is far less than Biden wants to spend. Heading into Memorial Day. Public Health officials are expressing optimism that the country is on the right track in the battle against the pandemic. But they're also cautioning Americans not to let down their guard too fast. NPR's Rob Stein has more the number of people getting infected sick and dying has been falling steadily for more than a month and Arthur Lowest levels and almost a year. More than half of all U. S. Adults are not fully evacuated. So unlike previous big national holidays, public health officials say it's safer, vaccinated people to take off their masks and for people to gather for picnics and barbecues over the weekend, But unvaccinated people still have to be careful and officials are urging more people to get vaccinated. Especially because the more contagious variants still pose a threat. Rob Stein NPR News Germany will spend more than $1 billion on development projects in the southern African nation of Namibia. Germany acknowledges it killed tens of thousands of Namibians more than a century ago when it occupied the region. Ish. My phone dickwad has more from Harari. The agreement with the Namibian government follows Germany's acknowledgement off the colonial area massacres as genocide. However, a paramount chief of the Herrero, one of the two affected ethnic groups, told Reuters the agreement between the two governments is a complete sellout chief. The Coiro Coral, said the agreement was not enough for the Herrero and Nama tribespeople. We had suffered irreversible harm. Germany ruled what it called Jim in West Africa from 80 94 before losing it during World War one. South Africa administered the country from 1920 until it became independent Namibia in 1990 for NPR news. I am my friend equal in Harari. You're listening to NPR news from Washington. Live from news 88 7 in Houston. I'm Kyra Buckley. State lawmakers have until end of day Saturday to pass significant changes to the state's electric grid multiple bills in response to the deadly blackouts, which killed at least 30. People in Harris County have passed but in different forms. Legislators need to reconcile the differences. One of the bills would require upgrades to the state's energy infrastructure. Which many say is not ready for the next big weather event. You can hear more on this with news 88 7 in depth at 8 45. Meanwhile, the clock is also taking to pass some of the governor's other priority legislation. Government reporter Andrew Schneider says one that could be in danger is the omnibus elections bill. The House and Senate each passed very different versions of Senate Bill seven. Conferees have been working for more than a week it trying to hammer out a compromise that can pass both chambers. They have until Saturday to have the conference reports distributed in the House or the bill dies. If that happens, the governor can call a special session to pass the legislation. U S Secretary OF ENERGY. Jennifer Grand HOME is visiting Houston today. News 88 Sevens Lucy Oh, Vasquez says it's her first official travel outside of D. C since taking up the role earlier this year. Grand home is expected to attend a round table with Houston, Marisol Vester Turner to discuss lower carbon energy sources and clean energy infrastructure. Grand homes visit comes as the bind administration pushes a robust infrastructure plan and his new members of ExxonMobil's board pushed for more climate change mitigation practices from a company which has its main campus in Houston. Lucy Oh Vazquez reporting Houston man charged in the death of four year old Milia. Davis has pleaded guilty as Katie Watkins tells us. This comes two years after Malia's remains were found in Arkansas. Terrian. Vince pleaded guilty to tampering with a corpse and injuring a child. According to the Harris County Da's office. He was sentenced to 40 years in prison. But feast a potential life sentence had a trial jury found him guilty. Vince was engaged. Amelia's mother in May 2019, Vince Malia and her little brother were all reported missing. Later that evening, Vincent Leah's brother showed up at a hospital, but Malia wasn't with them. For weeks, authorities and volunteer groups looked familia around the Houston area. Her remains were eventually found on the side of the road and Arkansas one month after her disappearance. I'm Katie walk INS in Houston as Memorial Day weekend approaches. Montgomery County says it will crack down on drunk drivers starting today through Monday, the county will begin what it's calling a no refusal operation. This means they'll strongly pursue blood samples of someone refuses a Breathalyzer test..

Kyra Buckley Katie Watkins Lucy Oh Vazquez Maya McGinnis Vincent Leah ExxonMobil Andrew Schneider Rob Stein May 2019 Arkansas Malia 1990 Amelia Vince West Africa Marisol Vester Turner 40 years Harris County D. C Katie
"second world war" Discussed on WBUR

WBUR

04:38 min | 1 year ago

"second world war" Discussed on WBUR

"A state of emergency to control the coronavirus less than two months before the start of the Olympics. Extension was ordered because the country has failed to stop a rise in the number of infections. Rupert Wingfield Hayes is in Tokyo. When Prime Minister Yoshihide a. Sigur reluctantly imposed a third state of emergency on April the 25th. Many experts here said the 17 days shutdown would not be enough. And so it has proved to be in the western Japanese cities of Osaka and Kobe Intensive care units are now full to capacity. The Health Ministry has admitted that some covert patients are dying at home because there are not enough beds in specialist covert units. New strains of the virus that appeared in western Japan last month have now reached Tokyo. British Prime Minister Boris Johnson's conservative Party has scored a resounding victory over the labor opposition. In its first electoral test of the Coronavirus era. The opposition Labor Party described its parliamentary bi election to feed to the northeastern English town of hardly pool. Shattering. Conservatives also made further inroads into traditional labor territory and local elections, demolishing more of the so called red wall had breached in the general election of December. 2019. The U. N Human Rights Office has called for an independent investigation into a Brazilian police operation in Rio de Janiero, which resulted in a police 25 deaths. The U. N said there was disproportionate use of force on that the police had failed to preserve evidence of the crime scene. One woman described how armed police stormed in her home in pursuit of a suspect. Congress would disappear will give you Sunday Only when the police saw the blood. They came in screaming. Where is he? Where is he? I just had time to put my Children here behind me, and they killed the boy in the room. They didn't give the boy time to say anything. My only reaction was to protect my family. My nine year old daughter saw everything. The police chief Ronaldo. Olivera said officers were acting in self respect Self defense in response to a well armed drugs gang and that the operation had been planned for months. Big cloud of capitalists and I'm like I want to make it very clear that the police do not act on emotion to carry out such an operation. That is a lot of planning on we follow many protocols so before people say the operation was not planned, way carried out 10 months of investigation. Somali troops ally to the opposition have begun withdrawing from their positions in the capital market issue following progress in efforts to end the dangerous political standoff. Some heavily armed troops moving on foot and in vehicles. Being seen returning to a military camp in the city. That withdrawal will ease fears of further violence between factions within the security forces over the failure to hold elections. World News from the BBC. Can you is conducting its first of a nationwide wildlife sense and Senate bid to boost conservation efforts. The Kenya Wildlife Service has helicopters will be used to help counted map of the distribution of the larger mammals on land. In lakes had on the Indian Ocean coast. Poaching has long been a major problem in Kenya, but the authorities say that strict anti poaching measures have seen far fewer elephants and rhinoceroses being killed. Economic data from China shows the country has rebounded more strongly from the impact of the Corona virus pandemic than was forecast. The trade figures of being seen as an indication of the global economy is also reviving. Steven McDonald is in Beijing. China's exports of outstripped expectations and imports risen to the highest level in a decade, according to official figures for the month of April. Man for Chinese electronic goods has picked up in recovering markets like the U. S. And in countries still struggling with the coronavirus, China's protective equipment sales of increased China's domestic consumption is also risen with the virus crisis for the most part under control here. Saudi Arabia has for the first time acknowledge that it's holding talks with its main adversary Iran aimed at reducing regional tensions right. Criminy has senior Foreign Ministry official Told Reuters it was too early to judge the outcome on that re had wanted to see what he called verifiable deeds. French spies are moving from a cramped former army barracks in northeast Paris to purpose built headquarters in the eastern part of the capital. 19th century building in Boulevard multi a as how's the DGSE foreign intelligence since the end of the Second World War and is now.

Rupert Wingfield Hayes December. 2019 Tokyo Rio de Janiero 19th century Olivera 25 deaths Kenya Congress Osaka Steven McDonald 17 days Beijing BBC 10 months Reuters Second World War U. N Human Rights Office Ronaldo Olympics
"second world war" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

KLIF 570 AM

01:38 min | 1 year ago

"second world war" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

"Second World War plane, numerous instruments, and by the mid sixties, he was the drummer for a group called the Tikis. They were, in fact signed a Warner Brothers records, but their producer suggested a number of changes for that band for their first album, Ted would take over the guitar and main vocals. And the name should be changed to Harper's Bazaar. And in 1967, they had their only hit record with Paul Simon's feeling groovy got no need to do Already. Ted was moonlighting on his band. He was getting together with Teddy Turner. And his Bunsen burners and double tracking his voice to do vocals and harmony parts on songs. Well, he actually made a complete album of them hit songs of the sixties as if they've been recorded in the 19 twenties, including. Hey, Jude Here reading you with the musical sanitation. Hey, Jude. Hey, Jude. Don't make it bad. Take a said song and make it clever stuff. But Jimi Hendrix was actually bigger that year. In 1969. Harper's Bazaar did a gig in Pasadena, Ted in the group jumped on the T W a flight to go home to the Bay Area. The.

Ted Jude Harper Teddy Turner Warner Brothers Jimi Hendrix Paul Simon producer Pasadena Bay Area
"second world war" Discussed on The Anthill

The Anthill

02:48 min | 2 years ago

"second world war" Discussed on The Anthill

"One, thousand, nine, hundred Britain and countries, because over major outbreaks of infectious diseases cholera than inbound. His. Interest implicit or Could probably. One of the things we drank decline in anxiety about the needs of the welfare. State is the shift mortality. Until the nineteen forties and fifties, you still had large numbers of people doing from communicable diseases. Thing. That seems to happen. People start dying instead because it lifestyle diseases. Heart disease concern things that matt named feeds back into a right wing agenda. Old people suffer because of what they do. They thankless. They deserve to final the difference infectious diseases. Thanks everyone affecting an issue. The Pool for infectious diseases. You're also protecting yourself in other words Roy's in nine hundred south interest. and. Creating that sense of enlightened self interest because the most people unknown sufficient altruistic Scott. Let's. Trusted Together that's just a piece of rhetoric in the end. You need to get a sense that blinkprotect. Protecting Renzo practice the only way you get people to say the importance of it, and that's what happens during signal blake, protecting the people. You were protecting yourself as well because bone still indiscriminately, the degradations of the women discuss the risk of a Nazi. Victory in the wool was indiscriminate. An order that tend. To create more of a sense of actually we need to work with people who we needed to practice. Probably look down seems being different and creating a sense in which even going may student lakes six on the. Scene to with. Thanks, PIPPA I think that's a nice night on which to end. Whether or not. We agree that the second world will or de Covid nineteen all great levellers. It does seem as though there are useful parallels foster drawer on individuals. As much as anything, it seems that fresh thinking about shared experiences. The came vital element postwar recovery. Cetinje something will pondering at the moment, T. So that just leaves me to say, thank you for joining me to talk about the origins of the British welfare state and recovery from.

lifestyle diseases blake Britain de Covid Heart disease Renzo Roy Scott matt
"second world war" Discussed on The Anthill

The Anthill

06:55 min | 2 years ago

"second world war" Discussed on The Anthill

"DURING THE WAR S. A patch of said. What happened. was that a lot of the debate? About what does the postal? Senator subjects which spending facing labor things like housing and of course lowered proserve population housing. The retention of employment than kind of full employment, which had not happened under the Conservatives in the nineteen thirties, going into the nineteen forty five election. You have a situation where Churchill is. Push me computer as the prime minister, but he's policy is not, and it's the quality who has the election manifested queens? It lessens the future who in talking about how do we win the peace? No, the one the war Bennett has given us a sense of the kinds of changes in public attitudes that helped put the welfare state at the heart of postwar recovery. The sheds suffering prompted fresh thinking. D think same could be true today as we emerge from this shed experience of Corona virus. Think the coronavirus like the. Chest the resilience of society and demonstrates the need to tackle numbers inequalities in this, so as we should already been occurrence for a number of years so. The extent to which the economy has produced or concentrated inequalities, the insecurity of large numbers of people. It's exposed the inadequacy of universal credit and. These? The delays in payments system. Is related to that. It's expensive. Housing crisis of the numbers of homeless pick streets reliance. People upon foodbanks. None of these things we news just. As things will already hoops and there in the nineteen thirties. The wasn to saints. solution ready unlined to hand. Experience of. War Socialism or on the Organization of society full that particular Ray. Creates a disappeared the willingness to expect. Shift in. Policies at least for claim. You could see happening across the political spectrum as well. The difference now is that. The government tackling these things under the temporary provisions of the. act. We don't know is whether there is a prospect of an real paradigm shift occurring the some something that there is some kind of courage shifting mentality on the cost of the public. Would I don't see? Is If you an overarching national conversation as happened during the wall which created. Wherein, you could move decisively that urging. Bennett, did you want to add something there I mean I think that's a loss of potential the, but but I think there will reasons to be cautious. I think if you think about this in the light of experience during the Second World War then they're also things you could argue. That we have in common without periods so. First of all. I think it's probably true. The both between nineteen, thousand, nine, hundred, forty, five on the current crisis. More people have a better understanding of other people's vulnerability than they might have been previously. So, in other words, they are less inclined, or they may be less inclined to blame other people's vulnerability on the personal failures of the people themselves as a greater recognition, the people be struck by misfortune through no fault of their own. A second assume is the idea that people also have a sense of their own vulnerability that more likely to be struck down by fourteen themselves through no fault of their own. And so that sense of greater personal vulnerability may also change people's attitude towards risk risk-sharing. So. There is an argument that's another important part of the impact of the second world. War On the construction of the welfare state was that it made middle-class people feel more vulnerable themselves, and so they saw great advantages to themselves in Sherri risks. Ultimately the creation of something like the National Health Service is a way of sharing risks across the whole population rav of making each best dependent upon the measures they can take themselves to protect themselves against the risk of ill health. Another part of this is the extent to which the government has. forced by second stances to intervene in economic life in a way, which would have been unthinkable full very hard to imagine you've expected. A particularly conservative led government. To accept that it needed to pay eighty percents of the wages of roughly a third of the population or third of the employed population. This is quite turn a marketable development. I think pepper refer briefly to what happened at the end of the first World War in the flu pandemic. That I think is relevant to this discussion because. The end of the First World War although there are lots of people arguing about the importance of reconstruction. They're also lots of people arguing for return for normalcy, and for the return of business as usual. And, in the general election in one, thousand, nine, hundred eighteen, despite all the arguments, the join the first World Mall, it was the desire for normalcy that actually what out in terms of the election results over the design changed, and so those a the the Conservatives gained seats in style coffee election. Tip at you to come in there. There's a great cartoon coup two very good thing as long as made in nineteen, forty six, I think to promote the coming of the ancients mcmansion yet and it starts starts with the idea. have been a missing if unite which we've already moved to tackling. In.

Conservatives Bennett Corona prime minister Senator Churchill World Mall flu Organization of society Sherri National Health Service Ray
"second world war" Discussed on The Anthill

The Anthill

10:37 min | 2 years ago

"second world war" Discussed on The Anthill

"The Wall and beverage never expected implementation until audible reports written with a function very clear and famously said at the time. A revolutionary moment in the world history is a time for revolutions, not for patching I suppose that. Sums this up. The Wall had been so extreme and recovery therefore needed to based on radical, thinking well fuck name for Britain, it was it was because it. It was intended to provide full. Every body was in most of the population. And providing up to liberal was the OH, poor law been really intended to conduct punish people fulsome to pined work, but part of what he's suggesting is, the state should take over much stronger roll out directing both social and economic change. Thanks pat tending to you now Bennett. The beverage report was published during the war, and its recommendations were enacted afterwards. What would the key changes to legislation got the recovery project moving? So if I could refer back to pacifist talk about PAT talks about the beverage report. The giants beverage talked about they were Wong. Take Mari- is less squalor. Sickness! And I focus on on the four of those on wont and sickness and Squalor Ignorance than that my way to approach this, the first of the sets of reforms to be introduced with the reforms effected education, which was designed to address the problem. I think nurturance. Joining the into a period, there have been a great movement to separate in effect, primary and secondary education to have a a break in the education system at the age of eleven, and that was then carried forward through the education reforms were introduced in England Wales in one, thousand, nine, hundred eighty fall, and in Scotland in one, thousand, nine, hundred, ninety, five, one of the main aims, those rights walls to consolidate the distinction between primary and secondary education. On the second key feature walls, they decision to remove fees in secondary schools so before nineteen thirty nine in order to attend secondary school. You either needed to house a scholarship, or you need to pay a fee on the abolition of fees made secondary education much more accessible to a large section of the population. The secondary to say something about his want social security. explained a key feature. The beverage report was this idea of consolidating the different insurance schemes that had existed prior to the Second World War. Then post while policymakers built on this to construct the basis of social security system, so one part of that swallows the National Assistant Scheme, and that was intended to replace the Polo on it was designed to provide benefits for those who are otherwise facing destitution all serious poverty. And then alongside that those national insurance scheme, and the National Insurance Scheme was an attempt to provide a single insured scheme that would cover all the main risks. So before nineteen thirty nine. You had separate provision for separate insurance schemes, dealing with unemployment, sickness and retirement or old age the national. Insurance Act was designed to try to bring all those things together into a single national insurance scheme, so between the two you have scheme, which is designed to offer protection against the main social contingencies all risks, and then it's reinforced with a national assistance scheme, which provides means tested benefits in case of those benefits and all to be sufficient. The third giant that I wanted to say something about his sickness dill health. Before the Second World War. Britain had a health short scheme, the covered roughly sixty percents of the male population, roughly thirty percent of the female population. On through that scheme, in short, contributors were able to gain access to a general practitioner. But. They didn't have the full range of medical services through that in short scape. Then alongside that there were a number of different hospital services, so though the voluntary hospitals which were. Essentially charitable hospitals that had developed from eighteenth century onwards in most cases. On by nineteen, hundred nine, those being funded by a combination of chargeable payments, patient payments on insurance schemes private insurance schemes. And then alongside side then you had public sector hospitals, and they were either hospitals being run by public health committees of local authorities all they were essentially old, Paul or institutions who now being run bibles. Call the Public Assistance Committee. So one of the key recommendations, the beverage reports was the beverage, said the his plan for Social Insurance to work his plan for Social Security to work. That were certain assumptions to one of those assumptions was a comprehensive national health scheme, until that was introduced under the National Health Science Nineteen, forty six, and in Scotland Nineteen, hundred, forty seven, and as a further North Island in nineteen, forty, eight on these crater, the National Health Service that was intended to be taxpayer-funded free at the point of use comprehensive, so covered all the medical services to the post might need and universal. It was open to the entire British population. The, fourth of the giants of that. I want to pick out from beverages. beverage called SCUOLA in other words Paul Housing. Again before nineteen thirty nine launch, numbs of people were living in unsuitable accommodation is because they were living in what we're called slums or insanitary housing. Off because they were living in overcrowded accommodation, and then clearly, the wall exacerbates that because wall results in the destruction of a significant number of housing units. So there's clearly a need to rebuild Britain the truly as well as figuratively after nineteen forty five. And how did attitudes shift during the war to make these radical changes suddenly possible? I think there are a number of different aspects to that on. The first aspect that I would focus on is the. Extent to which the government was forced to into the in areas, the economy and society in order to maintain social cohesion and maintain the social fabric. Because augury, one of the lessons of the first world will was if society collapsed as home. It became impossible to maintain the war effort. Some people would argue that was ultimately. Why jumped needles? The First World War because. Domestic arrangements collapsed. So, the first thing was how you preserve civilian welfare, not sense on the government introduced a number of measures designed to do that of which the most important would have been rationing, which was designed to ensure they were were fascist. All and everyone had the food they needed in order to maintain a level of physical health, and that in turn then helped shape people's attitudes about ideas, route, entitlements and so. I think a second part of it is thought. The war has an inspection effect. This is something that to economist Alan Peacock and Jack Wiseman taught about nearly nineteen sixties. He said that the war affects the way we think about social issues in a number of ways one of them is it? It casts a kind of searchlights on existing arrangements, and it highlights the deficiencies, and that was particularly true of the hospital service, so it was on. The stars of the wall that will be lots of casualties, and therefore the health service needed to be geared up in order to deal with the casualties that would result both military casualties on civilian casualties. It's because of the threat of bombing. And so this meant they had to have a close look at the Quincy of hospital facilities around the country, and that in turn helped concentrate minds on the need to improve the coordination of hospital services and also improve quality of hospital services. One of the ways in which I think, popular attitudes are affected is that you have the social provisions which previously been regarded as unthinkable? which when circumstances change can now be fought. There's all said the idea that war's demand sacrifices walls were a great disruptions. People's lives although war was great disruption to people's lives. UNSEW in order to make this more tolerable, people needed golfer the inspiration as it were that the sacrifices would be worth. It's the what would result from this actor. FFICES was not just Nutri victory, but successor world in the future, and so that I think also helped shape attitudes. So that's bill legistlation hip her. Briefly taken through the political landscape at the end of the war, because it was quite distinctive, and it plays an important role in how all of this unfolded. The two main political parties in Britain the Conservatives, and Labour at what together in government during the conflict in a highly unusual period of cross, party corporation, and then very quickly off the end of the war came an election which changed everything so in nineteen forty five. Some, look this poison into this. Many people in the country, not least in the Conservative Party. Won. Election they had any monies to win. Hundred fifteen seats, a previous election, one, thousand, nine, hundred sixty five ten years the last..

Britain Sickness National Insurance Scheme giants Scotland Social Insurance Paul Housing Bennett National Health Science PAT England Wales Mari National Health Service Quincy of hospital
"second world war" Discussed on The Anthill

The Anthill

01:34 min | 2 years ago

"second world war" Discussed on The Anthill

"Be so brands zoo, but very few people would slip through the net, and the report was incredibly popular among the general public. It seems to imagine out but. People were queuing up to purchase copies of it. Even though it was a government document. Politics is beverage worked so hard promoted as he was on the BBC any Reid articles and being with big queue up within the month, a hundred thousand copies it being sold. The government propaganda machine them in a suit. Inflammation promoted it because they thought he could really raise wartime morale by promising improved lives off the wall, but bumpers new Burlington in twos was Churchill. He tried to stop a summary of the report. Being circulated to troops, then have giving zoos unpopular, but he never really supported beverages proposals and hope all be quietly shelved. But then we felt we making forty three backbenches one the largest anti-government boat of the war for a commitment to implementing it bumped chill, chill in the conservative still kept their distance Langbo strongly supported, and his popularity was one element in the doing so well in the forty five general election. And such as partially explain why. The report was published in Nineteen, forty two. But nothing came about as a result of it until the nineteen forty five election. What is never intended to if most of us won't on proposals that were intended to be often..

Churchill Inflammation BBC Reid Burlington
"second world war" Discussed on The Anthill

The Anthill

04:22 min | 2 years ago

"second world war" Discussed on The Anthill

"Colleague. Laura Hood the conversations politics editor. The second. World War was the deadliest military conflict in history. It killed somewhere between seventy and eighty five million people which amounted to around three percents of the global population in nineteen forty. Those who survived were left to face a vast reconstruction project. From decimated landscapes to emotional trauma, an economic devastation, the horrors of the early twentieth century amounted to a mammoth recovery challenge. There are many different ways to think about postwar recovery and many different nations. We could consider. But for this episode in series I wanted to zone in on the UK West, some surprising political developments took place in the postwar years. Essential component of the recovery process after World War Two in the UK, was the construction of the welfare state including the world famous. National Health Service. A flurry of legislation in the nineteen forties brought in what is called a cradle to grave social security system, the promised to provide a safety net against many the evils that played the lives of ordinary people as a result of the war. Hunger sickness and unemployment. That would be better housing better, education and financial support for those unable to work and would be publicly funded healthcare for all. A pledge that many did he like to hear from that governments during the coronavirus pandemic? Deceased of this project being seinfield years prior to World War Two. But the singular circumstances of the conflict provided the momentum needed to get with project up and running. So many people were left needing help after fighting ceased that radical thinking was urgently needed. In the end protective rebuild after conflict became a complete overhaul of the way the British state operated. It was reconstruction on an epic scale. Now with the shared experience of economic hardship job, losses and health concerns as a result of the current pandemic. It seems like a good moment to reexamine. How all this came about in one, thousand, nine hundred eighty Britain. With me to discuss World War Two recovery are PAT thane visiting professor in history at Birkbeck College. Bennett Harris Professor of social policy at the University of Strathclyde. And PIPPA guttural professor of history in policy at the University of Westminster. Now as I mentioned discussions about offering British citizens, greater state support had been going on for a long time before it will too, but I want to begin discussion in nineteen forty two. That's when landmark report by William. Beverage was published. Proposing a series of measures to address five giant evils want disease, ignorance, squalor, and idleness. Pat Many people describe the Beveridge report as laying the foundations for the welfare state. What did he actually propose? Be Martine forty round for posing phones to the health system associate insurance because the being going criticism before the war engineering beverage. The the provision of state pensions health. Non Employment Insurance and other benefits, the grownups with the century in inveigh haphazard a coordinated way he's. An early in the war became up this that these systems were preventing severe polity, so they showed massive politics Mungo. And evacuation showed policy among children. So commissioners intended to propose ways to improve the system. But recruitment didn't think is terribly important. A beverage was any push to chair. It 'cause he'd been advising on his Bevin. Minister of Labour. Organizing the wartime labor market, but betting got fed up with being bossed around by Babri, which is Varga beverages mode met bridge was a specialist in labour masses. So. I've go to appointed jazz. Insurance Committee to get rid of him. A beverage very disappointed aches seems so unimportant.

PAT thane William Laura Hood UK Bennett Harris Professor of so National Health Service editor Insurance Committee professor of history University of Strathclyde Varga beverages University of Westminster visiting professor Employment Insurance Britain Martine Birkbeck College
"second world war" Discussed on KMJ NOW

KMJ NOW

01:36 min | 2 years ago

"second world war" Discussed on KMJ NOW

"A decade plus away from the second World War she's born in Illinois moves Los Santos during the Great Depression she got her first start on radio but her first regular job was as co host of Hollywood on television variety show that aired six days a week in the forties she's beautiful by the way I mean look at now she still you know ninety eight she was married three times her third husband Alan one whom she met on password died before their eighteenth anniversary in nineteen eighty one she was the array as she was originally cast as man hungry Blanche on the golden girls but they change roles with rue McClanahan I love anyway right she's an animal lover been involved in all kinds of things including working at the LA soon the Morris animal foundation for over forty years sure ninety eight today Michelle Obama Happy Birthday to you former First Lady still looking good out there doing thank site about football this weekend I'm not allied Humm pumped this is gonna be could be good weekend how may give me a break down football stuff with it later three two three five three twenty four twenty three hatchet Benson shows your Twitter feel free to tweet at me got to be a you know I we talk about like guns here the big rally in in in what's going on in Virginia and you got all of these things are happening in guns we worry about guns but you know the is the flu still nasty and we're in the midst of the season the good news influenza like illness was high in thirty two states in the second week of January but the number of cases were down from the previous week it's still unclear if the flu season.

Illinois Los Santos Hollywood Alan Blanche LA Morris animal foundation football Humm Benson Twitter Virginia flu Michelle Obama
"second world war" Discussed on Hijacking History

Hijacking History

05:44 min | 2 years ago

"second world war" Discussed on Hijacking History

"Beginning in one thousand nine hundred thirty five that year he announced that he would not limit the German army to one hundred thousand men a direct Violence nation of the Versailles Treaty from this point forward Franson England would have had every right to invade Germany which would not been hard to do because direct violation of the Versailles Treaty was the same as reopening the war but the allies Britain and France refused to do anything because they were so afraid of another world war and so they basically tried to appease Hitler and they didn't nothing as he invaded one country after another now the first country that Hitler invaded Austria the country of his birth and he did that in March of nineteen thirty eight this was a bloodless invasion because the Austrians basically refused to him and Austria became a satellite of Germany affectively being absorbed by Germany in September nineteen thirty eight Hitler demanded portions of Czechoslovakia which was a democratic state not only was Czechoslovakia eager to event itself it had a very fine army and it had a defense agreement with France and the Soviet Union so if Britain and France wanted to stand up to Hitler September nineteen thirty eight was the time to do it. Czechoslovakia would have been able to spend itself to some extent and the French and the British would have had more forces in place then Germany but once again appeasement over-ruled common sense and the British and the French met with Hitler in Munich and they agreed to sell Czechoslovak walking down the river Czechoslovakia was not present at the Munich conference in September nineteen thirty when Britain and France agreed to let Hitler have portions of Czechoslovakia in return for a mere promise of peace of course Hitler didn't mean it but the allies hoped that somehow he did so the world was headed straight towards World War now in early nineteen thirty nine the British and the French guaranteed the security of Poland this ironic because Poland was an undamaged radic country unlike Czechoslovakia and it had no good army at all but now Britain and France we're going to stand up for Poland they really did mean it this time and they made it clear to Hitler that if he invaded Poland they would declare war on Germany Hitler did quite believe it though the allies had never stood up to him before but just in case Hitler decided to make a deal with the Soviet Union listen to guaranteed its neutrality in the event of war between Germany and Britain and France a non Russian treaty which contain two parts one part was public and that was the nonaggression promise the other part was secret and that was that when Germany invaded Poland on September first nineteen thirty nine Russia would invade Oakland from the eastern side at the same time and the two countries would greedily slice up Poland and added between themselves so of course this was a shameful agreement and the Soviet Union would have a lot of explaining to do later when it was invaded itself by Nazi Germany and it had to explain why cited with Hitler for so long but that was the situation on September first when the Nazis invaded Poland World War Two was often running because the British in the front inch made because the British and the French upheld their agreement and declared war on Germany now for a long time was no fighting from September nineteen thirty nine to May nineteen forty there was what was called the droll gear in French namely the phony war there was no fighting and that's because the British and the French hope that the dogs of work somehow we put back into their pin. Germany wanted to try to make some deal with Britain and France if possible because Germany's main enemy was East in the Soviet Union however by May Nineteen Forty Hitler had decided enough was enough and he invaded France and the Benelux nations Belgium Netherlands and Luxembourg he rolled right over them and in just one month breath Hitler accomplished what the Germans had never been able to accomplish in World War One namely the defeat of France and World War Two was nothing like World War One World War One was a war of attrition where the two armies faced off against each other on a common battle line and neither army was able to push the other army out of its.

Hitler Germany Czechoslovakia Poland France Soviet Union Britain Austria German army Munich England Benelux nations Oakland Russia Belgium Netherlands one month
"second world war" Discussed on Hijacking History

Hijacking History

03:55 min | 2 years ago

"second world war" Discussed on Hijacking History

"In this introductory podcast to unit five we look at the overview of the period from nineteen fourteen to nineteen forty-five when you have two World Wars separated by twenty year period called the intro of South Eastern Europe. powerful enough to keep the lid on these nationalist movements Austria Hungary was an ally of Germany and Germany was powerful Germany decided to support Austria Hungary in the suppression of national desires in the Balkan regions for a variety of reasons that you can read about in your textbook this brought Germany and Austria into conflict with Russia which was one of the triggers.

Europe. Germany Austria Hungary Austria Russia twenty year
"second world war" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

07:12 min | 2 years ago

"second world war" Discussed on KQED Radio

"You are an educated aware American you would want to have read it makes its way in a fictionalized away in in into the Great Gatsby because one of the characters there has read it and now has a view on the perils of of immigration it was translated into German in nineteen twenty five and and Adolf Hitler just completing the final edits online com read it in fact he described it as my Bible the Cape because it gave the sort of racial account of of European history of the rise and fall of of empires based on the purity that those states maintain within their their core populations in fact if you can go to the library of Congress in the rare books room now and hold Adolf Hitler's copy of the German edition of grants passing of the great race it was it was collected by the library after the second World War and holding it you realize of course that the Germans that the **** were were not so much you know creating from whole cloth a racialized system that would of course find exit it's a it's an expression of the third Reich they were part of a global consensus among many states about the natural hierarchy of the world and the importance of racial purity well that's kinda chilling was it it it it is and you know there's there's now there are more there's more more his may be really terrific historians who are writing about the connections between you genesis in the United States and in Britain and in and in what would become **** Germany you know no country in the world had a more perfect system than the United States of racial hierarchy and racial segregation the **** were actively studying the Jim crow system in the United States a system in which you know you inherited a race in which the state had a real interest in categorizing you by race and in which that category had a deep impact on every aspect of your life you know from what school you went to what swimming pool you could go to what what grave site you could be buried in you know the international congresses of eugenics before the second World War were were held around the world some of them held in New York at the at the American museum of natural history American eugenicists were given you know state state medals and awards by by Germany even after nineteen thirty three after the the coming to power of the of the **** so the story of the twenties and thirties of the time the bow as of his students were very active is about battling the obviousness the the consensus about racial and gender and sexual hierarchy that that a lot of people at the time agreed on this was not part of the French me how this was this was really the establishment right so so Bo est took these folks on in in talks and articles and letters it's interesting that he himself engage in this practice of measuring people anthropometry is that how you say that's right anthropometry yum in effect he got a commission there was a congressional commission the dealing him commission which wanted to look well at the physical attributes of European immigrants maybe maybe you can explain what it what its goal was and what bow as did for them right so the deland commission was established by Congress as as a scientific study massive massive scientific and and the social scientific study of the effects of immigration on American society of course this was the height of of of immigration late nineteenth early twentieth century immigration particularly from eastern and southern Europe and they wanted to understand how this was transforming American society and they commissioned a huge array of scholars and specialists to work on various studies and bow as his contribution to this was to try to answer the question what is the what is the literal physical a fact of immigration on the bodies of people who immigrate to the United States and he he knew at the time that he was taking on and after I really fundamental idea because if you believe in the heritability the heritability of of of race as an idea and of course at the time race didn't just mean the categories we might have on the US census now race is a term that that also referred to Slovaks or Jews or or polls or Italians the word race this sort of applied to to each of these categories as well if you believe that those things were real and biological and could be inherited passed down from a parent to a child then there should be some measurable difference it was believed in your anthropometric features or head shape in femur lane Finn and so forth so he he asked this question he sent of students and research assistance all across New York measuring people and what he found was that once the children were born in the United States raised in the United States regardless of their racial background if you like they had more in common physically with other Americans than they had with groups from their their old homelands and today that strikes is of course is pretty obvious it's you know neo natal nutrition and all sorts of other environmental factors that would go into shaping your body but the finding was revolutionary because if there's no stability in this idea of race there's no stability to it in terms of your your the P. physical features of your body how could you then attribute other things to it how could you can attribute civilizational level or intelligence or these other things that folks wanted to to married to the idea of race right and this congressional commission did they get his point aha race isn't what we thought it was well unfortunately unfortunately the study was that was buried in this long big huge set of volumes that that comprise the that don't come commission's final report and then once you get to about a decade later in nineteen twenty four of course the the those old ideas about race and the natural hierarchy of human societies is the thing that informs the very restrictive immigration policies that that come in them that that are designed explicitly to increase the percentage of people of northern European ancestry Charles king's new book is gods of the upper air after a break he'll talk about Margaret Mead and other women in bow as circle of anthropologist who's field work in popular writings open to new ways of thinking about race and gender also linguist Jeff non Berg reflects on how we've learned to express emotional nuance in emails and social media I'm Dave Davies but this is.

"second world war" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

02:31 min | 3 years ago

"second world war" Discussed on 710 WOR

"So soon after the second World War in the holocaust, but it's there and, and we gotta take it serious. I think from all that I can see. It's much worse in Europe than here, but it is here part of it stimulus. Congress here told me in my lifetime, that I would hear members of congress give for the kind of antisemitic statements that congresswoman Omar until I leave have made, I wouldn't have believed it. So you got to take it seriously. You gotta reprimand them. You've got to push them back. You got to censor them, really. Look at the president, though. We had so many candidates from presidents that had swore that they would move the capital from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem. Well, Donald Trump did it recognizing the Golan Heights. Everybody said they would do it. He did it. There's never been a greater friendship relationship than I think the United States in Israel of ever had. And then you look at the president's economic policies breaking record after record. And then I hear this new green deal Democratic Party. No oil, no gas, no combustion engine. No cows, no planes, and everything's free and doesn't sound like scoop. Jackson and Joe Lieberman to me. It sounds like a party. That's lost their way. Well, I hate to say it, but, but you're right. And it's surely, not the Democratic Party that I joined when John F Kennedy was president, and honestly, it's not even the Democratic Party that it was when nominated Bill Clinton, who got elected president of the United States. The if the Democratic Party continues to be influenced, but what I take to be not the majority party members, but the but definitely the majority of the activists in the party and moves ever leftward with more and more governmental programs and far out left programs. It's not going to be viable party anymore. I mean an and we need to go strong parties in the United States of America. We need to parties more with Senator Joe Lieberman on the other side, eight hundred nine four one Sean toll-free telephone. Phone number. You wanna be a part of the program as we continue, and we'll talk about the rise of antisemitism. Not only in Europe, but in the United States as well. And why is the Democratic Party, not forceful in condemning and speaking out against it that and much more as we continue, Sean.

Democratic Party president United States Senator Joe Lieberman Donald Trump Europe Congress congresswoman Omar Golan Heights Tel Aviv Bill Clinton Sean John F Kennedy Jackson Jerusalem Israel America
"second world war" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

08:39 min | 3 years ago

"second world war" Discussed on KGO 810

"For the second World War that transforms the twentieth century. And that today all the remains of this are in place. The Chinese will become the Chinese communist empire. The Soviets will become the Russian federation, the Japanese will become allies with the United States. The United States will become trading adversaries, and perhaps military confrontational opponents of the Chinese but nineteen thirty seven. Though, it is though we're looking at seventy five seventy six years is the predicate for all this Peter a very good evening to you. Congratulations. I ask you what your general opinion? Now before we plunge into the details of the summer of nineteen thirty seven in Shanghai, the Japanese empire had conquered bench. Schuco? What is the Japanese plan for China? What do they want to accomplish in the summer and fall of nineteen thirty seven good evening to you. Good evening. And thank you very much for having me on your show. It's a great honor. And regarding Japan's plans China in the late nineteen thirties. The strategy. Also, the decade had really been to to China in in a piecemeal, fire fashion. I is you mentioned in nineteen seventy one they had to take over Manchuria and renamed it mentioned mental. And then gladly there was like this creeping invasion of China. The Japanese army gradually moving south watts gobbling up data pieces of China little by little. By nineteen seventy seven. They had reached present day. Beijing at that time it was called. It was called debate king, and it wasn't it wasn't a capital. It hadn't been for ten years. But it was still a very important important city in China culturally, and historically, so it was a huge price for the Chinese to take over this pot of cabins. This part of China. So so what what the plan was in nineteen thirty seven was to to to occupy one one on a small bit of China. And then. I guess eventually. Create the complete control over China about the plan was not at that time to launch a post invasion of of all of China. What happened in nineteen thirty seven. Was that Changcai Schick decided to to fund the challenge the Japanese and comeback draw a line in the sand by by launching a full-scale war with the Japanese, and it did that five taking the battle not to north of China where the Japanese wanted to battle, but to take it to the east coast of China area. So the Japanese plan is to gobble up China's a bite at a time, but Chiang Kai Tak who is parked at his capital Nanjing, which is more than one hundred miles to the north west of Shanghai. Looks to surprise the Japanese by opening a front at Shanghai this. He believes will surprise them in the summer of nineteen thirty seven and this is important again for the strategic thinking of all the players. China has a plan a drafted in nineteen thirty seven this is the Chinese general's staff pla- war plan. What do they want to accomplish? What is the Chinese ambition launching this front and Shanghai in a sneak attack? There were a variety of motives, and I I guess the the motive also depends on who you ask the even if you asked one person if you ask Chang Shik, what was your motive with with the opening up a new front in Shanghai? He probably would gave several different reasons. One reason was that it was that it made a tactical sense to to fight the Japanese English Changhai area because the Japanese at that time were superior to the Chinese, especially when it came with technology, especially tank technology, the company's always Houston superior to what the what the Chinese could muster. So what what what China's needed to do was to take to take the battle to a place to an area where whether by the Japanese could not fully utilize the armor, which means the. Area around Shanghai, which was not not great tank country that were like a small small plots of farmland were like little villages. He wasn't like a north of the north of China with a flat plane, which is like the tank country to this tactical consideration. So they chose chose the battlefield of Shanghai and the environs because they know the Japanese arm, and the Japanese artillery and the Japanese air would not be overwhelming in urban and suburban environments at the same time they were looking for diplomatic success in Shanghai. If I read you correctly, the Shanghai Shanghai shack wanted to resolve his relationship with the Soviet Union at the end of August in nineteen thirty seventy south does sign a nonaggression pact at the same time. He believes what the the United States eventually is going to fight Japan. So he wants he wants the United. States and Britain to help him is that why he he he attacks the Japanese. Well, that's his hope, but it's still it's still controversial. What did you really hope in the summer of nineteen thirty seven, and what did he realistically expect the the Americans and the British to to jump right into the wall at that time and support them against the Japanese it's possible. And it's it's definitely makes sense. If you look at what he did. But it's also possible that he was like a building sympathy for the future that you. But but definitely what's important here is that the Shanghai at the time was home to a large expatriate community. Japanese, of course, but also lots of British and Americans pretty much every nationality in the world was represented in Shanghai because combustion the important city. Right. The international community was parked on the other side of the river and a free in zone that was protected from the conflict all during the fight from August till middle of November watching this. It reminds me pretty much of fifty five days at Beijing during the rebellion early in the century because the international community in the open door policy saw itself, a supervising China now, it's just watching China fight with the Japanese one more before we plunge into the fight itself. The eighty eighth division and the eighty seventh division are two of the best divisions in Chiang shacks army. You have information that the eighty eighth division our officers in it, nationalist officers provoked the Japanese in an incident of murdering two Japanese officers at Hong Chow. Era. Jim I believe I say that correctly to the south of do we believe that Chiang KAI Shek knew about this provocation that he ordered it? It's. Unlikely that he directly ordered it. And if there's no source. No ridden source. No indication a no no evidence whatsoever. That did offer it what we do is. We have a testimony from participants. India vents. Pretty much admitting that this was this was this was an ambush a deliberately set to to kill these Japanese and make it look like a shootout to make it look like. The the opposite had happened the Japanese at attacked the Chinese and the index way of giving the Chinese. A reason or an excuse to launch an attack ridesharing it's divisions into the city when we come back the provocation on August tenth within moments. The Chinese will be moving their best troops to the frontline too quickly. The.

China Shanghai Shanghai Shanghai United States Beijing Japan Russian federation Peter Chiang KAI Shek Chiang Kai Tak India Manchuria Chiang shacks Changcai Schick Nanjing Chang Shik Soviet Union
"second world war" Discussed on AM 1350 WEZS

AM 1350 WEZS

02:38 min | 3 years ago

"second world war" Discussed on AM 1350 WEZS

"The Republic of mutual saved to go to the hell in the west coast. All number as well. This one is number seven one. To this chart this league. Straight ahead. Yeah. That would've been very important those times would Nobile not. No. And then something just happened recently where there was a plane that crashed. And then the there were people that survived, and then they ended up in the local tell us that story. Jordan, the second World War one of the planes actually crashed on a beach nearby for both the men play in the plane survived the end up in a pub on the go to win the next morning. They were safe enough. Right. And there's men aren't here any longer. The memory of them stories living, and that's why because you know, how the Irish are. This story comes to life where every day. They didn't you know, it just happened. Somebody just said that to me, and I'm like what plane crash? So yeah, it was a few years ago when that happen. But there have been other things that if that happened here like for example, tell us the lure of the lighthouse because if you look at these clips you'll see this one little section where way off in the distance. There's a lighthouse and there's two there's a couple of interesting things about one that there's nobody manning the lighthouse no later. Later. She would have played very important rule. Nearly all of the fish go into Killybegs would have been passion by this late. Wow. And so the lighthouse hasn't been manned since what later hasn't been notions nineteen seventy four nineteen seventy four. But then there was some kind of curse or something that was put on the lighthouse was a small called DASA was banished to the Houston Patrick's or special into trouble. He spent seven years living on the pre and then repent today at the request only. He said that they ever come on how it will be three tragedy. Or the so when nineteen seventy four tomatoes keepers left the became on an habit. Litter Boulton crew or lost just behind the island. Year after that the third law just read in the corner to survivors from Houston of one of them living locally here. Wow. And that does.

Patrick Houston Jordan Nobile Boulton Killybegs seven years
"second world war" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

12:46 min | 3 years ago

"second world war" Discussed on KQED Radio

"This coming up tomorrow night Tuesday night at eleven. K Q E D San Francisco and kqei Kiwi. I north Highland Sacramento and live online at kqeDorg at two o'clock. Welcome to world affairs. The weekly broadcast of the World Affairs Council. I'm Jane, Wales, your host, the United States seems increasingly inclined to go it alone abandoning long-term commitments even leaving alliances, but what will replace the current world. Order an order that has made us both prosperous and secure. Joining us to discuss this issue is noted scholar Robert Kagan. He's a senior fellow at the Brookings Institution. And author of the new book the jungle grows back America and our imperilled world. This broadcast is made possible each week by the generous support of Chevron VM ware and the Draper Richards. Kaplan foundation, we're going to have a conversation for about an hour now about the war order that was so painstakingly built with the US shuttle at at the lead and where it stands now. Whether it's got the kind of popular support it needs to have and whether it has leadership. On the political level as well. So I'm gonna ask you to just start by defining the elements, if that postwar level, so we have a sense of whether it's alive, and well, you know, the thing about the the order that we've been enjoying as we've been we've it's been so successful in a way that we take a lot of it for granted. And I think it's worth remembering that if you look at the whole sweep of human history, we've never had a period that was this prosperous that was this peaceful in terms of great power conflict, and that where you had such a wide spread of democracy. All three of those things are the rarest commodities in history and to have them all at the same time, which we have really ever since the end of the second World War is extraordinary. And I think the the problem is is that Americans basically came to take it for granted. And we have this idea that somehow, you know, the human race has just evolved into this into this wonderful condition, and you know, you read books by Stephen. And pinker talking about how it looks like just enlightenment principles have succeeded. And I think what people forget is that this was constructed. This was something that was created out of the rubble of World War Two by people who lived through two world wars, and the holocaust and Japanese atrocities in China and dropping to nuclear weapons, and they knew that what they were really doing was setting up barriers against the worst elements of human nature and the nature of the international system. And so the decision by the United States to maintain a presence in Europe. And in Asia may put an end to long cycles of conflict in both those regions that began with the rise of Germany in the nineteenth century, and the rise of Japan and had led to endless conflict the United States put an end to those conflicts by by establishing that presence which in turn. And made possible economic growth in both those regions because nations were able to focus on economics and social well-being rather than military power, and it also made possible the growth of democracy because democracy is fair better in situations of security than in situations of insecurity. And so, you know, sometimes when people hear liberal world order, they think it's a very kind of idealistic sort of airy concept, but I mean it in a very concrete way, they were very concrete things done the establishment of international free trade regime. The establishment of security in Europe and Asia. That made possible this remarkable period that we've been in this involved building institutions building alliances. So in the case of Europe and security. It was NATO an all concept of collective security. And of course, on on the economic side, the notion of economic integration and the world in which you'd have free trade as fast as possible. A third thing was was built during that period. And that was the whole concept of economic development because right before the end of the war, the mid mid-forties, we had the Bretton Woods accords that created those institutions as well. So you'll even saw prosperity not not just where the great powers were just sort of lessening day. In various other regions of the world say a word about that. Yeah. In fact, I mean, that's one of the remarkable things about the period of prosperity since World War Two, which is that there had been a previous growth of the of the global economy after the industrial revolution. But that that growth benefited only the transatlantic space only the United States and Europe, whereas the enormous growth in in a global prosperity and annual GDP growth in this period has has actually taken place outside of the transatlantic zone. And we see, of course, the results all around us in China and India and in other parts of the world and it during this period. It's worth recalling some four billion people have been lifted out of poverty, and we now have the largest class in the world is one of the revolutions that's occurring in world affairs. Today is this is this is the is the departure of so many billions from poverty into a kind of a middle class. Yeah. And we'll turn back to the issue. Middle-class, obviously, this is all in our interest. It's not just are being carrying about the rest of the world. But it's it's opening markets star good. I mean, the key thing about what the founders of this international system were doing was that it they were very much doing this in America self interest. But it was unenlightened farseeing understanding of our self interested wasn't a narrow as long as our shores are safe and our borders are safe, we're safe. They had already learned that. If if the world order collapses at Alta does affect Americans, and therefore it was in our interest to create a peaceful world and prosperous world department of of this postwar period that feels so most revolutionary to me is is the notion of embedding, your former enemies into a larger security structure, the notion that Japan and Germany would. Would ultimately have more in common with us than in conflict. That's a pretty unusual approach for victorious power to take over our defeated. Power says something about the thinking, then whether how controversial it was at the moment. Well, it was remarkably not that controversial because everybody already had the experience of the aftermath of World War One and the failure of the treaty and the failure of the league of nations, which led Germany to be the German people be resentful and looking to get back what they had lost in World War One. And also led to the Japanese also feeling that they'd been left out of the settlement. They felt wrong during that settlement. So when when World War Two, and if people were very conscious of that, then realized you didn't need to incorporate these defeated powers, and because the Americans were so conscious of the need to fight economic collapse in these two vitally important regions. Well, there's no way to talk about economic. Success in Europe without German economic success. So Germany had to be allowed to grow and prosper economically. If all of Europe was going to be and therefore make it a stable region that the United States could trade within the same was true in Asia. And so yes that and that was the revolution. By the way. Not only integrating Germany and Japan into that economic order that of the United States was putting together, but also taking two of the most aggressive military powers in the world. And basically having them for go. Geopolitical ambition. We, you know, the order created a situation where Germany and Japan turned away from natural national traditions of ambition on the geopolitical front and made them GIO economically and bishops their ambitions shifted, and they weren't the only powers to do that Britain and France also used to be the most important geopolitical players in the world, they also gave up geopolitical ambition and turn to economic growth and social wellbeing as their number one goals that was that was a true revolution. When you listen to political discourse today, there's this sense that somehow it's not fair that they were they were free to pursue their economic interests because there were surface security arrangements in place. But this, of course, has been all in our our self interest. As you noted it was in our interest, and it was part of our plan. I mean, that's what I find. So extraordinary. It is so much to our benefit that countries like Germany. And Japan and other former great powers are not returning to their old military strength. They're old geopolitical ambitions because that leads us back to the world that produced World War One and World War Two and actually led to the deaths of so many Americans fighting in those wars. It has always been a blessing to us that the Germany's in Japan's of this world do not want to become great military powers. Now. Of course, they they should. And in many cases, do share the burden with us. They fought with us in Afghanistan. Japan spends a lot of money actually on its defense. But for us to want them to take over that role flies in the face of everything that we learned in the first half of the twentieth century now at the time that we're pursuing this this policy of integration and in both economically, but in terms of security arrangements. We also were pursuing a policy of isolation and containment with the Soviet Union. And that was George Kennan was developing the whole concept to what degree do you think the American public looks at the order, we have mainly in terms of not only the transformation of Europe and Japan, but but in terms of the bulwark against a shared enemy is the rationale in our minds and our current psyche one of the Cold War will it is. And you know, I think that's one of the problems that we face. It's it's actually a historical misunder. Standing about. Why we created this liberal world order to begin with? I think most Americans, including many people who should know better think that it was created in response to the Soviet Union. But it wasn't it actually was created during the second World War as a way of avoiding a repetition of World War One and World War Two at a time. When the leaders of the United States from Harry Truman to Franklin Roosevelt Edina, Jason thought of Soviet Union is going to be an ally after the war. So this was not a response to the Cold War. What happened was once it became clear that the Soviet Union states. We're going to be adversaries. I think the great accomplishment of the Cold War is is actually the success of the liberal world. Order because liberal order was both strong enough cohesive enough rich enough successful enough attractive enough both to deter Soviet the Soviets from using military power. But also to turn the. Soviets Justice Kennon predicted in on themselves to question, the the the sort of the heart of their ideology, and ultimately decided that it wasn't working. That's what Gorbachev was about. In a way cannon was the prophet of what happened, and he said, if you go back to his long telegram, and Mr. x article, he said to some extent, this battle would be one within ourselves that if we proved that we were coherent and capable that would be the way we would alternately win this conflict and that turned out to be so true. Well, that takes me to a little bit to the American psyche. Because I think at the end of World War Two my grandfather fought in World War One my father in World War Two, you're you're you're raised hearing about that experience. But we were very confident nation right after World War Two we'd been not terribly successful. Our economy was just about to grow very fast in part. Because if I..

United States Europe Germany World Affairs Council Japan Soviet Union Asia America Robert Kagan San Francisco Sacramento Brookings Institution senior fellow Draper Richards kqeDorg
"second world war" Discussed on WINT 1330 AM

WINT 1330 AM

01:36 min | 3 years ago

"second world war" Discussed on WINT 1330 AM

"Legacies stories from the second World War. I'm up on the ridge showman. They're looking down in one of the guys from another company was walking down there in the sniper Gibson right in the Nick. And his last words were mother. I mean, really sad. I'm Tom Swope. My guest this week on legacies Gustov and yeti junior. One Gus was in high school. He heard about an interesting program in the eleventh grade I signed up for army specialized training program because we were promised to be get trained as an engineer. And I wanted to be an engineer. No, this was the opportunity. And of course, they send you when you graduate. You come Lieutenant. Which was an added inducement and yeti graduated in June of nineteen forty-three within weeks. He was in the army. He was sent to camp put in Texas for infantry, basic training. I didn't understand since I signed up for edge. Dp Wyan was I mean sent to known to Texas. Well, Finally, I guess. The powers to be relented and went to North Texas state teachers college in Denton in October. And there. Covering one.

Texas engineer Gus Tom Swope North Texas Gibson Denton Gustov Wyan