17 Burst results for "Second"

"second" Discussed on 60-Second Science

60-Second Science

06:49 min | 3 months ago

"second" Discussed on 60-Second Science

"We bring you up to speed on the science behind the most urgent questions about the virus and the disease. We demystify the research and help you understand what it really means. I'm Tanya Lewis. I'm Josh fishman. And we're scientific Americans, senior health editors. Today, we'll talk about the plan for a second vaccine booster shot. The prospects of a new COVID wave and whether people will put on masks to stop it. And how to think about COVID risk when it comes to everyday activities. This week, the FDA authorized a second booster shot on top of the ones given last year. That would be four shots total for me, Tanya. Why this new one. It happens sooner than I expected Josh, although the scientific community had been debating whether additional booster shots were needed for some time. Normally, the FDA holds a meeting of its advisory committee before deciding whether to authorize vaccines or boosters. But that didn't happen this time. The move makes boosters available to adults age 50 and older and anyone 12 and older who is immunocompromised, four months after their first booster shot. For people who had two shots and a booster, this would be their fourth shot. For some immunocompromised folks, this would be their 5th shot. That's a bunch of jabs. Why does the FDA think we need this new one? It was based on some evidence that immune protection against severe disease wanes over time in these groups. A recent CDC report found that protection against hospitalization waned from 91% to 78%, four months after a third dose. But some experts are not convinced that a second booster shot will significantly improve immunity. It may top up antibodies for a few months, but at a certain point with additional shots, we may see diminishing returns. For those who haven't gotten their first booster yet, that is important to do, and if you're older or higher risk, you might want to consider getting a second booster after four months to top up your protection. It seems like many people have ditched their masks and health officials are allowing it. But if a new COVID surge comes, Josh, will people put them on again? That's a really important question, because some kind of surge is coming, and we know masks stop infections. The effectiveness of a good mask like an N95 is beyond dispute, as you've pointed out, Tanya, and we will face more COVID, infections and hospitalizations have started to rise in Europe. The new BA two variant is becoming more common there and in the U.S., and like Europe we've cut back on masks and on restrictions. So we're likely to see something a spike a surge or whatever you want to call it. It's not clear how big it will be. But if it gets above a certain level, we should put masks back on, according to the CDC. If cases and hospitalizations per 100,000 people in your area jump up by 20 hospitalizations a week, if you're starting from a low level of cases, then put on a mask when you're indoors with other people. But masks aren't just health aids. During the pandemic, they've become political symbols. Some people are really pro mask and others are adamantly opposed to them. Exactly. So how's that going to play out in the future? I ask an expert on mask attitudes, Emily mendenhall, a medical anthropologist at Georgetown university. She just published a book called unmasked based on research and communities in Iowa and in California. Emily's talked with us about masks on an earlier episode. She says anti mask feelings stem partly from perceptions of low disease risk. People would unmask if they weren't worried about themselves. Maybe they were younger and didn't think the disease would make them sick, and partly it was political. People said they didn't want governments dictating their behavior. They had legitimate worries about business closures, and their ability to make a living. But it was also about making a public show of defiance. Masks got caught up in all that. Pro mask feelings come from an idea that we faced a collective risk. In the street, Emily says, people would talk about the need to work together and protect one another, and obviously they also felt they were in danger as individuals, and they trusted government guidelines. As the pandemic has worn on, these collective worries have faded in many places, and mask wearing is faded with them. Without actual rules such as mandates, people in those areas are unlikely to put masks back on. But Emily says there's another group that we overlook. The sometimes maskers. That's about one in three people in her research. They're all political moderates, sometimes government does a good job, they say, and sometimes not. Sometimes the media is trustable, other times not so much. And sometimes they wear a mask. There are huge swaths of Americans who would put on a mask if they were around someone with a weak immune system, or someone older, or at risk in some way. So the focus should be on sometimes maskers. That's who's willing to listen to mask promotion if COVID starts to peak in their communities. It's a sizable group, Emily says, they could be part of making mask wearing seem normal, especially in times of danger, and making it normal is key. Emily still thinks mandates are important, but she understands there's a lot of resistance. If these sometimes maskers put on N95s, they could start a whole surge of protection. Clearly, people are growing tired of restrictions as we head into pandemic year three. Many are eager to get back to doing things they enjoy again. Is there a smart way to evaluate any risks as we venture out more often? We're definitely getting to the point, Josh, where people are tired of wearing masks of social distancing and avoiding the people in places they enjoy. But the virus hasn't gone away, and it isn't likely to anytime soon. There will always be some level of risk, but as with everything in life, we have to find ways to balance risks with benefits. One of our freelancers, is working on a story for us about this. He asked a number of experts in epidemiology, risk assessment and related fields, how they make their own decisions about COVID risk. We can think about risk in three different ways, they said. There's personal risk, which is the risk of you or people in your household contracting COVID. There's community risk, which is the likelihood of encountering someone with COVID in your local community, and there's exposure risk, which accounts for the chances of getting COVID from a particular setting based on things like airflow and the behavior of other people. Caitlyn jetliner, an epidemiologist at the University of Texas Houston, says that age is the biggest personal risk factor, followed by having certain comorbidities or being immunocompromised. She estimates that vaccinated and boosted people in their 60s have a ten times higher likelihood of dying from severe breakthrough cases than 18 to 49 year olds. People who are at higher risk should talk with their doctors about what risks or reasonable..

FDA Tanya Lewis Josh fishman Tanya Emily Josh CDC Emily mendenhall Europe Georgetown university aids Iowa U.S. California Caitlyn jetliner University of Texas Houston
"second" Discussed on Second Avenue Sagas Podcast

Second Avenue Sagas Podcast

08:04 min | 1 year ago

"second" Discussed on Second Avenue Sagas Podcast

"A couple more questions I know we're getting close to the end of our time have a few more that I wanted to toss your way I. It's very interesting to hear sort of how the governor can really interfere with the process really create a solution but caused problems at the same time at something to consider as we watch his style evolve now I wanted to ask you you were part of the planning process for the Second Avenue subway. You're covering ground familiar to you as you researched and wrote the book. What was the most surprising thing you learned throughout the process? When? When young people start at in agency? I think there's a tendency to think they know things that other people don't know. and. I didn't understand the history of New York. I didn't understand the history of the MTA, the history of subways what people had tried and what they hadn't tried. The people. Need to reinvent the wheel when it comes to transportation in your just about anybody any any idea that you might have now for the most part has been thought of it's been studied. Maybe even tried out somewhere else. So I didn't understand so much and the other thing is. There is a little silo that lots of people working. So the engineers work with the engineers I was a planner I worked with the planners or construction workers. There's the politicians who were talking among themselves. A lot of civic players. There's a lot of advocate for environmental projects for Contra. Construction Work Union folks real estate folks people thinking about the future of New York who got together in. New. York and the one, thousand, nine, hundred and said, we need to rebuild the subway system and we need to start with the second avenue subway and to me it was really fascinating to see all of these different conversations among different people not necessarily. Everybody knows knowing what was going on and one thing I learned was if you want to build a massive project You have to get the politicians to support it. You need to get the bureaucracy in the agency to supported, and that's not always so easy and you need to get the public behind it and the civic center behind it and what I mean by the sector is I mean the nonprofits and the organizations that do research advocacy so could be labor unions or Business Groups I'm GonNa you get all those three together that can really make fundamental changes and that's really important to think about right now like how do we deal with the real financial crisis that the MTA's facing and it's really important for the MTA bureaucracy for the politicians and for the civic groups to be able to join together for the unions and the management. For the real estate folks in the business folks, environmental groups to all say, this is really important that we have to. Maintain and pour more resource resources into taking care of our transit system. So to me, that was really interesting thing all the different players how they don't really talk to each other and then trying to put the whole story together. And thought about it recently. Did you see the pictures of governor Cuomo going into the White House to see president trump about the second avenue subway? Did you see that? The so I thought that was really interesting because I, realize that that's happened before and have a picture in my ball. Governor. Rockefeller sitting in the Oval Office next to the fireplace talking to President Nixon about getting funding for the Second Avenue subway. And what I loved that scene of governor Cuomo going into the White House worrying is masks was I could actually picture what they talk about because when a read that Governor Rockefeller went to the Oval Office to he, President Nixon I remembered that have the audiotapes Richard Nixon. Secretly took audiotapes his office. So got to listen to the meeting and that was really fun to hear what a governor says and what they ask for when they will go meet the president, the United States oftentimes people that they've competed with don't necessarily like, but it's interesting to watch governor going hat in hand trying get money for what he considers a really really important project. So I think that's a great segue into my last question brings me back to the title of Your Book. The last subway. So the book tells the story of challenging planning process that's often uncontrollable cost estimates that can skyrocket and a process that can be bent or broken by politicians. I. Don't view it as a particularly functional approach to transit expansion. So do you think the second avenue subway what we have so far? Phase one is that the last subway New York sees and if so what does that mean for the future of the region and if not, what should we expect going forward? So a MTA chairman was asked the nineteen seventies if we're ever going to see the second avenue subway and his response was ever is a very long time. So I do think New York City will see more subway extensions and think at some point, we will finish the second avenue subway. The trouble is that it took us a hundred years to build the first phase. So hopefully, it doesn't take three hundred years to connect three-phase. Answer, to that is but I did. Call this book the last way because it's always the neck subway and always the last subway at the same time it's always the next subway that is going to build, and it's always the last subway that we're either looking at or have started or have have completed a phase of so i. think that term ways indicative of a number of things and last way it's sort of a sad. Word but in some ways, it's sort of a hopeful were word of where we're going next. So what did you take that name? I'm curious Benjamin. I think my reaction to it was that it's in a way it's It's. An amusing play on the fact that we've waited ninety years, right? It's it's this promise of a subway. It's the last subway that was supposed to have been built in Manhattan. It was supposed to be a nineteen twenty's era line that's never materialized but I think it's it's it's pessimistic realistic way it's it was such a challenging process. It's sort of scarred the neighborhood. It cost a lot of money. It took a really long time to get even even the new planning process took fifteen years or so to get from the planning phase to the opening in two, thousand, sixteen, twenty, seventeen so. It sort of suggests that without massive structural reform and a better process, this will indeed be the last subway in New York City. Until we fix these problems that was my takeaway. It's it's interesting if you look at the most recent planning process or the nineteen nineties to get us here and most recent construction projects starting to run two, thousand, ten or so. To get us here and to see what a city like. Beijing can do. Beijing and other Chinese cities have built entire transit systems that rival hours. In that same time that it took us to build a one point, five miles subway station. So I, I think you're right when you talked about structural changes that if we continue to fund transit here in your the same way we've always funded if we continue to have the same organizations tried to build it and if we Have this same resources that we currently have now than the last way more appropriate than another term So I I do think it's important to look at how we're building those subways who's making those decisions are paying for them and why they're so expensive if we want to improve transit system. Right Right Phil I think that takes us to the end of our time. Thank you for joining me. This has been a great conversation. Thanks and I was always I'm.

MTA Manhattan governor Cuomo President Nixon New York City Governor Rockefeller White House president Beijing Oval Office York New York Construction Work Union United States Benjamin chairman
"second" Discussed on Second Avenue Sagas Podcast

Second Avenue Sagas Podcast

06:20 min | 1 year ago

"second" Discussed on Second Avenue Sagas Podcast

"So because we want to minimize the construction impacts and because we want to provide access all the time, it makes it much more expensive and we have so many more things underground now. So today we have electric lines and own lines and cable lines and files lines and emergency connections for fire and police, and when the street gets opened up, it's this. somebody referred to it as like opening up a can of worms or a can of rubber bands where you're not exactly sure where each wire goes to. So it takes a really long time to figure out all the cables and the wires you WanNa make sure you don't disrupt anyone service. You don't attorneys owner Internet off you didn't worry about that in the early nineteen hundreds. It was a contractor who explained to me. Building a subway line in Manhattan. Now is kind of like painting in office while somebody's working there. So. If you have somebody working in a in an office like think about, your, Home Office. And you're trying to paint the room at the same time you have to plastic off you might have to lose the electric lines. You have to move the telephone lines you have to move all the furniture from one side of the room to the. Then you have when you're done, you put the plastic and you move everything over again is so much easier to just take everything out of the room and paint the room but we don't do that anymore we tried to accommodate all the people that are living and working. And what you said is right there's so many regulations and they're all really well meaning we have lots of safety role. We have Americans with disabilities act the Americans with disability. Which means that people in wheelchairs can use the subway that means the platforms have to be wider, which makes it harder to build express local trends. Putting elevators is really expensive. We have very sophisticated communications and fire. Safety Systems. To make sure that everybody can get out and kiss there was a fire or smoke rolls. There's lots of labor rules that we didn't have in the early nineteen hundreds they. The labor unions, they they get good benefits and they have very strict rules. We have regulations for buying American for hiring minority contractors, the kinds of things that we didn't have in the early nineteen hundreds. Again they're all well meaning but when you put them all together, it makes it much more difficult takes much so much longer and much more expensive to build the subway line than it used to be. So, let me let me ask you Benjamin surprised when you put all this together how complicated is to build a subway or do you think he got that sense just by looking at over the years I mean I think I got that sense by looking at it over the years and I know that you when you and I were talking before we started this episode you'd wanted to ask me what the thing was that I found most surprising. What was new to me? From your book and I think that dovetails nicely with the next question that I have for you. So I'm going to answer your question that I posed to myself as I ask you the next question the thing that that surprised me the most I think building on this complexity of building the subway is the end process of getting to an opening by the end of two thousand sixteen. So the governor steps in the project is sort of stumbling along Andrew Cuomo steps in with. Nearly. Total control. He's appointed close aides to the MTA board. He's circumventing certain procurement oversight process. He's and generally just decides to say we're GONNA finish this on time finally, you've delayed it for too long. We have to get to the end point but in the process, he distracts the New York City Transit Authority from its core mission of operating the transit network because he was pulling resources into the Second Avenue subway project and I hadn't really conceptualized the decline of the subways. And twenty seventeen as a result of the second avenue subway work I think it was really interesting to put those dots together. So what I want to ask you is whether the government's involvement in this project was good for it bad. For New, York, city or did it sort of fall into that gray area of politics because ultimately, as you said, it's a very political driven process and the governor gets to do what he wants because he's the person in control of this apparatus. I've talked to a few different governors about their role in transportation agencies. Sometimes, they're very hands off and there's nobody in the history of of of. The governors in new. York who've been as hands on on certain projects as governor Cuomo has been. I. Saw it with the bridge in my book politics across the Hudson I started writing about the planning for the Tappan Zee. Bridge before the governor came in and it was fascinating to watch the transformation on how things move so fast when it's important to the governor. And the same thing with the Second Avenue subway I'm watching what's going on and then all of a sudden people's feet to the fire and he bangs heads any intimidates people and he's on top of them all the time and he's leading meetings in his bringing people together. And is really interesting to see how when a governor gets involved. They can really change organization. So the MT has fifty thousand people. It's hard to to turn that proverbial battleship or to move that ellison. Very fast but when people are scared for their jobs when contractors are scheduled for the future work when MTA employees are told that this is really important to the governor, he will cancel vacations. Decision made things that had been festering along stop festering. So it. Governor can do a lot when they focus on a problem and this is Andrew Cuomo's way of dealing with what he considers crises and you could see it with culver nineteen. He's on top of it. He knows all the details he's talking to people all the time and he's really taking control the second avenue subway it was a, it was a double. Edged sword it was he got people moving faster but by taking away resources, the MTA spent a little less time doing the kinds of things that they need to do all the time, and that includes things like inspecting parts and testing equipment and putting plans together to fix those everyday problems that need to get fixed and somebody said to me if you're not inspecting. If you're not seeing. And you're not fixing it's going to create problems and what happened in.

Andrew Cuomo MTA governor Cuomo New York City Transit Authorit Manhattan Home Office Tappan Zee York Benjamin MT culver ellison
"second" Discussed on Second Avenue Sagas Podcast

Second Avenue Sagas Podcast

06:01 min | 1 year ago

"second" Discussed on Second Avenue Sagas Podcast

"The Senate and the governor. They're making the choices sometimes they're doing it in public and sometimes they're not doing it in public and all of these leaders have had projects when they come in. And if you grew up in Brooklyn, you're going to be thinking about problems that you have thought about for years and your neighbors have thought about for years whether it's water traffic or education, and you're going to bring some of these projects into the governor's office into the mayor's Office to the legislator's office when you when you take over. So it's not a surprise. If you look to see which governors pour the most resources in second avenue subway, it's the ones who lived on the upper east side and we've had lots of governors. From the upper east side. In back back from the nineteen sixties until recent times and. They look at projects a certain way and those politicians they also want to get credit for projects. So they don't necessarily want to start projects that lasts for twenty years. They do like to finish the projects that have started for twenty years and they don't necessarily like to continue projects that our previous governor. Initiated. So let's say governor Cuomo always really pushing Laguardia air trained to Laguardia, and let's say his term engineers years and somebody else came in. The next governor might not say oh. Let's do more laguardia because I was going to be like the Andrew Cuomo project so they picked around. The. The personalities are so important what their priorities are where they're from their constituency suburban or urban. And oftentimes you need a balanced to get things done. So there's a reason why you said access. Long on-road connection to the east side of Manhattan. Where that's going to get the next couple of years it it got tied to the Second Avenue subway. said access was really important to the long islanders and the second avenue subway was really important to the New Yorkers. It was tying the Republicans and the Democrats together. It was the downstate and the suburban interest together in those two projects moved along in parallel at least the first phase of the second avenue subway and he said access so. There's nothing wrong with politics. We don't really want people who don't elect to make all the decisions for us. I think the important thing is that we just understand what decisions they're making and making sure they have the information that that they need to make accurate decisions and sometimes that's not all always the case sometimes. They don't know exactly what the problems are that need to get address. Of course, the irony about some of these projects, especially side accesses that the politicians who were the biggest promoters of them have long been out of office I. Think you end up in these situations where projects take so long to materialize that the people who promoted them aren't around to enjoy the political praise that comes with completing them. Yeah. So one thing I thought was really funny that I realized was you don't necessarily have to build the second avenue subway to get a lot of credit for him you don't have to necessarily. You just have to announce it. You just have to have a press conference on second. Avenue. Saying we're going to build the second avenue subway or we're GONNA. Start the next phase where we got funding for it and you got a lot of attention. And one of the problems with the transit system is there's so many needs of the transit system whether it's signals or trax stations or escalators or elevators. Millions of things that need to be done to improve the subway but for some reason. If you're going to improve the ventilation at the time square station, you're not GonNa get nearly as much press is if you make a big splash announcement about new subway line. So I'M GONNA. Ask You about the complexity of the project now to. Over the years grew more difficult to build subways in the United States and. Came to the point where the Q train extension. First phase of the Second Avenue subway is the world's most expensive subway expansion project. You write about the MTA's desire to create sort of a conservative twenty-first-century subway using tried and true techniques. But these techniques had to be adopted for newer and more exacting standards, ventilation systems, fire suppressant systems, elevators, escalators, wider platforms, giant station caverns, deeper tunnels, and the Federal Environmental Review Process means the MTA had to produce hundreds if not thousands of pages of documentation all of this adds up in time and money can you talk about how these demands shifted over the years making subway construction more difficult to even just get off the ground? So understand subway construction I. spent a little time at the Transit Museum looking at pictures. If. You go to the Transit Museum and you probably want to go after the culprits scared's over in downtown Brooklyn you can go into an old subway station and you can see some old subway cars and buses in turnstiles, and you can also see how subways were construction constructed in the early nineteen hundred. CONSTRUCTION WORKERS WOULD Open up the street. So they dig up the street, it go down ten or fifteen or twenty, and they would lay tracks down and then when they were done lane, the tracks down they were covered up the street would get covered up, and then people could take their horses and carriages and walk and strollers and go back on the streets sidewalks again. It's very different. The way it's done right now. Today we try to minimize all sorts of disruption. So we don't want to close off the street we want to keep it open, and that makes it trickier. We want to make sure that they're still access for cars and buses and deliveries sidewalks, and we also WANNA make safe. We don't want anybody falling into those holes in the early nineteen, hundred sixty was not a high priority and people would die. Construction would die in passer bys with sometimes die during these constructions of these big major projects..

Transit Museum MTA Laguardia governor Cuomo Andrew Cuomo Brooklyn Senate Manhattan United States
"second" Discussed on Second Avenue Sagas Podcast

Second Avenue Sagas Podcast

06:27 min | 1 year ago

"second" Discussed on Second Avenue Sagas Podcast

"So the decision was made and and I don't think anybody would argue about this one to start where you can connect to the existing subway line. So there's an east West subway line under sixty third street and when that was designed and built in the sixties and seventies, it was designed in a way that we connect with second avenue. So the first phase goes north. From sixty to ninety six because that's where the most. Writers are coming from the that's the highest population density. So, we don't have the most efficient way of building yet but at least we didn't make that same mistake from the early seventies of trying to build everything and then running out of money and ending with abandoned tunnels. So one of the one of the things that you keep coming back to in the book. And that I think looms large over this project whether it's now or in the past is cost and it seemed for decades that no one within. The planning process whether it was with New York City Transit Authority the MTA, the board of estimates etc could ever really accurately assess costs for this project. Before it began. As I said, they lost the core competence competency required to scope and price these projects and a lot of these numbers that they put together in the mid nineteen fifties or nineteen, sixty eight. Seemed not to be based in reality I found this fascinating and the distrust and transit numbers seems to linger to the present day as projects like east side access of seen budgets explode. In particular when you were writing about the Ronin budget in nineteen, sixty eight, the MTA had sort of budgeted three hundred, fifty, five million dollars to build the full length of the second avenue subway. That you call delusional figure. That Ronin deliberately failed to adjust for inflation and other factors, and you write about how it was developed without an adequate engineering review and without knowing basic elements of the program such as the number of stations or their locations. Ronin didn't account for the need to purchase more subway cars or operate them at new stations, and it's almost as though it felt like leaders never intended to build the second avenue subway and that planning was just a way to draw attention to the need to invest in transit was the subway stalking-horse did the MTA intend to build it? I mean how how does that shift the view of the project over the years? You have to remember there's different organizations that are controlling the subway system. So in the early years, it was a private company that was operating then the city took it over and then. People didn't think the city was doing good job so. A. Transit Authority set up New York state set up transit authority thinking that was run more like a business with professional folks who on a board, they could do a better job. That didn't work out so well, either. So the next phase was the MTA was graded, which was more of a state organization did not a city organization. So Thinking about who is making these decisions sometimes, it's the mayor and sometimes it's the governor. Sometimes it's other folks over time who've been making decisions and coming up with the estimates when it's the governor like nineteen, sixty eight and the governor's name was Nelson Rockefeller Nelson Rockefeller was looking to run for president in nineteen, sixty, four and eighteen, sixty eight. So when he put his MTA plan out there, it wasn't just for New Yorkers it was also to get some national attention attention on how he is governor could show how. A strong governor. Sort of visionary lowered thinking could address a lot of the metropolitan transportation problems that were going on. What might work for New York also work for Los. Angeles. It could work for Atlanta. For. CHICAGO. And he had his eye on the White House and the people around him were very loyal to him and the MTA chairman was had been working for him for years and he wanted to help the governor move onto the White House. So the document was a little bit of a political document and it include lots of different promises, not just for that political national attention but also to get buying and support from all the figures that you would need a new. York. So it's the city council and the mayor and the state legislators. So they put this plan together. That was gonNA satisfy these diverse entrust, but it just wasn't really feasible or possible. And the numbers didn't really make sense. The MTA chairman was just hoping that more money was going to come in from federal government state government and the money never did come in. And when he did was he ignored a lot of the problems on the subway system and we can blame that he was a little ignorant. We can blame that he was overly optimistic and the word delusional. Does. Fit for part of the way that he looked at all the different problems and it took years until we really got a better handle in. New. York on how bad the transit system had deteriorated and how much has to be invested billions of dollars a year just to maintain what we already have let alone to expand the transit system. So you talk about how you talked about how the nineteen sixty eight document was a political document and I think that's a theme that shows up frequently throughout the book I was struck by how? When you start in the Koch Administration and move through the last few decades of New York politics, mayors, governors, all have different priorities Koch wanted lower Manhattan rail link to JFK Rudy Giuliani wanted to subway to Laguardia. Governor Pataki Senator D'Amato wanted Eastside access to appease their suburban constituents, and as these men move in and out of office projects come and go. How does the push and pull of electoral politics and the suburban pressures on Albany impact the MTA's ability to plan and build complex New York, city based subway expansion projects. The people who really are making the decision about where to invest the state's resources are the leaders of the assembling. The leaders of the Senate and the governor. They're making the choices sometimes they're doing it in public and sometimes they're not doing it in public and all of these leaders have had projects when they come in..

MTA New York Governor Pataki Senator D'Amat City Transit Authority Transit Authority York Nelson Rockefeller Nelson Rock chairman Ronin White House Rudy Giuliani Atlanta Albany CHICAGO Koch Administration Senate Koch
"second" Discussed on Second Avenue Sagas Podcast

Second Avenue Sagas Podcast

06:09 min | 1 year ago

"second" Discussed on Second Avenue Sagas Podcast

"So what we're talking about is since nineteen twenty nine, we haven't really been able to significantly expand the subway system. And this is really important because in New York City subway is so important to the development of New York we wouldn't be able to live in the kinds of places we lived in we wouldn't have skyscrapers. We wouldn't have big football and baseball on sorry non Bucknell football what we wouldn't have big baseball stadiums. If if we didn't have the New York City subway system because we're able to get tens of thousands of people or sometimes thirty thousand people into a very small complex buildings because we're able to move so many people. So New York was built around the subway system. It's sort of like. A skyscraper needing it's elevator system the he just can't function our city cannot function without a well-maintained. Subway system so I think it's really interesting to look at. The history of New York, over the past hundred years thinking about building the subway lines and then not being able to expand them anymore and it's really looking at the rise and the fall and the rise and fall of New York through lots of different generations in lots of different eras and the attempt by different generations to improve our transit system and we generally weather right now. Our generation now has to decide what are we gonNA. Do about our transit system where we're GONNA put our resources and what's the most important priorities So you asked about the second avenue subway. Would what I find. So interesting about it what made you decide to start your website called the Second Avenue Sagas Dot Com I. I think for me it was it was a very similar. Reaction to this new subway line, we hadn't seen a new subway line come online in decades we had stubs into queens and connections of tunnels, but those those didn't really have the impact of building out something new giving an avenue, a new line and I've I had come to a really appreciate the way transit powers, cities, I. I've seen cities with good transit systems. I've seen cities with bad transit systems. I've seen how transit can make the city more accessible and when I moved back to New York after college I thought this is. something. Very exciting. New York is doing. The Democrats had retaken the Senate in two, thousand, six Chuck Schumer. Promised to get federal funding finally, get this project off the ground. So I wanted to follow along as the subway became a reality something that we haven't seen happen in New York City in decades. What were the challenges? How did construction work did the neighborhood react to it? I think as you detail in the book it was. A tough process for the MTA learned a lot about building something and they had sort of gotten away from that ability to build a subway. and to me, it was just about following along this project that had an opportunity to reshape the city. Glad. We're both interested in the same kinds of things. I think I think our listeners should understand is there is a piece of the Second Avenue subway opened on January first two, thousand seventeen, and it's a one point five mile segment. And it goes from sixty third to ninety sixth street. But that's only a very small portion of what's been promised. The Second Avenue subway has been promised to go the full length of Manhattan. From the northern part and he's him down to the battery aid where the financial district is. And that's been promised since nineteen, twenty nine, it's it's still. Considered a on on the on the bucks with we have this first phase that's opened up. We have three stations out of sixteen plan stations. and. It's GonNa take a long time before we see that the second phase and the third phase and the fourth facebook. So that brings me to a question that I wanted to talk to you about. In the book as you get up into modern times so you you go through the history of the line it's a fascinating glimpse it sort of the way this line has low has fed into the creation of the MTA the way it's sort of played up in City Lor towards the end you get into the nuts and bolts of the current planning initiative and when you spoke to Naga Raja who was then the head of MTA capital construction he says that he felt building the full line. All at once at least digging, the hole tunnel would have been cheapest and fastest, but it wasn't financially or politically feasible. Costly is that kind of decision for any of the future phases? Should we have built the whole thing all at once. You can ask anybody whether make sense to build something all at once or to start a project completed project, and then years later come back to it, and the answer is really easy. It's much more efficient to build the entire thing all at once. We have something called tunnel boring machines today. Tullamore machines or these. Monstrous machines that several blocks long that dig through rock and spew the rack out into the back, and then goes up onto the street goes onto trucks, and then it gets sent out to New Jersey or the Bronx or somewhere. We wrought a tunnel boring machine in two at ninety street to digs off to sixty third street, and we pulled the machine out. And then we disassemble it and ship it away somewhere else as opposed to taking that machine and going all the way to heaven if we had kept a machine in if we had kept the workers on the side, kept the same engineers. Kept the the construction team together we could build it faster and cheaper. The trouble is that we didn't want to make the same mistake that was made in the nineteen seventies. The Second Avenue subway construction in the nineteen seventies started up. He's darling and there's two abandoned tunnels them. It started in east. Village. Street was opened up. The street was closed up started in Chinatown, and there's an abandoned. Tunnel in Chinatown. We what we didn't want to do is we didn't want to start building the entire thing and then running out of money..

New York City Manhattan MTA New Jersey baseball Chuck Schumer facebook Senate football City Lor Naga Raja
"second" Discussed on Second Avenue Sagas Podcast

Second Avenue Sagas Podcast

06:46 min | 1 year ago

"second" Discussed on Second Avenue Sagas Podcast

"A new episode this time on my websites namesake. That's right. It's a podcast episode about the Second Avenue subway or more specifically a book about the Second Avenue Subway joining me today is Philip plot and associate professor of Political Science at Saint Peter's University in New Jersey and more importantly the author of last subway the long. Wait for the next train in New York City, a book all about you guessed it the second avenue subway much like everything related to the Second Avenue subway pledges book ran into a bit of global bad luck that was published on March Fifteenth Twenty Twenty amidst the dawning days of New York. City's Corona virus lockdown professor plots couldn't make the usual rounds to promote the book and he and I had to delayed this podcast episode a few times this spring. Now fill is an only a professor or an author will some listeners may have read politics across the Hudson, his twenty fifteen book on the efforts to build a new Tappan Zee bridge plotting career path has brought him close to the city's transit network and the second avenue subway before turning to academia fulltime Phil worked for the lower. Manhattan Development Corporation for nearly ten years overseeing development of the World Trade Center site. Before that, he spent nearly thirteen years working for the MTA managing agency wide issues for both the seven line extension and the second avenue subway during each project's planning. Phases he writes what he has lived and today he's going to talk about it with me Phil. Welcome and thank you for joining me. It is long long overdue and thanks so much for having me. I'm always been a big fan of the Second Avenue sagas website. Thank you. Well, I want to start out with an easy one for you and it's a question you could use to flip the tables on me. Why Right? About the Second Avenue subway? What is it about this project that seems to draw historians of New York City to focus on it over and over again. You know there's something exciting about envisioning subway system for New York. Thinking about having a transit ride that's quieter and faster and cleaner and safer and more modern when we traveled to other cities. Were going to Washington, which WHO's subway system is probably about fifty years old now or if we're going to San Francisco or for going to Singapore. Beijing. Or Tokyo we see modern subway systems not subway systems that are a hundred years old and I think we all envision a better future for New York City, not using subway system that was built by a great great. Great. Great grandparents. So, there is that that sort of futuristic thing about the second avenue subway, but then there's also something dysfunctional about the entire history of it. And it's A you think about our inability to build a new subway line in the past fifty years in New York New York history was always about building new things. We built canals, we built railroads, we built trains above ground. We build trains a below ground we bill parkways and expressways. We're always on the forefront of technology, but we stopped doing that. A Long. Time, ago. And then I think the second avenue subway subway really represents that inability of new. York to expanded infrastructure. And there's. Other things about the second every subway. Think of kind of interesting for me. It's a it's a little bit the Charlie Brown of Transit Lines Charlie. Brown tries to kick the football and Lucy pulls it away at the last second. So that's always seems to be what's happening to the second avenue subway all sorts of different excuses you can come up with, but it's always been pulled away from from us at the last second one of the things I learned from your book though is that some of those excuses were sort of built into the process we the second avenue subway was routinely used as a promise to get money and maybe the intent to build it wasn't always there. There was always the hope and the dream of building it but I think you're right. I think sometimes there seemed to be people who would promise the second avenue subway even if it wasn't all that feasible and that happened in the late forties for sure. So New York subway system was started as in nickel in one thousand, nine four and it wasn't the subway fare wasn't raised until the late nineteen forties. So we're talking forty four years of inflation all prices of everything from bread to rent double or triple or quadruple, but the subways always a nickel because the city didn't WanNa raise the fair you don't want to. Run. For reelection if you're the guy who raised fair after a few decades. But the the mayor of New York City William Dwyer promised. If we raise the subway fare from a nickel, then we'll be able to have enough money for the second avenue subway. So the Second Avenue subway is always been been out there and been promised as some part of like newer infrastructure package for for New York but you're right necessarily there. And I'm just thinking you had you had something which I thought was amusing years ago up on your Second Avenue website you had. A little clip from the TV show madman you probably remember that there was A. TV shows from the nineteen sixties and there's this woman checking at an apartment on York Avenue and eighty. Fourth. Street. She's concerned that the apartments like a little too far from the subway and the broker says during the nineteen sixties believe me when they finished the second avenue subway, your apartments go quadruple in value. So. It has this like cultural icon, historical icon and. An icon of okay. The future and I kinda the past. So you're right. You can look at the Second Avenue subway is representation of lots of different things. To me, I think the story of the Second Avenue subway also the story of the history of New York City. In the twentieth century, you can't really talk about the development of the city without focusing on how we haven't been able to build transit infrastructure over the last seventy or eighty years. Or so we've built a lot of roads. We had Robert Moses, the master planner who many believe did more. To Stymie the development of subways than anyone else over the last one, hundred years, it sounds to me like you do. But do you view the subway a sort of a metaphor for development in the city a stand in for the Twentieth Century Urban Development History of the city. Yeah. The Second Avenue subway wouldn't be so interesting if it was just the story of a train line underneath the street but. It really stands in for expanding the subway system. And I use the second avenue subway as. The last subway in the next that it's always been since nineteen twenty nine, the next subway that supposed to be built in your..

Second Avenue Subway New York City New York New Jersey York Phil Twenty Twenty Corona Tappan Zee bridge Manhattan Development Corporat professor World Trade Center MTA associate professor of Politic Beijing Robert Moses Tokyo Charlie Brown Philip plot Saint Peter's University
"second" Discussed on Second Avenue Sagas Podcast

Second Avenue Sagas Podcast

01:40 min | 2 years ago

"second" Discussed on Second Avenue Sagas Podcast

"Welcome to season two of the Second Avenue Sagas podcast. I'm your host Benjamin K back and I'm bringing you all things transit from subways to buses and everything. In between after a short break this winter we're back with new episodes. New guests new pandemic and a newly departed trained daddy. Today we're catching up on the transit beat with Jose Martinez senior reporter at the city and a longtime transit beat writer. Martinez is one of the veterans of the transit. Beat New York originally a newspaper man. Martinez started out with the Journal. News in Westchester in the mid nineteen ninety s before jumping to new glorious tabloids. He spent over a decade covering courts for the Daily News and the post before transitioning to New York. One where he covered the transit beat and hosted the popular in-transit newsmagazine segment. I've appeared on his show and in his stories countless times over the years as the first three months of twenty twenty have been busy ones for the MTA. I wanted to welcome Jose to the podcast for discussion on everything. That's been going on lately. Jose welcome and thank you for joining me. It's always good to see you been my pleasure. Thank you for having me this great countless times. I think I can count on one hand. The number of times. I put you on T- well I've been in your stories. Maybe not so before we dive into the news. And there's been a lot of news lately. Let's talk about your current Gig. I'm a big fan of the city. I think the coverage has been top notch and at a time when local news outlets are dropping like flies around the country. The city offers a voice in the wilderness. But not everyone is familiar with it. Can you give a little overview for those listeners? Who Don't know what the city is. It's an online outlet it's at the city.

"second" Discussed on Second Avenue Sagas Podcast

Second Avenue Sagas Podcast

14:33 min | 2 years ago

"second" Discussed on Second Avenue Sagas Podcast

"Second Second Avenue Sagas podcast. I'm your host Benjamin K back and today I'm talking all things subway maps with Eddie Jabbour the creator of the kick map a graphics and brand designer for for major companies by day to Boras carved out a niche for himself in the world of subway maps for the better part of two decades. You know him as the brains behind the kick map a dynamic version one of the New York City subway map that it's legions of fans swear as far superior to the one issued by the MTA to Bore Bay Ridge Native and Lifelong Lover of trains. Once told The New York Times it takes cryptic archaeologist unquote to read and understand the current. MTA subway map. It's complex convoluted complicated. And shows a static glimpse of only peak hour service. It's a snapshot in time. Rather than a comprehensive view of subway service and longtime followers of Second Avenue Sagas know that I've never urban one to withhold criticism of the current subway map. The kickback came about at the dawn of the smartphone era. Eddie had started building his own version of the subway map. In the early two thousands and so the prevalence of the iphone gave him an immediate platform for an APP that adjusts to real time service opened the kick map at four. Am and you'll see overnight service opening at four PM and you'll see peak hour service all it's busy glory for variety of reasons the MTA hasn't yet incorporated a true time based APP into its myriad digital offerings and so as twenty nine thousand nine in the first season of the Second Avenue Sagas podcast draws to an end. I wanted to sit down with Eddie for discussion on all things. Subway maps Eddie. Thank you for joining joining me. Let's start with kidnap itself though I know many listeners are intimately familiar with the kick map. Tell the folks at home what it is what it does. And what makes it a Superior Transit Map Yup thank you for the words. The kick map was created as an APP and our inspiration was actually Google maps school street car maps and it seemed to us that transit maps were stuck in the twentieth century. The brilliance of Beck's map for the London Underground the vinnie Ellie Nineteen seventy-two subway. Map Diagram maps were a product product of their time. And what we were more excited about was would google had done for the for the car street map. And that is the dynamic map when you zoom in you different information than when you zoom out and the idea was to make people familiar with the transit system assume most complex system in the world The New York City transit system and to make the master at to make them feel that they mastered the system that they understand. Stand the system. So you talk about the kick map as a dynamic transit map from the outset. That sounds far more useful and adaptable than a static paper or PDF subway map APP but not everyone knows what it means a map to be dynamic. Can you talk a little bit more about the elements of a dynamic map and what makes the kick Napa dynamic subway map certainly You know as two thousand nineteen comes to a close where we're go. We're going into the third decade of the twenty first century and the transit maps worldwide. In our opinion have mostly not change. You're still stuck in the mid twentieth century. Sorry and we jokingly referred to these maps. Although they're brilliant they were brilliant at the time they're dead maps another words there one dimensional. It's it's when you zoom in. It's the same map when you zoom out. It's it's the same map. There's no change that Google has brilliantly done with their street street maps when you zoom in you see more street detail you see a retailers whatever when you zoom out get an overview of the city and we think that transit is extremely important for large cities and to master the transit system. You need a great mapping system. One of the things that we discovered early on the transit system itself is virtual. It's underground you don't see it and it's really the map. That is the reality of the system and if the map is antiquated if the map hasn't changed really early virtually changed in forty years or more. There's a problem with that. And we were lucky to be as part of this this period where a couple of people using a program like adobe illustrator can make a very very accurate map can make a dynamic map with multi layers of information. So can we were trying to do with Google had done for street. We're doing for transit. Another which you zoom in then you see street detail as well as a subway detail you zoom out and you see the boroughs you see the the transit system against the city you see that intimate relationship that such important relationship between transit and New York City. It built the city. It built the modern New York. It's interesting we'll get back to this little later in the discussion but I think for a lot of the history of the debate over how subway map should be designed. There was a tension between win. schematic diagram maps versus geographical map. But today it seems with all of this technology that we carry around the geographical map is sort of one out in in a way because it's more flexible but it also helps tie the city to where you are on your phone correct. It's kind of funny. The the transit map the dead map is we call it. Whether it's the diagram or the geographic is really it. Most people don't use it. It's you know it's a symbol of the city. It's on the subway cars. It's in the station but let's face it. Most people go to Google. Go to Google transit and go. I'm going from point to point B.. I'm going from this from my office to restaurant. What's the best way to get there and Google our opinion of Google Transit? is they do a very good job. But it's not transit centric even though they say it's Google transit if they've they tell you right up you know it's better take your number or it's better to walk or whatever so the map has become an icon. It's always always an iconic symbol of the city. The city is New Yorker London. It's a symbol but we think it needs to be a dynamic not only a symbol of the city but there's a use for a modern twenty first century subway map. So what's I'm curious to hear the official kick map origin story. What made you spend so much of your time? Enmeshed in the world of transit map design. which maps did you use for inspiration? And how much time does it take to create the original initial kick map. Yeah I'm a New Yorker. I was born in New Yorker raised a New Yorker and like most New Yorkers never looked at the subway map. We only looked at the subway. If we were going to a place that we he'd never been to but to go to work to home There was no scheduling at the time. The map was just something again on the wall. The tourists used or that we would use if if there was as a destination that we were a little unsure of so we never thought about the map until I had a client from out of town a well. Travelled urban client who I wanted to take the subway to dinner destination and he confided in me that the subway intimidated him. And when I when I pursued it I was wondering is it. What what aspect of the subway and it literally had to do with the complexity of the system and that when he would try to use the map the current map it just? He couldn't figure it out he couldn't figure out the connections he couldn't figure out the difference between express and local. The map wasn't clearly presenting that to a person who didn't know the system. It's funny hearing somebody say the subway map intimidates them. Because I feel like that can be common experience for people who are travelling in New York. You know we all have the subway maps more or less in our heads. Were going every day and like you said if we're going somewhere we're new with might look at the map to see what the station is that we're getting out at but we don't think of it. Is something daunting when I was traveling over. The summer went to Tokyo for the first time. We looked at that subway map and and it's not even useful as a map. It's just a mess of lines and interchanges and there you need something that's dynamic. You need Google to tell you where to go. Yes I agree to us again. This is not our day job. This is this is passionate. Cities Are Passion and we do this on the side where we can we we kind of love it to us. Tokyo is the Mount Everest of maps transit APPs in other words. We are going to tackle that map Sunday. And we're going to you know we are going to master it. We're going to master that system. I know Tokyo fairly well. I've been there a few times. Ars Myself the system is amazing again. A not criticizing the systems New York systems or any of the systems. They are amazing especially question. New York's twenty four seven express local the whole thing so it really has to do with. The map is not kept up with the system so so you mentioned the local in the Express. One of the things that the kick map does that. I think drew some inspiration from the way Moscow Vanilla designed. The map is delineating between in expressing local. Right now you look at the MTA subway map. Everything is a trunk line. It's one line if it's a one train. Stop if is to train stop. There's the differences in little bullets. But here can you talk a little about the design elements. That would certainly first and foremost the map is about information design and one of the things on the information design. One of the realities of New York is the population is so varied and with a lot of people. English isn't even their first language and the the environment of the subways one of split-second decisions. You're three and is coming in. Is that might train isn't not my train so the map should be able to be scanned rather red and the brilliance of the diagram. Whether it's the Beck Diagram or vanilla diagram is the map could easily be scanned. You knew okay. The train in is going from Fifty Ninth Street to Twenty Fifth Street. It doesn't stop at the Museum of Natural History so you have a quick read. A quick read not true with the present map with prison map you have to go to each and every station and see the little letters or numbers next to each and every station to see if your train stops there. There's one classic example that I think hundreds of people make this mistake every day. You would think that all trains would stop up at Times Square. They do and you would think that. All trains stop at Columbus Circle. They don't how many people get on the number two or three express train at forty seconds three times square and want to get off at Columbus Circle and they go right through Columbus Circle and on to seventy second street if you look at the current subway map the official subway map is not clear earlier in the map does not delineate like vanilla map did it is not clear that your two or three train does not stop there. And as I said said it's happened to me. I'm sure it happens to one. Hundreds of people every day that they Kurt and New Yorkers to again if they're unfamiliar with that of course it stops fifty nine hundred the only consistent cross street that every train stops it by the way is forty second street whether it's thirty four th street thirty third dirt fifty nine th street fourteenth street a lot of trains. Bypass those and intuitively. You would think they would. They would all stop at those major. Your Cross streets but they don't kick map shows that clearly. I think it's interesting to think about. How subway map designs have become at least from transit agencies almost two simplified fight you know the MTA went from multiple line showing? You could trace the three train from one end in Brooklyn all the way to Harland. See where it stops you can. You can't do that quite what is easily now. And that's one of the problems that I think people have with the London map too and I know that you've taken on sort of a design of the London map that's A. That's a tough one on the London sort of held as the grand standard of subway designs. Lately they've started to add more and more things to it that make it more and more complicated and they don't do a very good job of delineating different service patterns but did you find challenges in taking on another city besides New York when you expanded. Yeah there are couple of things is about other cities we we made this dynamic formula for the New York City Map and then the the other test for us was Kim in this formula. Be Pertained to other major systems but keeping their iconic status in other words. Yes we can make a kick Map New York City kind of map for London but we wanted to keep the London maps. DNA and what we attempted we. We tried three cities we did Chicago. Washington DC and London as tests cities to see if the character of those iconic maps could be maintained but yet have better have the more dynamic way finding ability that the New York City Map has and we think we have succeeded in that. Because we don't want cookie cutter maps across the world. We do want an international way finding standard for transit transit as I said like Google does for cars and streets. But we want that each individual city whether you're in Tokyo or you're in Paris or we're in Washington DC. The map is a proud symbol of those cities and we wanted to maintain that sort of cultural DNA so back to New York work for a few more questions. One key element of your dynamic map is the prominence of New York City's neighborhoods setting aside endless battles over neighborhood. Boundaries your color for a approach to demarcation.

New York City Google New York City Map MTA New York Tokyo Eddie Jabbour The New York Times London Columbus Circle official Benjamin K Beck
"second" Discussed on Second Avenue Sagas Podcast

Second Avenue Sagas Podcast

12:20 min | 2 years ago

"second" Discussed on Second Avenue Sagas Podcast

"Welcome Back to another episode of the Second Avenue Sagas podcast I'm your host Benjamin k back and my guest today is Sarah Feinberg the former administrator of the federal route Eh Bloomberg and facebook she served as chief of staff at the US Department of Transportation for heading up the F. R. A. for the final two years of the Obama Administration Sara joined the MTA board in February after serving as a judge of the governor's genius challenge in twenty seventeen over the past eight months. She's been a vocal advocate for responsive N. responsible MTA allow voice speaking up for some of the more powerless transit riders during MTA board meetings the first eight months of fiber time on the board would have been anything but quiet for the MTA the L. train work has loomed over the city while a fare hike went into effect in April meanwhile the governor has been pushing for MTA Trans formation while the board recently approved a fifty one billion dollar capital plan the largest five year investment plan in the agency's history the MTA came under fire from transit advocates who charged the governor with delaying the public release of the plan advocates for New Yorkers with disabilities have been flooding MTA board meetings for years urging for an increased urgency and investment station accessibility it's just another year for the MTA but it hasn't all been bad news though as Omni the not as long awaited Metro card killer debuted earlier this year and this month's launch of the Fourteenth Street bus way has been hailed citywide as a transit success story with the capital plan largely supporting Andy Byford fast forward initiatives and the launch of the bus way the MTA seems to be on a better path lately but I still hear lots of skepticism towards the governor and his way of inserting himself awkwardly into the MTA's affairs and there's an ongoing debate over the role of the board governing the MTA the board is act as a buffer between the governor and the agency it's that role and her experiences at the federal level that Sarah and I are going to discuss today Sarah thank you for joining me Thank you so somewhat rare among MTA board members these days is your background you grew up in West Virginia spent twenty years in DC with a stop in San Francisco before arriving work in so many people on the MTA board to seem to be New Yorkers for the duration of their lives or their adult lives their careers I think it's important to have a diverse array of voices on the Board how did the transit systems in the places that you've been to compare with New York's and what can you learn from these places great question yes a growing up in West Virginia Group in Charleston West Virginia which is actually usually the biggest biggest city in West Virginia except during WVU Football Games morgantown the biggest city so obviously there's no subway there there is a bus system I actually took the city bus school most days and when I wasn't playing sports took the city bus home and so I was bus rider from early on and You know the bus that I rode before it came up the hill to get me serviced even more rural part of of the outskirts of Charleston we actually lived outside of the city limits so so that was my first experience with transit and in Washington to when I got to Washington right after college was the first time I had ever written subway I visited New York like once with my mom when I was title we didn't take the subway I don't know why and and I remember to this day I used to feel so grownup when I would ride the metro and I get nervous about like putting my card in and I would frequently take the train in the wrong direction and get off and turn around and come together way and and obviously got got used to it over ears but but I am still frequently in DC because my family they're my partners families there's were there a lot and we try to use the system and were frequently like waiting for ten or twelve fifteen minutes for train not at two o'clock in the morning three o'clock in the on Tuesday so I've spent a lot of time living near a system that is clean and beautiful and accessible the ball and and well-built but boy leaves a lot to be desired the services that's always that's always the the DC New York debate that we all get into the aw I don't often by the way there are a lot of places you can't get so great if you're going to dismiss greatest going to Capitol Hill great if you're going you know it seems like a commuter system almost that is sort of masquerading subway stops are very far apart and don't go to a lot of areas there's not good inter connectivity across the city but people love it because they say it's cleaner and I guess getting to be more reliable than it used to be yeah I mean and look when I was a dot we were in the when I was chief of staff at dot and then F. R. E. Administrator we were in the middle of this debate about whether we needed to actually shut down for some amount of time because the system had not unlike New York had reached a maintenance level that where it had just fallen off a cliff and we were having thing smoke incidents fire incidents which were really really dangerous and you don't know how much you paid attention at the time but it we F- Attala the from smoke inhalation and it was horrifying and so we were in the process of and obviously it's one thing to work in transportation at the federal level and then the system that Sir the federal government to actually think about having to shut that down because you have safety concerns we were going through the steps of trying to figure out how you get an entire federal workforce to work work you have to shut down the system so those were not good times they are such a better place now than they were anyway already gotten distracted that's quite all right so safety it's part of the conversation safety I feel like has been a theme for you over the last few years you know when you're you started at the CIA at a time when the Senate decided to push out PC compliance deadlines but it's still been a big focus of the administration and something that you are speaking out for you here's what are your experiences and perspectives from the FAA have you been able to bring to the MTA discussions and meetings and how does their safety records stack up well anytime you're at a department of Transportation Transit Agency any kind of deal like that at an airline the whatever safety is the top I'm first priority because nothing else matters you can't get that right right so that was very much the the priority when I was chief of staff we spent a lot of time working on the read by rail issue which was the movement of volatile crude Oughta added the BOC into the to the coast and figuring out what we could do to improve the safety of of of the rail system that way and then at the F. A. Obviously tons of of safety issues that we're working on reference the Senate pushing back that deadline first of all that's probably a whole other podcast we could do an it's an actually the P. T. C. debate is real lesson that you may WanNa talk about it at some point in in pushing a bureaucracy meet a challenge that it does not think that can meet and then it's not particularly interested in meeting and that was really it was a huge piece of the two years that I was there and the congress eventually moved to the deadline because they because they failed to get me to move the deadline because the administrator said I will not move this deadline because If the administrators willing to move safety deadline we will have much bigger problems and so and so the reason they moved it was because was because we refuse to move it but in terms of safety lessons I mean it it it always has to be priority number one and then everything else can get done after that but if you're not able to keep people's safe then you can't do anything else so after your departure president trump named former railway executive to the IRA which sometimes people viewed as asking the into guard the Fox to guard the Henhouse and Elaine Chao is hardly been a friend to urban transit agencies has the shift in federal policy harmed the MTA in we'll get back to the capital plan do you think it's safe to still assume a massive federal contribution to the MTA's long-term investments sell so my successor Ron Batori was a CEO at At conrail and and you know that the the sort of knee jerk reaction is that's the Fox guarding the Henhouse I have to say I have not been particularly alarmed by any safety decisions he's made he's continued to prioritize PTC when the easiest thing in the world would have been for him to walk in and find ways to extend the that line so I I actually feel like he's done a great job and I I don't think that his tenure Fra's necessarily impacted mta all that much look I mean secretary chows impact has been enormous even if you just look at gateway the fact that the admission nation is willing to stop a project in its tracks for no good reason whatsoever that anyone can determine there's some talk about about funding but in my experience in history and long before I was in the Obama Administration I spent many years on Capitol Hill working with polly Bergen others you know this is an unprecedented really abuse of what the administration should be doing of what any administration should be doing I mean the responsibility is to keep projects moving not to kill them in the cradle so that that that alone has been really get into how much that can harm the region you know even if trump loses next year and there's a new administration and they sort of ramp backup gateway funding still four years we're not getting back right the time has been lost and to be clear like this is nothing short of someone sitting on a piece of paper so that the project won't move forward this is not let's have a debate out money funding let's have a debate about how the you know what exactly is included in the project maybe we should include bridge maybe we shouldn't include four whatever none from the president he doesn't want to support a region that's not going to vote for him didn't vote for him doesn't particularly like him look I I mean I don't know if it's secretary chows harder if it's the president's part but it's hard for me to understand or imagine someone who's been elected by the American people intentionally wrist asking the economic impact that we could be flirting with in New York I mean the the governor and I've had multiple conversations about this and I I've suggested and I think at some point someone will probably do this that you know we just we probably need to do a quick and dirty study about what the economic impact will be if we lose that tunnel so because again and you know there's a people who are focused on gateway in more and more people are understand what we're talking about when we say lose a tunnel it's not that all of a sudden some of the tunnels going to go floating down the river and we're GONNA have a we're going to have a massive incident what's going to happen has an engineer is going to walk through that tunnel one day is gonna say that's it like trying to start your thirty year old car in your driveway on a cold day at some point you can you can you.

MTA facebook US Department of Transportatio Sarah Feinberg Benjamin k administrator Obama Administration chief of staff Eh Bloomberg eight months two years fifty one billion dollar twelve fifteen minutes twenty years thirty year four years five year one day
"second" Discussed on Second Avenue Sagas Podcast

Second Avenue Sagas Podcast

03:24 min | 3 years ago

"second" Discussed on Second Avenue Sagas Podcast

"The test subjects why is our block being the ones subjected to this. That's also i think disingenuous of course because they would object to it just as much but at least in the public and the press you could take that away there is interestingly also a legal argument to make for approaching this with a master plan and this is what i'm one of my twitter or followers was discussing the other day. If you do a master plan and you subjected to an environmental impact statement a city wide master plan you might not need to do do an environmental impact statement for each of these projects if you do it on a city wide basis you sort of grandfathered in the finding that this is better for the city that it helps the environment that there's no adverse impact impact and that people will be able to get to move around faster and emissions will drop. It's interesting that you don't really see politicians embracing that quite yet though well because are always fighting last week's fight. I think that's part of the problem but i mean look i think also just because of where i come from things often which is like the media and your local group of nimbies. The master plan is good. It is not going to completely disarm the nimbies. They say they want the master plan but in reality that won't make much difference but like you said i think it like i said it takes away one little bit of ammunition from the nimbies and also look. I think we should have a department of transportation ten and a mayor who says here's what we're going to do. We want to get people out of cars. We get them onto bikes. Who want to get them into transit and in pursuit of that goal. I guess what we we are going to get sued like crazy but as long as we cross our ts in daughter is and do all this stuff and master-plan subject to major environmental review starting now that that would be one way of achieving baco. I guess they're concerned too at a certain level that if they lose one of these cases where what happens next we all assume they're going to win on fourteenth street. We've seen them win with the prospect park west bike lane what happens if they lose and nobody really knows does right and that i mean look. I think that's all of our fear. Isn't that your fear right like you could have a jet go before some judge and it's completely subjective as much as you'd like like to think that it's not and then suddenly like the whole project the whole enterprise of improving bus service across the cities in jeopardy yeah it would it would it would actually so. I think a loss here would be a crushing blow to any attempt at reforming the way we share streets base at this point absent legal reform. I mean that's how we spelt about. The prospect park west bike lane is that this was so important because it was <hes> some of the most powerful people in the city suing the city to get rid of this thing and we felt like this was the future of new york city's bicycle lane program basically on the line and it had immediate effects. There are some bike lanes still around the city that we're watered down back then because the city got scared off and didn't want to get get sued again and we no one thankfully and i think is jeanette sadeq khan wrote in new york magazine towards the end of their term twenty thirteen. You know the bike wars are over on the bikes. One is because we won that legal battle and it was really important so yeah. I think a loss on fourteenth street would just be just devastating would probably do must two years. We don't have left speaking of climate change to really turn things around. Yeah i think at that point.

new york city jeanette sadeq khan new york two years
"second" Discussed on Second Avenue Sagas Podcast

Second Avenue Sagas Podcast

04:29 min | 3 years ago

"second" Discussed on Second Avenue Sagas Podcast

"Over the coming year. If the conversation is about vulnerable low income, people who for rare reasons, need to drive into the central business district. Then I think you're really having a values driven conversation. And it's one that a lot of folks would be open to if cautious. I think if you have whole industries and swabs of the economy saying, we want preferential treatment that is a very different conversation and one that, that I would hope would be less well received. So I want to switch shifts focus a little and put on a bit of a skeptical hot here over the past few months. Ivan expressed some concerns about the messaging behind the congestion pricing push, I think a few others have as well. Now don't get me wrong. I think this is a very big victory, and we should definitely be celebrating it. I sometimes worry about the public facing messaging congestion pricing is being trumpeted by everyone as a way to fix the subways, but the money also has to go towards increased transit reach to provide alternatives for those who will no longer choose to drive end. There are immediate ideally immediate congestion reduction benefits. So it's not just about fixing transit. It's sort of about fixing everything fixing New York City streets, do feel there's some tension in this messaging, and do you think that in light of the fact that truly fixing the subways, and most importantly, overhauling, the signals will take longer than a few years that were over promising at the outset, I think that all these repairs will? Necessarily take longer than a few years on that note of the timing. I actually do think it's important for the MTA to roll out some service improvements in service increases in the near term. Even just as a as an element of rolling out congestion pricing in order to demonstrate to the public that congestion pricing is not going to provide only abstract value in the future. But real life value that we can experience right now. Under question about the messaging, I I don't know. I think you're asking a lot of our political system. I think congestion pricing has been proposed as the solution to various problems over the years. And I think that, that's rooted in reality congestion, pricing, does not solve any of our problems. It reduces traffic and it brings in a bunch of money. Those will help make the problems easier to solve and it's not. I think that's the, the most accurate way of describing it. It's not a silver bullet, but it is progress. It is a step toward all of these goals goals of improving transit service goals of adding transit because there is a new source of funding that can pay and loosen up other funds. Right. Even if it goes to the capital program, it does have an impact on the MTA day-to-day operations budget. And that can if done right increased bus service in the boroughs, for example, it does reduce traffic congestion. It does improve air quality all these things are true. Not, not at miraculous, right? It's not it's not black and white. It's not. Yes or no? So it's not it's not a miracle cure, but I think it's fair to use all of those messages to talk about congestion pricing. But I think that the reason that it's talked about so much in the context of fixing the subway is because that's the concern that's pressing enough to get it across the finish line. One element of that, too, is that we've already seen from queens. You representatives trumpet part of the deal that they made to pass congestion pricing. I think these were fairly transit sympathetic representatives in the first place, but we saw yesterday Wednesday, some of these representatives put out a press release saying the MTA's promised to look at L A R affairs as a way to rationalize them for those constituents who don't have subway access. And they've already looked to expand bus service. I'm sure we'll see more of those, I think I would view that as a victory as well. I think that's totally reasonable. I think that a bunch of legislators, I think if we get into political horse trading in destructive way of people are using their. Congestion pricing vote to demand leverage on some unrelated topic that has nothing to do with, with transit for their constituents, but I think if they're making the reasonable argument that we're asking people to leave their cars at home. And so we should be providing better transit options, not just in the core of Manhattan. But in neighborhoods around the city that have worse transit. I think that's a very reasonable position for a legislative to take. And if that's what they've been negotiating for. I think there's something commendable about that. I've seen some people also complain and I think this is not the right complaint. But some people have complained about the two year implementation.

MTA Ivan New York City Manhattan queens two year
"second" Discussed on Second Avenue Sagas Podcast

Second Avenue Sagas Podcast

02:44 min | 3 years ago

"second" Discussed on Second Avenue Sagas Podcast

"Play in this discussion. First of all, I think that as a process question, some folks are critical of the legislature taking some of those decisions to a panel down the road. But I actually think when you take a step back, that seems like a pretty appropriate decision to make it this time not just for strategic reasons of them, not wanting to make tough choices. But because the legislature never decides on tolls and on the minute show of, of tolling and charging and fair fairplay panel is less likely to be subject to capture than legislatures because you can directly lobby a bunch of elected officials. It's harder to lobby panel and the panel gives everybody a little bit of arm's length distance from those decisions. It makes it in some ways a little more technocratic, but I think it's also fair to point out that the panel will ultimately, the decision will ultimately may be made by the triborough bridge tunnel thirty which is a subsidiary of the MTA, which reports to the governor, and that's a, that's a reality. But I, but I do think it's the with. The structure they created in which penalize making the decisions. There is a bunch of advocacy work for us to do to make sure the congestion pricing plan is robust, and that it's fair and it's special interest groups do not get to lobby for special exemptions. And you know that's not a zero exemption policy. I think that all of us can picture some circumstances in which we think some flexibility could be fair. But very limited, right? The, the queens midtown tunnel does not have exemptions on its toiling and the George Washington Bridge does not have exemptions on its tolling, and I want to be very careful that congestion pricing remain fair as the concept is, and part of the Galateri in nature of congestion pricing is that everyone who benefits is chipping in and every time you do create an exemption it that premise, if I've thought about the exemptions in the context of the mayor statements, because he often talks about making sure that people who are driving to the hospitals which are all within the congestion pricing zone for the most part. Are exempted and, you know, at the surface that sort of sounds like a ridiculous exemption. There are people who take the subways and buses to the to their doctors appointments every day. But on the other hand, the seems like one of these limited cases, were maybe an exemption isn't bad public policy. But when I see organizations like the truckers association start lobbying for exemptions. I roll my eyes, little, they're the ones who should be paying, but they're also the ones who would benefit tremendously, and who could more easily pass costs on. And I think that's what you're raising is a real question of how this conversation will go over the coming year. If the conversation is about vulnerable low income, people who for rare reasons, need to drive into the central business district..

legislature triborough bridge George Washington Bridge MTA Galateri
"second" Discussed on Second Avenue Sagas Podcast

Second Avenue Sagas Podcast

04:25 min | 3 years ago

"second" Discussed on Second Avenue Sagas Podcast

"Right. Right. It's not guaranteed. We need to implement it, correctly and on MTV reform. We should be talking about MTA reform. We should be talking about cost control. We should be talking about efficiency. We should be talking about reducing the time that these projects take, we should be talking about agency culture and being open to creativity, and they're all sorts of things that should be part of an MTA reform conversation. I just think that not everyone's definition of reform is how the governor proposed it in this budget excess. I think that's right. And I think it's part of the ongoing conversation that, that hopefully, the window will still be open to have in Albany. Right. Hopefully that we've moved on from the conversation about whether or not we're doing congestion pricing, because the decision was made it past. There is implementation to work out. But I think we've, we've flip the switch from New York does not do congestion pricing into a new territory of New York does do congestion pricing. The conversation is not over about empty reform, because that is much more nuanced. And we'll take longer. That's good. So shifting gears from Albany. I wanna talk a little bit about the mayor. I haven't been particularly impressed with the mayor statements on congestion pricing. He would frequently go on Brian Lehrer and talk about his preference for the millionaire's tax. He introduced the concept of exemptions to congestion pricing. He does. Doesn't seem to totally get the benefits of reducing traffic in city streets. What was his role in this process? And how do you feel about whether or not he did a good job standing up for New York City's interests? I actually think that the mayor did a couple of things that were very valuable on the road. Congestion pricing. The I was proposing the millionaire's tax. I actually think that part of the problem that we're having in twenty sixteen and twenty seventeen is that the conversation was stuck and that was that we needed. We needed forward motion, the governor and the mayor reporting fingers at each other, we were out there with our komo's MTA hashtag ended in some ways the political system was running in circles, and the mayor proposing a specific revenue source that would be used to upgrade the transit system, actually helped move, the conversation forward, even for folks who didn't agree with the millionaire's tax part. Of what it laid bare was it the mayor and the city of New York did not have the legal authority to create a renew revenue source for transit. You may recall the mayor proposed a millionaires tax and then couldn't implement I became quickly apparent as insiders were aware that any revenue proposal would require the approval of the governor and the legislature. And I actually think that, that shift in public understanding to seeing that it's the governor and the state legislature that are responsible helped lay the groundwork for congestion pricing. That's good. So the mayor's role I mean as much as he doesn't seem to have come to this proposal too. Late in the process, it does seem as though the mayor played a useful part in getting us to where we needed to be. Yeah. I think both I think the mayor's proposal the millionaire's tax was helpful as I said, and I think the mayor endorsing congestion pricing in the endgame of the conversation was also helpful. The mayor is. Is a known progressive people understand the, the values that he brings to policy questions and his endorsing congestion pricing helped allay what I think was a misconception at times the congestion pricing was not progressive. Because in reality, I think it is, I think it is I've made the case for in various outlets that I think it is so shifting from the politics. I wanna talk a little bit about the process. I mentioned earlier the traffic mobility review board. This is a six member board. That'll be run out of the triborough, bridge and tunnel. Thirty it'll feature one member appointed by the mayor to from outside the city and three appointed by the MTA and already the times in an article you were quoted in today talked about how special interests are jockeying to push for exemptions. Now, I don't believe a final plan with numerous or really any exemptions is the best interest of the city, but that's the next fight, what's your view on exemptions, and then what role will the writers aligns and the fix the subway advocates..

New York City MTA Albany Brian Lehrer MTV komo
"second" Discussed on Second Avenue Sagas Podcast

Second Avenue Sagas Podcast

03:42 min | 3 years ago

"second" Discussed on Second Avenue Sagas Podcast

"We have worked with a growing coalition of state legislators. To demand transit funding and in some cases to push back on when the governor had proposed to reduce transit funding. And so we had the framework for a coalition of legislators from years of working with them not on congestion pricing, but on other transit advocacy issues, and I think part of what has really changed in the years since mayor Bloomberg had proposed congestion pricing, a little more than ten years ago, part of what has changed is that the subway system has gotten so much worse that even legislators who many of them personally, don't take the subway drive, but even legislators recognized because their constituents are complaining to them. And because it's in the news that public transit needs a new generation of attention and the new set of funding of investment. And so part of what I think, is interesting about the dynamics in Albany is that first the state legislature demanded true. Visit funding for many years. Then the governor proposed what I think is more significant transit funding than they really pushing for which is the proposal for congestion pricing. And then it took some work back in the legislature to get them on board with what many of them had extensively been demanding in the first place. I feel like one immediate recent tipping point was the, the press conference, the w was very instrumental and drowning out some of the opponents of congestion pricing. I think that's right. I think there's, you know, I think there's a lot that led up to that moment that you're referring to where some congestion pricing. Opponents had an event and the transit workers unions, well is various grassroots groups, like ours, went and to w certainly had the loudest voices present. In, in telling them that they were wrong in their position to congestion pricing, but I think there is a dynamic that led up to that even just within the legislature where there are some folks, who have always supported congestion pricing, whether it's because they represent transit riders. That would be a significant source of transit funding or because of environmental reasons or because, you know, of, of values reasons of wanting to charge car drivers into Manhattan, who are generally wealthier and use the money to fix transit, which is generally used by everybody, but who are on average, less wealthy. You always had some core components, but the deterioration of the transit system, and some of the work that we and the other grassroots groups did meant that this time in vis congestion pricing fight some, the folks from Brooklyn from queens, from the Bronx who had not always been supportive of congestion. Pricing were much friendlier to the idea. And I think that openness, which really was a good faith reassessment of the idea that openness, I think made a big difference in the legislative dynamics I feel like an in a certain way to this is a good cumulation of the writers alliance approach to building support for transit, if you target individuals and work with them to get them to this idea, and to see how this idea benefits, a lot of people and not just a few people and how it really benefits everyone, you can bring them on board. More and get them to be if not advocates for the plan at least receptive to its that they'll vote for it. I think that's right. I think. We at the riders alliance and some of the other grassroots groups that we work with have had a strategy for many years of building legislative advocates, and champions in the legislature. And for congestion pricing. Specifically, I think it's valuable to note that some efforts that have been going on for years in the wilderness like the move New York proposal, which was a version of congestion pricing..

Manhattan mayor Bloomberg Albany w Brooklyn Bronx queens ten years
"second" Discussed on Second Avenue Sagas Podcast

Second Avenue Sagas Podcast

11:46 min | 3 years ago

"second" Discussed on Second Avenue Sagas Podcast

"Welcome to the new second avenue, sagas podcast. I'm your host Benjamin k back and joining me this week for the very first episode city council speaker, Cory Johnson. Now, instead of a traditional state of the city speech councilmember Johnson released a sweeping call this month to reimagined the way we get around New York City. He has grand designs on in the streetscape prioritizing, the district's buses and cyclists, over private automobile traffic and he wants to humanize New York's transportation landscape. What lamenting changes that should severely curtail car ownership in the five boroughs? The centerpiece of the speakers plan is an ambitious call for the city to take over control of its subways and buses from the state, I was joined last week. With city council speaker Cory Johnson, and his aides Kelly, Taylor and rob Newman to discuss the, let's go transit plan. Thank you, taking after thanks for coming inbound. Thanks for having me. So, well, I know my readers keen to hear more about this plan. Let's start with an overview in the basics why this plan. Why now walk me through some of the highlights of how you envision city control? The transit system to work in particular of the role of the so-called mobility's are will sometimes crises are opportunities if policymakers and leaders actually use that opportunity in a way, that is creative for thinking outside the box and the idea of municipal control of subways and buses at new. I'm not the first person to call on Jolo to talk about it and twenty thirteen. Christine Quinn talked about it, and twenty thirteen there, another people that have run for mayor and other people that have in the past. But I think this is the first time that elected official with some level of prominence has decide. And to not just talk about it in a sound by like way, a one off to off way. But to actually present a real plan that could be dissected that could be modified that could be added to, and we're in a crisis and the crisis that were in stems from years of disinvestment years of bad management. And also a lack of creativity on figuring out how to have a twenty second century mass transit system in New York City not too. Sound hokey or soundbite easy. But the reason why New York's economy has grown decade after decade after decade is because of masters. It is because of our subways and buses. And if we want to continue to grow who want to be of a center for economic activity and a life blood for the entire region. We need a mass transit system that works in the current structure at the MTA is a system that was set up to deflect accountability. It was basically created in the late nineteen sixties. In the midst of and oncoming fiscal crisis that the city was about to go through and Rockefeller had his own reasons and Lindsey and his own reasons and many people had their own reasons, but we're saying is there's a better way to do this. And there's much better way to do it because of the day-to-day issues that riders face was a better way to do it to actually be able to grow the system and expand the system created with the system and do all sorts of things that other cities in Europe and around the United States have been able to do and so the, the real crux and highlight of the plan is really threefold number one, municipal control subways and buses how you do that. What it looks like McGovern structure, accountability structure, a financing structure, number two overall bowl on what you look at as the streets of New York City, how to make the streets, safer and more, livable, and number three wrapping that all into one as a broad. Sort of transit transportation agenda for New York City, and not just looking at these things, and their own silos, but actually saying, how do you integrate subways and buses and bikes and pedestrians and safe and livable streets in a way that works for the entire city and a master plan? Mike way not piecemeal. Not one off, not an NBA. How do you do all this collectively? And that's what the speech was about. That's what one hundred and three page. White beep was about. And that's what I'm going to talk about over the next months over the next two and a half years as I continue to be speaker of the council. So one of the features of this is an increased accountability at the local level for transit. I think one of the issue, one of the ways that the governor has sort of exploited the complicated structure of the anti as to claim nobody's in charge when he's in charge, your plan makes it very clear. The mayor appoints somebody that mobility's are who is in charge of overseeing the department of transportation and what you're calling that. How do you feel that is responsive to voters? How do people then know that somebody is in charge? They can go to for complaints and problems. Well, no city thankfully, no city in the United States or the world, I think is. Comparible to the greatest city in the world, New York City, but there are things you can learn from other cities on what they've done. Well, and the turnaround Chicago's still has been problems with crime. And with. All sorts of issues that are still plaguing Chicago. But Rahm emanuel's been able to actually do some really good things, and he has basically operational control of the subways and buses. The elevated L in Chicago and Los Angeles. They've actually been able to get a bond passed over one hundred billion dollars to actually expand subway service in LA, and Elliot's a major car culture, as we know I was just in LA over Christmas. And when I was driving around I actually saw the new stations that were being built and Garcetti has control in many ways over there. So in the United States, you have examples. And then when you look at what Andy viral was able to do in London where this is almost the exact setup in London where you have the mayor who appoints Commissioner abilities are overseas the subways and buses and streets of London. The same thing in Sydney, were Andy Byford was similar in Toronto. So we're not. Creating something that no one's ever done before. We're modeling off were modeling this idea of what we've seen work. In other places where you can have greater accountability the flexibility to try new things. Do things expand service, and I think one of the biggest issues with the MTA right now as you have basically two ninety nine percent of the public, a faceless unaccountable board that makes the sessions that affect them every single day. And what we need is stricter accountability greater accountability, a better governance structure. It can be modeled in many ways of all the examples. I just gave. But similarly, the waterboard and New York City. Everyone talks about New York City is the best water in the world. And the mayor believe thankfully, nothing's gone wrong with our water. We have great reservoirs in the north and feed the city, but the mayor has aboard which sets the water rates which oversees all this. And if something did go wrong. The mayor would actually be the one responsible for that subways, and buses impact the most people every single. Day in New York City, and the mayor of New York City, this mayor in any other mayor pass marriage and future mayors don't really have the level of thority control and accountability that they should have just quickly getting into sort of the top level structure, repel, you'd in business, I think one of the parts of the plan that's really appealing. Is the way it sort of an organized divorce. You have the MTA staying alive to service debt. You have that, that would operate transit system in one of your proposals to ensure that all the people who are on the board of this new entity are New York City residents who ride transit, so they'd have a familiarity with the system in no the NATs of it. How do you think that plays into sort of a better oversight function for aboard, like that, before I answer that, I think the one shocking thing, though it shouldn't be shocking. And again, it goes to why it's important for people to understand how dysfunctional Byzantine and screwed up. The cards setup is is that the one member of the board. Who is Jezek needed as the transit tentative and rider doesn't vote on the board right now, which is crazy. And I laid it out, these the longest serving board, Alvin right? Yeah. So. You know, twenty three members on the board six of them nonvoting of the seventeen members of the board. Four of them only have a quarter of a vote. The county executives get a quarter vote each from Nassau Westchester and Rockland and Putnam. And then the other members of the board four by the mayor and the rest by the governor another entities. So what, what we want is, we want a governance structure, that would actually make sense and be responsive to, to riders. I actually that Veronica Vander pool. It's been a great board member, and we need more people like her who are thoughtful and creative, and demand tough answers to questions that matter. And hopefully what you have is you would have a diverse prosecution of New Yorkers from all five boroughs from different life experiences that would come to this as being people that use the system every. Single day. Use the subways use the buses and would understand in day-to-day basis, Andy Byford, humanity. So anti-british you know, walks around the streets of New York City, and he takes subways buses every single day with the customer service tag that says Hello. My name is Andy Byford, and people stop him all the time, and anyone who runs a New York City, transit should be doing that every past president should have been doing that. Members of the board should probably walk around with the same tag on their shirt that Andy has so that the here from riders on a day-to-day basis, that's not the case of where we are in now, that's what should be the case. And by the way, this isn't rocket science will revolutionary, this is just the way it should be. But again, the system is so Byzantine is so screwed up and set up to deflect any level accountability that I don't know if the boy. Members riding the bus in trains every single day. And I don't think the public knows who these people are. So even if they did so most don't. So, so that's what we're trying to accomplish here. So I have to ask your daily transit writer, we've all seen what the last few years of governor Cuomo's approach to transit is in the way he interacts with the city. I think his last minute meddling on the L train through years of planning into disarray. He seems to now be making power play through this congestion pricing proposal to sort of take more control. Over the city streets is the idea that we should be focusing more on city controls of a response to Cuomo is this is New York City saying, we need to take back some of this power from Albany, because we need to be able to set our transportation future.

New York City Andy Byford United States MTA Cory Johnson councilmember Johnson Chicago Christine Quinn Benjamin k Europe department of transportation Rahm emanuel NBA governor Cuomo Jolo London Los Angeles
"second" Discussed on Second Opinion

Second Opinion

03:42 min | 3 years ago

"second" Discussed on Second Opinion

"Many rates of sexually transmitted diseases or higher now than they've been in a decade while there are several explainations for why this might be. So they're still an urgency to reduce their spread. This is Dr Michael Wilks with a second opinion. Wendy has a serious case of cla media that spread to her abdomen in talking with me. She reports that she's embarrassed about some poor decisions. She made that led to her having unprotected sex. So she's now infected to make matters worse. It turns out that the man she had a relationship with works in a nearby office. They're no longer together, which creates its own social problems. She's told him that he needs to be treated for media. But he has no health insurance. He's hesitant to go to a free clinic. And he generally hates doctors Wendy asks me if I can give her some medicine. That she can give him. Now. This is an interesting proposition on the one hand it makes perfect public health cents, treating her partner could stop the sexually transmitted infection from spreading to others on the other hand. There are some uncertainties what if she doesn't give him the medicine medical schools. Have traditionally taught trainees not to prescribe medicine to people that they have not examined themselves, but this is a little bit outdated. What about if we're using telemedicine or the internet, and I talked to the patient, but can't examine them. Should. I not prescribe them. Any medication? Also, what if the patient has an allergic reaction to the medication? I prescribe am I responsible because I've never met the guy and asked him about the allergies. Also who should pay for the medicine? The patient me the patients non-insurance the doctor. Government the medicine isn't horribly expensive. But the cost of filling a prescription is certainly a barrier. That's why I'm handing Wendy the pills in the office says she can take them right away. That eliminates the chance of a well, meaning intention that is in followed up with an action will study show that people are significantly less likely to be reinfected. If both partners are treated at the same time from a public health perspective, simply telling a person like Wendy to go tell her partner to go. See a doctor is not very effective. That's why the CDC centers for disease control now recommends giving medication to the patient for their partner. Still. There are states, you can probably guess which ones and you'll be spot on that do not allow that practice and those are the same states that have higher rates of sexually. Transmitted disease and higher rates of reinfection. Of course, it's best for me to see Wendy's partner. So he can be checked for other diseases and educated, but treating a known disease today is better than hoping he might come in someday in the future. I gladly gave Wendy the pills that she would need to give to her partner. This is Dr Michael Wilks with a second opinion this podcast was made by public radio station. KCRW our status as a nonprofit enables us to make bold and unusual programs. But we need your support to keep it that way donate or become a member at KCRW dot com slash join. And thanks.

Wendy Dr Michael Wilks partner KCRW CDC one hand