4 Burst results for "Sean Van Dyck"

"sean van dyck" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

WABE 90.1 FM

01:49 min | 5 months ago

"sean van dyck" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

"Have any knowledge, when they do not know the language, when they do not even have that self confidence to work. In the hectic last days of the American presence in Afghanistan, the U.S. prioritized getting people out who worked with the U.S., and Devin Cohn with refugees international says the focus was on those who might qualify for special immigration visas or SIVs. Cohen met with a group of female Afghan refugees evacuated to Albania, who were waiting to be resettled. They were doctors, lawyers, and advocates for women's rights, most did not expect to come to America. Because of the work that these women did, they were at risk by the Taliban. Yet they didn't work for the U.S. government. So there really was no way and there's still very few ways for them to get to the U.S.. Sean Van Dyck's group Afghan ivac formed a coordinate a range of vet groups who were working to get people out of Afghanistan. One year out, he's worried public attention is fading. What's really important is that the world doesn't stop talking about this because as soon as the world stops talking about it, that's when we're going to see the uptick. And what we saw when Ukraine kicked off was that there was an uptick in raids on houses in beatings. The group supports the recently introduced Afghan adjustment act, which would help Afghans caught an immigration limbo. Masuma S mazada as sister goal some miss maldad worked with USAID, and not directly with Americans. But it was enough to get her family on the radar for their last minute evacuation. Glad to be safe, she's also sad that she's now part of a brain drain forced by the Taliban. It's made me sad and it's just telling me that my education was useless. Then I can not use it for my own people for my country

Devin Cohn U.S. Sean Van Dyck Afghan ivac Afghanistan Albania Cohen Taliban U.S. government Masuma S mazada Ukraine USAID
"sean van dyck" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:20 min | 7 months ago

"sean van dyck" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"In the weeks after Russia's invasion of Ukraine, the Biden administration announced plans to accept a 100,000 refugees from the war. But the move has raised questions about a possible double standard. When the Taliban took over Afghanistan last August, the United States evacuated about 79,000 Afghans. But most who made it to the U.S. still have no clear way to stay. And back in Afghanistan, thousands who were promised U.S. visas are still stuck. NPR's quill Lawrence reports. Nahid farid was a member of Afghanistan's parliament. Well connected with the U.S. State Department, and the Taliban knew that. I was just sitting different threats from ISIS K from Haqqani network from the Taliban and imagine if I was in Afghanistan and they definitely would harm me. As her home city of Herat fell, she fled the country. Fareed has a green card, and her husband is a U.S. citizen, so they can stay here in the U.S.. She's even got a fellowship at Princeton. But in the chaos last August, she took her sister in law's children and got them out. Now they can't get the kids parents here. We try to bidding them to the U.S. but still it didn't work. It's a sense last August that they didn't see their parents. Imagine how hard it is for their parents, especially for the mall. She knows she's one of the lucky ones of the Afghans airlifted out to military bases in the U.S. about half 36,000 are here on what's called humanitarian parole, giving them two years to stay. But almost a year in, they have no clear legal option to remain after that. U.S. immigration services told NPR they've received 46,000 requests for humanitarian parole from Afghans in the past year. And from Afghans outside the U.S., only 300 were granted. Jennifer Pato with the international refugee assistance project says the government has to do more. Many hundreds or thousands of people have applied for humanitarian parole as a way to try to get themselves and their families out of danger. The U.S. government has simply sat on the applications and has not processed the vast majority. Patoda is also working on SIVs, special immigrant visas, a program for Afghans who worked with the U.S. Military. It's been backlogged since its creation in 2009. The State Department says it has increased resources to get more SIV candidates out of Afghanistan. But there are tens of thousands of them, including one of Jennifer patis clients. Who we agreed to call just by his nickname, diffused bombs for U.S. green berets. We were working for the U.S. special forces and they were conducting operations days and night. We were dismantling landmines, which were placed by the Taliban, our job was dangerous, and the threat were extremely high. U.S. Military records show that while on the job in May of 2020, a Taliban gunman shot sarvas in the spine. He woke up 9 days later on a U.S. base surrounded by military doctors. And they were very happy that I opened my eyes. But right now I'm in Wiltshire. I can not walk. The bullet paralyzed him from the waist down. When Kabul fell last August, couldn't get through the crowds at the airport in his wheelchair. And since then, he's been in hiding. He has a request of the U.S. government. They should not forget me. I myself do not have anything in my life right now, but at least they can fulfill the wish of my wife and my child in order to have a bright future. And so we owe them a life debt. We owe them a debt of gratitude. We owe them what we promised them. Sean Van Dyck is a navy veteran with a coalition called Afghan evac, which is pushing to revamp the SIV program. Because we sent young men and women far fields to Afghanistan and Iraq and we said you tell these folks that if they stand with us, we'll stand with them. What Congress has done is turned us into liars. Van Dyck mentions Congress because there is a legislative fix. The Biden administration has asked Congress to pass the Afghan adjustment act, which would streamline the process for SIV candidates and other Afghans to get legal status in the U.S.. Congress left that provision out of the Ukraine funding bill last month, because some Republicans claimed that Afghans need more vetting. It is not escape notice that help for Ukraine a predominantly white Christian country has come much faster than help for Afghan allies. Quill Lawrence and PR news. This is NPR news. This is WNYC. Later on morning edition, members of an indigenous community who live near uranium mill in southeast Utah worry about their health. A lot of our people start getting sick and kids in other adults started to have asthma like they never had before. A big concern how radioactive waste is being stored. We'll take a closer

U.S. Afghanistan Taliban Biden administration quill Lawrence Nahid farid NPR U.S. State Department Jennifer Pato international refugee assistan Patoda Herat Ukraine Fareed Jennifer patis sarvas U.S. government Russia Princeton Sean Van Dyck
"sean van dyck" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:37 min | 10 months ago

"sean van dyck" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"News I'm a Martinez And I'm Rachel Martin New immigrants from Afghanistan are settling into their lives in the United States while thousands of others wait for a way out of Afghanistan Advocates worry that as the humanitarian crisis in Ukraine absorbs much of the world's attention Afghans who supported the U.S. Military in Afghanistan may be forgotten Steve Walsh is with member station KPBS in San Diego and he's got our story Joe would carry me watches on his phone a recent news report out of Afghanistan It shows a group of girls being turned away from the school He interprets the video for me Is your patient 5 months ago carry me arrived in San Diego with his wife and two boys Part of a growing number of Afghan refugees The world watches as the Russian invasion of Ukraine produces millions of refugees almost overnight but carry me in other Afghan refugees are still focused on the plight of their country Many are nervous that the U.S. will move on leaving thousands of people who work with the Americans stranded Some remain in hiding They are house going from this house to another house to hide them This is a big concern if they are forget and just something bad may happen to them Sean Van Dyck is part of a coalition of mainly veterans groups trying to bring Afghans who worked with the Americans to safety Afghan has been working with the Biden administration but Van Dyck says The White House has said very little publicly in months We're willing to bend over backwards to help Europeans that we haven't served with in the scale that we have with Afghans And that we've kind of taken our time on Afghans Folks with whom we serve for 20 years folks who stood by us on the battlefield Afghanistan didn't come up during the president's State of the Union address Van Dyck was particularly frustrated after the Biden administration announced that the U.S. would allow 100,000 Ukrainian refugees into the country Nobody's saying that we shouldn't be helping Ukrainians We all agree What we're saying is that it would be nice if folks who didn't look like us got the same help as folks who looked like us Advocates are still waiting for the administration to get behind a permanent status for thousands of Afghans like jawad karimi He was given a temporary status called humanitarian parole The only Steinberg with the refugee aid group Hayes says it doesn't fix their situation It's not a permanent status in any way It is not an immigration status It was very important in that it allowed a lot of people to get here very quickly and obviously time was of the essence But what has happened now is that they are here with no path to permanent sea Feinberg says the biggest problem isn't the shifting focus from one refugee crisis to another she says the previous administration gutted the U.S.'s refugee resettlement program It's a lot easier to wreck a program than it is to rebuild And so that's where we are now Slowly but surely building up an extraordinary progress is being made but it feels painfully slow for the individuals who are directly impacted Joe Ed viscera just received his green card which will allow him to use his degree in computer programming in San Diego He was beaten by the Taliban as he made his way to the Kabul airport with his family This was just days before the last American flight left One of them had the one pipe on their hand and they were beating on my back and my foot We escaped from there and somehow we entered to that airport He left behind two brothers who also worked with an American company He says the Taliban has searched their homes looking for proof that they work with the U.S. Our suggestion is that for the American government is that police help the pupil for the family of those who were helping the Afghan government that and also the American troops in Afghanistan Because for many Afghans time is running out For NPR news I'm Steve Walsh All right let's go now to the Texas Gulf Coast where folks recently laid eyes on a critter that as some in Texas might be fixing to say ain't from around these parts It's.

Afghanistan Biden administration U.S. Rachel Martin Van Dyck Ukraine Sean Van Dyck San Diego Steve Walsh jawad karimi Martinez Joe White House Joe Ed viscera Steinberg Kabul airport Feinberg Hayes Taliban
"sean van dyck" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:34 min | 10 months ago

"sean van dyck" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Afghanistan are settling into their lives in the United States while thousands of others wait for a way out of Afghanistan Advocates worry that as the humanitarian crisis in Ukraine absorbs much of the world's attention Afghans who supported the U.S. Military in Afghanistan may be forgotten Steve Walsh is with member station KPBS in San Diego and he's got our story Joe would carry me watches on his phone a recent news report out of Afghanistan It shows a group of girls being turned away from the school He interprets the video for me 5 months ago carry me arrived in San Diego with his wife and two boys Part of a growing number of Afghan refugees The world watches as the Russian invasion of Ukraine produces millions of refugees almost overnight but carry me in other Afghan refugees are still focused on the plight of their country Many are nervous that the U.S. will move on leaving thousands of people who work with the Americans stranded Some remain in hiding The house going from this house to another house to hide them This is a big concern if they are forget and just something bad may happen to them Sean Van Dyck is part of a coalition of mainly veterans groups trying to bring Afghans who worked with the Americans to safety Afghan ivac has been working with the Biden administration but Van Dyck says The White House has said very little publicly in months We're willing to bend over backwards to help Europeans that we haven't served with in the scale that we have with Afghans And that we've kind of taken our time on Afghans Folks with whom we serve for 20 years folks who stood by us on the battlefield Afghanistan didn't come up during the president's State of the Union address Van Dyck was particularly frustrated after the Biden administration announced that the U.S. would allow 100,000 Ukrainian refugees into the country Nobody's saying that we shouldn't be helping Ukrainians We all agree What we're saying is that it would be nice if folks who didn't look like us got the same help as folks who looked like us Advocates are still waiting for the administration to get behind a permanent status for thousands of Afghans like jawad carry me He was given a temporary status called humanitarian parole The only Steinberg with the refugee aid group haiya says it doesn't fix their situation It's not a permanent status in any way It is not an immigration status It was very important in that it allowed a lot of people to get here very quickly and obviously time was of the essence But what has happened now is that they are here with no path to permanent sea Feinberg says the biggest problem isn't the shifting focus from one refugee crisis to another she says the previous administration gutted the U.S. refugee resettlement program It's a lot easier to wreck the program than it is to rebuild And so that's where we are now Slowly but surely building up an extraordinary progress is being made but it feels painfully slow for the individuals who are directly impacted Joe Ed viscera just received his green card which will allow him to use his degree in computer programming in San Diego He was beaten by the Taliban as he made his way to the Kabul airport with his family This was just days before the last American flight left On their hand and they were beating on my back and my foot We escaped from them and somehow we entered to that airport He left behind two brothers who also worked with an American company He says the Taliban has searched their homes looking for proof that they work with the U.S. Our suggestion is that for the American government is that police help the people or for the family of those who are helping the Afghan government that and also the American troops in Afghanistan Because for many Afghans time is running out For NPR news I'm Steve Walsh All right let's go now to the Texas Gulf Coast where folks recently laid eyes on a critter that as some in Texas might be fixing to say ain't from around these parts It's.

Afghanistan Biden administration United States Van Dyck Ukraine Sean Van Dyck San Diego Steve Walsh haiya Joe jawad White House Joe Ed viscera Steinberg Kabul airport Feinberg Taliban Afghan government American government NPR news