17 Burst results for "Sean Ramos"

"sean ramos" Discussed on Today, Explained

Today, Explained

04:35 min | Last week

"sean ramos" Discussed on Today, Explained

"Like you want your flight attendants to have practiced in emergency before they get on the plane and we should expect the same public health the reason flight attendants and flight crews get us through those things is. They've like literally walked through it. They have muscle memory and they have very clear cues remind them like i do this this and this now even though my brain is like firing crazy stuff. We have to practice public health emergencies and our responses to them or will be slow and we'll be biased in the response even so. This is a city with a bunch of reputable universities. Could they really not have done better than this. Twenty two year old andre devotion. Yeah and a lot of the volunteers and community advocates that we talked to on the ground who had partnered with philly fighting cova to do testing and who were really relying on them to provide. Services felt really burned that the city made that decision. I mean they trusted that. The city picked philly fighting cova because they were the best option and so they got into bed with them because they figured they were reliable. It just seemed like a great fit. And retrospect there were things that i missed by the things. We talked to. One community advocate. Syria rivera. She works with a community center in a mostly. Puerto rican neighborhood in philadelphia. And you know. She described how she felt like philly fighting. It said all the right things to her organization to try to help but then there were unreliable. They didn't show up half the time five minutes before they were supposed to be here again. I'm sorry we can't make it today. That was that was the conversation she really felt like they were using her group to be able to say. Oh we partnered with communities of color. We you know. Did all the right things you should pick us to be the vaccine provider and they got this opportunity. You know on the backs of her community. They used our logo basically our name and the relationship we've built with their community to say. Yeah we did that but didn't do anything. And you know it's people like syria that have had to do the work of rebuilding that trust with black and latino communities across philadelphia. Andres not doing that work. The health commissioner resigned. He's not doing that work. So it's the people in these community groups who are doing the work of rebuilding that trust even though they were the ones who were betrayed to begin with not to mention this could have increased vaccine skepticism among already skeptical segment of the population. Do you have any idea if this made people more reluctant to get the shot in the city or the state. It's hard to draw a direct line from the philly fighting covered scandal to you know people who are feeling hesitant about getting vaccinated now but what i think you can say on a broader level. Is that people rely on their public health agencies and just on government agencies in general to provide them with services and follow through and when they screw up the more they screw up the less confidence people have in those agencies and in the healthcare system as a whole a lot of people are probably harboring false beliefs about the vaccine efficacy or safety. And they're doing that on their own accord but for some of them. It's probably because they've seen stuff like what happened with philly fighting cova and they say well that seems like sham and so the more real shams you see the easier. It is to believe that nothing to be trusted. Nina feldman is a reporter at whyy public radio in philadelphia. She hosts a five part. Podcast on this very saga. It's out in the world right now. It's called half faxed faxed like be a x. X. e. d. half vac st-. You can get all the juicy details we couldn't fit into this episode there. We use music from half faxed in our episode. Today it was composed by max. Merrin episode was produced by miles. Brian and little disclosure miles isn't a long term relationship with whyy reporter nina feldman in fact they just got engaged. Muzzle puff sean ramos. Ver- more off monday for indigenous peoples day. Back tuesday with more today explains.

cova philadelphia andre Puerto rican rivera Syria Andres syria Nina feldman whyy public radio Merrin nina feldman whyy max sean ramos Brian
"sean ramos" Discussed on Today, Explained

Today, Explained

07:50 min | 2 weeks ago

"sean ramos" Discussed on Today, Explained

"Think bad really fell apart too and you know. I'm the on the summit last week. The un general assembly summit the general assembly president biden summit was meant to be a launching pad for new global initiative that really brings in not just the us and governments but philanthropy and businesses for sort of a whole of society moment to say we need to seize the moment we need to uses energy not only to end the current pandemic but to ensure that we build back better and that is the kind of infrastructure and systems. That will be more resilient for the next time not to bring this back to dark place but let's talk about political polarization for a minute here especially as it relates to this pandemic. i mean seven hundred thousand dead. President biden likes to come out and remind us of of this unimaginable amount of death and it feels like half the country's hearing it and half the country doesn't care half. The country still wants to fight about masks on planes and make you know flight attendants lives and nightmare. How have we learned anything about how to combat political polarization in a public health crisis over the course of two administrations. Yeah i can't tell you begin to tell you how sad expe- and i have talked to a few friends who are not mask wearers and aren't vaccinated. And you know. I go back to those conversations. Where even knowing me and trusting me. I can't convince them that. Those are the right things to do. I think we have to really move forward in a way that respects our differences and understands that people inherently believe differently to me. It's about scientific literacy. People trust those that are closest to in their own communities who they trusted before the crisis happened and think we really need to understand where this is coming from. It's coming from deep distrust of our institutions and our scientists and what it means if it's been that long to develop you're not going to solve it quickly and you're certainly not to do well trying to solve it in the midst of the crisis so i think what it points to the need to really invest in the development of those long term relationships of public health officials in those communities who can be trusted but are also really rooted in the scientists in the science and also healthcare providers in those communities that have access to the right information and really build long term relationships with their communities patients and this is a tech conference on contractually obliged to ask if tech can help. Disinformation is spreading on tech. Gonna let you start this. Can you combat this information with tech are we. Are we doing a good enough job. Probably baseball could do better. They know they could do better. I other others are the social media companies. I think recognize the challenge of and i think work at it. I think unfortunately of the people who aren't vaccinated. I think the date is two thirds of them believe one of five major falsehoods about the vaccine and most of them say they get their information from social media and facebook and whatsapp real problems. And that's just the reality and is it addressable by them. Yes i believe it is a long conversation. You can read the new york times piece where the show. The i was having with facebook from the white house. If you want. I think there's also this that is not the media but sort of more people focused. You know when i was a kid. If we had to research paper we went to the library. And now i'm dating myself and my teacher told me that. The encyclopedia was not an appropriate reference. Ahead actually look real reference texts and that was sort of baked in that you actually had to figure out what the source date is. I think we need to do a better job of teaching. People that googling something or looking it up and social media is not research research knowing the source of the data knowing who you trust in being able to sort of sort through all this information to find the criminal truth and i think by the same token scientists need to do a better better job making reliable information available and accessible and reliable table interpreted. Yep we're at this conference right now where there's an app. There's rapid testing. There's really clear. communications clear. Rules were living currently in this. Little bubble in the optimal version of this pandemic and a lot of people aren't an haven't been for over a year and a half now. Have we gotten any better. At dealing with that or learn some lessons that can help in the next pandemic. Look i mean we opened our first federal facility right here in east los angeles and it was mobbed on the first day people from beverly hills probably the first time they've been in east los angeles in a long long time i would venture say and when we looked at the peak of deaths here in january the western parts. You know santa. Monica beverley as well some of the safest part of the country and east. La was was we're all of the deaths were occurring. And you know. I personally think that's the whole thing right there. That's the whole thing right there out of sight out of mind. I can't people have said to me. And i don't know a single person died of cove this little last year. So maybe maybe that's changed and my response was always you know the people you didn't know people dying of can like no i don't and i'm like well person who grows your food. The person who drives the truck bring the food to the warehouse. The people in the warehouse the people in the grocery store. You not know their names but those are all the people that are dying in a different kind of society. You would know their names but there's this sort of dissonance cognitive difference because we live in these bubbles. My podcasts called in a bubble that you have a very you can kind of carve out the life you want whether it's information bubble whether it's life or whatever and that's why i think we tolerate so many things you'd think we wouldn't tolerate if you'd have told us any of us the unionist we would be would be shaking their heads and seeing two thousand s today three thousand s we would get used to it it will be very sad maybe with all maybe of us would say that's possible maybe a lot of us would say it wouldn't but it would very very sad what it says about us that you know kinda life just goes on unless we know the person and that means we had a lot of work to do as a society to bring the stuff together. All the questions you're asking politics is just a reflection of culture. It's not politics doesn't just happen by itself. We gotta go fix some of these other lines as idol issues. I think that was sean ramos forum talking to andy. Slavic who used to work in the biden white house and nancy message. Who was a director at the cdc thanks to. Vox media's michelle berg and any towel for their health with a live show and thanks to fox's dylan scott for help with the question i'm halima shaw. It's today blamed..

biden summit general assembly President biden facebook Monica beverley los angeles baseball new york times white house us beverly hills santa La sean ramos Vox media michelle berg biden andy nancy
"sean ramos" Discussed on Today, Explained

Today, Explained

02:34 min | 2 months ago

"sean ramos" Discussed on Today, Explained

"It's today explained. I'm helene shaw. Filling in for sean ramos firm and it seems like haiti cannot catch a break. Just last month the country's president was assassinated and just last weekend a part of the country that people thought was relatively safe was struck by an earthquake. We're talking about southern and western haiti. Which is a basically an agricultural rule area people often refer to it as degreen. Parts of haiti is one of the last places. Where you you'll have a lot of trees you don't see the deforestation as there as you see in the rest of the country. Jacqueline charles is in haiti. For the miami herald. We reached her by phone just before the arrival of tropical storm grace which came just two days after the earthquake while this country that has faultlines running routed. This is an area that was sort of on the low risk in terms of the next big one. Everyone thought the experts bother the next big one would have been in northern haiti on saturday. what happened was there was the quake in the major quakes. The epicenter of the seven point two magnitude quake is about eighty miles west of the capital port-au-prince the coastal town of high was one of the hardest hit. And it's hospital is at capacity. We theme at around seven point two. This would put it higher than the twenty ten earthquake. That basically destroyed all tahiti's capital quarterfinals around. This is what is the biggest town of in this region can see behind me. This is what's left of a massive five story hotel this is. This is sina butter devastation. Again it's an assessment of the damage may wanna thinks that it's happening here. If you were just looking at it from a perspective of what you saw twenty ten you know utah. Houses completely collapsed. We have more than three hundred thousand people died in may according to government figures here was talking roughly about thirteen hundred people. The latest figure pathetic number expected to rise magnitude seven point two earthquake displaced thousands. Left more than one hundred dead and more than six thousand injured. Grace not to get you three hundred thousand. Would you saw twenty ten. And one of the reasons for that is that we're talking about agricultural area not seeming metal crowded. You're talking about here where you don't have a lot of people but the houses both or not i top of each other but there has clearly been destruction a lot of loss of of year. People have died..

haiti helene shaw sean ramos earthquake Jacqueline charles miami herald tropical storm grace au tahiti utah Grace
"sean ramos" Discussed on Unexplainable

Unexplainable

04:23 min | 3 months ago

"sean ramos" Discussed on Unexplainable

"It's the first thing they do. They take a dump chair worlds here. Okay i get that right. Thirty three which makes even more sense. Not only is the first thing that you create but like shit itself is creative you know shit used as fertilizer is maybe the greatest example of shipping associated with things positive. It's almost miraculous that you know you can put it on the ground and it. Totally speeds up the creative process. Because what are you doing with shit in creation myth. You're turning it into something usable. Something necessary that one can't do without this theory that you've just laid out like makes the most sense from like you can see shit you can see things growing from it like that is the Ha like we were talking before. It's like seed exactly. It creates a lot of potential for more life. But they're still a pretty fundamental question. Here there are lots of ways of reading myth and the issue should be. What do you learn about myth. You might not have learned. Otherwise we have this idea that sometimes creation has to be like poof something out of nothing in myth you know they call that creation ex nilo and i guess these myths focusing on poop. I feel like they kind of tell us that we can view creation as being something out of something so i think it is transformative. It's taking shit and it's turning it into a building block a plan. You know what comes out of it. Everything comes out of it. Well then in the astro biological sense like thinking about if something like shit or microbes whatever could see by on earth and we have to think about the thing that came before it and we have to think about how. Maybe the earth isn't this kind of special eden where all the magic happened and life started and thrived and it's kind of a similar thought scientifically like we have to think about what preceded the earth. I could just didn't pop out of nowhere. There was an antecedent. there was another place with life before it. And that's why we have life here and that's the shift and you know. The major accepted scientific explanation for the arjun of life on earth is that it just sorta spontaneously started here but if we do go back to the moon and we find that any of that bacteria is still alive it sort of makes it seemed like some of these creation. Myths may be had it right in a way that science might not. Yeah but if they even have the right idea they didn't have the. I mean it was just a guess sir but i mean even if it is i guess it points to something bigger. You know. maybe it's just this impulse to say we don't think of creation as something that comes from one spot we actually think creation is just transformation maybe creation doesn't really even exist. I like that better to me. The universe and spirals out creation methods starts on here from whizbang. There's life here is actually a lot simpler than thinking about how life travels from planet to planet even like across solar systems. Thinking of all the things that have to happen for the web of life to spread across the galaxy is amazingly more complex in any story that has ever been told if it has happened. I think the story of life becomes so much more spectacular and the origin of it might even further and further back than we can possibly ever see because even that becomes even unspeakable to think about how broad and how intricate and complex the real truth of life is the greater universe. This episode was reported and produced by. Brian resnick and noam hassenfeld. At from sean ramos durham. And we knew mixing from fem- shapiro me personnel fact. Checking from will read alex pena music from phnom and the mysterious

nilo Brian resnick noam hassenfeld sean ramos durham shapiro alex pena phnom
"sean ramos" Discussed on Today, Explained

Today, Explained

07:55 min | 3 months ago

"sean ramos" Discussed on Today, Explained

"Explained. I'm sean ramos firm. A month ago president biden challenged the nation president biden today announcing a national month of action to help the country reach his goal. Seventy percent of adults with at least one dose by the fourth of july to sweeten the deal biden proposed a number of incentives. Get a shot and have a beer free beer for everyone. Twenty one years or over to celebrate the independence from the virus. The president was willing to pull out all the stops including a partnership with anheuser. Busch for it didn't work. The nation still hovering around half vaccinated but the pledge to literally by the country a beer if seventy percent of us got vaccinated. Said something about how we think and how we drink. I've noticed over the past few years. Alcohol cropping up in all sorts of places that it didn't use to be like you used to be able to buy wine at the supermarket to take home. You could not buy wine in a plastic cup to carry around the supermarket. While you shot. You could not buy whine at starbucks. You could not buy beer at the zoo when you were there. Like looking at the with your kids k. Julian is a senior editor at the atlantic. She recently wrote about the nation's drinking problem. Americans have been drinking more and more for about twenty years and we're drinking in a weirdly different way. It seems like we're more likely to be drinking it alone. Which tells us. I think that something kind of interesting is going on. We're not drinking more because we're hanging out and partying. Were drinking more for reasons that have to do with coping. We know that when people drink alone or they drink outside of a social context. It's usually because they're trying to deal with negative feelings like they're trying to feel less bad and we've seen as sort of really dramatic experiment with that over the past year where we've become really accustomed to drinking at home as a way of coping with anxiety. Okay so so people are self medicating which not the best. But on top of that there are all these profoundly damaging and deadly effects of alcohol abuse right. Yeah yes it's particularly surprising. Given a couple of things i like. We know in a way that we didn't use to that. Alcohol is associated with increased risk of certain cancers so we used to think it was good for your heart now. The evidence is way more mixed and in two thousand eighteen. There was a big meta-analysis biggest meta-analysis to date of studies on alcohol's effect on health and longevity and found across the board that alcohol will make you die sooner. So tell me kate. Why do we drink so let me get the really obvious. Answer out of the way and then we'll get to the less obvious. Answer the obvious answer. Is we do it because it's fun. Scientists have recently learned that alcohol has a really large capacity to produce endorphins endorphins. Of course are the natural. Opiates so the body produces so obviously. We want to do it but that kind of raises a second larger question. That's a bit trickier which is why has evolution. Set us up to do this thing. That is so obviously bad for us. Rate and people who've looked at this most recently and i think provocatively a social scientists named edward slinger lynn. Edward slinger lynn. Your new book has a bit of an eye popping opening. i want to read it to our viewers. People like to masturbate. They also like to get drunk and eat. Twinkies have sort of the point that there must have been something it was doing. It was really good. That was balancing out. The harms or otherwise. Evolution would have fixed this right. It would have favored people who hated the way. Alcohol tasted for example. It didn't do that so what could have been going on. And this dovetails nicely with some recent archaeological findings so about twenty five years ago. A site was identified in eastern turkey. Go beckley tebbe. It's called. It is the we think earliest human temple to have been found. It's ten to twelve thousand years. Old means it predates or very early part of the agricultural revolution. It's not only twice as old as stonehenge. It's made of these gigantic pillars of stone. That would have taken hundreds of people working together to put together. And what's perplexing about this site is. It wasn't a place where anybody who is farming. It wasn't a place where anybody was living. As far as the archaeological record suggests it was a place where people were partying. These stones have these elaborate drawings of people playing music and it looks like drinking alcohol and they've also found these enormous debts that look like they were made to hold really old school beer and life. It's basically an ancient brewer. It's basically an ancient ancient brewery. It's like an ancient club right. Yeah so archaeologists trying to puzzle this out that what was happening is that hunter-gatherers were coming from all directions periodically to have these big alcohol fueled feasts and presumably the draw The food and the booze got them to cooperate and put up these gigantic pillars of stone. it probably led a lot of authority to the people who organized the whole enterprise and it very likely motivated people to want to settle down and cooperate. I mean you have these sort of fractious unrelated groups of people. It's not obvious why they would wanna come together but partying seems like actually a pretty good answer. Why is it significant. That that long ago people were getting together to drink and party. Well i mean if you think about it one of the really important things that we have to do to succeed as humans work together so we're in some ways more lake bees or aunts than we are like chimpanzees right. Chimpanzees are totally fractious and competitive. And you couldn't possibly put thousands of chimps together and like expect them to have a party or like a bunch of stones. Humans have to do this right. Human civilization requires people to cooperate. And there's a line of thinking that you know. Alcohol may have helped us to do that. Sort of socially distant hits us just enough to cooperate in a way it may be similar to what religion did for early humans mean essentially just as early religions gives people something to rally around. Alcohol may have played a pretty similar function. And what do we accomplish. As a result. So disgu- i was referring to a moment ago. Edward slinger lend came to this subject. And sort of an interesting way. My day job is early. Chinese fluffy's early taoism and confucianism all these thinkers that i look at an early china. Wants you to be spontaneous. They might be in the state. it's chinese. it's called way. Or i translated as effortless action. It's kind of like being in the zone. And he looked at sort of the functions of this state of being and how it might be useful in the modern world and then he made the observation in an aside. That can't try to be relaxed. So maybe chemical intoxicants especially alcohol or this cultural tool that we've used to reach inside the brain and turn down. The prefrontal cortex the part. That's charge of tension control..

sean ramos president biden biden anheuser edward slinger lynn Edward slinger lynn beckley tebbe Busch starbucks Julian atlantic cancers kate turkey hunter Edward slinger china
"sean ramos" Discussed on Today, Explained

Today, Explained

05:47 min | 4 months ago

"sean ramos" Discussed on Today, Explained

"I'm sean ramos. Firm over the weekend the ninth installment in the fast and furious franchise made something like seventy million dollars in north america. That means a whole lot of people went back to the movies this weekend. People are well ready to get back to business as usual and we couldn't have gotten to this point without our healthcare workers. They got us through a nightmare year. Unlike a lot of us who just had to stay at home or mask up when we went out or went to work they got to see what six hundred thousand deaths really looked like. And this isn't over for them yet are still dying. So it's worth asking after everything they've been through. How are they doing. Vox is julia. blues recently. Asked and what she found. Is that a lot of them. Have been struggling with their mental health as a warning. The show today will feature discussion of suicide. I want to tell you the story of one doctor out in utah. His name is scott jolly five years old. He bit an emergency physician his whole career so almost thirty years. He was five foot ten. He had brown hair and he was athletic. He loves skiing. He loved golfing but he is specially loved fly. Fishing he five flourished all over and yellowstone island park idaho. Jackie jollies scott's wife. His goals were to catch a fish everywhere. He went one thing. That scott's friends told me was that he was a very detail oriented person even in his hobbies with life fishing. He would be like obsessed with finding the perfect bait he would outsmart the guys who are working in the local fishing shops. About where the best places in the rivers where he was fishing and he and his wife owned a cabin in a boat on a lake where he used to fish. He's spent many many hours on this lake putting his precisely where he knew a whole was an a man a lot of fish and so he would point the tip of his boat the back of his boat based upon the surroundings to make sure that he was in that whole and he'd be able to catch that twenty five pound fish and he would make me drive the boat and make sure i was always keeping in that angle so he would get into that whole precisely and i would spend hours hours out there with him. This part of his personality definitely carried into the hospital. He was very meticulous about caring for patients he never wanted to make a mistake and What jackie told me. His colleagues had told her that in his career in medicine he never had a patient complaint against him. He was just absolutely obsessed with putting his patients. I wear in. His career was scott before the pandemic began so he was heading toward retirement. The one thing that i've come to appreciate about emergency medicine reporting this story is that doctors often refer to it as the kind of dumping ground of american medicine. Basically you have to imagine you have patients coming in handcuffs with the police patients who are delusional type of emergency. You could imagine. And basically by a couple of years. Before the pandemic scott's in his early fifties and this really started to wear on him and it started to take a toll things that you can do in your thirties like you know doing a night shift and then sort of turn your body clock around and doing a day shift. Get a lot harder The older yet that's miles greenberg. He's a close friend of scott's back to residency even a lot of practicing emergency medicine. Docs who are still in their fifty. S have really dialed back. The number of clinical hours they do and that's in fact what scott was looking to do. Everything was going really well. He had that right shift so he was really at a good place of his career and felt like he was going to end it in a very positive now to what happens to him when the pandemic hits we'll at the start of the pandemic last year you have to remember all these hospitals we're expecting this massive influx of patients and they didn't come at first in many places. The caseload wasn't that high initially but everybody was frightened right and everybody. You know kind of went into lockdown going to the er or other places like that for routine medical care just became things that people didn't want to do if they didn't have to so the volumes dropped off a cliff and of course we know hospitals are businesses and when volumes were down they started to cut back and one of the cutbacks they made in scots hospital was on staffing. So he got reassigned from some more manageable day shifts. He had been onto these evening shifts and usually in the past they would be covered by two doctors but because of the cutbacks he was often working alone and so when the pandemic started happening he would be the only went on working with nurses or techs and so i think that stress level as being an aging physician started taking a toll on him. He couldn't spend the time with his patients that he normally did. He had worry about his. Ppe had worry about being safe. He had to make sure his stuff was safe. Scott was a perfectionist like many physicians are and he was already in a place where he felt like he couldn't deliver the care that he wanted to deliver the way he wanted.

sean ramos north america Scott Jackie jollies utah last year seventy million dollars scott jolly today two doctors five foot six hundred thousand deaths scott ninth installment fifty twenty five pound fish fast and furious five five years old one thing
"sean ramos" Discussed on Today, Explained

Today, Explained

02:08 min | 4 months ago

"sean ramos" Discussed on Today, Explained

"Their <Speech_Male> not <Speech_Male> just in twenty twenty <Speech_Music_Male> two but moving forward <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> because <Speech_Male> lawmakers <Speech_Male> are intentionally trying to <Speech_Music_Male> make it harder to vote. <Music> <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Female> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Female> Ian millhauser <Speech_Female> is a senior <Speech_Female> correspondent. At vox <Speech_Female> you can <Speech_Female> read his work on <Speech_Female> voting laws over <Speech_Female> at vox dot com. <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Female> I'm lena shaw <Speech_Female> sitting in for sean ramos <Speech_Music_Female> forum. <SpeakerChange> It's <Speech_Music_Female> today explained <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> who <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Silence> <Advertisement> <Silence> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> <Silence> <Advertisement> <Silence> <Advertisement> <Silence> <Advertisement> <Silence> <Advertisement> <Silence> <Advertisement> <Silence> <Advertisement> <Silence> <Advertisement> <Silence> <Advertisement> <Silence> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> support <Speech_Music_Female> for <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> this episode comes <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> from forward. <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> Most people go <Speech_Female> to the doctor for the <Speech_Female> one offs like rashes <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> and colds. <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> And your annual flu <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> shot but <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> doctors can do more. <Speech_Female> That's <Speech_Female> why you need forward. <Speech_Female> Their doctors <Speech_Female> go beyond everyday <Speech_Female> care in an effort to <Speech_Female> catch top killers <Speech_Female> like cancer and heart <Speech_Female> disease early. <Speech_Female> They use advanced <Speech_Female> technology to help <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> you reduce risks and <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> achieve long-term <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> results so <Speech_Female> invest in a doctor. <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> That's invested in <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> you and your <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> long term health <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> at go forward <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> dot com.

"sean ramos" Discussed on Today, Explained

Today, Explained

08:05 min | 4 months ago

"sean ramos" Discussed on Today, Explained

"It's today explained. I'm halima sitting in for sean ramos firm protesters and military in myanmar have been mired in a bloody conflict for months. It all started back in february. When people took to the streets to protest a military coup the political party led by aung. San suu cheat. The national league for democracy won parliamentary elections but the military claimed fraud and detained top l. d. leaders since then things have only escalated at the beginning. We didn't feel like Lights were being threatened. A stock warning from the un special envoy on myanmar quote. A bloodbath is imminent. But i think we've got the message loud and clear by the end of march today on the show we'll hear from people who've been resisting myanmar's military and we'll find out why this might mark a turning point for a country that has spent most of its history under military rule. John kirby your foreign and national security reporter for vox dot com and we just heard from someone in myanmar who described violent military crackdowns on protesters. How did things get so bad after. The coup thousands and thousands of people in me amar took to the streets for these massive protests just hundreds of thousands of people walking through communities and professions into a remarkably coordinated show of opposition. They're protesting in big cities like gang on they're also protesting in different corners of the country. There is a real massive outpouring of support for unsung succi and opposition to the military takeover. People are wearing red. They are holding up their fingers in this three finger salute which is an image to the hunger games there are professionals and students who are leading these protests the force of the protests and the size of the protests were even somewhat unexpected. You know. I had talked to some folks before who had a pretty dismal view about the pro democracy movement in myanmar but These young people these professionals. I mean the protests included a huge cross section of people and a real groundswell of support and movement of opposition against the coup and that kind of massive peaceful protest movement continues but as the weeks. Ground on things take darker. Turn a site. The anti coup protest movement never wanted to see the death of a protester march. Twenty seventh was the bloodiest day to date. More than one hundred people were killed today. The us ambassador to myanmar said security forces are murdering civilians. There's last protests that went to was a flash protests that happened was the army date and that protests involved a lot more running and hiding regrouping compared to back in february and since then it has only gotten worse. More than eight hundred people have died. According to figures at the hands of the military and more than four thousand have been either charged or detained. What happens in detention. You know there's a lot of allegations of of torture and abusive practices on beyond that and right now. There's a sense of this military conducting the reign of terror forces report of the opened fire on mourners at the funeral of the students. Who amongst those killed there are reports of people now becoming fearful of you know who to talk to and whom to trust because people are reporting in secret to the police. The military is using people that they've killed according to reports to kind of terrorize communities and at the same time communities are trying to build up their kind of defenses against the military. I'm trying to fortify neighborhoods but there is a lot of fear. There is a lot of mistrust you know. I talked to one protester who used a a student who basically said know when she goes out into the street. She makes sure that she never has anything on her phone. Because if anybody sees her organizing or coordinating a protests. She doesn't know what will happen to her. The peaceful protests have kind of morphed into something a little bit closer to a resistance movement kind of an acknowledgement that. Maybe the the peaceful protest won't be enough to kind of fight this military at the same time. The economy is struggling and the de factor civilian leader on song cheever remains in prison on trumped up charges mr chase facing charges that range from illegally possessing walkie-talkie radios to violating state secrets laws. The country seems on the brink of a possible civil war or revolution so the public is largely angry with the military. But where does the previous government stand on this. Are they trying to retake power. Are they involved in this resistance. Some other members of the l. d. have kind of taken to form their own political party in kind of a government in exile which has been known as the national unity government and they are fighting for international recognition. And they're also trying to establish kind of people's defense force to possibly take on the military and their goal at least one of the goals that they've stated to eventually kind of form or become the new democratic government of myanmar who is still supporting the military if anyone the military i mean i am sure Listeners have heard that in myanmar there is a real kind of segregation between the military and the rest of the general public and the military kind of socialize in their own circles. They have their own media. And so it's a very very insular institution and so there is a lot of support there. But outside of the military among the general population there really seems to be this growing sort of anti military sentiment that wherever you stood on the political spectrum wherever you stood in terms of your religion or ethnic background there is kind of a growing sentiment of. We're all in this together against the military. We're talking about a country that has spent most of its sixty year. History under military rule and while protesters are hoping for the best in want this to lead to revolution. What are the chances this could turn into civil war instead. Yeah i mean. I think there's just so many question marks that it's really hard to predict right now and i think you know the discussions of the civil war are serious but at the same time. It's important to recognize that me mar in many ways has been at civil war for the entire course of its history. The differences that many of these civil wars took place on the borderlands of myanmar with ethnic armed organizations who've been fighting with the military on and off for decades and so me and has never fully been at peace. What is different now. Is that the civil war. Become something that engulfs the entire country and includes a population and people who may have not been necessarily involved in fighting the government before but it is sort of important to keep that in. Mind when we talk about me and more that this country has not really known piece in many ways when it comes to a revolution i mean. I've talked to many protesters. Also members of ethnic armed groups who really see themselves as embracing a kind of mission to bring democracy to me amar and truly believe that they can win and that they will try to win at all costs to establish a democracy. How they will do so is really hard but what i do find interesting. Is that among the people who are fighting for this democratic future. They have.

february John kirby today thousands more than four thousand More than eight hundred people More than one hundred people one protester sixty year end of march today hundreds of thousands of peopl thousands of people myanmar three finger sean ramos dot decades seventh one least
"sean ramos" Discussed on X96

X96

05:31 min | 1 year ago

"sean ramos" Discussed on X96

"Time about only because I'm not you well you Fraser I'm Ali yes Ali A. K. A. Cassius clay okay one okay yeah it's just fine I interviewed genres quite some time ago for the let's go each show podcast in our member him being very genuine friendly very friendly very nice and he had it has an interesting story an interesting life story hit his do I remember this right his dad was in a well known or in certain circles but an Elvis impersonator okay I got a look this up now how long ago did you interview it's been three years ago more he yeah probably more than that and it it his yeah his dad was some sort of an entertainer and I'm pretty sure it was a he was an Elvis impersonator I'm gonna have to work now I have to learn a lot I'm trying to look at real quick alls alls I know is is is that you she seems somewhat reasonable when he started the job and then he took he drank the trump Kool aid he started that and you can just see it on his Twitter feed how he has just evolved over this period of time seem better when I back when I interviewed him somebody I like the little bit I mean I didn't agree with all of his policies but yeah it was somebody I could talk to and agree with on certain things but then when he beat because he has become a he has become a real trump supporter yeah he said he was just a blatant from support yeah he's he's joined that cult completely and don't understand when seemingly intelligent people are still on that train I they don't get it let's see Shawn ray as out of the hood and into the AG's office is the article from the Deseret News I've found what I think there's some about his in here hello my gosh you know what his DJ name was high level coverage yeah pineapple crush who yeah yeah I'm trying to see how are you all in that same article yeah but his he his father and he did come from tough circumstances raised came from tough circumstances of the poor of really bad side of town he and he had and he he became an accomplished person I'm trying to see if there's anything about his father here but I can't find it I swear that is found pineapple crush yeah his father was no Berto buddy ray as powerful multi talented man who by the age of seventeen was a line producer for MGM studios and headlined his own band everybody thought he sounded like Elvis well he worked with Bob Hope which led to his own radio and TV shows in the Philippines well there's also a painter of some note according to raise his father was commissioned by pope Paul the six to paint his portrait which was displayed in the Vatican I get it now I get it now see hearing about raises dad his dad was a liberal elites no longer doing that rebelling thing that usually kids did in their teens but he waited yeah he can his father of left the Philippines came to America and struggled for a long time to but he painted portraits of Gene Autry John Wayne Magic Johnson the Apollo eleven crew a painting that was sent to the Smithsonian institute that's cool Selma I think his father to be a little disappointed in the right I don't know if his father and his father I think it's still alive or was when I talked to him anyway Sean Moran sees yeah he's running against and I don't really know anything about David Leavitt other than I use eight Mike Leavitt's brother he's not Sean Ramos that's all I need is the Utah county attorney he's been a in ju AB county government as well I think and so he's working his way north shrimp from ju AB county in a Utah canyon but I think that the it's just a funny funny thing about him is that he works as a baggage handler kind of person that for delta airlines so he can in this family can't live free no not a discount they fly fellow if you work a certain number of hours a year your hold you when your whole family can fly free anywhere delta goes and now to fill a request via text Abu Ali yes Ali A. K. A. Cassius clay you want to take a step away political pugilist I don't play you feel lucky punk I.

Fraser Ali A. K. A. Cassius
"sean ramos" Discussed on X96

X96

12:56 min | 1 year ago

"sean ramos" Discussed on X96

"He aged out of the handsome romantic leads and he was from a family of three generations of film actors in India where the film industry is really really vital and very popular and he was in he was in hundreds of name fix and Marilyn Manson has just finished his new album and he says it's a masterpiece so you know I'll just keep this music going for Merrill it works Marilyn Manson completed work on his anticipated new album according to the shock rocker and his producer shooter Jennings it's a masterpiece follow up twenty seventeens heaven upside down has been in the works for a while mentioned previously stating that the LP would likely be self titled and released before the end of twenty nineteen twenty nineteen came and went without a new record Manson did release a cover of the doors the end and the traditional folk tune I do know this god's gonna cut you down who let her do that I think Johnny Cash as well god's gonna cut you down the new Instagram post Genting shares a photo of himself next to a framed image of Marilyn Manson on the cover of Rolling Stone with the caption just waiting for the Spanish masterpiece to be released well coronavirus updates for the state of Utah the as of yesterday Utah reported a hundred and fifty two new cases but no new deaths so that's extremely good news governor Herbert has issued an executive order that places the state under moderate risk instead of high risk for spreading coronavirus move was largely expected we can now cautiously relax some requirements allow businesses that were closed to operate with with a safety measures in place he said and so some bars and restaurants and gyms are going to be opening up starting tomorrow Salt Lake County will begin reopening facemasks German now the mayor Jenny Wilson announced that she says we are let's slowly reopen things face masks are required please please if you're going into businesses make sure you wear a mask I was out about yesterday running a couple of errands and it was about fifty fifty people with masks without asks that's what I love I went to I do I rode my bike downtown to the studio yesterday to pick something up a man I didn't have to put my mask on because everything was so deserted I mean I was I was not within a hundred yards of a person ever even in the building I went into the building and there was literally no one in there yeah Saudi that was kind of you need a mask you can go to that corona virus dot Utah dot gov and there's a link there were any issues on little given mass you feel a little form and I did it yesterday took just like three minutes to fill it out but then you get an email back that says will set your mask could be three or four weeks away you know so it takes awhile for it to get to you awesome promising news a drug called ram desert you showing benefits in corona virus trials now this is a drug that was developed for when the a bola crisis was happening in a bowl was breaking out and it proved to not be affected for a bowler and and may now that's never really been on the market and not used for anything other than they tried it with a bowl of patients and and it didn't seem to have an effect well somebody said well the let's Gilly add is the drug company that makes the the wrapped around rent as of and who should what was tried on some corona virus patients see what goes here and it has proved to be pretty effective I think there was a thirty percent something like that right not curing it but easing symptoms it seemed to ease symptoms so when you say well okay big deal well that is a big deal particularly if you can ease the symptoms to the point where a person doesn't have to be put on a respirator or more more more you have to be taken yeah maybe they can even stay at home and take it so the chief seems to be showing some promise you know the hydro hi Watson Corcoran we've we got our eight hundred thousand dollars back the state of Utah got the eight hundred thousand dollars back for meds in motion the company that was paid to for this unproven drug governor Herbert said we've we investigated all of this they meant well nothing to see people meant well the department heads should have consulted with each other better there should have been more transparency but everybody was just doing it because they meant well aha aha I'm sure that's true yeah I'm sure that I'm sure that that is absolutely true I'm sure there's a lot of that and helping a buddy I feel the middle well and some the end there was there are particularly probably one or two people who stood to profit from it greatly and they've they went yeah let's let's see well I knew him well and I want to be rich that's some B. S. right there what we're gonna leave us we're gonna just leave it there you know we are yeah yeah that'll be the end of life if if if it were me it would be investigated all the way and charges would be brought if we need to do nobody's going to be fired nobody's going to be voted out of office nothing to see here move along move along we meant well US and speaking of that that banjo company that surveillance company where it turns out that the the founder of the company was a member of the KKK when he was a kid and and was involved in a drive by shooting at a synagogue Pat Bagley had the greatest car political cartoon about that yesterday I think it was it was us the it was Sean Ramos obviously and some other like a legislator sitting in this gigantic robot machine yeah you know it was like a dome and they were operating the controls in this machine was going around and spying on people and picking stuff up and you know looking into people and and it was very it was really scary looking and men Sean races saying oh yeah hold on is it turns out by the way that this guy who deserve it was in the KKK and that was just a minor compared to what this monster was exactly from monster company was just what we yeah and he was in the KKK you know let's see movement on welfare he went on to have hearing that well you've got nothing that you have four three four minutes from now yeah any other thing was on one more thing about banjo as I recall reading the stories this was all stuff that was done without approval of the legislature this was all out of Shawn ray as his office he's the one who struck up the contracts and he's the one who started paying the money and from his office budget so the slow turning general bug fixes the issue with there was never any legislative oversight now legislature when make up with me yeah he meant what the legislature got wind of this they did start looking into it and saying wait a minute wait a minute wait a minute why work we're spending all this money and and nobody's really approve this let's take a look at it and that but then when this stuff about him being in the KKK the founder of the company then then it just put a halt to it immediately listen the you know restaurants are gonna start opening up tomorrow and Gino was up in Huntsville yesterday and there's a story about the place that we all love the top in Huntsville called the shooting star saloon Leslie solder owns it it's been open that saloon in in Huntsville has been open since eighteen seventy nine the small town saloon is known for friendly staff a star burger and a St Bernard head on the wall his name's Buck stopping mounted server Saint Bernard head on the wall of the shooting star it's a tiny place now they had to close because of coronavirus but they've been trying to do takeout orders and you do you do you do you go by there yesterday no but I was talking to my my sister about it because she lives up there and but just to go back to Buck the St Bernard quickly largest St Bernard Hughes in the Guinness book of world records he weighed two hundred ninety eight pounds and stood forty one inches tall yeah he died in nineteen fifty seven I have the shooting star was is the longest continuously operating saloon even through fourteen years of prohibition and you say how did that work because it was in Huntsville yeah and when they would get word that the that the the wrongdoer because the river numbers are coming yeah you had someone like you right up the canyon really quickly and say they're coming shut it down and they would shut it down to make everything look okay and then they re open with somebody had to rise only can do they have a phone I had a phone back no no I want to think of a guy on horseback note the kitten until one of those little inefficient I think somebody probably called the cops on them but amazing that it stayed open throughout prohibition then and now they were you know in in danger of of going out of business so they have this indie go go that you can buy gift cards you can buy private events you can you can just donate and because because for a bar and this is what we're we're doing lots of fundraisers for different bars and things you know even if they sell food they're selling it to go think about selling to go food in Huntsville whether or not that many people it's it's hard to stay hard when they open the hunt for people they need their to their Starbird say need their star burgers and this is one of those current it's a national treasure it certainly state treasure and you don't wanna maybe should describe the Starbird to it's a hamburger probably eighty to eighty five eighty percent fat you know you gotta are we doing it rightly yeah and then on top of the hamburger thank you they put a sausage on it like a hot dog sauce but it's not this not just specifically a hot dog it's a spiced sausage so they split it open and put that on top of it then you can have it with cheese and onions and whatever you want man is it good and they've got dollar bills from all over the you have one of their stapled to the ceiling you know they've they've estimate there's about fourteen thousand dollars were the dollar bills state for those and they have the best in the men's room and I think I asked somebody about the women ladies room but the men's room hat is just covered with graffiti but it's clever graffiti most of it it's not just you know boost it's like jokes and things like that so I'm gonna post a link to the to the indie go go just because it's it's a treasure I lost another solution they stayed open through prohibition we can't lose them now and I I think there's a sign on it that says you know both of the month the longest continuously operating freestanding bar west of the Mississippi yes somewhere it says so all right sports weather traffic well Mike Tyson's training yes he is he really good he said he wants to but is he there's a video of him training fifty three I'm gonna be honest with you guys to solving mystery thing isn't paying the bills we want to raise money for charity all yeah he said he wants to do some exhibition around and people would pay for that it paid to fight him yeah probably would yeah only get in the ring with iron Mike you bet yep and then he would he please probably still good he's you know he's done horrible things he's done amazing things he's Mike Tyson he wants to box for charity which which is great weather let's see very warm yesterday it got really hot two eighty five.

India Marilyn Manson Merrill
"sean ramos" Discussed on She Podcasts

She Podcasts

10:37 min | 2 years ago

"sean ramos" Discussed on She Podcasts

"To? Halloween is looking at L. C.'s instagram's stories. Because she does such a great job with the girls looked amazing love their makeup in the painting. The painting faces. It was amazing and all the people all they were out I mean they looked like they trucked people into this neighborhood just for Halloween easy. It's insane like we thought like it's going to be cold. It's not going to be the same. I mean it really was cold and windy just miserable for for Turkish meeting really and it. There were so many people there. I was like what is happening. But but my I have to share about my favorite my favorite Halloween costume that we saw. I had just a little bit. I couldn't catch them because I felt like. That's so weird and creepy that this other other mum is filming my other children but they had these two mini. UPS like guys little ups costumes. That's what they were so. These ups guys dressed rest with their ups outfits and they were carrying a box and they were like two and a half years old and they were walking down the street and you could just see. They were so cute with the little hat and the little outfit and and just walking around with their box I was like I can get so captured. A little bit of those guys giver. Every so you wouldn't have known it was really cold there until Elsie put the camera on her. She had a wool cap and a big jacket and I was like she looked miserable and cold and everybody else is running and getting candy. You would have never known it was cold. It till you see Elsie and she had to like I had to put myself in there too because I was like people don't really know like everybody you in there. There were so many families that were all dressed up like in theme. And I'm just like really who has time like I'm not gonNA know. I have no time for that. My favorite family costume ever was when they were It was years ago and big. Love was on television and my friend and her husband dressed up as Mormons and dress their daughter also as one of the wives lives. Oh my God so it was like she was too so he had like two and forty amazing because my result but this this was a very sad halloween for me because this was the first time that my kids did not go out trick or treating. Because they're too old and the reason it was sad is because as I couldn't have the dad tax on the candy like their and collect all the almond joys ounce bars and stuff that they don't like you know that was the Adad tax even still give that out. I've not seen one almond joy. My kids sack. Yeah that's weird. My girls are not allowed to eat the candy. Really they just get like a couple. Okay Andy Choices. But they're allowed to play with the candy so you'd see them they trade candy they like sit down and have like serious trading. Like I'll give you this one for this one and and then they line them all up in like different colors and different hunter. I just it went out there. And they are sitting around with all their candy and then Hunter calls me and I hear like Mama Mama and I'm like what what's going on right so I go over there. She's like who makes twix and I was like. What do you mean who makes twix? And she hasn't. She had divided all the candy by the Manufacturers A- and I was like Oh my elsie is a good thing. You do that because you're training them for future. FBI interrogation 'cause you've taught them what torture is really all about young so that they can withstand torture if there ever interrogated later because who the fuck won't let their kids eat eat the candy but they can fuck and play with it. It's almost torture really is hockey worst. You're the worst. You are the worst I mean just just this give them like five minutes and donate the rest. No I want you to make candy houses and divide them up knowing full. Well you'll never taste the sweet the sweet berry of a skittle creamy chocolate chocolate business. Or however you say that of our crunch Oh so the sunny call madam who runs the parents on demand network and she's also part of she podcast. Her children went out and they collected all the candy. And I guess they're not allowed to eat it either. What they did was there was a dentist? That would you take their candy to the dentist. They way they give you a dollar a pound for it and what they do is take that candy and they ship it to military people overseas and I thought that was such a great idea. Most people do that here. I just give him like a couple of pieces of day. Because he's he's already obsessed with candy and like I mean we don't really eat it you know. It's funny knowing that he has all this candy. He's really calmed down about like like like last week he was a kind of dessert dessert. The Union desert. You don't share. I need chiller now that he has a giant saggy Gandhi. He has not really mentioned it. Acceptable it cannot a piece of candy after dinner. Okay just knowing that it's there it's like it's like eased his stress about sugar. AL which is weird. I don't know crazy. How how nutty they get four ninety? When when emily and they were little they would be so indulgent and rob would let them be indulgent? I couldn't watch it so like after two like you know. We got divorced when they were like two and three Lisa like the first couple years. I just didn't go because I could not watch my four and five and six and seven year olds to shove as much much candy into their faces he would allow. I couldn't watch it without being nauseous. I was just how fun at Your Dad's I'm going to go out to dinner by. And then then after a while you know like I didn't really have to parent them as much when they're when they're it's either go with the parent who will let you or go at the parent. Who will micromanage you? And the micromanaging isn't fun for any of us. It's more fun for them to just like what I don't see I'm okay with not really. Do you know what I mean. That was the choice either. Have have fun on Halloween or have a stick shoved up your acid every moment. I don't really you know I was to psycho about it now. I I mean I wasn't sake about this year but he also was. I sat for some reason. He was he. Maybe he's small enough where he can use restraint or just you know if he gets a piece he'll just be like okay. It's the wanting I think that's worse. Once he gets it. It's like I don't have to tell him to stop. He just is done. Yeah mine are also done with it too. But it's it's it's interesting how I think that the having it and I know it seems really weird that they get to play with it but they can't eat it and in looking at I just I honestly think like that is so bizarre but I'm all I'm it's like the they now see candy as like Lego. Like you know what I mean. It's transmitted in their head. You know we should have done. I just had the best idea. If you still have candy left. Sorry we do. You should just save all of it and make a giant S. gingerbread house because by then it'll be hard and like a little bit stale and you can use the chocolate for bricks and you can use. They could totally make it. Ars just gorgeous house of like Christmas House right. I might be able to do that. I think that will be a really really down there and see what they say still says child abuse it is child abuse but I mean if they're going to be abused they may as well do something with it should be artistic. I have an hi. It's time why don't you buy them a bicycle. Then you don't let them ride it. You just kind of have it sitting in the driveway and they can paint the bicycle and they can like driving around with their hands them. Sit on it and you don't let them pedal hit around but they can't peddle it. How many other other nowadays can we come up with John Probably a lot? But it's like that's not so good they go crazy with a candy like hunters like mood. As soon as she had her candy by the time we got home she he was so awful that I was just like dude. I can't do this you are. You've got this reaction to this stuff and I. How am I supposed to deal with this is? This is a pain in my behind the anyway. How `Bout we talk about? podcast God Walli. No just get out. I knew do you please. Let's get to some news the news you can you for the informed pod talk all right so the big news at least for me in terms of education right That I saw calm down the pike and I saw some postings from the mighty carry Hoffman on social media. I we saw that. There was this in. This is like an an and I'm sharing now an article from variety so variety dot com covered. This which is like what anyway. So here's a title Ex. Google to launch podcasting one on video series exclusive. So I guess they gave him an exclusive for this because this is already come mount given the fact that this was written on October thirtieth and it is Google podcasts and PX teamed up for a ten part original series to teach budding podcasters how to perfect their craft. That's what I'd says year podcasting one. Oh one sort of like little mini. What would you call it a Toyo maybe two steps today I'm not sure series. But it's like ten videos and educate okay. Yes that's that's what is educational series correct. And it's being hosted by Lucia Ajayi coast of Renton randomness and has Jesus and JAL off. PODCAST as well as Sean Sean Ramos Suaram host. Vox Media's Daily News podcast today explained and the this is the interesting part. It's going to be subtitled in English. Spanish Portuguese French Hindi in Arab Arabic Arabic Arabic. I know Arabic to reach audiences around the globe. which is awesome but one of the things that I really like about it particularly from the structure of the way that they put this together is that it is essentially exactly what I'm saying Landing page in it is at Google Dot P. R. Dot Org. It has a short super short paragraph at the top. Then it has the podcast cast all laid out in one page. All of them are hosted.

"sean ramos" Discussed on She Podcasts

She Podcasts

10:33 min | 2 years ago

"sean ramos" Discussed on She Podcasts

"To. Halloween is looking at L. C.'s instagram's stories because she does such a great job with the girls looked amazing love their makeup in the painting the painting faces it was amazing and all the people all they were out I mean they looked like they trucked people into this neighborhood just for Halloween easy it's insane like we thought like it's going to be cold it's not going to be the same I mean it really was cold and windy just miserable for for Turkish meeting really and it there were so many people there I was like what is happening but but my I have to share about my favorite my favorite Halloween costume that we saw I had just a little bit I couldn't catch them because I felt like that's so weird and creepy that this other other mum is filming my other children but they had these two mini ups like guys little ups costumes that's what they were so these ups guys dressed rest with their ups outfits and they were carrying a box and they were like two and a half years old and they were walking down the street and you could just see they were so cute with the little hat and the little outfit and and just walking around with their box I was like I can get so captured a little bit of those guys giver every so you wouldn't have known it was really cold there until Elsie put the camera on her she had a wool cap and a big jacket and I was like she looked miserable and cold and everybody else is running and getting candy you would have never known it was cold it till you see Elsie and she had to like I had to put myself in there too because I was like people don't really know like everybody you in there there were so many families that were all dressed up like in theme and I'm just like really who has time like I'm not GonNa know I have no time for that my favorite family costume ever was when they were it was years ago and Big Love was on television and my friend and her husband dressed up as Mormons and dress their daughter also as one of the wives lives Oh my God so it was like she was too so he had like two and forty amazing because my result but this this was a very sad halloween for me because this was the first time that my kids did not go out trick or treating because they're too old and the reason it was sad is because as I couldn't have the dad tax on the candy like their and collect all the almond joys ounce bars and stuff that they don't like you know that was the Adad tax even still give that out I've not seen one almond joy my kids sack yeah that's weird my girls are not allowed to eat the candy really they just get like a couple okay andy choices but they're allowed to play with the candy so you'd see them they trade candy they like sit down and have like serious trading like I'll give you this one for this one and and then they line them all up in like different colors and different hunter I just it went out there and they are sitting around with all their candy and then Hunter calls me and I hear like Mama Mama and I'm like what what's going on right so I go over there she's like who makes twix and I was like what do you mean who makes twix and she hasn't she had divided all the candy by the manufacturers a- and I was like Oh my elsie is a good thing you do that because you're training them for future FBI interrogation 'cause you've taught them what torture is really all about young so that they can withstand torture if there ever interrogated later because who the fuck won't let their kids eat eat the candy but they can fuck and play with it it's almost torture really is hockey worst you're the worst you are the worst I mean just just this give them like five minutes and donate the rest no I want you to make candy houses and divide them up knowing full well you'll never taste the sweet the sweet berry of a skittle creamy chocolate chocolate business or however you say that of our crunch Oh so the sunny call madam who runs the parents on demand network and she's also part of she pot guest her children went out and they collected all the candy and I guess they're not allowed to eat it either what they did was there was a dentist that would you take their candy to the dentist they way they give you a dollar a pound for it and what they do is take that candy and they ship it to military people overseas and I thought that was such a great idea mostly will do that here I just give him like a couple of pieces of day because he's he's already obsessed with candy and like I mean we don't really eat it you know it's funny knowing that he has all this candy he's really calmed down about like like like last week he was a kind of dessert dessert the Union desert you don't share I need chiller now that he has a giant saggy Gandhi he has not really mentioned it acceptable it cannot a piece of candy united up Your Dinner Okay just knowing that it's there it's like it's like eased his stress about sugar al which is weird I don't know crazy how how nutty they get four ninety when when emily and they were little they would be so indulgent and rob would let them be indulgent I couldn't watch it so like after two like you know we got divorced when they were like two and three Lisa like the first couple years I just didn't go because I could not watch my four and five and six and seven year olds to shove as much much candy into their faces he would allow I couldn't watch it without being nauseous I was just how fun at Your Dad's I'm going to go out to dinner by and then then after a while you know like I didn't really have to parent them as much when they're when they're it's either go with the parent who will let you or go with the parent who will micromanage you and the micromanaging isn't fun for any of us it's more fun for them to just like what I don't see I'm okay with not really do you know what I mean like that was the choice either have have fun on Halloween or have a stick shoved up your acid every moment I don't really you know I was to psycho about it now I I mean I wasn't sake about this year but he also was I sat for some reason he was he maybe he's small enough where he can use restraint or just you know if he gets a piece he'll just be like okay it's the wanting I think that's worse once he gets it it's like I don't have to tell him to stop he just is done yeah mine are also done with it too but it's it's it's interesting how I think that the having it and I know it seems really weird that they get to play with it but they can't eat it and I mean in looking at I just I honestly think like that is so bizarre but I'm all I'm it's like the they now see candy as like Lego like you know what I mean it's transmitted in their head you know we should have done I just had the best idea if you still have candy left sorry we do you should just save all of it and make a giant S. gingerbread house because by then it'll be hard and like a little bit stale and you can use the chocolate for bricks and you can use they could totally make it ars just gorgeous house of like Christmas House right I might be able to do that I think I think that will be a rolling really down there and see what they say still says child abuse it is child abuse but I mean if they're going to be abused they may as well do something with it should be artistic I have an hi it's time why don't you buy them a bicycle then you don't let them ride it you just kind of have it sitting in the driveway and they can paint the bicycle and they can like driving around with their hands let them sit on it and you don't let them pedal hit around but they can't peddle it how many other other nowadays can we come up with John probably a lot but it's like that's not so good they go crazy with a candy like hunters like mood as soon as she had her candy by the time we got home she he was so awful that I was just like dude I can't do this you are you've got this reaction to this stuff and I how am I supposed to deal with this is this is a pain in my behind the anyway how `bout we talk about podcast God Walli just get out I knew do you please let's get to some news the news you can you for the informed pod talk all right so the big news at least for me in terms of education right that I saw calm down the pike and I saw some postings from the mighty carry Hoffman on social media I we saw that there was this in this is like an an and I'm sharing now an article from variety so variety dot com covered this which is like what anyway so here's a title ex Google to launch podcasting one on video series exclusive so I guess they gave him an exclusive for this because this is already come mount given the fact that this was written on October thirtieth and it is Google podcasts and P. R. X. Teamed Up for a ten part original series to teach budding podcasters how to perfect their craft that's what I'd says year podcasting one on one sort of like little mini what would you call it a Toyo maybe two steps today I'm not sure series but it's like ten videos and educate okay yes that's that's what is educational series correct and it's being hosted by Lucia Ajayi coast of Renton randomness and has Jesus and Jal off podcast as well as Sean Sean Ramos Suaram host Vox Media's Daily News podcast today explained and the this is the interesting part it's going to be subtitled in English Spanish Portuguese French Hindi in Arab Arabic Arabic Arabic I know Arabic to reach audiences around the globe which is awesome but one of the things that I really like about it particularly from the structure of the way that they put this together is that it is essentially exactly what I'm saying landing page and it is at Google Dot P. R. Dot Org it has a short super short paragraph at the top then it has.

"sean ramos" Discussed on Today, Explained

Today, Explained

04:28 min | 2 years ago

"sean ramos" Discussed on Today, Explained

"Story. Is the balls and strikes and unpire that ideal is that only true for the person who sits in the middle for the one Justice at any given time e-e-e-e-no, it's such an interesting problem. I always paraphrase of book by Keith by I think, it something like all judges are political except for when they aren't the tension year, describing is the tension that you know, we all have to hold in our heads, which is social scientists are definitive above the fact that, you know, conservative judges are conservative and liberal judges are liberal, they are creatures of the political environment in which they're raised more and more, you know, whether they are raised in the hothouse of the federalist society sort of family or the American constitution society, their political actors, and when they get on the court, they act politically, and it's I think more and more the case that judges are on a team, whether they choose to admit it or not and more and more the case that there. There is no center. There is no real swing at the court. The way there was for most of history. And as we look forward to immigration and gerrymandering and the citizenship question and ObamaCare and the transgender military band, these huge lead divisive issues that are heading to the court in the next few months. What does it mean that this conservative chief Justice who historically has voted conservatively, but has shown a cage only, you know, the capacity swing to the left a little bit. What does it mean that he is the new person sitting in the middle? I think that we have seen in the last few months and even years that he has the capacity went needed to steer the court to a more moderate less dramatic path. He has the wherewithal. And he's deployed it on numerous occasions now to say, we're not. Gonna go big. We're gonna do this small. We're going to do this in a narrow way we're gonna kick this case back for somebody to take another look. But I think that it would be a mistake to say this is a person who has become a centrist or moderate because I don't believe that's the case. I think this is a person who's deeply passionately concerned that the court not be a political football. And so if he has to do one or two big things this term and leave too big things to next term. I could see that happening. I think the more interesting question, I think it's early days. I don't yet know if in reaction to Donald Trump in Trump ISM and Trump's kind of utter contempt for the rule of law, and the constitution and checks and balances and the notion of co equal branches of government, if that could change who John Roberts is and in some of the cases, you're describing be DACA or the trans banner the census case in some sense. When Trump is itself is on the line. It'll be interesting to see how the John Roberts who kind of clapback at Trump this winter if he's going to become a different person in response to that in it's early. But that's I think almost more interesting question. let's hosts the amicus podcast for slaked. It's about the supreme court of the United States. I'm Sean Ramos firm today explained. Thanks to hellofresh for supporting the show today. They got premeasured ingredients and easy recipes that come straight to your door, and you can get eighty dollars off your first month by going. Hellofresh dot com slash explained eighty and entering the promo code explained eighty. That's hellofresh dot com slash explained eight zero with the promo code explained eight zero for eight zero dollars off your first month.

Donald Trump football American constitution society John Roberts Keith United States Sean Ramos eight zero dollars eighty dollars
"sean ramos" Discussed on Today, Explained

Today, Explained

02:30 min | 3 years ago

"sean ramos" Discussed on Today, Explained

"This is today explained. I'm Sean Ramos jerem whenever I start an interview. I asked my guest to tell me what they do. Just so I get it. Right because sometimes titles are long in complicated. My name is John Alterman J O N LT. Your man senior vice president Brzezinski churn global security and geo strategy and the director of the Middle East program at the center for strategic and international studies in Washington DC. Okay. Now last real questions. Are you not done? I thought Zoltan have just announcing my title, the whole thing. Okay. So so Dr ultimate there. Two major conditions to the United States withdrawal from Syria. One is not until ISIS is defeated and two is not have the Kurds are in a precarious position if they're unsafe. So I want to understand each of those a little more starting with ISIS. How exactly is ISIS doing right now? Why is this is down but not out and one of the challenges of ISIS is it's it's strong because it's always been a very adaptive organization. It's been an online ideology, it's been a fighting force. It's been a terrorist group that does onesies twosies and a bunch of lone wolves in Europe. And elsewhere. It has been a federated set of armies that operate in Tunisia, and Libya, and Egypt and Yemen and a whole bunch of other. Places. So what we talk about when we talk about ISIS is you're actually talking about a lot of things some of which rely on activities in Syria, some of which are inspired by what's happening in Syria, and some of which might only have a little bit of relationship to things in Syria. But in many ways are independently owned and operated franchises. What's really hard is determining when an idea is dead. When does ISIS lose its ability to inspire anybody in Syria to do anything, the reality is we're likely not to know that ISIS is going to be able to disrupt ISIS is going to be able to kill people in Syria for a long time to come. What is good enough is going to be in the eye of the older?.

ISIS Syria Sean Ramos senior vice president Middle East Washington DC Zoltan John Alterman J O Europe Brzezinski United States Tunisia director Yemen Libya Egypt
"sean ramos" Discussed on Today, Explained

Today, Explained

05:00 min | 3 years ago

"sean ramos" Discussed on Today, Explained

"Day. Experience and gridlock government where nobody takes responsibility for anything. And everybody blames everybody else. I don't have any experience in creating the worst public school system in the industrialized world. Most violent crime ridden society in the industrialized world. But I do have a lot of experience and getting things done. Probably the highlight of the debate of all the debates was vice president debate, which was a mudfight among Al Gore. Dan Quayle, and Admiral Stockdale who was Ross Perot's running mate whenever stuck they'll said who am I why am I here? I mean, we got a lot of chuckles out of that. But basically to laugh at the base didn't really change that much. Yeah. So what are the last few weeks of the campaign? Like, basically, the fact is Bush was was in big trouble. He had Perot for all the the thoughts that Perot could take for both parties. It was clear that Ross Perot only target was George Bush, and he did everything can to make his life miserable. Perhaps if it was just one on one with Bush versus Clinton Bush spend all his money all the money on negative stuff on Bill Clinton as we saw with Mike Dukakis in nineteen ninety eight with the Willie Horton attacks. But I think the fact that that Bush was getting bombarded by both sides. It was just no way for him to win. It if anything he would have needed a big mistake by Bill Clinton or an amazing showing in the debates and neither one happened. So what are the what are the results of this election? I know I think I've heard that he lost. But how bad was the popular vote? Seemed kind of close Bill Clinton got forty three percent. Bush got thirty eight percent. The the real story is that Ross Perot got nineteen percent of the vote nineteen million votes. Well, of course, he also wrote got zero electoral votes, which just shows the problems of third party candidate. But Bush in the popular vote was close electricals was pretty much a landslide. I think even finished third in Maine, which is where he has a house in Kennebunkport. So and they knew the best in Maine. But it was not a good campaign. It was not a good result for the president probably the lowest percentage for for an incumbent president. I dunno maybe since Herbert Hoover nineteen thirty two now. I asked that we stand behind our new president, and regardless of our differences all Americans shame that share the same purpose to make this the world's greatest nation. More safe and more secure and to guarantee every American shot at the American dream. How did George Bush take his loss? How did George Bush take the defeat of being one term president will India's? Dr we indicated that he was very stunned by and very disheartened, and very bitter and hurt and yet roll the talk about, you know, whether to talk about immigration and draft dodgers and personal attacks. And and Willie Horton all the things that Bush has been settled with throughout his career, the snarky comments against Geraldine Ferraro, for example, in the nineteen Eighty-four vice presidential debate for all that I think the way he handled himself in defeat. Not only was his concession to Bill Clinton, very very gracious. But he wrote a note that came to light only recently to Bill Clinton was delivered during the transition. The note says handwritten dear Bill what I walked into this office. Just now I felt the same sense of wonder and respect that I felt four years ago. I know you'll feel that too. I wish you great happiness here. I never felt the loneliness some presidents have described there will be very tough times made even more difficult by criticism. You mean nothing's fair. I'm not a very good one to give advice. But just don't let the critics discourage you or push you off course, you will be our president. When you read this note. I wish you well. I wish your family. Well, your success now is our country's success. I routing hard for you. Good luck. George. Magnanimous response. Very gracious response. I think this letter to Bill Clinton on the day of Clinton's inauguration show, the true essence of who George. Herbert walker? Bush was. Can Rudin hosts the political junkie podcast. I'm Sean Ramos room this today explained.

Clinton Bush Bill Clinton Ross Perot president vice president Willie Horton George Al Gore Herbert Hoover Maine Dan Quayle dodgers Herbert walker Mike Dukakis Kennebunkport Sean Ramos Geraldine Ferraro Rudin Admiral Stockdale
"sean ramos" Discussed on Bleeding Green Nation

Bleeding Green Nation

01:41 min | 3 years ago

"sean ramos" Discussed on Bleeding Green Nation

"What if all you're breaking news alerts had a voice what would that sound like it would sound like today? Explain its daily news podcast from vox. I'm Sean Ramos grim every day my team, and I take one essential news story, politics, two movies sports science, and we break it down into twenty minute episodes. Perfect for your ride home subscribed today. Explain on apple podcasts or wherever you listen from Stitcher, and the vox media podcast network. Welcome into at the podium. This is episode nine. I on your host, Michael kissed. Follow me on Twitter at Michael kissed NFL. This is all brought to you by Espy nation and bleeding green nation. Look the day. We've all been waiting for is finally here once after his off season surgery for a herniated disc. Timmy, Jernigan has been cleared to return to practice giving the eagles some sorely needed reinforcements especially needed along the interior of that defensive line. That'd be clear Jernigan is not on the active roster yet, and it's still on the list, but he did participate in the walk through today on Monday in this opens eight twenty one day window where the eagles can activate him at an point Jernigan added twenty four pressures two and a half sacks and thirteen run stops the eagles defense last year. And before we get to excited, we can only guess what type of player will be getting back back injuries can be extremely difficult for big men to overcome. But you hope that we get him. Back at least close to full health, and he brings some of his trademark for step juice to the defense. We will keep you updated on Jernigan as we move through this week and let you know, if anything changes with his status, and of course, bleeding green.

Jernigan Michael eagles vox media Sean Ramos Twitter Timmy NFL eight twenty one day twenty minute
"sean ramos" Discussed on Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

05:07 min | 3 years ago

"sean ramos" Discussed on Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

"Not that you would launch all the applications on your computer at the same time just for fun, but you could laptops running the eighth gen Intel core processor with Intel. Octane memory allow you to push your computer to new limits with Intel. Uptaken memory. Everyday tasks are up to two point one times more responsive with all that power, the possibilities seem endless. What are some of those possibilities you ask, how about launching big media apps and content faster, allowing you to create more in less time with the eighth gen Intel core processor, many of your everyday tasks, speeding up to like Email presentations. Even your browser can launch faster with Intel, uptaken memory. So not that you would store thirty two gigabytes of photos on your computer, then open them all at once, but you could don't believe it go to Intel dot com slash you could now to learn more for more complete information about performance and benchmark results, visit Intel dot com. Tom slash benchmark. Today's sponsor is babble the number one selling language learning in the world. I took Spanish in high school and I still speak it just enough to get by when I'm on vacation in Spanish speaking countries and impress my wife, but I am not fluid, which is why I'm excited to use babble for free. You can also learn French or a talian, or German, or Russian or Swedish using Babbel's ten to fifteen minute lessons that can leave you speaking in your new language within weeks. You can try babble for free, go to babble dot com or download the app and try it for free. That's Babbel b. a. b. b. e. l. dot com or download the app to try it for free babble dot com. Three, six. In this hour studio, three sixty. We are exploring facets of speculative fiction, fi, fantasy horror, anything other worldly. Fans of the novelist. George are Martin have been waiting seven years for the next presumably final installment of his fantasy series a song of ice and fire that idea. Multi novel series never sat well with the consistently productive and considerably more concise, Harlan Ellison. It only took dust to ski one book to do crime and punishment. Why do these blowhards these bloviating nitwits need six books to talk about dragons. Bloviating or not Martin's series of novels, and it's TV adaptation game of thrones is the most popular fantasy franchise. This side of Middle Earth and Hogwarts. One of the most popular characters on game of thrones was played by Christian Nairn such a perfect name for an actor in a medieval fantasy. It was a difficult part because he only spoke one word and had to use that one word to express everything panic, anger, confusion, joy, two thousand fifteen. Our colleague, Sean Ramos forum talked with him about playing maybe the oddest big role in big time. TV history. I'm Kristen Narain after DJ best known for my real, probably in game of thrones. And who do you play again, I play ho door on him. He say. Even if you've never watched game of thrones, there's a fair chance you've heard of door. He stands out because he's really big. He's really lovable and he only says, one thing. Who. Oh, sweet. Giant. The one dimensionality of hauteur makes him really malleable as a walking hardly talking mean and the internet has a ton of fun with him. Even search engines, get it on it. When you goule hauteur the official Google search results just say ho door over and over like forty times. Hauteur had no idea. It says Google did it. Yeah. This bizarre. That's really takes me fair. I Google the idiom takes me to the fair, but my results were inconclusive. Hauteur belongs to a special league of TV characters that have found life far beyond their TV worlds online. It's him sailor moon the entire cast of the office. They're gifts and super cuts, and memes for days dedicated to these people. Just imagine how much power you reeled when you're one of the most beloved characters on the most pirated TV show in the history of the universe, the internet's favourite TV show. Christian Nairn is well aware of his unique position and he's using it to promote his other passion. Hor is really into house. Christian

Intel Hauteur Christian Nairn Kristen Narain Google Martin Babbel Tom slash Harlan Ellison Hor Babbel b. Middle Earth Sean Ramos official George DJ thirty two gigabytes fifteen minute