21 Burst results for "Sean Parker"

Parker Wins Woolf Award

The Horse Racing Radio Network Podcast

05:22 min | 6 months ago

Parker Wins Woolf Award

"Industry star of the week. I mentioned it's a special interview. It really is because anytime. You have an opportunity to visit with the george woolf memorial award winner. It's a privilege. And i have the privileged i of welcoming in jockey. Does sean parker who this past week got the news. He would receive that award and he is with me now. Here on the horse racing radio network to sean. Congratulations my friend. Thank you thank. You appreciate them. Yeah thanks for taking the time you look at your resume. You see five thousand eight hundred and forty-three winds not bad for a kid from cincinnati ohio Known plus i'd probably this is something you know riding horses. What something i really planned on doing. So i mean that's great for you know coming from cincinnati not knowing what i wanna deal just being in being able to do what. I love now riding. Horses wasn't something you planned on doing. So how did you end up doing it. I love grown up around the racetrack. You know with my dad and everything and the court skills to sit down. And i used to be able to sit and ruin i kid i just love you. Know everything about the jackie's and everything like that so I was getting close to sixteen. And i was still light enough but i mean i was taller and my dad said hey just give it a shot you know ryder cup races get out your system and then you know that way you could say you did it and enjoyed it and everything like that so yeah so i got the right a couple races and after the couple i just got the bug and i just wanted to keep doing it i just couldn't you know give it up after that so i got lucky enough my dad was you know by and telling me you know who wanna do it to go for so that's what i've been doing. What else do you think you might be doing. If you didn't pursue this as a jockey. I have no clue. I honestly i My grandmother used to always Tell me you know getting ready for college. And everything like that. And i always told her you know. I would like to go to college. But i don't think i was smart enough for college. And she said oh you can do it and she said what college did you like to say. Well we're gonna go to college. They want to go to university ally. That way i can enjoy hawaii but other than that. I really couldn't tell you what i would be would be doing. I mean like. I said when i started when i was sixteen. I've been doing it. Ever since. I never really thought about doing anything else. Tell me about getting the call that you were going to be. The recipient of this year's george woolf memorial award on. That was a great call me. I needed it to after you know last couple of weeks and everything so it was. It was a call that i would. You know happy to hear just because you know my peers and everything voted on it. And i got lucky you know i know. I know a lot of riders just traveling around lately and got to meet a lot of great friends. So i mean it's just means a lot. Yeah this is an award on. You mentioned that your peers jockeys vote on this award which makes it even more special. But this is an award. That doesn't mean necessarily that you are the greatest rider in the world but it. It means that you are a great person who has represented the sport in a fashion. That's deserving of having your name associated with jockey. Light george wolf so talk. Tell people about what this were award actually means to you I mean everything is just like You know like Like george wolf me myself as a jockey. I try to help everyone that i can help you know. As a young rider coming in what i was star. Now i had all the odorized by kerber there and he Taught me a lot. I mean a lot of the old riders me down until you do this and do that and you know. Watch this and watch the so. I kind of felt like that. That's what i should do to help people. And then you know coming up apprentice jockey and stuff like that and try to help them out the same way. I was told you know what i mean you know. Just try to let everybody know that. We're we're riders. And i mean we we learn every day. It's not something that we can say we master because if you think you've mastered then you you know you might need to be our sport. Because i don't think you ever mastered jackie. There's a lot of times that we we make mistakes all the time and we try to. We watched races. And we you know come back and make it better if we can so. I just try to explain that. So a lot of the young riders to that. You know we're going to always make mistakes. They just whether you can handle letting you know. Get back on the horse and you know you know i could older guy told me like when you get off the horse. Turn a page. as another. There was a match lawn waiting for you. So you gotta just keep your head up and just keep doing what you love and just keep doing it. And like i said. I was taught from the older riders. And i feel like. I'm kind of veteran writing. Now that i i should kind of you know help out. And like i said. I still take Are still you know. Talk to other riders and take advice moneywise all the time too so i mean. That's just something that. I think that we ought to do with individual plus we all out there out there for the same thing trying to win and i mean we all do it. You know safeway and everything that we're doing it the right way so

George Woolf Memorial George Wolf Cincinnati Sean Parker Jackie Sean Kerber Ohio Hawaii Safeway
Wildfire smoke is especially dangerous for children

Climate Connections

01:12 min | 7 months ago

Wildfire smoke is especially dangerous for children

"As the climate warms more devastating wildfires are raging across the west and filling the air with toxic smoke. The smoke at self is composed of hundreds of toxins predominantly though. The smoke consists of particular matter. That is very very small. Two point five microns or less and the reason. This is so dangerous as that particular matter of that size when it's inhaled it can go all the way to the base year long and crossover into the bloodstream. And then re kavak in many different ways throughout the body. That's mary mckee of the sean parker center for allergy and asthma research at stanford university. She says children are especially at risk because their bodies are still developing they also tend to more physically active than adults so they may inhale smoky air deeper into their lungs so she recommends that parents monitor air quality and keep their kids inside when the air is polluted and certainly if a child has any type of respiratory disorder. Make sure you have a prescription refilled and on hand. If they should need an inhaler or something like that in the moment she says these precautions can help keep kids. Safer as wildfire seasons. Get more extreme.

Kavak Mary Mckee Sean Parker Center For Allergy Stanford University Respiratory Disorder
Lady Gaga, boyfriend Michael Polansky are Instagram official

Jason and Alexis

01:09 min | 1 year ago

Lady Gaga, boyfriend Michael Polansky are Instagram official

"Okay let's talk about lady Gaga as new boyfriend you want to see a picture of him you can go to the my talk Instagram and see them Michael Polanski is his name he's thirty three years old some facts about him he co founded and runs Facebook co founder Sean Parker's philanthropy foundation so he runs this foundation called the Parker foundation he also graduated from Harvard there's a smart guy for their anti met her he met got got through Parker so I'm having a hard time supporting this union because I'm still waiting for her to get together with Bradley Cooper all what's going to happen I I still holding out hope friends I was thinking about that and and then I thought you know what I think they're too big of stars together I think Bradley Cooper need somebody that adores him and he's already married is me don't know how he broke up with every in exchange yeah well they were married well I think you have a child together see we know all about it I'm still waiting what I'm saying is I don't know if he could handle lady Gaga schedule and not being there to

Lady Gaga Instagram Michael Polanski Facebook Sean Parker Parker Foundation Harvard Bradley Cooper Co Founder
Just how beneficial are 'Opportunity Zones' to residents in low-income areas?

The Takeaway

11:44 min | 2 years ago

Just how beneficial are 'Opportunity Zones' to residents in low-income areas?

"As a government policy the idea of these opportunities owns has been around for decades low income areas get special tax incentives to encourage investment presidential candidate and senator Cory Booker has been a big proponent of opportunities owns as a way to inject capital an ailing cities like Newark New Jersey which is got millions of dollars in private investment under the policy we know that kids growing up in low income areas actually will make less money than their peers growing up in areas that have more economic investment and so when I was a mayor of one of America's poorest census tracts was mayor of Newark New Jersey one of my major goals every day was how can I get capital invested in my communities to create economic opportunity roughly twelve percent of census tracks around the country are being re classified as opportunity tones including almost all of Porter Rico conocer questioning just how beneficial these tax breaks will be to residents of low income areas and new reporting has emerged showing how this program has already been manipulated to further benefits the ultra wealthy for more on this I spoke with Justin Elliott a reporter at pro publica and Samantha Jacoby a senior tax legal analyst with the center on budget and policy priorities and I started by asking Justin to explain just what an opportunity zone is so this is a program that was created by president trump's tax law that was passed back in in twenty seventeen and the basic idea is to give series of tax breaks to people who make investments in poor areas around the country the goal is to incentivize new investment in the areas that need it most and there's an interesting history to these ritual get into in just a moment but let's let's focus on some of the latest news we just saw senator Cory Booker representative Emmanuel cleaver and representative Ron behind sent a letter to the treasury inspector general that would investigate the potential political influence on how these zones are selected what exactly are they talking about basically they're they're talking about the process by which the areas that are eligible for this tax break were selected so my colleague and I ProPublica and also other reporters at The New York Times have written a series of stories about how several very politically connected billionaires have to use their influence to get areas where they owned real estate made into these opportunities owns thereby qualifying them for this very lucrative tax break and doing it in ways that are potentially not really aligned with the original policy goals of the program the idea of using tax breaks to revitalize low income areas has been around for awhile where did it originate and how is the sort of legislation that we're seeing now different from its original intent as he said there there's sort of a long history of what's commonly called a place based tax incentives and and the idea is by encouraging investment in areas that are historically distressed where residents might have faced a systemic discrimination or lack of opportunity by encouraging investment in those places you might create widespread economic benefits new jobs things like that your examples of those going back to early nineties are things called enterprise zones new markets tax credits the difference here I think is that the opportunities on tax break is really centered around capital gains which primarily float to the top one percent of people so by definition these are gonna directly benefit wealthy investors and may or may not have benefits for low income residents of opportunities up before they they were rebranded opportunities owns and before the trump administration has created this new version of an opportunity zone did these ever work in the past did these enterprise improvement areas are business improvement districts or whatever we want to call them have they worked in the past Samantha I think there's Serena and mixed results the there's been criticisms of of these types of policies that they could be easier feeling gentrification and displacement of low income communities in these areas maybe they have some affect on job creation but it's not clear whether those jobs that are created are filled by residents of the is a low income areas or whether the jobs go to people from outside the areas so I talk a little bit about who's benefiting more but Justin we just talked about the news here that there are representatives who are who are concerned about how how these loans are being selected but wasn't Cory Booker a big supporter of the opportunities on program yeah absolutely it is a program that is very much had bipartisan support and actually existed as a standalone bill before it got put into the trump tax law Booker has definitely championed the idea I ELT sometimes refers to these areas as domestic emerging markets because that is the term uses and the idea of a in its current form anyways you can trace this back to Sean Parker whose Silicon Valley billionaire early Facebook investor who actually created a think tank in Washington DC to push this idea which it was ultimately successful so Samantha let's talk a little bit about how it works here is we are we're talking about things like capital gains and probably most folks like myself will not ever come near a capital gains so if I'm a wealthy investor and I'm looking at an opportunity stone what's going to drive me to what either create a business there or build a an apartment building there what what type of investment are these opportunities owns trying to attract and what's the benefit to people who are who have all this money to go there and and invest so just for a little background capital gains come from increases in value of expensive assets like stock or real estate typically only wealthy people have those and you know it's also important to know that capital gains aren't aren't really tax like other types of income like wages are salaries they're not taxed every year investors can actually avoid paying capital gains taxes by just holding on to their assets for over time and that itself is a big benefit and then when they actually are taxed at taxed at a lower rate than ordinary income but what this incentive actually says is Hey you know even if you sell your assets we'll give you extra tax benefits if you put that gain into an opportunity is on so the first thing is you you don't have to pay that tax that you would otherwise until twenty twenty six as long as you hold on to that investment and the opportunities on for a certain number of years and even then when you eventually do pay that tax you get a fifteen percent cut then the really big benefit comes later so all gain on your new opportunities on investment can be completely tax free as long as the investor hold on to it for at least ten years so what that does is that could create a really big benefit but particularly for projects that have the highest value for investors so just as an easy example an investor might get a much more generous tax break for say the high end real estate as opposed to investing in an affordable housing project Justin you have reported on a few places where these so called opportunities owns have really done what Samantha's laying out here which is benefited the extremely wealthy who have invested here one of the people we're talking about is a man named Dan Gilbert in Detroit who is he and how did he benefit from this opportunity zone Dan Gilbert is the billionaire founder of quicken loans the mortgage company he also owns the Cleveland Cavaliers basketball team in the last several years he's gone on a buying spree in downtown Detroit as some several billion dollars into buying up actually most of downtown Detroit my colleague and I did a story looking at how all these areas in downtown Detroit where Gilbert owns most of the buildings have been named opportunities out it's a one one of the themes that emerge from this was that Gilbert has a number of already planned developments including you know luxury residential developments skyscraper office towers and those are now in opportunities and so what we're looking at is him getting potentially getting tax breaks for projects that he was going to do anyway when the entire point of the program was to incentivize new investment downtown has actually been gentrifying in part because of Gilbert's previous investments in the last several years and in fact these areas of downtown when you look at the data are are much wealthier than the rest of the city but those are the areas the wealthier areas that got named opportunities on's where Gilbert RD owns a you know again billions of dollars worth of real estate and part of the reason they were named opportunities owns is that Dan Gilbert's lobbyist got involved at both the state and federal levels and so there we go with that brings us full circle back to the question about who is influencing who in choosing these opportunities sounds and whether or not they're being chosen because of political motives is that not right that's right so the way that the law was written that there's an enormous amount of autonomy given to the governor of each state so basically the federal government was in charge of deciding which areas around the country were eligible to be named opportunities owns and then that list went to each governor who got to pick a quarter of those as the opportunities and so we see in the in in multiple cases including Detroit where there were you know influential local businessman who lobbied the state and you know in the end the areas were where they already on property were named opportunities so that that's that's what happened to tried and then there's been other reporting about the lobbying having at the federal level and on the eligibility front Samantha were these opportunities owns necessary how are these created and and essentially inserted into the tax law so as anything just mentioned previously opportunities own legislation was originally introduced in twenty seventeen and and the early part of twenty seventeen with bipartisan support but then nothing really happened was that until the end of the year when policy makers were considering big twenty seventeen year end tax legislation that legislation was passed with an extremely rush process you would typically expect with legislation like this to see you know months long public hearings broad expert input on on all sides of the different issues similar to what happened and in nineteen eighty six when there was a major tax reform effort that took years to it to to pass where is this was kind of rushed through in just a couple of months and opportunities owns were sort of slipped into it without a lot of attention being paid to it and and I think kind of as a result of that there are a lot of holes that the treasury department had tend to fill through implementing regulations which actually gave treasury a lot of power to make important decisions about who can actually benefit what types of investment can qualify and you know what they could have done was add significant public protections to it to make sure that investments have public

Cory Booker Senator Twenty Seventeen Year Billion Dollars Fifteen Percent Twelve Percent One Percent Ten Years
"sean parker" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

Newsradio 1200 WOAI

01:42 min | 2 years ago

"sean parker" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

"Offense coordinator, Matt before to be there next coach NFL networks in Rappaport reports. Melvin Gordon is expected to play Sunday against the patriots also reported the running back is a little bit of a niece sprain and crop ESPN's. Rob demoss key reports. The Browns meeting with former Packers coach Mike McCarthy is on hold in the NBA. Coach Scott Brooks said that Otto porter will come off the bench again in Tuesday's game. The Sixers, but he will not have minutes. Limit any baseball USA. Today's Bob Nightingale report that the White Sox have agreed to terms with John Jay, pending a physical. I'm Dan strafford. Mrs thin your fantasy sports radio network. News update fantasy sports radio network keyword fantasy on your iheartradio app. Just ask your smart speaker for us. Alexa, play twelve hundred w I on iheartradio. That sounds like a pretty good choice to me. San Antonio's first news. Sean parker. Welcome into Wednesday. The ninth day of January, and what a difference a day makes you could actually see driving to work this morning. Did I didn't pass up stone of this morning because I actually saw where it was. Day.

White Sox Otto porter Rob demoss Melvin Gordon Dan strafford patriots Sean parker Scott Brooks Rappaport coordinator Sixers Alexa NFL San Antonio Bob Nightingale Mike McCarthy ESPN Browns Matt NBA
"sean parker" Discussed on Grumpy Old Geeks

Grumpy Old Geeks

04:16 min | 3 years ago

"sean parker" Discussed on Grumpy Old Geeks

"I need to have their feet held to the fire and all they're being sued. So hopefully by everybody who ever spent money on last action, I seriously if you've ever watched a video on Facebook, here's your two cents a man's. Now this is this is one of the big ones. Yeah, and hopefully, yeah. I mean, it's coming from the advertisers who are filing the lawsuit, but is crazy. It is crazy. Zach. What are you doing. Oh, I know what he's doing. He's taken all of his money and putting it into opportunities zones. Have you ever heard of opportunities owns? No. I know Sean Parker is involved in it, which means it's probably bullshit. Yes, he crafted a little known part of the tax code called opportunities owns, and now every one percenter in Silicon Valley wants in in what it is. It's basically a way to create tax havens for your money and get really good PR and everybody wants in on it that has a bunch of money so they can avoid paying taxes because of they don't have enough money already. Apparently. I don't. I don't understand it, but I, how the hell is Sean Parker crafting any kind of tax legislation to begin with, you know who approved this lobbying probably lobbying and it's it's incredible, like the ability to defer paying capital gains tax through twenty twenty six after selling your company, for instance, appetizing the chance not to pay any capital gains tax on any money you make on top of that payday, if it's invested in an opportunity zone, the real ka ching. Awesome. Yep. And I know somebody who actually just moved to Texas to avoid paying taxes. Go figure that we will not name names on that one, but you know who I'm talking about the rich get richer because they know what to do. Yeah. And they can afford to do it and they can afford to do it. And I do what you're talking about. Well, there's some more shenanigans going on over at Microsoft day. Microsoft executive allegedly attempted to invisible one point, five million dollars. The former director of sports marketing and alliances was charged with five counts of wire fraud this week for allegedly, trying to sell one point. Five million from Microsoft is also accused of stealing and selling more than sixty Super Bowl. Tickets belonged to Microsoft pocketing over two hundred thousand dollars in the process there. Well, Bye-bye. You've got busted. Yeah. Oh, man. And well, he can get a job when he gets out of jail because Mujber is now testing an undiminished staffing service just what we needed. I love this is an article I found in a gadget. It's like it's called Uber works. And so they say right at the beginning because they know what's going to happen here. It's like few the Uber works. No, it doesn't jokes, yes. And yeah, they're trying to become the Amazon of services they say, and it's great. Yeah, so you can't just get a job anymore. Now you have to get a job through Uber and then they take even more of your money. Job listings indicate the company is looking for people who are willing to be on call. During the busy periods of nights, weekends and holidays, and have a strong interest in the on-demand labor space. Nobody has an interest in strong interest in the on demand labor space. They have a strong interest in getting paid because they can't find any fucking work anymore or side-hustle because they got fired from their regular job. And now this is all they have left. Yeah, yeah, it's awesome. Yeah, we'll see how this one plays out where we're going. It's been working in Chicago and they had did do trial run here in l. a. so expect us to be rolling out soon. Uber works, we, here's the other one though. Buber works will let companies recruit short term workers such as security guards, just what you want a short term on demand security guard. Exactly. Look, we can't trust the Microsoft executive that was getting an amazing paycheck. We're to trust on demand security guard. We know how good their background vetting is. You know now I never really knew how to pronounce his company's name if it's winnings or why things I was just say winnings because it sounds like a, you know, a snooty European Butler winnings with e winnings. Be new kind of what it goes. It's the founder of weavings, but his company back from knock ya not too long ago because it didn't do too well over there..

Microsoft Sean Parker Zach executive Facebook Texas Chicago European Butler wire fraud Mujber founder Amazon director Buber two hundred thousand dollars five million dollars
"sean parker" Discussed on The Tech Guy

The Tech Guy

02:46 min | 3 years ago

"sean parker" Discussed on The Tech Guy

"Well, hey, hey, how are you today? Lille the port here, the tech guy. We're gonna talk computers, the internet home theater, digital, photography, smartphone, smart watches, but this segments going to be a little bit different for the last few weeks. We've been talking with my buddy Adam fisheries, the author book called valley of genius. That is a series of interviews with some of the biggest names in technology at the history of Silicon Valley. And I wanted to play some of these recordings more than two hundred interviews with Sean Harker who Sean Parker added fishing. Sean Parker is the co founder of Napster, which have your don't remember. It was the first time that news it became free and then that collapsed in giant ball of flames. And he was the guy who then found Mark Zuckerberg and helped him create Facebook was was like eighteen nineteen years old. He was kind of in the bro house in in San Jose coating on Facebook. This is a course in the movie that great quote, you know, what's not a million dollars, you know, it's cool a billion dollars. I don't know if Sean Parker said that, but he became the first president of Facebook. Yeah, he was the one who kind of showed Zach the way Zach wasn't even aware that companies like Napster were businesses before he met Parker. So let's start with Napster Sean Parker and Shawn fanning too young dropouts, who decided music wants to be free? Exactly. I mean, fanning was in his dorm room up in Boston and Parker was down. I think in Virginia, he was actually working for Mark pink Pinkus a really founder as an intern. And anyway, he he's on our c. which is this early chat program and discovers this early kind of music trading software. That any and he decides he's going to be the business guy. Now he's like twenty. Nothing. Nothing. And and the other Shawn Shawn fanning is similar. Like, you know, he's a coder Shawn fanning. He wrote the code xactly. So we have this classic coder kind of marketer duo and they, they get some money and moved to Silicon Valley Sean FANG, and I met in underground living in suburbia. Interested in computer science part of the computer underground hanging out with a lot of people online who shared our interest prior to the release of Napster. Prior to that pivotal moment, the web was.

Sean Parker Shawn Shawn fanning Napster Facebook Sean FANG Sean Harker Mark pink Pinkus Silicon Valley Mark Zuckerberg Adam fisheries Zach San Jose co founder Virginia founder Boston intern eighteen nineteen years billion dollars
"sean parker" Discussed on Triangulation

Triangulation

04:22 min | 3 years ago

"sean parker" Discussed on Triangulation

"That's the line in the movie which nobody ever really said, which is a million dollars is cool. No, a billion dollars will. He might have said it. I don't know a good lines. A great line. Aaron Sorkin said, Aaron Sorkin said it. Happed into something anyway. So all my quotes from those guys are real are real. By the way, there's no screenwriting in here. It's actually that's one of the things we mentioned this last time. That's really great about this book. There's no Adam Fisher in here. This is the all the work in this book was assembling quotes from two hundred people playing putting him in order. He was a knee peds with scissors and paste putting it all together, but then it flows in. It's like a just a great cocktail party where some of the most interesting people you've ever met are just telling stories about how it happened. The story about the early early Facebook is they the one of the things they were working on? Was keg bots. You know, this one vote, they had a keg. Okay. That was in the office. This is when they finally got an office and they weren't working out of a house and on University Avenue, and you go to the keg, you work there and the keg would recognize who is at the Caig and tell everybody, hey, so, and so's drinking, you know, join them right. Turns out this is actually may be the start of their virtue of their facial recognition patents. You know? So there you know. But that's. Shorted. And if you read the account of what early Facebook was like, it was one big cake party. People got to work no earlier than noon. A lot of them came in their pajamas including rucci the I, I'm sorry, I can't pronounce her last name, but she was the first female engineer there and they would work all day or you know, 'til cocktail hour. Go out, have some beers and a burger. Come back and drink all night long as they pushed out new code. You can Carson. If you pull up the wired story, there's more pictures. Yeah, from that era. And I think I'm not sure, but the mural behind them in that picture is I remember they paid for in Facebook stock. That's right. And that the the Murless is now a multi-million. Yes, that whole story was therapist. There you go. That's that bureau right there is all their the whole story about, you know, it's a graffiti thing and all the all the kind of pornography who did the, you know is actually apparently Sean, Parker's girlfriend who did the most pornographic parts here of that mural not the not the graffiti artists from LA. Wow. So rookie sung v. song v. I'm sorry. Yeah. Well, you talk to so many people. Not surprising. Yeah, some of those, there you go. There's so so that's Sean Parker on the right, right. Am I right? Yes. On the right and then in the middle, who's who's that? It says Carson in the quote. Let's see destined mosque. Moskovitz. That's right to talk to him. Yeah. And and then as on the floors at Mark. You could tell from the curly hair and that's the that's the mural that the million dollar mural the massage therapist also became a millionaire because you know fewer smart. In those days, you took stock, it's cash. Yeah. So so that's where the bro grammer culture this whole, You you know know. it was a run like like, you had, you know, why is Facebook have this sophomore culture, right? That's the big question. Well, it was it was founded by sophomores literally, and that DNA still pervades Terry wanna graduate. Facebook was more of a undergraduate culture. Google is more of a graduate student, but the parties a Google, legendary, really. Then it fair took a huge bite of this chapter because that was the that was the kind of sexiest chapter. That was the most Vanity Fair like they were the sex..

Facebook keg Adam Fisher Sean Parker Aaron Sorkin Carson Google engineer graduate student Caig LA billion dollars million dollars million dollar
"sean parker" Discussed on Acquired

Acquired

02:04 min | 3 years ago

"sean parker" Discussed on Acquired

"And this is really how spotify becomes a thirty billion dollar company so also this email is a masterpiece of if you're a vc and you're trying to get yourself into a deal in investment or when a deal like this is how you do it take notes because shortly thereafter founders fund comes in and john adds another fifteen million to the round that was already closed danielle says of course i need to have you involved and and found his and sean and up and up investing but this is this is it and so at this point in time this is the end of two thousand nine the company spotify believes there about six weeks away from being able to launch in the us they've been working on deals with record labels forever sean knows dealing with the record labels takes longer than you think he thinks it's about twelve weeks away in the next quarter they'll get out in the us turns out to take another two years until they until they're finally able to launch in the us it's not until twenty eleven but that also is very fortuitous for the company because they basically take those two years and they do two things they foster their relationship with facebook through brokered through sean parker and they essentially reoccupy the entire product to rely on facebook connect and social log and and then distribute every action that every user takes we'll get into this within spotify gets distributed out to their facebook account to the news feed and this is really what drives spotify viral growth this is this is you know it's farmville for music like you really are just seeing every update that every one of your friends takes in spotify in in your news feeding ben listen to wake me up before you go i mean i seriously i remember turning publishing on and off specifically when i was listening to certain songs like this doesn't go to my facebook and i was one of those people.

danielle us facebook sean parker spotify john two years thirty billion dollar twelve weeks six weeks
"sean parker" Discussed on Acquired

Acquired

02:27 min | 3 years ago

"sean parker" Discussed on Acquired

"Yeah totally well so summer two thousand nine this is when sean parker comes back into the story rises from the dead yet again a rides back in from the sunset on his horse so specifies growing across europe their labels are slowly letting them go into more and more countries and towards the end of the summer they end up raising fifty million dollars in what was their series b at that point from wellington partners the hedge fund and lee cashing the the wealthy hong kong based the hong kong taiwan i i believe hong kong based billionaire but sean parker so at some point at some point daniel comes to silicon valley comes to the us and he meets with mark zuckerberg and facebook can apparently some parker's there too and he's like this is it this is napster two point out this is the way to do it and but they just closed this round this fifty million dollar round sean this time had joined up with peter thiel as a as a partner at founders fund and so shaun writes daniel this email willing to i believe he hadn't met him because in this email he says i look forward to meeting you in person the hull okay liked this but i look forward to meeting you i see all these anyway so maybe it was that daniel met with zach and zach told sean parker about it whatever sean parker went crazy parking goes crazy in love with this thing totally falls in love with it and so he writes this email which is online on the internet published for posterity will link to it it's amazing and so i'm just gonna i'm just going to quote liberally from this email here it starts off with i've been playing around with spotify you've built an amazing experience as you saw zack really likes to i've been trying to get him to understand your model for a while now but i think he just needed to see it for himself facebook has been in partnership discussions with various companies to fully integrate music download with the facebook profile most of these deals would have resulted in the wrong user experience and i've done my best to stop them where they didn't make sense remember parker has no formal involvement with facebook at this point in time in particular there's no way that i tunes could enable the right experience on facebook.

sean parker hong kong daniel mark zuckerberg facebook peter thiel zach zack europe wellington lee partner shaun spotify fifty million dollars fifty million dollar
"sean parker" Discussed on Early to Rise Radio

Early to Rise Radio

01:32 min | 3 years ago

"sean parker" Discussed on Early to Rise Radio

"Instagram they did it to make it addictive they're they're going out there i like these guys who have made their hundreds of million dollars now on this apology tour they no longer work for facebook and they're like yeah you know they're like sean parker whatever the guy and then there's another guy an indian gentleman i've seen chamrann through something like oh now he's even starting this society foundation for for integra integrity on the on the internet but i don't think he gave all his money back you know that he made from building these things which they are now saying we totally made addictive you know we're we're really sewri or facebook should be really sorious like okay great and the guy who who built instagram the courses that he did it stanford were at the intersection of computer science psychology in order to know how to make people at dictated to these things and so that's what you're fighting against and so that's why you have to go to extreme much like an alcoholic has to go to extremes to stop drinking or any addict has to go to extreme to stop whatever it is and you know he was just talking to your your team member here and he he loves to go and totally disconnect way out in the desert and all this stuff and you know what sometimes you have to do those things and so i built all these systems around myself so that i can do these things much like a bodybuilder might build systems around himself so that he's not tempted by things when he's in a diet face if you wanna do amazing things sometimes you have to do that.

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"sean parker" Discussed on Back To Work

Back To Work

01:59 min | 3 years ago

"sean parker" Discussed on Back To Work

"It seems strange like how how i guess i didn't realize how much i craved that feature until i had it because like i said before nothing against sonos speakers are good but they're not a super a lot of fun to use snow mainly just used sonos to keep the speakers updated and to select groups because i don't think you can create groups in pairings of sona speakers in the spotify app but what everyone is the current one it'll just throw right to that it's the best so yeah yeah i'm poster boy you know i'm thinking i might do more playlists i really like making playlists some people seem to like them i've done a few for rectify and rodrick on the line in the past and maybe do some more of those once i have mixed luck with moving items around on a list and that confuses me but i'll figure that the way that i actually got into spotify years ago when i first started using it was with a playlist and it was who is what's the name of napster guy do you remember the napster guy is sean parker yeah he actually had a playlist and i it was of like the most popular fanning sean fan parker sean parker shawn fanning i'm gonna say fan scratcher the head this is large spherical object in the road he's got the head in one hand and the sandwich and the other scratch another great movie that you can be watched it and movie parker i think it is i'll say park bill bill parker so so i got into a by i subscribe at its play this and had like a lot of good songs that i liked at the time and i thought okay this is really cool because there's these songs from all different sean everything else it really it was the first streaming service that i ever got really got into and now i have tons and tons and tons of playlists on there i live i live by the playlets i use the radio feature but i'm never like thrilled with the radio feature.

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"sean parker" Discussed on Download

Download

01:47 min | 4 years ago

"sean parker" Discussed on Download

"Okay but let's just move on from that and understand that the he did say later by the way the company overwhelmingly does good in the world i should say his name his name is is complicated form i for my american california mouth to say because he's got a complicated last name but his name is chamrath poly hoppy tia i want to say that's my my my guess at it and he called him sweetie and he is the here's the founder and ceo of social capital the sean parker said he was a conscientious objector to social media i love that ma'am i mean i get i get the reference split likes his social okay every twitter twitter's gotten a lot of a lot of criticism way lamine this isn't just about facebook twitter's got a lot of criticism lately a lot of the criticism tour twitter and facebook is that while they are aware of some of the ways that their social media platforms could be misused to bully people and to rally kind of ugly violent groups into finding other people like them and then coordinating what they do to two treating people badly on the internet to doing terrible things in real life in lots of there's a whole catalogue of it that that the problem is that they also don't wanna drive everyone away from their platform because that's their business and so when mark zuckerberg says we want to focus on the community and not making a prophet you know i i look at that and i am a little cynical and i say will yet because you make your profit from your community so it's all intertwined in the same way with twitter like twitter could probably clampdown more on some of the bad users of their service but they've really.

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"sean parker" Discussed on The Tech Guy

The Tech Guy

01:33 min | 4 years ago

"sean parker" Discussed on The Tech Guy

"Exactly the kind of thing a hacker like me would come up with 'cause you're exploiting of vulnerability in humans psychology the inventors the creators it's mees said sean parker it's mark zuckerberg it's kevin systrom on instagram it's all these people understood this consciously and we did it anyway and i'm sure that they told themselves and they still tell him cells was for the benefit of society because if we are all connected for all you know talking to each other good things will happen and we've seen that's true and bad things too will happen i think it comes down to though i've been thinking about this because i don't i you know the shows about technology we wanna talk about the benefits of technology how to use technology howdy it know so you can use it better so you can use it to your advantage and disadvantage so i'm not anxious to say that well get off the internet it's pad for you but i think i think i put thinking about the problem and i think i understand that a little bit about what's going on and maybe there is a ray of light at the end of the tunnel and the the two words i'd use our uncanny valley the real versus the synthetic so in our you know our lives let's let's call our lives real xiaoji our interactions with humans in in the flesh when your face to face real call that the real thing but even going back to the very earliest humans back to the people living in caves.

sean parker mark zuckerberg kevin systrom
"sean parker" Discussed on The Tech Guy

The Tech Guy

02:09 min | 4 years ago

"sean parker" Discussed on The Tech Guy

"He says i dunno though i really understood the consequences of what i was saying because what happens when the network gets two billion or two billion people at literally changes your relationship with society with each other it probably says sean parker what are the case created facebook interferes with your productivity in weird ways yes and your sleep and you're relationship with your children and your family god only knows he says what it's doing to our children's brains the thought process this is actually a great insight an important understand uh uh but why facebook and you know you could say this about twitter and you know just the internet general the thought process he says it went into building those applications facebook being the first of them was all about how do we consume as much of your time and conscious attention as possible they that's what the optimize for they call it engagement but what it is is your attention the more you spend on facebook more attention you pay the more they can make an advertising the happy they are and it's not i don't think it's i don't even wanna ascribe greed to them i mean th you know it's a somewhat profitable business but i don't think they do it for greed i think marcus genuine mark zuckerberg when he says i just want people to connect but what he what he probably would be more honest to say i just want people to connect on my platform bright worse paint here unfit i i don't think he cares about connecting anywhere else he certainly doesn't care about collecting in real life he wants to be able to connect on facebook he wants more of your time more of your intention he wants your engagement sean parker says the way we do that we need to sort of give you a little dopamine hit it also going that the pleasure sensor center every once in a while buying new because someone liked her cut commented on a photo or a poster whatever and that's going to get you to contribute more content that's going to get you more likes and comments it's a social validation feedback loop.

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"sean parker" Discussed on Inc. Uncensored

Inc. Uncensored

01:34 min | 4 years ago

"sean parker" Discussed on Inc. Uncensored

"Gets a small stipend and doesn't pay any tuition i think they said something like four percent of all phd students in stem actually pay tuition instead there they're tuition gets waved so that they can concentrate on their studies and get out of grad school with not a lot of debt what the proposal is going to do if it passes is treat that waiver as income and therefore tax it so at carnegie mellon a phd student in in the in school computer science gets an annual stipend of about thirty two thousand four hundred the university covers the students forty three thousand dollars in tuition but if that forty three thousand dollars it said magara near you're now you're now going to quadruple your tax bill making effectively impossible for anyone to go to grant skains almost as if they don't want people to go to as it's it's almost like this may be a good reason to not passed the largest tax overhaul in thirty years in like a weekend the level of damage that this could do to our economy and our competitiveness is is staggering and i salute why is going to be like button wired dot com for doing a great report on all right that's all see that triple gannon when he was hitting a lot i want to thank my colleagues emily canal things jam john fine of legal and have will yakha with thank you jim do you like ink on censored please go to apple podcasts and leave us a review it's wonderful to hear what you're thinking and also a great way for news news to find us you can also send us feedback to uncensored at inc dot com our producers are a c is an i'm convinced by better clues join us next week and thanks for listening.

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"sean parker" Discussed on Inc. Uncensored

Inc. Uncensored

01:44 min | 4 years ago

"sean parker" Discussed on Inc. Uncensored

"Lil it let's call leg algorithm make mischiefmaking it's happening on the scope that is substantial that were not opting into and that is where this gets really freaky the algorithm is not your friend and i think we're seeing that play out in lots of roadways met my personal fear is that it's too big for facebook to get a hold on a handle on but you know shit i think they're sweating they should be sweating in you know maybe it's time for regulation and do you see this the regulation like as it regulating these companies like utilities will i i can't foresee it it'll be it'll be a weird kinky thing i mean i when i say want regulation what a one is there to be as a a threat of regulation that severe enough that they actually get their should together and do something um and i think they are smart enough to realise it they're better off trying to fix it themselves than to have congress lee something tenetur kony in on them but i mean there's not enough accountability and god knows these guys got a lot of money well i look forward to seeing the left and the right working together the beautiful it's been it's been awhile all right let's move on to our exit interview which was previously recorded if you're taking your company public you likely cd o in ipo is offering then of course it is but look again and you'll see that going public getting a formal audit and the ipo readiness process can be about more than an offering or even an obligation it can be an opportunity to gain insight audit an ipo readiness services from deloitte can help growing companies prepare to go public a deloitte audit is an opportunity to see further and deeper into your business and gaining objective outside perspective from auditors who serve the fortune one thousand seat obligation as opportunity deloitte dot com slash us slash dg see.

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"sean parker" Discussed on Inc. Uncensored

Inc. Uncensored

01:57 min | 4 years ago

"sean parker" Discussed on Inc. Uncensored

"Murder kidnapping election engineering happens on on facebook and other any other site but i think um just the idea that for a long time people have felt bamboozled by these platforms upload your photos put in all your preferences in and then you know you can will connect you with friends and then we know that it it's not for our benefit it's for the benefit of a select few very rich people who were lucky enough smart enough to make the platform and then a bunch of investors and everybody else has and advertisers and everybody else's just screwed and has all their personal information and now gets hyper targeted for their race religion their viewpoints their inherent by a and now who you vote for well okay three coup three quick thoughts on that number one i'm angry facebook right now i'm on facebook five six times a day i keep in touch with distant friends i've reconnected with them that's a huge benefit to me i'm not gonna lie i'm willing to bed that the vast majority of americans aren't concerned about the these sort of things as for sean parker and roger mcnamee speaking of i agree with you by also think a year ago they would have been defending facebook to the end and the fact that some prominent voices that people that speak will actually it attention and have access to giant platforms rod roger mcnamee is like writing for usa today i mean that's really not nothing and had a third thought to what child so we ran a feature story about three years ago weaker or yeah on wicker and several other startups that were trying to create not necessarily social media platforms but including social media platforms that would have rigorous privacy protocols that in that were literally constructed in a way that even if the company was subpoenaed by a law enforcement officer the couldn't say anything about what went on in the platform because they literally didn't have access to it it was that.

facebook roger mcnamee officer Murder kidnapping sean parker social media law enforcement three years
"sean parker" Discussed on Inc. Uncensored

Inc. Uncensored

01:43 min | 4 years ago

"sean parker" Discussed on Inc. Uncensored

"If you're wondering how to get the funding needed to run a small business today cabbage has the answer cabbage help small business owners access simple and flexible funding right away without the headaches that come with applying for traditional loans apply on line four from your phone by securely linking your business information to get an automatic decision there's no waiting in line scanning documents or tracking down financial statements cabbage gives you the flexibility to decide what's best for you were business once you approved you choose wendy use your loans and how much to take you'll pay only for the funds you actually use cabbages supported over one hundred thousand small businesses with three point five billion dollars in funding visit cabbage dot com slash uncensored there's no cost to apply or set up your line of credit an inc uncensored listener we you qualify for funding you'll get a fifty dollars visa gift card you can use anywhere that's cabbage with a k k a b v eight g e dot com slash uncensored so it's interesting leg we're not hearing this from zuckerberg non hearings from sheryl sandberg not hearing from jack dorsey the top people huegel but something seems to be happening now what comes of this i don't know but i find italy's someone encouraging that you know the people have silicon valley have an idea of the horrors that they've wrought and the unintended consequences of our lives being on these platforms and i'm not just talking are ridiculous and there's such a disconnect though between i don't think in general the reason that the public wants to pick up pitchforks against the tech world has much to do with facebook i think people kind of like facebook because it allows than i think they in touch with the physical with the russian interference is very stark.

sheryl sandberg jack dorsey facebook wendy zuckerberg italy five billion dollars fifty dollars eight g
"sean parker" Discussed on Inc. Uncensored

Inc. Uncensored

01:40 min | 4 years ago

"sean parker" Discussed on Inc. Uncensored

"Russian money coming into the tech world alongside how russia may have meddled in the us election via our social media platforms certainly is there any expectation that some funding sources my draft for certain startups i mean like how important were these entities in investing and um you know he's in we concerned that this money might be analyses against hungary was not doing any investing for awhile to think people are soon as take money from yuri milner ha ha ha sorry i have this on a leading question i don't know what what are we think it's hard to say that the list so around you're you're you're running start up you know you need money yuri milner zwilling darfur you ten million dollars a reasonable terms uber feeling that it could be kremlin adt probably don't take i think things are going to change down especially how much we're learning about how russia used our social media platforms maybe people wanted to send some selves from from russia funding specifically because of that i think only time will tell really is to what happens but i'm definitely can see alana's startups trying to put some some space between and then russian funding thank you i can sign and other things i answer your question totally there's only so much money to go around so thanks not answering our call her legs santa rosa and ensure calls there's the guy who got a really great bitcoin's inc uncensored is brought to you by goldman sachs some of the most important questions facing the world today intersect with the global capital markets climate change autonomous driving the future of china's economic growth on exchanges at goldman sachs the firm's podcast you'll hear discussions on topics with farreaching implications like these plus much more.

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"sean parker" Discussed on Inc. Uncensored

Inc. Uncensored

01:31 min | 4 years ago

"sean parker" Discussed on Inc. Uncensored

"That's coming from recode so he's he's very much intention in the tech world another bit of news involves yuri milner he's a russian billionaire who created the venture fund digital sky technologies and said the paradise papers revealed that facebook and twitter received hundreds of millions of dollars from the kremlin through d s t global and we're sure it was from the kremlin because if i'm not mistaken millner denies that's the source of the fund oh well if he denies well i have you know trying to get all sides of the story in a recent recode profile of him had he literally had like plastic cups with names on them and was like moving balls around like a shell game as i can this is this is your ration that this is your alibi millner made a ton of money and i think in the nineties on a a somewhat itself dubious russian tech start up so like he really got involved in american tech companies in two thousand nine he was serving on this innovation commission that was created by a dimitri his name an incentive rates so in two thousand nine facebook announced an investment of roughly two hundred million from donors company digital scott technologies and said that the company planned to spend at least a hundred million dollars of that buying back additional stock and his new venture capital firm dse global also has a massive statement these and this is a problem because okay we'll separately nesar issues because if you look at the arrest of prince alwaleed this is large invocation so the tech world i mean.

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