20 Burst results for "Sean Kelly"

"sean kelly" Discussed on Lex Fridman Podcast

Lex Fridman Podcast

02:30 min | 1 year ago

"sean kelly" Discussed on Lex Fridman Podcast

"That sounds like a that. Sounds like a contradiction. Like how could it really be significant. Not be based on anything. But i think that's the contradiction that somehow characterizes us and. I think that we're the being that sort of has to hold that weird mystery before us and live in the light of it. That's the thing that i think is really at our core. And so how. How do we do that. I will say this one thing And i learned it from a philosopher from a guy named albert bergman who's joe german philosopher lived in montana now taught in montana for his whole career and i say this to my students at harvard now he said this is the way that i think about my life and i hope you'll think about your life to he said you should think about your life hoping that there will be many moments in it about which you can say. There's no place i'd rather be. There's no thing i'd rather be doing. There's no buddy. I'd rather be with. And this i will remember well and i think if you can aim to fill your life with moments like that it will be a meaningful one. I don't know if that's the meaning of life. But i think if you can hold that before you it'll help to clarify this mystery and the sort of bizarre situation in which we find ourselves sean. This conversation was incredible and those four requirements have certainly been fulfilled for me. This is a a magical moment in that way now will remember. Well thank you so much. It's an honor that you you spend your valuable towels me. This is great. Thank you thank you for having me. I really really enjoyed it. Thanks for listening to this conversation. With sean kelly to support this spot guest. Please check out our sponsors in the description. I now let me leave you with some words from albert komo in the depth of winter i finally learned that within me there lay in invincible summer. Thank you for listening and hope to see you next time.

albert bergman montana harvard sean sean kelly albert komo
"sean kelly" Discussed on Lex Fridman Podcast

Lex Fridman Podcast

03:59 min | 1 year ago

"sean kelly" Discussed on Lex Fridman Podcast

"Talk the aliveness in the digital space that you see it as as being dragged into this over optimize world but that may be This is in fact. It is a world that opens up opportunities to truly experience life. And there's interesting to think about all the people growing up now who their early experience of life is always mediated through digital device. Not always but more and more often mediated that device and how we're both evolving technologies evolve in humans evolving to them may be opened a door to a whole world where the humans and the technology or a systems are interacting equals. So now i'm going to agree with you. You might be surprised that i agree with you but i think that's exactly right. I don't want to be the person who's saying our job is to resist. All of this done. I don't wanna be a luddite. That's not my goal. The goal is to point out that in the supreme danger lies the saving power to get in the right relation to that understanding of what we are That allows us to find the joy in it. And that's i think that's a hard thing to do. It's hard to understand even what we're supposed to be doing when we do it. I'm maybe more than you. I'm not of the right generation to be able to to do that. But i do think that's got to be the move. The move is not a resist it. It's not an a stall gic move. It's an attempt to push people to get in their relation to it. That's not the relation of it controlling you and depriving you of stuff. But if you're recognizing some great joy that can be found in it. When i interact leg robots i see. There's magic there and i just feel like the person who here's the music on others don't and i don't know what that is and i'd love to explore that. Yeah because it seems to. It's almost a future talking. And i'm trying to hear what it's saying is dangerous world or is this beautiful world I can certainly understand your enthusiasm for that. Who's used to be things that i found overwhelmingly citing and i. I'm not sort of closed off from that anymore. I mean i'm not now closed off from that even though my views are are changed. I don't work in that world. But i i do think i think it's interesting to figure out what's at the ground of that of that response. Yeah we talked about meaning quite a bit throughout in a secular age. Polinsky me ask you the big ridiculous question. Almost too big. What is the meaning of this thing. We've got going on. What is the meaning of life. You're you're saving the softball for the end is the one. I don't know what the meaning of life is i. I think there's something that characterizes us. That's not the thing that people normally think characterizes the traditional thing to say the philosophical tradition even in the ai tradition which is kind of Manifestation of philosophy from plato for the traditional thing to say is that what characterises us as our rationality that. We're intelligent beings that we're the ones that that think. And i think that's certainly part of what characterizes us. But i think there's more to it too. I think we're capable of experiencing simultaneously the complete and utter ungrounded -ness of everything that's meaningful in our existence and also the real significance of it.

softball
"sean kelly" Discussed on Lex Fridman Podcast

Lex Fridman Podcast

03:25 min | 1 year ago

"sean kelly" Discussed on Lex Fridman Podcast

"The game players can trust it and they talk that way that it's gotta kind of authority They say i read some people who said about alves zero when played go It's like it's playing from the future. It's making these moves that are just out land dish and there's a kind of brilliance to them that we can't really understand will be catching up to it forever i think in that context like it's mapped the domain and domain is map because it's combinatorial problem ruffling but in something like music or art of of a non finite form. It feels to me like i. It's a little harder for me to understand. What the analog lavar trusting that stravinsky has recognized something about us that demands that he right this way. That doesn't seem like a finite thing in in quite the same way now we could ask. We could ask the system. Why did you do it. we could ask stravinsky. Why did you do it. And maybe it will have answers. But then it's involved in a kind of communicative aktin. And i think lots of artists will often say look i. I can't communicate better than what i've done in the work that that is the statement. Yeah yeah so the yeah we. Humans are able to answer the why either. But i do think the the question here is Will first of all language is finite. Uh certainly when express through a tweet so it is also combinatorial problem. The question is how much more difficult than chess. And i think i think all the same ways that we see. The solutions to chess is deeply surprising when he was first addressed with ibm deep blue. And then with Alpha going off four zero zero. I think in that same way. Language can be addressed and communication can be addressed. I don't see having done this. Podcast many reasons why everything i'm doing especially as digital being on the internet can't be done by a system eventually so like i think we're being very Human centric thinking we're special. I think one of the hardest things is the physical space actually operating like touch in the magic of body language in the music of all of that. Because it's so deeply integrated through the long evolutionary process. What it's like to be on earth. What is fundamentally different. And ai has Can catch up on. Is the way we apply our evolutionary history. On the we act on the internet on the way we act online and as more and more of the world becomes digital. You're not operating in a space. Where i is is behind much less. So we're both starting at zero. I think that's super interesting do you do you know this. Do you know this author. Brian christian is that someone. You've ever heard of sounds familiar he he. He's the guy who competed in the..

stravinsky lavar alves chess ibm ai Brian christian
"sean kelly" Discussed on Lex Fridman Podcast

Lex Fridman Podcast

03:43 min | 1 year ago

"sean kelly" Discussed on Lex Fridman Podcast

"It didn't perform its communication in that opening moment but it did ultimately establish a new understanding for all of us of what counts as good art. And that's the kind of deep communication that i think good art can can do. It can change our understanding of ourselves and of what a good manifestation of something of ourselves in a certain domain is and use the term socially embedded that art is fundamentally socially embedded. Yes and i. I really like that term because I see like my love. Artificial intelligence in the kind of system that we can bring to the world that could Make for an interesting and more lively world and one that enriches human beings is one of the ai. Systems are deeply socially embedded cook. Yes so that actually is. In contrast to the way artificial intelligence had been talked about throughout its history and certainly now both on the robotic side and the side it's.

"sean kelly" Discussed on Lex Fridman Podcast

Lex Fridman Podcast

05:47 min | 1 year ago

"sean kelly" Discussed on Lex Fridman Podcast

"Always knows somehow where these things are going to happen and writing about it giving this really good description and then signing it eyewitness and it's as if i even understanding of his life is that he was supposed to be a witness to it he was supposed to see others but not get involved. He never is interested in trying to keep the bad things from happening. He just wants to report on them when he sees them. And i think that he's an incredibly isolated person character and it's his isolation from others from the love of others and his inability his desire not to love others 'cause that attach him to someone that i think is really the ground of his condition and i and i think that aim to be isolated which many people have nowadays i mean you see it in the underground man to just sort of taking yourself out of the world because you don't want to have to take responsibility for being involved with others. I think that's a bad move. And and i. And i do worry that. Maybe i never knew david foster wallace. I have no right to to comment on his life but he portrays Himself in that one episode as a person who who does that. And i think that's dangerous. Yeah there's some sense which being sensitive to the world. Like i find myself the source of joy for me is just being really sensitive to the world to to experience. There's some way is quite brilliant. What you're saying that that can be isolating. It's darwin studying a new kind of species island. You don't want to interfere with the you find. It's so beautiful they you don't want to interfere with its beauty So there is some sense in which that isolates you and then you find yourself deeply alone away from the experiences that bring you joy your and that could be destructive. it's It's fascinating how that That works and in his case. Of course some of it is Just chemicals chemicals in his brain but some of it is the the path his philosophy of life. Let him down. And that's the danger would need you to gazing into the abyss. the Your job is a difficult one because Doing philosophy changes you. Yeah and you may not know how changes you until you your change and you look in the mirror. You wrote a piece and mit tech review saying that. Hey i can't be an artist. Creativity is and always will be a human endeavor. You mentioned burt criticism of symbolic guy..

david foster wallace darwin burt
"sean kelly" Discussed on Lex Fridman Podcast

Lex Fridman Podcast

04:29 min | 1 year ago

"sean kelly" Discussed on Lex Fridman Podcast

"There's something astonishing about watching someone who's got a body like us and having a body is a limitation it's like the site of sores and pain and agony and exhaustion and it's the it's the thing dies in the end And so it's it's what we have to confront. I mean there's also joys that go along with having a body like if you didn't have a body there'd be no sex if you didn't have a body there'd be no sort of x. Excitement and so on but But somehow having a body is essentially a limitation when you watch someone who's got one and his extraordinary at the way they use it you can recognize how that limitation can be to some degree transcended And that's what we can get when we watched federer or some other great athlete. Sort of doing these things that transcend the limitations of their bodies and that's the kind of peak experience that we're capable of. That could be a kind of salvation. That's a very different story. And i think that's a livable story and i don't know if it would have saved him but i feel like i. I wish he developed that that side of the story. Can we talk about. And i just comment that. I deeply appreciate that. You said You were going to say something. The the fact that you're listening to me is amazing that you care by the humans a really appreciate that We should be in this way listening to the world so There's there's that's a meta comet above maybe of the things we're talking about but you mentioned something about levitating and a task that is infinitely boring and contrasting that with essentially levitating on a task that is great like the highest achievement of The this physical limiting body in playing tennis. I often say this. I don't know where i heard. David foster wallace say this but he said that the key to life is to be unbearable that is the embodiment of this philosophy. And i won people. Ask me for advice. You young students you know. I don't find this interesting. I don't find this interesting. How do i find the thing. I'm passionate for To be very interesting to explore because you kind of say that that may not be a realizable Thing to do which is to be unbearable but my advice usually is. Life is amazing like you should be able to. You should strive to discover the joy the levitation in everything and The thing you get stuck on for a long period of time that might be the thing you should stick to but everything should be full of joy so that kind of cynicism of saying a life is Boring is a thing that will prevent you from discovering the thing that will give you deep meaning joy. You're saying being unbearable is not actionable for human being so okay. Excellent question deep question and and the you might think because of the title of that of the book burn. I wrote all things shining. That i think all things are shining and But actually i think it's an unachievable goal to be unbearable. I i do believe that you're right that a lot of times when people are bored with something is because they haven't tried hard enough and i do think quite a lot of what makes people board with something that they haven't paid attention well enough and that they haven't listened as as you were saying So i i do think there's something to that. That's a deep insight on the other. Hand the perfection of that instant is that nothing is ever anything less than joyful and i actually think that dostoevsky melville both agree but in very different ways that life involves a wide range of moods and that all of them are important. It involves grief..

David foster wallace tennis dostoevsky melville
"sean kelly" Discussed on Lex Fridman Podcast

Lex Fridman Podcast

05:07 min | 1 year ago

"sean kelly" Discussed on Lex Fridman Podcast

"There's huge chapter on melville a big chapter on David foster wallace. Who didn't care about all. But i was fascinated by and so learning to think that way while writing that book with him. was an amazing experience. So i have to admit as one of my feelings in life on many failings is. I've never gone through moby dick our or any of melville's works so maybe can you comment on before we talk about davor. David foster wallace. Who i have gotten through What are some of the sources of meaning in these classics good so mo- moby dick i think is the other great novel of the nineteenth century. So the brothers karamazov moby dick and they're diametrically opposed. Which is one of the really interesting things. So dossier the brothers karamazov. Is this kind of in kind of existential interpretation of russian orthodox christianity. How do you live that way and find joy in your existence. Moby dick is not all about christianity about it sort of starts with the observation that that that the form of christianity that That ishmael is is familiar with is is broken. It's not gonna it's not gonna work in his living life. He has to leave it. He has to go to see in order to find what needs to happen. And ishmail is the the boating captain the the whaling boat captain so. Now he's not the captain that's ahab a as the captain. Yeah right let me back. Up the old. The famous opening line to the vocal. Call me ishmael and that's it. Smells them the main character in the book. His nobody his you and me. He's the everyday guy he's like a nobody on the ship he he's like you know not the lowest but certainly not the highest. He's right in the middle he and and he's named shmaya which is interesting. Because ishmael is the illegitimate son. Of abraham in the old testament. He is the the. I think if i have rights again someone will correct me. I think he's the he's the one. He's the one that islam traces. Its its Genesis two and so islam is is an abraham acc- religion judaism and christianity but judaism christianity trace their lineage through isaac the quote unquote legitimate son of abraham and ishmael is the other son.

David foster wallace melville moby dick ishmael davor karamazov moby dick Moby dick abraham isaac
"sean kelly" Discussed on Lex Fridman Podcast

Lex Fridman Podcast

03:31 min | 1 year ago

"sean kelly" Discussed on Lex Fridman Podcast

"You know. I've been reading this text for forty years but the question you asked is what i've never asked and it would be true. It would like he would he. Would he would find in what people said things that were surprising in new to him. And that's humility. actually that is listening to the world. Absolutely absolutely he was always ready to be surprised by something that someone said. Yeah and there's something astonishing about that. So his influence. Was you know for people who didn't know him. Through his interpretations of these tax. He wrote about a huge range of stuff but people who did know him. It was through his presence. It was through the way he carried himself in in his life and So in any case that's who he was we. I graduated after many years as a graduate student at. I didn't start in philosophy. I started in math math and computer science. Actually and then. I did a lot of work in computational neuroscience for a few years the to fascinating journey. We'll we'll get to it through our friendly conversation about artificial intelligence. Sure 'cause you're you're basically fascinated with the philosophy of mind of the human mind but rooted in a curiosity of mind through the. It's artificial through the engineering of mind. Yeah yeah that's right so so bert. I mean the reason. I was attracted to him. Actually is is because of his to begin with was because of his criticisms of what was called traditional symbolic ai in the seventies and eighties. So i came to berkeley as a graduate student who done a lot of math. And a lot of computer science computational neuroscience. I i noticed that you had you interview a lot of a lot of people in this world and i had a teacher at brown as an undergraduate Jim anderson who wrote with geoff hinton big book on neural networks So the so i had. I was interested in that not so interested in traditional. I like sort of list programming's things that went on in the eighties because it felt sort of when you made a system do something all of a sudden. It was an interesting thing to have done. The fact that you'd solve the problem than made it clear that the ball wasn't an interesting. And i have that. Experience and bert had criticism so of symbolic guy. What he called. Good old fashioned day. I go fi- and And i was attracted to those criticisms because it felt to me that there was something lacking in in in that project. And i didn't know what it was i just felt its absence and Then i love that. All his arguments came from his reading of this phenomena. Logical existential tradition. And so i had to try to figure out what those folks were saying and it was a long road. Let me tell you took me a long time. But but it was because that i was able to do that so i am not that huge debt of gratitude and eventually we went out to write a book together which was a great experience and yes we published all things shining in two thousand eleven and that was. That's a book. That i definitely would not have had the chutzpah to try to right if it weren't for burt because it was really about know. Great literature in the history of the west from homer and virgil and dante to melville..

geoff hinton bert Jim anderson berkeley brown burt homer virgil dante melville
"sean kelly" Discussed on Lex Fridman Podcast

Lex Fridman Podcast

04:06 min | 1 year ago

"sean kelly" Discussed on Lex Fridman Podcast

"Heidegger says care is the being of dawson. Highness's name for us that what it is to be us is to be the being. That already cares and you can't not do that. You can pretend you're not doing it But you're just carrying in a different way. It's like start saying you can pretend you're not taking responsibility. You're you you. You can pretend that you don't have to make a decision. That is making a decision not carrying as a way of caring and so. I think the existentialist that i'm interested in things that we do care. That's that's constituent of of what it is to be us and so they'll they'll think that the stoic scott it wrong but that that leaves open a huge range of moves about how we inhabit that existence. Well let me ask about. I ran okay so it just so happens that have gotten. She's entered a few conversations in this podcast and just looking at academic philosophy philosophers in general. They seem to ignore in rand. Do you have a sense of why that is that she ever come into play. Her ideas of Objectivism come into play discussions of A good life from the perspective of existentialism. In how you teach it how you think about it. Is she somebody who you find it all interesting soon. No i don't think she is. But it's been a long time since i've read her stuff. I read it in high school. I read the. Fountainhead in high school and atlas shrugged. But that's at this point of very longtime ago. I think i read something about objective epistemology or something too. So you know my view about her could be based on a total misunderstanding of of what she's up to But sort of my my caricature of her and tell me if i've got wrong is that she's sort of motivated by a kind of i think it's maybe sometimes you call it libertarianism. But a maybe let's in the context of our discussion Tie it back to start a kind of view. According to which we're the being who has to contend with the fact that we're radically free to do stuff and we're just not being courageous or brave enough when we don't do that and the people to admire are the people who make stuff out of nothing So maybe that's a bad caricature. No no no. I think No i think that's pretty accurate. I'm not again very knowledgeable about the full depth of her philosophy. But i think she takes a view of the world. That's similar to surgery in in conclusions but makes stronger statements about epistemology that first of all everything is knowable and there's some you should always operate through reason like reason is very important like It's like a you start with a few axioms and you build on top of that and The axioms that everybody should operate on the same again. Reality is objective. Subjective so from that you can derive the entirety of hall human should behave at the individual level and at the societal level. And there's a few conclusions she would talk about virtue of selfishness and sort of a lot of people use that to dismiss her look. She's very selfish and saw she actually meant something very different is like it's more like the sultry thing. Take responsibility for yourself. Understand what Forces you're operating under and make the best of this life and that's how you can be the best member of societies by making the best life you can and just focusing yourself fix your problems first and then and that will make you the.

Heidegger dawson scott
"sean kelly" Discussed on Lex Fridman Podcast

Lex Fridman Podcast

04:43 min | 1 year ago

"sean kelly" Discussed on Lex Fridman Podcast

"Of a like what's the darpa. There's more almost like a buddhist. Yeah that's sort of like watch the river and like become the river like this kind of idea that would it means truly experienced the moment so there is an experiential part of existential as and where you want to not. It's not just about. We've been talking about kind of decisions and actions. But also woody means to listen like you said from each like what it means to really in the world experienced the moment so he's very good at writing about what it means to experience the moment and experienced the full absurdity of the moment and for him I'm starting to forget stepping wolf. I think is Humor it's part of the absurdity. Which i think modern day internet explorer very well with memes and so on humor is a fundamental part of the existentialist ethic. That's able to deal with absurdity. You gotta like laugh at it. I think there is some i. Well let me just say something about humor. Because i think you're absolutely right cure guard. Who is danish and you know. Most people think deeply depressed on is actually an incredibly funny writer and someone who was a classmate of mine in graduate school who left philosophy to become a hollywood comedy writer He's very successful guy and then he came back twenty five years later and wrote finished. This dissertation and i was the the reader on the dissertation. There may be a conflict of interest on going but but His station was about. He called it kirkegaard and the funny which is a kind of a funny title. Yeah but but kirkuk guard. According to eric kaplan's reading Kirkegaard has Does have this idea that. There's something destabilizing about humor. That's crucial to the sort of the important possibilities for us. And so he the. There's the idea that like there's a moment when a joke is being set up when you're sort of proceeding as if you're on stable ground and then the punchline comes and the rug is pulled out from under you and for a moment it's like you're falling you don't you you..

darpa woody kirkegaard eric kaplan Kirkegaard hollywood
"sean kelly" Discussed on Lex Fridman Podcast

Lex Fridman Podcast

04:56 min | 1 year ago

"sean kelly" Discussed on Lex Fridman Podcast

"Because in cameras view when you experience your day as sort of going on in this deadening way and you're just doing the things that you always do the way you always to them for kamu that reveals the truth about what our lives are. I think there's some aspect at least for me. And maybe maybe he just didn't feel this or didn't have access to it. Maybe others don't but for me. There's an extra part to it. Which is somehow that yes. That's the way things are and it's inadequate and there something that's missing from that aspect of our existence that could be there and it feels like our lives are not about just putting up with that and sticking it to the gods by embracing it but seeking that absence part of it. The part that's recognizable in its absence in your experience of that. And that's that's what i think. I think we do have the experience of the presence of that in moments when you feel truly alive. And that's what you mean by the word aliveness which is a fascinating powerful word. Yeah that's what i mean by it. I mean i think most people can recognize moments in their lives when they really felt alive. And it could happen in a moment when you know. I don't know maybe miles davis felted in that moment when he was responding to herbie hancock's cord. Or maybe you feel it in that moment where you grab for the hand on the first date and the gesture is reciprocated. Or maybe you feel it in some moment when you art doing a kind of peak athletic thing or watching somebody else to a peak athletic thing I think there are moments when we when it feels like it's not like the way camus is describing things and it's better because of that so i think one really powerful way for me to understand aliveness is to think about going into darker territory is the thing about suicide and i've known people in my life who suffered from clinical depression. Yeah and you know whatever. The chemistry is in our brain. There is a certain kind of feeling that is to be depressed where you look in the mirror and ask. Do i want to kill myself today. This is the question that komo asks this question this philosophical question and there is people who when they're depressed say not only do they say i want to kill myself or don't they say it doesn't matter and that's chemistry..

herbie hancock davis camus clinical depression komo
"sean kelly" Discussed on Lex Fridman Podcast

Lex Fridman Podcast

04:59 min | 1 year ago

"sean kelly" Discussed on Lex Fridman Podcast

"I don't know anybody else who notices this. But sard in sard actually quotes. A passage from dostoyevsky when he's developing his view close to pass. It doesn't appear quite in this way but the passage that start quotes is this. It's it's in the form of an argument. Sorry puts it in the form of argument. He says Look there's a conditional statement is true. If there is no god that everything is permitted. And then there's a second premise. There is no god that's starts view. I mean he's an atheist. There's no god conclusion. Everything is permitted and that starts radical freedom and if you think about the structure of the brothers cuts off. I think dostoyevsky though he never says it. This way would run. The argument differently is a modus tolan's instead of a motorsports. The argument for for dostoevsky would go like this. Yeah conditional statement if there is no god than everything is permitted but look at your life. Not everything is permitted. You do horrible atrocious. Things like be involved in the death of your father and there is a price to pay. That's not a livable moment. You to take to have to take responsibility to have to recognize that your at fault or your somehow guilty for having been involved in whatever way you were in letting that happen or bringing about that it does happen is to pay a price. So we're not beings that are constituted in such a way that everything is permitted. Look at the facts of your existence so not everything is permitted. Therefore there is a god and the presence of god for dostoevsky. I think he's just found in this fact that when we do bad things we feel guilty for them with that. We find ourselves to be responsible for things even when we didn't intend to do them but we just allowed ourselves to be involved in that and the nature of garbage for the cs keys. I mean unclear. I mean it's a very complex exploration in itself and he basically god speaks through several of his characters in in complicated ways. Yeah so it's not like a trivial version of godhra view. It's totally not trivial. And it's not a a being that exists outside of time. None of that is sort of relevant for dostoyevsky for him. It's a question about how we live our lives..

tolan godhra
"sean kelly" Discussed on Lex Fridman Podcast

Lex Fridman Podcast

03:31 min | 1 year ago

"sean kelly" Discussed on Lex Fridman Podcast

"Heidegger says a crucial aspect of what is to be us is our thrown nece were thrown into a situation were thrown into history were thrown into our parental lineage. We're and we don't use it that stuff that we don't choose we couldn't choose if we were god and we existed outside of time. Maybe but we're not. We're finite in the sense that we have beginning that we never chose. We have an end that we're con often trying to resist or put off or something and in between there's a whole bunch of stuff that organized us without our ever having made the choice and without our being the kind of being the could make the choice to allow it to organize. We have a complicated relationship to that stuff. And i i. I think we talk about that at a certain point but the the first move is to say sorry. Just got a surf descriptive problem. He's missed this basic fact that There's awful there has to be an awful lot about us. That's saddled without our having made the choice to settle it that way. Right the throne of life. Yeah you ha- that's a fundamental part of life. You can't just escape it exactly. You can't escape it altogether altogether. Yeah exactly you can't escape it all together but nevertheless you are riding a wave and you make a decision of the in the writing of the what you can't control the wave but you should be a like on as you ride as you should be making certain kinds of decisions and take responsibility for it. So why does this matter at all the the chain of decisions you make good while because they constitute you they make you the person that you are so you. Here's what what's the opposite view. What's what's this view against This view is against most of philosophy. From plato forward. Plato plato says in the republic. It's a kind of myth. But you know he says people will understand their condition. Well if they if we tell them this myth he says look when you're born. There's just a fact about you. Your soul is either gold silver or bronze. That's those are the three kinds of people there are. And you're born that way and if your soul is gold then we should identify that and make you a philosopher loss for king and if your soul is silver. well you're not going to be a philosopher king you're not capable of but you could be a good warrior and we should make you that and if your soul is bronze than you should be a farmer labor or something like that and that's a fact about you that identifies you forever and for always independent of anything you do about it And so that's the alternative view and you could have modern versions of it. You could say the thing that identifies you as your i q or your genetic. Makeup bore the percentage of fast which muscle fibers. You've got or whatever it could be something totally independent of any choice that you've made independent of the kind of thing about which you could make a choice and it and categorize you. It makes you the person that you are. That's the that's the thing that started and the existential aganst. So this idea that something about you forever. Limiting the space of possible decisions you can make archer says no. The space is unlimited..

nece Heidegger Plato plato archer
"sean kelly" Discussed on Lex Fridman Podcast

Lex Fridman Podcast

07:09 min | 1 year ago

"sean kelly" Discussed on Lex Fridman Podcast

"The following is a conversation with sean kelly. A philosopher harvard specializing in existentialism and the philosophy of mind and now a quick few seconds summary of the sponsors. Check them out in the description. A really is the best way to support this podcast. I is coin base a platform. I used by cryptocurrency. Second is inside tracker a service..

"sean kelly" Discussed on Rock N Roll Archaeology

Rock N Roll Archaeology

05:29 min | 1 year ago

"sean kelly" Discussed on Rock N Roll Archaeology

"This was during. I think that album had been recorded but not long. After there was some ugliness with bob and lee getting kicked out of the group will they did the record and they road co-wrote wrote played on it but they're not pictured on the record nor worthy initially credited on the record right picture of tommy aldridge and rudy sars and the reason ever burying stories. But the reason the reason. I heard they was you know they were started. Asked about the financials either seasons Going hey sin what we signed up more. Wait a second you plan to shows on a day. you're making twice the revenue. I should be getting all just asking so basically sharon learning good lessons from her father. Good bad whichever we want take just give a little bit of a background don arden. Who was a very famous manager. His daughter sharon arden. Who would become sharon. Osborne had picked up the reins of managing ozzie and then obviously would eventually marry him and they would have reality show. I just wanted to give some people might know her as the mom on the osbournes reality show anyway. I just wanted to give a little background on. You were saying but yes continue. Yes we're we're we were saying is like they're asking too many questions they're getting to wise. They want much money. Get him outta here. Let's get some people who will ask for less or ask last question. Yeah you know. And and so they find tommy aldridge. Guess tommy i think before that it would been playing with pat travers. Wackle arkansas and then randy brought his friend rudy. Been playing together in quiet riot right and that was the lineup. That ended up touring dire in the lineup. You see and you hear that lineup on that randy rhoads tribute albums while so. They really became the more famous lineup. Reno rudy tommy aldridge. Because they were the ones out touring the most and unfortunately were there when randy tragically best and these guys..

tommy aldridge don arden sharon arden rudy lee bob ozzie Osborne pat travers sharon tommy randy arkansas randy rhoads rudy tommy aldridge Reno
"sean kelly" Discussed on Rock N Roll Archaeology

Rock N Roll Archaeology

05:19 min | 1 year ago

"sean kelly" Discussed on Rock N Roll Archaeology

"You referred to as your bitch like keep your bitch in check and then the story is kurt like rolled his eyes and looked at courtney and went. Hey bitch stay in. Line like odyssey very sarcastically. And i think tried to take a swing and stephanie. Seymour was with axl and said something courtney like. Are you model yet gordon. He said are you a brain surgeon or something. Some exchange god. It's is exactly you are correct. That is the that's like. The eighties meets the nineties. Right there happening in time. Those two competing kind of ethos of a misogynist rockstar with a model girlfriend versus the to kind of anti establishment. You know janitors tastic and exactly sarcastic. Take yeah exactly exactly and building since that will rock and roll. Circus that will show sexist Had to building sixty seventies own yaron. It's the way we do this. We've made it we can be and guy slight guy in you know hunched over destroys it. yeah by being inclusive by mielke kids in america feeling included. What an idea rather than we're above us like yeah weird and don't let people tell you that you're wrong like it was beautiful. No it's totally true. What i mean. Bow profound ruined my life. Because i finally got my hair right my thought i was going to get a record deal and i had to figure out how to do things different but now i can look at it and say yeah. That's probably good for humanity. I think in retrospect so yeah the guns n. roses and then the other one. I mentioned bon jovi which sonically kind of nowhere near metal but again. They've got the hair and they were there in the era. They've got the hitter and they were there. They don't what funny thing with bon jovi. There was a choice. Made their with bon jovi. When they came out he had a choice to either go. Solo allah billy squire and be that guy or all the time and kind of veer more pop even rick springfield but there was a conscious decision to put a.

courtney mielke axl kurt Seymour stephanie gordon bon jovi america billy squire rick springfield
"sean kelly" Discussed on Rock N Roll Archaeology

Rock N Roll Archaeology

05:22 min | 1 year ago

"sean kelly" Discussed on Rock N Roll Archaeology

"The rock and roll hall of fame. I'm your host joke was allah. And what's the premise. Here said i know too much about the rock hall. It has followed me from my childhood. And now and now you all have to listen to it. You're listening to it by choice you know. Who's gonna listening to it. Not by choice. Exactly is my co host the skeptic. She is being held hostage on some level. Kristen stuttered. hi kristen. Hi joe still still casting. After all these years no one. No one can see that. I blinked twice several times. You're looking for a way out twice on a podcast. Audio format doesn't exactly work. Sadly has happened for me to figure out. Some other cues to get someone to rescue you from from your prison. Kristen i in yes. You remember what we're in right now. What guide cast okay. I remember burke salons because i- hayden so much is it Mu september silence. Yes you nailed it. We are in new september. Excellence september celebration of the rocco's musical excellence category which there are three inductees for that. This year We went through the history of the category. We talked about billy preston and we are going to be talking about heavy metal guitarist. Reindeer roads today with our guest who i will bring in. He is joining us from toronto. He is a player. A musician author educator. Many hats sean kelly. Hi welcome to the show. Hi how are you great. We were so excited to have you. And i'm excited to do this episode. I'm realizing who were talking about now. And i'm like. Oh yeah something i know so little about. I'm excited absolutely sean. Kind of before we get into stuff you know. Usually our guests are either comedian friends of mine or they are music journalist but i always love it when we get to talk to. A editors of a documentary could we. We spent a whole bunch. That's true we spent a whole month talking to editors of but i really. I think it's very very fun. And insightful we get to talk to musicians because there is a deeper understanding of the work. And i just wanna give you the opportunity and i know this is. This is maybe quite a task to have you condense your career and life into short roll sound bite but if we can talk a little bit about your background music sure well you know. I started off. Playing guitar was influenced by a lot of the eighties. Hard rock that was coming out around eighty four. You know you're quiet..

hi kristen Kristen billy preston hayden burke sean kelly joe toronto sean
Brees, Saints singe sinking Eagles, 48-7

Football Frenzy

00:36 sec | 4 years ago

Brees, Saints singe sinking Eagles, 48-7

"The New Orleans Saints home Sunday against the eagles. And drew Brees in the saints continue to put points on the board resolved on the backfield. Takes shotgun snap. Looks to throw down the right sideline. What? Touchdown New Orleans. Thirty eight yards Alvin Cabrera striking down the right sideline. At an absolute laser throw by troop race. Wow. Raised threw for three hundred and sixty three yards or score. Sean Kelly the call on ESPN radio saints ninth straight win. Now. Ninety one on the season beat the eagles, forty eight

New Orleans Saints Eagles New Orleans Alvin Cabrera Brees Sean Kelly Espn Thirty Eight Yards Sixty Three Yards
2018 NBA Playoffs: New Orleans Pelicans thwart Portland Trail Blazers in series opener, hold on for 97-95 victory

CBS Sports Radio

01:16 min | 5 years ago

2018 NBA Playoffs: New Orleans Pelicans thwart Portland Trail Blazers in series opener, hold on for 97-95 victory

"Three for their seventeenth straight win overall it was this insatiable all around play of ben simmons that led the way the biggest difference i've noticed with this first game than the regular season is you gotta be locked in simmons was certainly locked in finishing with seventeen points fourteen assists nine rebounds jj radic twenty eight points marco bell and e poured in twenty five off the bench the raptors were looking to snap a ten game losing streak and playoff series opener's who was a three point game against the wizards answering the fourth until surgery baca led the toronto charge triple works parsi now back to the nearside lightweight what walk toronto eric smith raptors radio network the raptors and their game one drought rallying past the wizards won fourteen one zero six sixty balk at twenty three points twelve boards the marta rose in at seventeen in the west the pelicans anthony davis was determined to get his first career playoff win and with the help of regime rondo andrew holiday he got it racing to the other end mccollum shoot cellini three knocked it in it beats the buzzer but it won't beat the pelicans and new orleans on the road is the sixth seed takes down the blazers here in game one sean kelly pelicans radio network ninety.

Ben Simmons Raptors Wizards Baca Anthony Davis Cellini Blazers Marco Bell Toronto Eric Smith Marta Rose Mccollum
Anthony Davis of New Orleans Pelicans bounces back from injury scare to score 41 points in win over LA Clippers

After Hours With Amy Lawrence M

02:18 min | 5 years ago

Anthony Davis of New Orleans Pelicans bounces back from injury scare to score 41 points in win over LA Clippers

"Sports fla i'll marco politi well after a slow start the rockets just too much for the thunder rockets have exploited this match up all night long over carmelo anthony is defending they go right atom drives lows right by gets to the rim and easily finishes with left and that is that just like taking candy from a baby make it sixteen straight wins for the rockets they bounced the thunder one 221 twelve chris paul with 25 james harden at 23 11 assists greg i commend the call on the rockets radio network house where the sixers outscored the hornets 121 fourteen ben simmons 16 points 8 rebounds 13 assists raptors pick up a halt 106 ninety two marta rosen at twenty five wizards outlasted the he 117 one thirteen in overtime thanks to thirty from bradley beal i anthony davis another monster night one thirty one thirty all the over the david fury there just goes to the rim all the old saab new york transparency today davis turnaround trouble up the larry god followed thirty nine for new orleans said third swiss forward slash all world anthony davis davis at forty one points thirteen rebounds pelicans to raise the clippers 121 116 sean kelly the call on the pelicans radio network press the scoreboard the blazers pounded the knicks one eleven eighty seven deeming low of thirty seven were used to got the nets 114 wanna once that curry with thirty four the mavericks down the nuggets one eighteen 10 seven college troops acci round syracuse took out wake forest 73 64 boston college dumped georgia tech 87 77 and notredame slip by pittsburgh 6764 automatic beds we had ourselves in overtime game in the cia how will walk away with a person died since 1993 guided put collagen charles movement is going to the ncaa tournament journalist in shock northeastern 83 seventy six in overtime to win the cia is their waste a thirteen point halftime deficit at scot graeme with called on westwood one hausbergen zagre routed byu seventy four fifty four to win the west coast conference rising league finals with the right state they raise cleveland's thinks seventy 74 fifty nec finals lu brooklyn down wagner seventy one sixty one in south dakota state is going dancing as they dump south dakota 97 eighty seven when the summit league memphis head coach tubby smith maybe in some trouble gary parish.

Scot Graeme Gary Parish Memphis Ncaa Anthony Davis Davis York Saab David Fury Greg James Harden Chris Paul Tubby Smith South Dakota Cleveland Carmelo Anthony CIA Pittsburgh Boston College Syracuse